The East Carolinian, November 25, 1980






Kaat (Earnltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 55 No25 Vt rv
10 Pages
Tuesday, November 25, 1980
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 10,000
Holiday
Gas Prices
Stabilizing
Motorists taking Thanksgiving
trips in North and South Carolina
will pay about 25 cents more per
gallon of gas than they did last year,
the Carolina Motor Club said
Wednesday.
The club said 52 percent o the
service stations it surveyed will open
rhanksgiving Day and gasoline
supplies remain good.
Although prices are up substan-
� from a year ago, the club said
i! increases have slowed and the
: unleaded and regular grades
jased around two-tenths of a
cent per gallon during the last four
weeks in the two Carolinas.
In North Carolina, the average
es are $1.28 per gallon for
unleaded gasoline and Si.23 for
while South Carolina prices
ged SI .28 per gallon for
id :d and Si .25 for regular,
e price difference between self-
service gasoline and full-service was
cents per gallon in South
C arolina and 6.3 cents in North
a compared to a difference
isl over three cents a gallon a
i . e club said.
1 he club also said the availability
premium unleaded gasoline in-
ised m the two states during the
ui weeks. Prices average
$1.31 a gallon in North Carolina
and Si.34 in South Carolina.
Diesel fuel prices went up six-
lenths of a cent in North Carolina.
to Si. 10 a gallon, while South
( arolina prices jumped 1.2 cents, to
SI. 13, the club said.
Search Committee
Visits EC Campus
Umbrella People
When the monsoons hit Greenville, umbrellas sprout all over campus.
Keep yours in hand � the weatherman is calling for more rain this week.
Members of the University of
Louisville search committee visited
the ECU campus last Thursday to
interview students, faculty and ad-
ministrators about Chancellor
Thomas B. Brewer. Brewer is one of
the top three finalists for the
presidency of the 20,000-student
campus.
One student member of the com-
mittee said most of the comments
she had received from students had
been positive. The committee hopes
to offer the job to one of the
finalists within the week.
Brewer has declined to be inter-
viewed by the media, but his office
did release a three-paragraph state-
ment on Thursday.
"A Louisville team visited Green-
ville (Thursday). There have been
no offers or negotiations. 1 have
concerns with regard to some areas
at the University of Louisville, and I
need more information before I can
determine my interest in the posi-
tion. Meanwhile, my work for Last
Carolina continues without inter-
ruption.
Brewer has indicated that he is
happy with his job at ECU but
would not rule out the possibility o
accepting a job elsewhere.
"For as many years as 1 have been
in administration' the statement
continued, "I have encouraged
faculty and staff to investigate pro-
fessional possibilities. By comparing
Black Unity And Awareness Benefit
Campus Groups Unite For First Time
By LEIGH �OAKLEY recognize individuals and their of benefit said Weatherall. Some going beyond the duties of a student
siMctait. nrwcwWM organizations and to show our ap- of this money has come out of his and for helping to make ECU a bet-
The First Annual Black Unity and preciation to those people who have own pocket. The management of ter place for everyone to be said
Awareness Benefit will be held at been leading the struggle for equal Flamingo Discotheque is co- Weatherall.
s Flamingo Discotheque today at rights sponsoring the event and is pro- Guest speakers for the benefit are
6:30 p.m. This is the first event of its There are about ten black viding the building at no charge. Mr. Eugene Charmichael of
d in I C"L history, according to organizations on campus, eight of Jason's Restaurant in downtown Durham, an attorney and a
sponsor and coordinator Marvin which are participating in the Greenville has provided gift cer- graduate of Central University Law
Weatherall. benefit. They include: Alpha Phi tificates to be presented tonight. School, and Mayor Lee Morgan of
"The purpose of the (benefit) is Alpha, Kappa Alpha Psi, Omega The program will begin with a New Bern. They will speak on the
to bnng all black campus organiza- Psi Phi, Alpha Kappa Alpha, Delta dinner catered by Bell's Plantation topic of Black Unity Awareness.
lions under one roof at the same Sigma Theta, Sigma Gamma Rho, Restaurant. Following dinner, each A professional modeling group
time said Weatherall. "We will SOULS, and the Preprofessional organization will have an oppor- from the Greenville area, CD. and
to reinforce the idea that we are Health Alliance. tunitv to recognize other organiza- Company, will present a fashion
all on the same team fighting for the "I have my own little company tions on campus during a Recogni- show. Six professional models and
e general and individual rights. called Home Team Productions tion and Awards Ceremony.
� I he benefit will allow us to where 1 get funds to put on this type "Individuals will be recognized for See 1ENEFTT Page 3, Col. 1
Anti-Iranian Sentiment Flares At UCLA
LOS ANGLES CA(CPS) �The other incidents suggest main the school's Campus Programs and jected adopting an anti-racism
University of' California-Los Americans are getting restless again. Activities Office relented. clause because the clause would be
. -�.l has recently agreed to for- For example, the president of the Robert Ringler, associate dean of impossible to enforce. The rejection
mally register a vigilante group that Iranian Student Association at Ohio the office, said he would be break- cleared the way for SAH's registra-
encourages citizen's arrests of pro- State was apparently the target of an ing university rules if he rejected the tion.
Khomeini Iranian students in this unsuccessful bombing recently. In- group's bid. The university's laws That was not the case however,
country vestgators said a fire-bomb had say any three students or staff or at the University o( Calitorma-
The group Save the American been thrown near the window of an faculty mav register as an organiza- Northridge campus. The Student
Hostages (SAH), offers a $50 boun- apartment occupied by Behad tion as long as their statement of Judiciary Committee approved
tv to people with information Bavarian and his wife, but no one purpose contains nothing illegal. SAH's constitution, but the Student
leading to Iranians' arrests. SAH was injured. But that did not stop other cam- Senate rejected the group's charter
believes these students are In an unrelated incident, the FBI pus groups from forming an alliance because "it was a very narrowmind-
dangerous criminals that threaten arrested three Iranian students in to keep SAH from being registered, ed group according to Senate
American lives. Vermont last week on charges they The Committee Against Racism member Fran Garfinkel.
i?s appearance on campus seems had attempted to buy two automatic (CAR), the leaders of the coalition, "1 don't think they'll get a charter
suggest a resurgence of anti- weapons from an undercover agent, charged that SAH was a racist here unless they change their name
Iranian hostility in this country They were being held in lieu of group and therefore could not be and their purpose. They don't have
i esulting from the ongoing hostage $100,000 bonds pending indictments registered. Yet since no anti-racism the right to be the judge and jury tor
crisis in Teheran. Though not of the by a federal grand jury. clause is in the school's guidelines anyone who looks Iranian Bill
scale and intensity of the nationwide At UCLA, the battle to register for registering organizations, Imada, a member ot the Senate,
protests and demonstrations that SAH as a student group entitled to Ringler said CAR's accusation was argued,
immediately followed the embassy campus office space produced not viable,
takeover last November, SAH and several weeks of controversy before The judicial review committee re- See IRAN, page 3, col. 4
Universities Squelch Student Governments
coHeiPn government in 1978, and inspired politicos see as an avenue to power Council members were elected as at-
Giving new impetus to a trend Georgia, Auburn and Northern Col- and prestige large representatives of the student
toward dissolving student govern- oiado to disband their governments. The Virginia dissolution seems to body as a whole.
ments, both the University of too. Pro-government students and have more conservative political College Council Chairman Bob
Virginia and University of Texas- faculty members gave Texas overtones than those at other cam- Gulley says the council exists to give
Austin have decided to abolish their students a new constitution in Oc- puses, where students typically wag- students input into academic policy
student representative bodies. tober, which they approved by just ed comic, absurdist campaigns for decisions they ordinarily wouldn't
The Texas vote reaffirmed stu- three votes. That vote, however, abolition. have. It has funded the English,
dent desires to get along without a was challenged. In the supplemental The Committee for Responsive Philosophy, and Economics clubs,
government. Texas students election last week, students voted Student Goernment, the 15-member some student-faculty mixers, and a
originally voted to dissolve their against restoring student govern- group that ran the anti-Council dance that lost $5,000 last semester.
�i��iSSSSmm ment by a two-to-one margin. campaign at Virginia, used Thomas Its critics maintained the College
nrr IriCirlo Al v'r?ima' a record 60 percent Jefferson's dictum that the Council served mostly to give
1 lw TlwIUw of the student voters turned out to "government that governs best money to groups that couldn't get
������������������������ abolish the Campus Council, one of governs least" as its rationale. Jef- Student Council Funding, and to
Announcements2 the two houses o student govern- ferson, of course, was a founder of give students who couldn't win seats
Campus Forum4 ment. the university. on the Student Council a chance to
Classifieds10 The reason, says council represen- The Campus Council began in play politics.
Editorials4 tative and pro-abolition worker 1978 as a complement to the Student McClintock relates the abolition
Fearless Forecast9 Steven McClintock, was that the Council. Members of the College to a conservative, anti-big govern-
Features5 council was perceived as "a wor- Council were elected from their
Sports8 thless institution (which) slimey various academic colleges. Student See SGA, page 2, col. 6
institutions, they either reaffirm
their dedication to their present in-
stitution or move to new challenges.
Even if the new position is declined,
looking at some depth at another in-
stitution provides new ideas which
should be of benefit to the school.
This attitude, I believe, is com-
monplace in the field of higher
education
Louisville's retiring president,
James Grier Miller, stepped down in
October. Other finalists for the
position are Dr. Charles G. Mayo,
president of West Chester (Pa.)
State college; and Donald C.
Swain, academic vice president for
the University of California system.
According to The News and
Observer, Brewer's annual salary is
563,250, but the Louisville salary
has not been set and will depend on
the candidate chosen, said Wood-
ford R. Porter, chairman of the
Louisville Board of Trustees.
Chancellor Thomas Brewer
SGA Legislature Okays
Reduced VAF Bill;
Now Goes To Sherrod
A SH), 100, reduced version of the
controversial visual Arts Forum
(VAF) Bill was passed Monday by
the Student Government Associa-
tion.
The previous bill was killed when
the legislature was unable to over-
ride Charlie Sherrod's presidential
veto. The old bill called for an ap-
propriation of $11,500, which was
S4,6X) less than the VAF originally
asked for.
Sherrod vetoed this bill because
he felt il tied up too large a part 01
the SGA budget. Sherrod must now
approve the new bill before it can be
implemented.
Ben Singleton, Chairman of the
Appropriations Committee, voiced
Ins opposition to the bill. He argued
that the VAF was an academic
organization, not a student service,
and as such should not be eligible
for the funds.
Speaking of the VAF, Singleton
said, "They would rather do things
for their own group rather than the
general student body
Shay Matthews, a member of the
Appropriations Committee, said
that if the SGA were not satisfied
with the bill the committee would be
willing to work on it some more.
VAF Preisdent Cindy Efird
apologized for the conduct ot art
students at the last SGA meeting
and retracted her statement that the
legislature was "young and inex-
perienced
She also said she felt that Sherrod
and the SGA acted reasonably in
handling the bill.
Sherrod cautioned the legislature
not to spend all the SCiA's money.
He warned that a time may come
when the SGA oi the campus may
be faced with an emergency tl
would require the use oi the con-
tingency fund.
In other business, Sherrod said
that the Department ot Institutional
Research would poll the faculty
about a fall break for ECU. He felt
the poll would find the faculty in
favor of such a break
Dr. Elmer Meyer, vice-chancellor
for student life, presented sketches
of the planned renovation of Jones
Cafeteria. The plans, provided by
Servomation, would add carpeting
and booths to the cafeteria. The
renovation will begin after spring
semester if certain legal questions
are settled. Meyer indicated.
Steve Morse
Lead guitar player and composer Steve Morse of the Dixie Dregs wails at
the Attic. For more photos, see page 5.





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Announcements
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Craig Poindexter, a freshman art major from Winston-Salem, explores
new uses for The Kat Carolinian.
NSEF Conference
To Be Held In D. C.
The National Student Educa-
tional Fund (NSEF) will hold the
Student-Secretan Conference
in Washington, D.C. on February
19-21, 1981. This conference was
formerly known as the Student-
Commissioner Conference on
Financial Aid. The name has chang-
ed this year with the creation of the
new Department of Education and
the ary position.
Dr. Michael Bakalis, Deputy
Under-Secretary for Intergovern-
mental Affairs for the Department
of Education, suggested an expan-
sion of the conference theme from
financial aid issues to "Students As
Peer Counselors
"The Department of Education
supports the Student-Secretary Con-
ference said Bakalis. "The theme
'Students As Peer Counselors' in-
cludes all types of students; secon-
dary, postsecondary, traditional,
nontraditional, minority, women,
handicapped, etc. working in all
facets of campus life: administra-
tion, orientation, academics, finan-
cial aid and student services. We are
pleased to continue this important
conference as evidenced by the in-
volvement of staff and support
among offices throughout the
Department
85 college and high school student
leaders from various geographic
regions and different areas of stu-
dent service will be selected from a
nation-wide group of applicants in
early December to participate in the
conference. Selection qualifications
include past experience in peer
counseling services, original plans
for future programs and knowledge
of student-consumer needs.
The conference program includes
panel and roundtable discussions
with Department of Education
policymakers about the federal
government's role in post-secondary
education and workshops to assist
conferees to design or improve ef-
fective peer counseling programs on
their own campuses.
Sponsoring in the conference
along with NSEF are the United
States Student Association and the
Coalition of Independent College
and University Students as well as
national minority, women, han-
dicapped and nontraditional student
groups and several state student
associations.
"Student and professional educa-
tion organizations have learned that
students have been producing infor-
mation material for other studenrs
and conducting peer counseling pro-
grams for years said NSEF Presi-
dent Kathleen Downey. "Among
the programs developed by students
are information, outreach and ser-
vice efforts in all areas of student in-
terest. By their involvement in these
projects and the conference,
students contribute substantially to
the academic and commmunity en-
vironment while acquiring valuable
learning skills
First United Black Benefit
Continued from page 1
seven models chosen from campus
organizations will participate in the
show.
Closing the benefit will be a Unity
Step Competition.
"The purpose of the step com-
petition is for the steps themselves
to reflect an expression of black uni-
ty said Weatherall. The winner of
the competition will receive five per-
cent of the total profit obtained
from the benefit.
Weatherall said that all other pro-
ceeds will be allocated as follows: 42
percent to black campus organiza-
tions; 10 percent to the United
Negro College Fund; five percent
each to NAACP. SOULS, and the
Preprofessional Health Alliance;
and 2K percent to Home Team Pro-
ductions to cover expenses.
Weatherall emphasized that there
is always a need "for blacks to
recognize that they are black
"Regardless of degrees or any
other types of achievements they
may obtain he said, "they will
always be black. Right here at ECU
and in North Carolina blacks need
to be concerned with their rights in
general and their rights as in-
dividuals
He stressed that the best way to
secure rights which can be denied is
"through affirmative action and an
organized effort to make certain
that those rights are not denied � to
ensure equality for all people
"The black organizations on
campus are very supportive of this
benefit, and black students here
have showed a tremendous interest
in the benefit itself W'eatherall
said. "I think the benefit will be a
great success
Tickets for the Black Unity
Awareness Benefit are S4.50 for
non-dinner guests and $7.50 for din-
ner guests. Tickets may be obtained
from members of any black
organization on campus or at the
door.
Pizzaiim.
AMERICAS FAVORITE POZA
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Todd Establishes Fund
Richard C. Todd, professor emeritus of
history, has established a third scholarship fund
bearing his name for scholarships in the Depart-
ment of History at ECU.
Proceeds of Todd's latest gift of $5,000 to the
ECU Foundation Inc and future gifts, will be
used to provide up to two scholarships for
members of Lambda-Eta chapter of Phi Alpha
international honor society in history, according
to Donald L. Lemish, vice chancellor of Institu-
tional Planning.
The fund will be known as the Richard Cecil
Todd Alpha Theta International Honor Society
in History scholarships and the amount available
for scholarships will be determined by the earn-
ings accrued on the corpus of the fund, Lemish
said. They are expected to range up to $500 each.
"Dr. Todd has been reponsible for endowing
three different scholarship funds in the history
department Lemish noted "His generosity has
been an inspiration to other faculty, alumni and
students to provide private gift support to the
department.
"Support from Dr. Todd, Dr. Lawrence
UCLA Group
Opposing Iranians
Continued from page 1
That was not the
case, however, at the
University of
Calif or nia-Northridge
campus. The Student
Judiciary Committee
approved SAH's con-
stitution, but the Stu-
dent Senate rejected the
group's charter because
"it was a very nar-
rowminded group ac-
cording to Senate
member Fran Gar-
finkel.
"I don't think they'll
get a charter here unless
they change their name
and their purpose.
They don't have the
right to be the judge
and jury for anyone
who looks Iranian
Bill Imada, a member
of the Senate, argued.
The formal reason
given by the Senate for
its decision was that
SAH's constitution
lacked any anti-
discrimination clause.
The anti-discrimination
clause must state that
anyone may joint that
organization. But SAH
rounder Kober Zlrgulis
says his group will soon
draft such a clause, and
appeal the Senate's
decision.
"Even pro-Khomeini
Iranians will be allowed
to join Zirgulis said.
"They can help us get
the real criminals
Zirgulis said his
justification for ar-
resting the pro-
Khomeini Iranians is
grounded in a federal
law which states that
"whenever there is a
declared war between
the United States and
any foreign nation, or
any invasion or a
predatory incursion is
perpetrated, attempted,
or threatened against
the territory of the
United States by an
foreign nation or a
government, and the
president makes a
public proclamation o'
the event, all native
citizens or subjects of
the hostile nation, be-
ing of age 14 or up-
ward, that are in the
United States and not
actually naturalized,
shall be liable to be ap-
prehended or removed
as alien enemies
So far, there has
been no reaction from
Iranian students on
campus.

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Brewster, Drs. Joseph and I.ala Steelman, and
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�Midowed on the campus
In 1974, Dr. Todd established the Richard
Cecil Todd Scholarships for Undergraduate
Scholars in History vith a basic fund to be main-
tained at a minimum of $20,(XX) tor one or more
annual scholarships in the department.
The Richard Cecil Todd and C lauda Pennock
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3U� �aat (Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Richard Green, gm
Terry Herndon, ucr4Amiam, Lisa Drew, , � em
Chris Lichok, mm m�m Charles Chandi er, sm i,i��,
David Severin, omui Mm�wr David Norris. ,���. e�
Anita Lancaster, � uanaier
November 25, 1980
Opinion
Page 4
Minges Upgraded
Student Enthusiasm Now Vital
When ECU head basketball
coach Dave Odom took charge of
the Pirate cagers before the 79-80
season he noted that one of the
main things that concerned him was
the atmosphere in Minges Coliseum
during games.
Odom and the athletic depart-
ment have recently made a series of
moves to upgrade that atmosphere.
New modern seats with backs have
been added to the north side of the
Coliseum.
The new seats add class and give
Minges more than just a high school
gym aura. In past seasons Minges
resembled little more than a huge
high school gymnasium. The Atlan-
tic Coast Conference gyms made
Minges seem very unprofessional.
Perhaps the biggest problem was
the alienation of students at home
games. In the ACC, where the at-
mosphere for basketball games is in-
credible, the students are seated
near the players and usually have
the best seats in the house.
Such was not the case at ECU in
the past. Students had no seats at
midcourt in the lower arena of
Minges. The midcourt seats on the
student side (south) of the gym were
occupied by friends of the
Chancellor. Now there is nothing
wrong with the big man's buddies
having good seats, but not allowing
the students seats at midcourt was
ridiculous.
Odom's new ideas nave rtd CJ
students of these woes. The second-
year Pirate mentor proposed and
got clearance for the new seats,
which will be used only by Pirate
Club members. This, too, is as it
should be as these people are
valuable money providers.
Under the new seating ar-
rangements students have the entire
lower arena of the south side to
themselves. They not only have
midcourt seats, but scats directly
behind the Pirate bench. It is a well-
known fact that students create at-
mosphere at basketball games.
These new arrangements should
enable the students to do just that.
Not only do the students have one
entire side oi' the Coliseum for
seating, they also have both sets of
endzone bleachers. This makes it
possible for students to surround 75
percent of Minges Coliseum.
The abuse is over. Students are no
longer being overlooked. With the
new seating arrangements the
students have become the main
channel of enthusiasm that must be
directed at the players. It is now up
to those students to do this. In the
past, students have often been less
than enthusiastic at most games.
This must cease.
The 1980-81 Pirates have a great
deal o( talent. Most of this talent is
young, though. The least ECU
students can do is show some en-
thusiastic support. These students
say they want their team to eompete
successfully with the ACC schools.
First let's see if they can compete
with the student fans of the ACC.
MTN
I BeUeve we need
NUGGAR POWER, BUT I PcNT
BELIEVE A WORP ANYONE
VnIHC BEUEvEg) WE NEED
NUCLEAR POVJER
H� JUST HASN'T BEEN THE SAME SINCE HE .
STARTED PLAVING DUNGEONS DRAGONS
Campus Forum
Cartoon Offends Readers
I am highly offended by your ap-
parent space filler used under the
November 11 editorial that depicted a
Polish Cultural Center as a fly-infested,
foul-smelling, trash can.
It is unfortunate in an institution of
higher learning that any ethnic culture
should be subjected to such ridicule. The
caricature was especially invidious
because it is unsigned, uncalled for, and
unrelated to the content of the editorial.
I sincerely hope that, in the future.
The East Carolinian will refrain from
the smallmindedness of subjecting
Polish Americans or any other ethnic
group to public contempt.
EDWARD MARKOWSKI, PH.D.
Associate Professor
Home Economics
I was greatly disturbed when I saw the
"ethnic slur" depicting a fly-ridden
trash can with "Polish Cultural Center"
written on it.
Evidently the attitude of the
newspaper staff toward Polish culture is
the one illustrated by the cartoon. This
not only shows the ignorance of the staff
cartoonist, but also reflects unfavorably
on the student body and this institution.
The newspaper does reflect the voice of
the student body and the institution.
Maybe the cartoonist owes us an ex-
planation as to why they chose an
"ethnic slur" cartoon. Could this be a
form of hidden racism? Can the staff
represent the views of all the student
body objectively if they hold these pre-
judicial views?
It is this type of prejudice towards
one's culture which led to the gassing of
the Jews in Germany, the Mai Lai
Massacre and the lynching of blacks in
the South.
The "Cultural Probem" is the staff
of The East Carolinian.
GEORGE AKEL
Graduate Student
How Do You Know?'
The November 6 edition of The East
Carolinian featured an editorial concer-
ning the recent campaign for the United
States Senate. The editorial contained a
sentence that read as follows, "East is a
man who, unlike his opponent, will vote
his conscience 1 don't know how the
writer of this editorial can say what is in
the mind and conscience of another pet
son.
1 can present at least one counter ex-
ample to the allegation that Senator
Robert Morgan, the opponent referred
to in the editorial, did not vote his cons-
cience. When the bill to extend the time
for ratification of the Equal Rights
Amendment came before the Senate,
both North Carolina senators voted
against it. Senator Morgan was lobbied
heavily by people who had supported his
campaigns with lime and mone. in-
cluding members of his own family
These were people whose opinions were
important to Senator Morgan but he did
not vote as they wanted him to. He e
plained that while he favored the amend-
ment, he could not, in good conscience.
vote for the time extension.
The issue here is not how one person
voted or how another person will vote. It
is that the writer stated as a fact
something which he could not know and
did not attempt to document. The
readers of The East Carolinian deserve
more responsible writing.
TENNALA A. GROSS
Beating A Dead Horse
What's the purpose of having a short
break like Thanksgiving if instructors
assign papers and projects due the first
day back? You go home, eat your din-
ner, wash the dishes and start to work. If
you're an out-of-state student, you
spend a large part of the time just getting
home, if you go at all.
Usually you cannot work ahead of
time because most instructors cram in a
test between that Monday and Wednes-
day.
It seems like the only reason anyone
gets out at all is because Thursday is
traditionally a religious holiday. One of
my psychology teachers even said our
project was due Monday (typed) so we
could have a chance to work on it over
the holiday.
The majority of the student body
needs a rest because 1) there is no fall
break, and 2) exams are two weeks after
we get back. You can't beat a dead horse
CATHERINE VOLLMER
Junior, Drama
Shocked By Decision
I was very shocked and disappointed
to hear of the administration's recent
decision to drop women's field hockev
and men's wrestling from the athletic
program. I would love to know just how
much money they plan to save by dropp-
ing these two sports. Also, 1 wonder just
what they plan to do with the money
that has been making up the budgets for
these two sports.
1 hope that our administration doesn't
feel that the small amount of money that
makes up these two teams' budgets will
help' either our football or basketball
teams win more games or recruit better
players.
I believe by having more athletic
teams, more people can participate and
become involved. What our ad-
ministrators are doing to the athletic
groups is terrible.
I would like to add that anyone who
would vote to discontinue any sport
would probably vote to discontinue
Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New
Year's.
JAY DEVER
Moorestown, NJ
Editors' Sole: According to Kenneth
Karr, ECU athletic director, about
$50,000 will be saved by the cancellation
of the field hockey and wrestling pro-
grams. The money is earmarked for
other major sports.
Preparation For War Has Become A Fact Of Life
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
for purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted. Letters by the
same author are limited to one each 30
days.
By PATRICK O'NEILL
On my chest I wear a button. Its
simple message is "Question
Authority The authorities I speak
of are our "leaders" in Washington
D.C. More specifically, those at the
Pentagon.
Questioning authority is our right
as American citizens. Survival is
everyone's concern. We should
seriously question what type of
security the Pentagon is offering us
and the world.
Human beings have reached an
impasse; we are now at the point
where we have the ability to totally
self destruct. Like the snail darters,
human survival hinges on one deci-
sion. Possibilities of extinction have
now reached their highest level.
Presently the world contains over
50,000 nuclear weapons. Many of
them far more powerful than the
ones we dropped on Japan in
August of 1945. One hundred thou-
sand people perished then and
genetic dysfunctions still exist to-
day. These weapons represent
enough strength to kill everyone on
earth 12 times. Despite these facts,
Carter's projected defense spending
for the next five years is one trillion
dollars. (Reagan promises to spend
much more.) And the Pentagon is
quick to declare that this is not
enough.
Dr. Joseph Fahey, chairperson of
Peace Studies at Manhattan Col-
lege, puts military spending in
perspective: "The United States
government spends per capita $32
on education, $35 on food and
nutrition, and $418 on defense
Seymour Melman, noted professor
of industrial engineering at Colum-
bia University, states further,
we paralyze the country as a
whole by diverting the lion's share
of our resources into the military
sphere Still we are told that we are
weak and vulnerable.
David McReynolds of the War
Resisters League and a 1980 can-
didate for President, calls military
spending the "primary cause of in-
flation in our society(it) weakens
the country because it diverts skills
and raw materials away from the
production of social wealth into the
production of "sterile" goods that
have no economic value Conver-
sion from a defense economy to
civilian production promises high
economic and social rewards, but
change-over has been slow. One cor-
poration, Boeing-Vertol, which was
outbid for a military contract in
1977, wisely converted to th� pro-
duction of railroad cars and electric
trollies. Other conversion projects
involving closer military bases ac-
tually improved their community's
economies. This ingenuity saved
countless lay-offs. However, cor-
porate interests play a strong role in
keeping present levels of military
spending high. Nuclear weapons are
only part of this spending spiral, but
for obvious reasons. They warrant
our greatest concern.
Discussion of the nuclear
weapons issue opens an area of
many variables. The Pentagon pro-
mise is peace through strength. This
strategy is appropriately called
MAD (Mutually Assured Destruc-
tion). This policy states that
deterence will exist indefinitely,
because surely no enemy would risk
a first-strike attack knowing the
deadly consequences that would
follow Secretary of State Muskie
says, there surely will be no vic-
tor in a nuclear war
This "suicide" idea makes sense
on the surface, but what about the
recent computer malfunction in
Colorado that set off a world-wide
alert? The failure of an electrical
component, worth 46 cents, was
responsible for that "error How
about the explosion of the Titan II
missile silo in Arkansas? Accidents
such as these could, and probably
will, happen again. What of ter-
rorism�six nations are known to
have nuclear arsenals now, and as
many as 35 should have them within
10 years. Terrorism abounds
throughout the world.
Marshall D. Shulman, State
Department expert on the USSR,
claims that the possibility of nuclear
war "is likely to increase rather than
diminish" if we continue on our
current path. Robert C. Aldridge,
convinced that the United States
was working towards a first-strike
capability, resigned from his posi-
tion as a defense aerospace
engineer. After 16 years of defense
work, he now writes: "Any hope of
avoiding such a disaster depends on
an informed public determined to
put the brakes to this deadly
momentum His beliefs need to be
looked at carefully and acted upon
by the American citizenry.
Recent claims made by defense
spending advocates, that America is
now a second rate power, have caus-
ed widespread, unnecessary fears to
arise. Richard B. Deats, executive
secretary, Fellowship of Reconcilia-
tion, wrote in a letter to the editor of
the Washington Post, that the cur-
rent military strategy was, "ancient
wisdom He continued, "The
claims of the warrior politi-
ciansshould be recognized as the
propaganda they most assuredly
are.
A recent Pentagon demonstrator,
Peggy Scherer, wrote of her ex-
perience there, this clean, quiet
atmosphere, (is) unruffled by the
cries, the blood, and suffering that
mark the victims of plans made in
this building Preparation for war
has become a fact of life for
Americans. War is accepted by
many as a necessary evil. This irra-
tional line of thinking needs to be
examined and constructive work
towards a peaceful means of resolv-
ing conflicts should become our
goal.
Patrick OWeill is a member of
the Greenville Peace Committee and
the Greenville Hunger Coalition.
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I Ml AS I CAROLINIAN
Features
NOVl MM k 25, 14mi
Thanksgiving Day:
Pilgrims, Parades,
Football Marathons
Dixie Dregs Perform
Photos by RICHARD GREEN
The Dixie Dreys brought their brand of rock'n'roll to the Attic in
downtown Greenville last Thursday night. The Dreys are going to
begin recording their fifth album in Januar. In the photo on the left
is Tee Lavilz playing keyboards; on the right is drummer Rod
Morganstein.
By DAVID NORRIS
FtMam ldiiir
Every holiday has its own unique
characteristics. This makes it easier
to tell them apart. Without special
characteristics, you'd only know it
was a holiday because the mail
didn't come.
Thanksgiving is certainly one oi
our more interesting holidays. It is a
combination of a colonial least
celebrating a bountiful harvest in a
new world with a day of television
shows celebrating 20 straight hours
of football. Few other holidays so
well combine the old and the new.
It would help if they could make
up their minds what day to have
Thanksgiving on; this fourth Thurs-
day in November business is too
complicated. You need a calendar to
figure out the date each year. 01
course, if you think about it. most
of our holidays are like that, few oi
them having one simple, definite
date like Christmas.
On the positive side, Thanksgiv-
ing does give us a four-day
weekend, and that's nothing to
sneeze at. Some holidays, like Col-
umbus Day, aren't even good lor a
longer lunch hour.
Thanksgiving brings back lots of
memories from childhood: watching
parades all day, making bulletin
boards in school, stores full ol
Christmas stufl and a strange break
with tradition on one occasion
(eating duck tot Rianksgiving din-
ner instead ol turkey )
Every rhanksgiving in elementary
school, we would study the Pilgi
for a couple ol weeks. I had the feel
ing that I knew the nan , erv
passengei on the Mayflower, plus
hall ol the Indiai in
Massachusetts.
Besides the studying, we also did
acres of artwork at thai time ol
year. 1 don't know how mam
Mayflowers, � Miles Si
dishes, turkeys, pier
cabins and Indian
when 1 was a kid. bin I I �
enough to popula
colonies.
I hese pict
with history. Sine
not always experts
17th century Ma
culture, we
dian friends look Ml
Cheyenne. I he �
fun to draw, a
especially ea
matter how ai
See THANKSGIVING, Page 6
Advice For Off- Campus Residents
Editor's note: This article con-
tinues ,i series of advice for students
living off-campus. This series is
made possible through the efforts of
your SC 1 'residential Cabinet.
I he majority ol leases are typical-
ly one-sided � and it's not the te-
nant's side, rhey give you the feel-
ing you ha e an umbei of obliga-
tions vnle the landlord has none.
I ln'ic are d-v. 1 any, remedies in
the least make the landlord do
his duty but plenty to make sure
you do youi s.
Main leases are one-sided for a
purpose to make you think you
have no recourse against a negligent
or nasty landlord. But, this kind ol
lease only works if you don't know
youi rights.
The real story is that there are
1 )untless housing, municipal and
health codes to ensure that you eel
the services you're entitled to. But.
you may have to fight to get those
services � through arbitration, te-
nant's unions, small claims courts
and complaints to housing and
health authorities.
But, before you put up a fight,
you first need to understand what
all those mind-boggling legal
phrases mean. Below, we've
assembled a number ot sections
from .1 typical lease thai you shuld
read with extra care and we'll tell
you what they really mean.
I his section is usually one-sided
and sometimes reads: "the lessee
shall render the lessor harmless for
any damages which may arise and
accrue however caused whether in
whole or part to acts oi negligence
on the part of the lesor In
English, this means that even if
something (or someone) is damaged
or destroyed because oi the
landlord's negligence you agree
to hold him responsible and sue
him. This is not so. Consult an at-
torney. You may still have recourse
against the landlord (lessor).
See if your lease tells who will fix
what if it's damaged.
Most leases will state that you
can't make changes or decorate
without the landlord's written con-
sent (otherwise youi security deposi
will !�� �l�.l It' il! it lv k ill v.i il
was), li will probably also scad, "all
alterations upon demised premises
shall become the properly ol the
landlord, and shall remain upon,
and be surrendered with said
premises So, even it you just
hang up a towel rack, it's supposed
to stay behind when you move.
Most leases provide a way to get
rent money from you in case you
refuse to pay. skip town, or are ex-
cessively late. Here's how it will
read: " I he tenant hereby pledges to
the landlord all the goods and chat-
tels ol said tenant which are upon
the premises as security of payment
ol rent or it might read: "the
lessor shall have alien upon all per-
sonal property oi the lessee This
section is not as threatening as it
sounds. Fact is. the landlord cannot
lock you out or enter your apart-
menl without a court order. Nor can
In- ,w stie dUpos&eu mi witl��m ;�
court order.
I his section might read: 'in the
even; there shall be an increase in
I
(costs) the tenant shall pay his pro
portionate share of said increase
In some leases, it'll state the max-
imum increase in either the dollar
amount of a fixed percentage; in
still others, the sky's the limit, fact
is, the landlord must state the
specific items (taxes, fuel, in-
surance, etc.) and the formula to be
applied. The landlord must also ex
hibit reasonable proof.
Some leases say that your lease
can be renewed even if you don't
sign up again. Here's how that sec-
tion will read: "upoi
the original term hei
shall automatically be renew
extended apon the same terms
conditions It the period ol
cy is specifically stated in th
there may be some quesi i n
as to contradictory clauses.
C heck this section to sec how lone
in advance you'U need lo notify the
uiuoh rrd On will�
leave, k
say s ould �
deposit.
Rhapsody In Rain
Learn To Enjoy Wet Weather
By DOUGLAS QUEEN
si�lf Wnlrr
"You can't make it go away, so
you might as well enjoy it
Those words were spoken by a
friend oi mine, Karan Kineh, about
the ever present Greenville rain.
And in Greenville, if you don't
cultivate a liking for the rain, you
will undoubtedly go crazy.
There are numerous ways to cir-
cumvent the deadening effects of
rain. One is to sleep through it.
another is to read through it, but the
best way is to walk through it.
Barefoot, tennis shoes, or gum shoe
boots are all welcome when it comes
to "walking in the rain
When I first came to Greenville 1
wasn't prepared for the drizzle or,
more apropos, the monsoon that
descends on the coastal plain from
November to February every year.
The first season brought not only
rain but also depression as I awoke
each morning to a lead colored sky
What T You 're,o Do If 4rrested
The following informationcourt. You may at any time in-
is provided as a service to IIvoke your right to remain
students by the SG 1 Presiden-silent or to have an attorney
tial C abiner.present at an interrogation.
In the following situations.3.) It you volunteer infor-
consult an attorney as quicklymation, it may be used against
as possible. I rv to rememberVOU.
(and write down) facts, names.4.) Stay calm and polite; be
places, and times.firm, but do not become
hostile.
II ARRESTED
1.) Do not resist arrest by aIF A SEARCH IS
police officei or campus of-REQUESTED
ficer, even il ou feel that you1.) You do not have to give
are innocent.your permission or consent to
2.) If you are in the custodya search of your home, apart-
oi the police, you have thement, or automobile; if you
right to remain silent and theconsent to permission, any
right to consult an attorney. Ifevidence obtained in the
vou cannot afford an at-search is admissable as
torney, one will be appointedevidence against you in court.
by the court to alvise you.2.) Do not endanger
Anything which you may sayyourself by physically block-
may he used against you ining a search.
that, with or without the rain, was
downright gloomy. That was a bad
time for me. Now, however, 1 love
to wake with the sky downcast and
holding the promise oi percipita-
tion.
My conversion occured when I
lived on Forbes Street about three
years ago in a house with a tin roof.
I'd lay awake for hours at night
listening to the soft patter ot rain
drops hitting the roof. I would im-
agine the rhythm becoming a unity
with rising crescendoes that resolved
into an even-paced denoument and
then rising again. Then "sleep, per-
chance to dream
From that auspicious start I've
become the rain-lover that 1 am.
Once with a good friend, Mary
Ellen Slagle, we watched a beautiful
down-pour accompanied by the
strum und drang oi nature's
violence. On that particular occa-
sion, Mary Ellen and 1 listened to
thunder that seemed to emanate
directly overhead. The lightening
fell to earth all around us, lending a
sense of danger and excitement. We
were on a porch, but the feeling that
we were stranded in some desolate
place could not be avoided, for-
tunately.
Last week, when the rains started
in earnest, I took my first walk of
the season. I just walked around my
neighborhood enjoying the solitude
and isolation that rain often
generates.
One of the pure, mercurieai
pleasures of walking in the rain is
walking in the rain with someone
else. A woman who enjoys this form
of entertainment is great company,
and the spontaneous feelings that
emerge can bind a friendship or a
See LEARN, page 6, col. 7
Print Auction Held
Photo by GAR r PATTERSON
The Fifth Annual ECU Print Group Auction was held Sunday night in the auditorium of the Jenkins I ine rts
Center. Over 200 prints were sold in the auction. A percentage off the money raised will go to the Print Group,
which will use it to buy supplies for the printmaking studios.
Alvin Toffler's Third Wave:
Optimism For Our Future
In this uncertain year with the
Middle Last at war and the economy
breaking new lows, it is refreshing
to find a new book with a note of
optimism about the world's future
instead of an impending doomsday.
This new book is Alvin Toffler's
latest work, entitled "The Third
Wave
like his bestseller "Future
Shock Toffler is again exploring
the many trends that are affecting
our complicated civilization today.
He tries to synthesize them to ex-
plain how the future might look 20
or 40 years from now. The author's
task is formidable, but he has
managed to accomplish most oi it.
From his research, Toffler has some
interesting news for us.
Toffler is convinced that the
modern world is on the verge of a
transformation. He calls it the
"Third Wave because it will be
the third revolution to hit the
civilization of man since the beginn-
ing of time. Mankind's first wave
was the agricultural revolution
which took place thousands of years
ago. The second wave was the In-
dustrial Revolution of the 1800's.
Toffler feels that we are now
about to embark on an electronic
revolution which will be as shaking
as the last two put together. It will
affect every aspect ol our lives in the
future. Both capitalist and socialist
countries will feel its influence. I he
third wave will not only touch our
lifestyles and work, but also our en-
tire way of thinking.
According to the author, the se-
cond wave of industrialism is dying
out now for lack ol fossil fuels. The
third wave, or electronics age, will
be forced to fill in where the second
wave left off.
Toffler explains that the forces oi
this new age are in action right ow .
See TOFFLER, page 7, col. 1
� '���
av. -�





1 HI- LAS CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 25, 1980
1T0n M f rrb III
6V DMP A)orti5
TH� VlvJ,UM pam
Tvocwn - six efcs rrrLC
Learn To Like Rain
Thanksgiving: Pilgrims And Parades
Continued From Page 5
can draw a pretty fair tipee. (Some
of us even learned not to spell it
"T.P)
rhere wre some pretty strange
Mayflowers floating out in the
Atlantic Oceans of these bulletin
boards. T bird graders created some
marvels of maritime engineering
that would have astounded the
builders of the Mayflower. Steam
balloons. 1 think Bullwinkle was my
favorite, along with Smokey the
Bear. People often say that children
have short attention spans, but I
could keep my attention riveted to
the TV for hours, waiting through
miles of marching bands and insipid
floats for another balloon to come
by.
On one of my Thanksgiving trips
to New York, 1 finally got to see a
balloon. The hotel was near the
engines and propellers were added parade route, and 1 looked out the
to some o' the less accurate render-
ings of the Pilgrim vessel. Some of
the more paranoid kids put in things
like twenty-inch cannons, torpedo
tubes and airplane launchers. I
think the idea was to ward off
pirates, who are well known to
dislike torpedoes and airplanes be-
ing flown at them by Pilgrims.
Eventually, school let out for
1 hanksgiving. By this time, we had
drawn enough Pilgrims to have a
permanent aversion to buckled
shoes and blunderbusses. luckily,
we had tour days to eat turkey and
watch T and not do any work �
this was something to really be
thanktul for.
rhanksgiving morning was a time
to watch parades. There were plenty
to pick from and they were endlessly
fasc inating to me.
1 especially liked to watch the
window to see my old pal Bullwinkle
floating on the other side of some
roof-tops. I watched a little o the
parade, too, but it was a couple of
blocks away. It wasn't real im-
pressive, since at that distance it
looked like a bunch of people walk-
ing around a couple of blocks away.
After the morning parades on TV
were over, it would be time for
lunch. Lunch always felt funny on
Thanksgiving. It seemed like you
should be eating turkey, but that
really had to wait for supper.
After lunch, mere would not be
much of anything to do, except wait
for supper. The aroma of baking
turkey filled the house, making con-
centrating on anything else impossi-
ble. O course, some people can
make a pretty good try at getting in-
terested in a football game.
In fact, since there are football
games on about every channel, some
people get interested in several
games, constantly changing chan-
nels to keep up with all the games.
Finally, dinnertime would start
getting close. When 1 was a kid, all I
had to do was clear off and set the
table. Later on, 1 made the mistake
of learning how to cook, so I'd have
to make some of the stuff for sup-
per. It gave me something to do, so I
didn't really mind. You can go crazy
sitting idly by, breathing turkey
aroma all afternoon.
One problem with our family's
traditional Thanksgiving dinner is
our custom of eating by candlelight.
Don't get me wrong � I love
candles. They lend a soft, beautiful
light to the room, and it's fun to try
and run your finger through the
flame without burning half the skin
off your index finger. However, I
think candles are better for a
romantic dinner oi pi.a instead of
anything with as many tiny,
splintery bones as a turkey
drumstick. It just makes for trou-
ble.
A funny think about turkey is
how long it takes to get rid o one
after Thanksgiving. It takes at least
a week o roast turkey, turkey sand-
wiches, turkey and rice, mashed
turkey and feeding-turkey-to-the-
dog to finally be able to return to
some other kind of food.
And, after finishing off one
turkey, it's almost time for
Christmas and another cycle of
turkey, turkey sandwiches, and so
on.
To end this article, I have some
leftover (no pun intended) things
that 1 want to mention.
First, 1 wonder why the settlers at
Jamestown never had a Thanksgiv-
ing. They arrived years before those
johnny-come-latelies got to
Plymouth, but people don't talk
much about Jamestown these days.
Maybe if they had invented a holi-
day, they'd get more publicity in the
history books.
The other thing is cranberry
sauce. I don't like it, have never lik-
ed it (although once I ate some and
didn't hate it too much), and pro-
bably never will like it. I hope I
haven't offended any cranberry
sauce dealers, but I have always
thought it was a dumb thing to have
that stuff put on my plate every time
Thanksgiving rolls around.
Continued from page 5
love. Rain makes people caught in it
closer.
I remember walking with a girl I
cared for very much in the rain this
summer. We had a perfect time
singing all the songs we could
possibly think of that had "rain" in
the lyrics. Of course, we skipped the
Neal Sedaka song as neither one of
us could sing that high.
Although 1 could sing the praises
of rain for a long time, I feel I must
present the other side. One of my
friends, Garry Nelson, just can't
countenance the rain. In his words,
if "it (rain) gets in your shoes, then
you get that godawful squish squish
squish sound every time you take a
step There is also the danger of
colds and a weakened resistance to
flu
One last remark for rain, and
then 111 let you be. Rain has a
marvelous ability to heal. I have a
friend who broke up with his fiance
last winter. He was in desparate
straits and we all worried about
him. One night in February, when it
was raining and on the verge of
sleet, he walked all night long. The
next day when a few of us, his
friends, went to see him, he was in
better spirits. When I asked him
why he seemed to be feeling better,
he said, "Well, I walked along feel-
ing really low. I thought about alot
of things. But when I realized that 1
was soaked to the skin and shaking
uncontrollably, I wished I was home
and warm and she was out here
freezing her ass off!
Ah! The joys of rain.
NOVEMBER 25 TH
ATTHEELBO
GOLD FISH
��
CONTEST
8:30-Close
t
,
Sfi
Ob,
$50.00 First Prize
plus other casti & door prizes
Sponsored By:
Senior
Show
David Walter of
Wiiision-Salem, a
senior student in the
ECU School of Art,
-� m t?c nnvinji a snow
art works in the
Mendenhall upper
cases from Dec. 1 � 7.
The exhibition in-
cludes graphic art
works, woodcuts,
silkscreens and draw-
ings.
Walter is a candidate
tor a B.F.A. in
graphics with a minor
in illustration.
He is the son of
Lloyd G. and Shirley
Walter of Winston-
Salem.
Choral Society Plans Concert
The Greenville
Choral Society will pre-
sent its Christmas con-
cert on Sunday, Dec.
14. at 4:00 p.m in the
tmmanuct Bapif"
Church, 1101 South
Elm Street, Greenville
(across from Rose High
Schooh
The Choral Society,
under the direction of
Dr. Rhonda Fleming of
the East Carolina
University music facul-
ty, will present the
following program:
"Jubilate Deo" by
Gabrieli and
"Christmas Cantata"
by Daniel Pinkham for
chorus, brass choir and
organ; and "Gloria"
by Vivaldi for chorus,
soloists and orchestra.
Soloists for "Gloria
will �� T���rioi�l III
Susan Jones, and Anne
Gunn.
Tickets for this con-
cert will be available on
November 25 at all
three Greenville loca-
tions of Steinbeck's
Mens' Shops, and mail
orders may be sent to
Mrs. Lucy Wright, 205
Greenwood Drive,
Greenville, North
Carolina 27834. Checks
should be made
payable to the Green-
ville Choral Society.
Tickets are $1.50 for
adults and $.75 for
students and senior
citizens. The number of
seats is limited, so
tickets should be pur-
chased early.
Apple Records
The Mushroom
Newby's Sub Shop
H. L. Hodges
Heart's Delight
The Gazebo
Pipe Dreams
and
The
N
Little Sisters
To ont�r trtm corttmmt emit TSB-BT01. 7Sa-B&4a or
750-0047 or Register in front of trie StuOent Store
November24th or 25th
ATTIC ATTIC
South' No. 6
Rock Nightclub
IN CONCERT
TUES3 P.M.
iwedTRICKSI
F SUPER GRIT
TURKEY TROT
Isat SUPER GRITl
sunBADGE
More for Your Money
at FOSDICK'S
Country Style Buffet!
All You Can Eat for $2.99
Barbeque � Fried Chicken � Fish
Homemade Chicken Dumplings
Boiled Potatoes � Green Beans
Collard Greens � Corn on Cob
Rice and Gravy � Cole Slaw
Everyday for Lunch
and Sun. thru Wed. nights
FOSDKKS
1890 Seafood
2311 S. Evans St. Ext. � Greenville
APPLICATIONS ARE NOW
BEING ACCEPTED FOR
GENERAL MANAGER
OF THE
Saat Ear0lmian
and
"Super Grit Cowboy Band"
Terry Forrest Show
with the Coulters
APPLICATIONS MAY
BE PICKED UP IN THE
MEDIA BOARD OFFICE
IN THE PUBLICATIONS
BUILDING
MON.THRU FRI.
8:00a.m1:00p.m.
2:00p.m5:00p.m.
THE DEADLINE FOR
SUBMITTING AN
APPLICATION IS
DECEMBER 3, AT
5:00p.m.
?
Wright AudifriMrn
East Carolina OfifrersitY
Sponsored by East Carolina University
dent Urton Special CBncert Committee
Greenvllle,4.0. t A v
V .
i i �
3rk�
ftneert commmae
� i 4
Vi.
Cen
Guill
The sei
East Carol
ty Ceramil
will be h
ECUs
Auditor!
main can
Cera ml
crafted bi
the ECU
will be s
to the pi
from 9
p.m.
AccorrH
Noss of
Guild, thj
is pi
Deccmbt
venienct
wishing
handr I
M
tor sale
under SI
eludes be
and fun;
sucl
pi
and b.
G
Row
at Clci
have '
tak
jail
pol
set up di
a buildii
the stal
picked u
or disori
can apj
magistral
set. pa
the gam
mg mat
plays.
T
O
As the!
predicts!
need
cheaper I
serviced
1 I
predicts
hae �
waste tl
lion am
avoid
matenj
ed
have
sul
roi
puter
workh
moderi
that it
problei
1 01
what
white
of gai
work ej
sive e.
compui
worker!
w �
�- � �� -� ��.
t





!MI I SI l AROl IMAN
NOVEMBER 25, 1980
ain
k for rain, and
be. Ram has a
to heal. 1 have a
up with his fiance
in desparate
worried about
February, when it
on the verge of
all night long. The
a few of us. his
see him, he was in
en 1 asked him
feeling better,
walked along teel
hi about alot
j thai 1
d shaking
was home
was out here
tf
o
?
'4
Qr
izes
Delight
Izebo
-earns
-8648 or
lent Store
��
f
I'
8M
1
1

Ceramics
Guild Sale
The seventh annual
East Carolina Universi-
ty Ceramics Guild Sale
will be held Dec. 3-4 in
ECU's Wright
Auditorium on the
main campus.
Ceramic items
crafted by students in
the ECU School of Art
will be shown for sale
to the public each day
from 9 a.m. until 7
p.m.
According to Maggie
Noss of the Ceramics
Ouild, the annual sale
is planned for
December for the con-
venience oi pei sons
wishing to purchase
handmade gifts.
Most items ottered
for sale are priced at
under $10. Selection in-
cludes both decorative
and functional pieces,
such as cups and mugs,
pots, platters, planters
and bowls of all sizes.
f �"
Discouraged
Photo by GARY PATTERSON
I his Pirate fan at the recent game at Eastern Kenluckv Iniversitv looks as
though he has lost hope, or is taking a post-game nap.
Lectures
Scheduled
On Art
The ECU Depart-
ment of Sociology and
Anthropology, in
cooperation with the
School of Art, is
presenting a series of
lectures on Pre-
Columbian art.
The first lecture, by
Dr. Paul Clifford,
curator of the Duke
Museum of Art, will be
held in the auditorium
of the Jenkins Fine
Arts Center on Mon-
day, Dec. I from 7:30
to 9:30 p.m. The topic
of this first lecture will
be Pre-Columbian man
and his lifestyle, as seen
through his art.
There will be five lec-
tures in all. This same
series of lectures was
given earlier this year at
the Mint Museum of
Art in Charlotte.
Goings-On At Other Campuses
Rowdy football fans
at Clemson U. don't
have to fear being
taken across town to
jail if picked up bv
police. Thanks to an
"instant justice' court
set up during games in
a building right next to
the stadium, those
picked up for drunken
or disorderly beha lor
can appear before a
magistrate, have bond
set, pay it and return to
the game without mus-
ing many of the big
plays.
A Lehigh U. Frater-
nity has been put on
university probation
for a year and ordered
to make restitution for
thousands of dollars in
stolen universitv pro-
perty found in the
house last spring.
Police discovered the
property, which includ-
ed biology department
skeletons, banners
from other fraternities.
tombstones, lawn or-
naments and things
from other schools,
when answering an
automatic burglar
alarm.
A class-auction suit
against Perm State U.
seeks $30 for each, stu-
dent housed in dor-
mitories in 1978, when
a coal strike threatened
heating supplies and led
the universitv to delay
the star; ol spiing term
by five days. The sun
claims students should
gel a 6.25 percent re-
fund of dormitory costs
because of the shorten-
ed term. That amounts
to $30 per student or a
Toffler's Third Wave
Optimistic Future
total oi $350,000. The
university gave students
an $8.40 credit on room
deposits that sprint
but that didn't satisfy
two graduates, who fil-
ed the suit and had it
certified as a class ac
tion.
The lawyer glut is a
myth, says the National
Association for Law
Placement, w hich
recently conducted a
survey showing 95 per-
cent oi 1979 law
graduates found jobs.
The NA1 P surveyed
139 lavs schools to find
out if the glut was real
and if admissions
should therefore be
restricted. The survey
found virtually all the
schools' graduates
found jobs in the field
within nine months oi
Emergency loan pro-
grams have been
decimated by greater
student demand this
fall. At the U. of
Texas-Austin, loans
wre cut from Si00 to
$50 because oi a low
fund balance caused by
making a higher
number of loans. The
Student Loan Agency
at the U. of Miami
halted all loans because
students wre unusally
slow in paying back
money they borrowed.
Bikes would be bann-
ed from the Arizona
State L. campus under
a plan proposed by the
univresity police. The
proposal must be ap-
proved by the state
Board of Regents
before going into ef-
fect.
Continued from page 5
As the energy crisis grows, he
predicts that industries are going to
need to search for bettei and
cheaper methods to give goods and
services to their consumers.
Foi companies to do this, Iottlei
predicts that nations arc going to
have to learn how to cut down on
waste through the use oi conserva-
tion and recycling. They will have to
avoid the loss of precious raw
materials that could now be replac-
ed such as oil. In short, they will
have to learn how to become sell
sufficient.
Toffler suggests that the com-
puter chip could become the
workhorse of the future for the
modern corporation maintaining
that it could help solve many of the
problems oi conservation.
For example, Toffler wonders
what would happen to the average
white collar worker when the price
ol gasoline causes the usual trip to
work each dav to become an expen-
sive excursion. He points out that a
computer console could let an office
worker stay at home and do his
work. Thus, the worker would not
EXPERT STYLING
FOR BOTH MEN
AND WOMEN
BY APPOINTMENT
ONLY
SHIRLEY'S
KUT & STYLE
301 EVANS ST MALL
MlV.h.s H1J) Mint 206
only save time and gas but also 8eUin8 thcir degree
would not have to fight traffic each
morning.
1 offlei is not blindly guessing at
the future. He merely shows where a
trend like this one might logically
lead to Many ol his theories about
what could happen are quite feasi-
ble, and s. me are even being put in-
to practice today.
line, a tew of his answers sound
a bit tot Utopian for some readers.
One should not take everything that
he states in this book seriously.
Although he has done his research
well, some ol his evidence does seem
flimsy and does not stand up well
under the light.
I offlei also tends to generalize a
bit too much in tins book. At tunes
he brings up a point to support his
third wave theory, and then forgets
to tell his readers how the two are
really connected.
However, if anything could really
be found wrong with 1 offlei's
book, it would be that it is a weak
sequel to his original work "Future
Shock Although he elaborates the
points made in "future Shock" it is
still much of the same material
covered before.
752-1855
So Specially
Hert!
hfin'ttl 'Heart
"Petjiiant
You'll Win
Her Heart With
This Highly
Personal Gift
idea
Mardeer
A SPECIAL OFFER FOR
THESTRUGGUNGSTUDBfT
KP
"tfr
A HOT HAM W CHEESE. REGULAR FRIES
� AND MEDIUM SOFT DRINK FOR $1.50
,40
Please present this coupon before ordering One coupon
per customer, please This offer not good in combination
with any other offers Customer must pay any sales tax
Offer expires Dec. 3,1980.
Good at all three Green-
ville, NC Hardee's
locations
Ytardeer
6
Mill Outlet Clothing
264 By- Pass open 9:30-6:00
Across From Nichols MonSat.
Ladies Shirt-Maker Blouses solids and Stripes $4.95 15.95
Ladies Knee Socks assorted colors, 1 doz $4 50
Mens Oxford Shirts button collar sizes 144-19 S12.99-13.99
Mens Poly-fill Vests$22.98
ABORTION! IF TO
lit Wit KO
PRIONANCY
prt�A�ny tot, Wrtf con
?��oi, ftd problem prtoiwi
cy covntMing For fvrttwr
infortottton call �� osis
(toll � frot numhir
ifH) Ml mi) botwton
A.M.I �.M WMWirt
KoMfk M�tim-
HMNIt OrfOMM'Mn
���tl Morton tt
EXCEPTIONAL
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.30 days paid vaction
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CURRENT
OPPORTUNITIES
nuclear engineering
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.aviation.law.nursing
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.intelligence
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more responsibility and
leadership opportunities
world wide travel and
adventure
prestige and personal
growth pontential
MOST LIBERAL ARTS MAJORS ARE ELIGIBLE
The NAVY OFFICER INFORMATION TEAM will
be on campus ����� Dec 234'�utside of
the Campus Bookstore. If you are interested
in arranging an appointment or taking the
Navy Officer Aptitude Test
call 1 800 7568 Toll Free
CLIFFS
SPECIALS
E. 10th St. Extension
752-3172
MONDAY-THURSDAY
Oyster Plate3.95
Shrimp Plate3.95
Seafood Plate3.95
Ocean Perch2.50
Blue Fish2.50
Crab Cakes1.85
THURSDAY
Popcorn Shrimp2.95
THE
GREA
RING
EXCHANGE.
(Or How To Get Your College Ring For Less.)
Trade up. Trade in. And save. Because
ArtCarved offers you the unique opportun-
ity to trade in your 10K gold high school ring.
You can save up to $90 on the college ring of
your choice. And ArtCarved offers twenty
different styles from which to choose.
Get ready for The Great Ring Exchange.
You can't afford to pass it up.
&v
�t
V
IRTC7IKVED
COLLEGE RINGS
Symbolizing your ability to achieve.
The Official ECU Class Ringi
DEC. 4-5
10:00am-4:00pm
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE LOBBY
WRIGHT BUILDING
Deposit required Master Charge �� Visa accepted
! 1980 ArtCarved College Rin
t
I





1HL I AS I t. AROI INIAN
Sports
NOW MHI R 1980 I'a'H
Wolfpack Rushes
By Wounded Bucs
By (H ARI.ES CHANDLER
Sports I dHor
RALEIGH � North Carolina
State overcame numerous first half
errors with a strong second half to
down I ast Carolina 36-14 Saturday.
The game was the final of the
season tot both teams. The Pirates
finished 4-7 and the Wolfpack 6-5 in
head coach Monte Kiffin's first year
at the State helm.
Following the win Kiffin said his
team was simply not willing to let
the chance of a winning season go
b the wayside after trailing 14-10 at
halftime.
"This is just a great bunch of
guys Kiffin said. "1 told 'em how
much it meant to me to finish with
an winning vear and thev cave it to
Ml 4 0 0 014
V si 7 3 i; u34
H 1 "llin �7 ktcfcofl return il nmrn kkfcl
l s rn 1 run iKilirr kkk)
H I ulltn S run il amm kick)
M s KilUr 4' M.
( v Mario 13 run iKilirr kick)
N( s J�l,Mn 1 run iKilirr ki. k
Si s Jacfcsaa ' run i Killer kick)
Ms Mi 1 ran run iKilirr kiiki
K IN( si
r irsl itn�n- oif.
Raafea Mird� 41-143m u:
I'avMnt �ard, Kr
I'n� 10-3-1S-5-1
r'unl. S-M.l: m ii
rumhlelost S-35-5
PraaMn �rtt h -�5 5
l old offcMc 150411
isim iix i 11 int k-
Ku-hmt h I iiil"n 11-52, Hawkins 539, Hin
� 1 SI s M. Iran �-l7 Marks lr 5H. irmi. k 11-43
iaikv.il ii' 4i i r i;
Pmiai M 1 lr�arl HI I" Millri : IIII 11 N s
crj 1-5 I �"
Kffri.ing Ml I i.lhm NC"S M.Iran v:4
JkkwD I-J7, Marks 1.
me. It you finish 5-6 you'll nevei be
able to say you had a winning
season evcrv vear
In the early going it appeared that
the Pack would not be able to get
ictoiy numbei sis.
E( I 's Anthony Collins got
things off to a roaring start for the
Pirates, taking the opening kickoff
97 yards for a touchdown to put lus
team ahead 7-0 early on.
The TD return was the second ot
the season for Collins, the other go-
ing for 10i yards in the team's 63-7
loss to Florida State.
The Pirates had a chance to move
ahead even further when State
quarterback 1 o! Avery was in-
tercepted by E l defensive end
Cliff Williams.
The turnover gave the Pirates
possession on the Pack 34 wo
plas later ECU's drive was
thwarted when State safety Hillery
Honeycutl intercepted a Greg
Stewart pass and returned it to the
ECU 34.
Wolfpack quarterback I ol Avery
and halfback Wayne Mel ean tool
turns running the ball tor the next
seven plays. Aver) finally going
over from one yard out to tie the
game at seven.
The Pirates could do little with
their ensuing possession and had to
punt to the Pack. The Rodney Allen
punt turned out to be a big offensive
play, though.
State returnee Louie Meadows
mishandled the kick and Pirate
linebacker Chuck Jackson tell on it.
giving ECU possession on the Slate
five.
Fullback Theodore Sutton gol the
eall on fust and goal and went in for
the go-ahead score. Bill Lamm's ex-
tra point put LCU up 14-7.
The Pack took the Pirate kickoff
and moved impressively to the ECU
28 where another mistake haunted
the Pack, Avery fumbling and
Pirate Jeff Pegues recovering.
The Pirates gave the pigskin right
back, though, when Stewart tumbl-
ed following a three-yard loss. State
recovered and reached the LCU 25
before yet another fumble cost the
Pack possession deep in Pirate ter-
ritory .
State managed to sustain a drive
at the end of the half, moving to the
Pirate 31 before settling for a
47-yard field goal from Nathan Rit-
ter to narrow the LCU lead to 14-10
at the halt.
The Pack came out steaming in
the second half, going 75 yards on
their first possession to take a lead
they would never surrender.
A 37-yard pass from Avery to
fullback Eddie Jackson set the stage
tor Andre Marks' 13-yard scoring
jaunt that put the Pack up 16-14.
Ritter missed the extra point try.
Collins then gave the Pack back
what he had taken away on the
ning kickoff, fumbling Ritter's
kickoff on the ECU 1" as State
recovered.
rhree plays later Jackson went
ovei from one yard out and the rout
was on. A two-point try tailed, leav-
.(. . Slate ahead 22 14 with less
than five minutes gone in the third
pei iod.
tte: Bill 1 amm cot 'fin-cornered
a punt inside the State one, the
Pirate defense held and gave the of-
A Loose Pig
r-noto by JON JORDAN
Pictured above is one of ten fumbles that occurred in
Saturdays ECU-N.C. State football game. Boih
learns lost the handle on the pigskin fie times. State
losing all tie tumbles and ECU only three. This one
was recovered b Pirate defensive end Steve
Hamilton (coming into iew at right in photo).
tense great field position.
The Pack defense got sticky too,
holding the Pirates scoreless as a
40-yard field goal attempt by Lamm
sailed wide to the left.
State then took over on their own
24 and capitalized on a face mask
call against the Pirates and marched
76 yards to paydirt. Jackson scoring
from three yards out. Ritter's extra
point made it 29-14.
The Pack was not finished,
though. A 72-yard drive was still in
the offing. Mel can got the call this
time and scored on a five-yard run,
making it 36-14.
The score topped off a super per-
formance by McLean, who rushed
for 176 yards on 30 carries. That
was the first 100-yard performance
b a Pack rusher this season and
was Mel can's carrer-high.
"Wayne's a complete back Kit
fin said following the game "He
may not be one o the top players
drafted but he's tough
ECU head coach 1 d Emory said
the State's dominance in the tren-
ches was the difference in the con-
test.
"Their offensive line mighl have
been the difference in th
said. "Thev did a good job ol con-
trolling our defense.
"Another big factot was that we
got some breaks and didn't cash in
on some ol them
Emory pointed out that losing
star linebacker Jeffrey Warren with
an injury in the second period was
also a blow to his club's chances
On the State side of things. Kiffin
appeared optimistic.
" 1 his is a team of the future he
said. "I've already invited our
seniors to visil us next vear because
to be in a bowl game
Kiffin Thankful For Season
Seniors Provide Win
Photo by JON JORDAN
ECU Fullback Theodore Sutton Crosses For His Final Pirate TD
Pirates Roast
Gobblers, 70-65
By JIMMY DuPREE
Aviisianl sporl rdilnf
East Carolina's Lady Pirate
basketball squad opened their
1980-81 campaign Sunday in Minges
C oliseum with a come-from-behind
70-65 victory over Virginia Tech.
ECU led 37-28 at halftime, but
Tech rallied and took the lead with
11:46 remaining in the game on a
field goal by junior guard Kim
Albany. She added another bucket
20 seconds later to spread the
margin to three.
A lay-up by senior forward Sandy
Berry with 4:32 remaining in the
contest gave the Gobblers their big-
gest lead at 58-53, but the determin-
ed Pirates were not ready to sur-
render.
ECU All-America candidate
Kathy Riley re-entered the game
after resting with four fouls to add
the offensive spark the Pirates need-
ed for their rally. The power for-
ward pumped in eight of her 19
points of the afternoon in the final
1:35 of the game.
ECU junior forward Sam Jones
led the Lady Pirates with 20 points,
while senior Lydia Rountree added
13 and sophomore Mary Denkler
10. Senior center Marcia Girven
claimed top rebounding honors with
11.
Berry was the top scorer of the
game with 21 points on eight o' 12
field goal attempts and five of six
free throws. Albany chipped in 16,
with Maureen Corrigan netting 10.
Both teams came out cold in the
first half, with the score remaining
knotted at six until ECU took the
lead with 14:03 before intermission
on a field goal by Jones. The Lady
Pirates went on to build to a 16
point margin on a Denkler field goal
with 3:09 in the half.
Berry's jump shot with two
seconds on the clock cut the gap to
nine as the teams headed to the
locker rooms.
"We're not relaxed in our posi-
tions ECU coach Cathy Andruzzi
said following the game. "We've
got to be relaxed and that comes
from hard work
While Rountree and point guard
Laurie Sikes did not start the con-
test, both saw extensive playing time
after just a few weeks practice due
to injuries.
"I've got to say we're really pleas
ed with their effort praised An-
By JIMMY DuPREE
vMst�nl spori- rdilur
RALEIGH � Going into Satur-
day's contest with the Pirates of
East Carolina, the Wolfpack of
N.C. State had little to be excited
about except the possibility of
posting a winning season for their
rookie head coach. While that may
seem like a goal worth fighting for,
it hardly matches up to what past
Wolfpack senior contingents have
had to look forward to in their final
outing at Carter-Finley Stadium.
Senior runningback Wayne
McLean of Lillington had rushed
for only 530 yards in the Packs' 10
previous outings; far below the
totals amassed by former NCSU
stars Ted Brown and Stan Fritts in
their senior campaigns.
Highly touted senior tight end Lin
Dawson came into the contest with
only 11 receptions from the eight
games he participated in. Dawson
was hampered by a leg injury early
in the year, but played with the in-
jury nonetheless.
"It sort of hurts knowing it's all
over now says Dawson, a native
of Kinston. "But I'm glad we gol
leave with tour winning records
The Pirates led State 14-10 at in-
termission, with the Wolfpack hav-
ing given up four fumbles and an in-
terception in the opening halt.
NCSU coach Monte Kiffin express-
ed relief his team was able to put
their offense back on track in the se-
cond half and pull away from the
Pirates.
"You don't know what it means
to be a first year head coach and be
6-5 Kiffin said in a post-game
press conference. "1 had to go
around thank each o' those seniors
for the effort they showed today.
"They have no bowl game to look
forward to; no ranking. They just
had super effort in the second
half
Kiffin expressed surprise that
ECU's defense yielded 176 for
McLean, but added thev were ready
to pass if that had been available.
"1 know some of the fans were
problbly about to go to sleep in the
second half because we were runn-
ing so much Kiffin chided. "But
thev were double and triple covering
(split end) Mike Quick and when
thev do that, you've got to be able
to run
The Pack had one long pass at-
tempt to Dawson which the former
All-State high schooler feels he
should have caught and taken to the
end one.
"Tol Avery is supposed to fake to
the fullback, tuck the ball and drop
back to pass, explains Dawson.
"When he let go with the pass 1
thought it was floating along, but it
just kept sailing away.
"1 probably lost at least a step
and there was no one between me
and the end one. 1 know 1 would
have made it in
Kiffin, known for his antics and
seemingly unceasing energy, said he
never considered the game out of
hand even with the abnrmally high
number of turnovers his team gave
up.
"At the end of the first half, 1
told them there was 30 more
minutes to play: if you want to be a
winner or a loser, you have 30 more
minutes'
ECU Drops Exhibition
Guard Laurie Sikes
druzzi. "1 think Lydia Rountree had
an excellant comeback. Kathy
(Riley) is a power forward; if Lydia
had a couple of more inches on her,
she would be a power forward too.
"But 1 think the exciting thing
was the comeback. The comeback
they made was very fundamental.
We gave a few baskets away that we
shouldn't have, but we're very-
pleased to have won
The Lady Pirates now prepare for
a Thanksgiving trip to New York to
face Queens College Friday and
Wagner Saturday. The next home
contest for the Last Carolina
women will be at 7:30 Wednesday,
December 3 against AIAW national
champion Old Dominion.
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Spurtsdiiir
After watching his young team
fall to Marathon Oil 103-83 in a
Monday night exhibition game in
Minges Coliseum, ECU head
basketball coach Dave Odom of-
fered assurance that better things
were ahead for his Pirates.
"It would be a grave .mistake to
believe the East Carolina team we
saw tonight will be the team we'll
see this year on a night-to-night
basis Odom said.
"1 have expressed grave con-
fidence in this team. What 1 saw
tonight tonight was not what I have
seen in practice. I can assure you
this won't happen often. I know the
ingredients that go in these guys and
they won't let it happen
Marathon Oil is a team comprised
of former college players who travel
around the country playing exhibi-
tion games with college squads,
much in the same fashion that the
Athletes in Action club does.
The visitors were led by forward
William Mavfield, a former Iowa
star, and Bob Bender, a former
guard at Duke.
Mavfield hit 11 of 1 shots from
the floor and finished with 23 points
and 18 rebounds fot the night.
Bender directed the Marathon at-
tack from his point guard position
and finished with ten points and ten
assists.
The Pirates were paced by
freshman guard Barry Wright with
14 points. Sophomore point guard
Mike Bledsoe and junior center-
forward David Underwood both ad-
ded 12. Bledsoe also tallied tour
assists.
Center Tom Szymanski and
freshman forward Morns Hargrove
were the Pirates' leading re
bounders, with nine and eight pulls,
respectively.
Marathon Oil jumped to an early
14-9 lead before the Pirates rallied
back behind Underwood. Barry
Wright's lay-in following a Herbert
Gilchrist assist brought the Pirates
even at 16.
Marathon struck back quickly,
though, reeling off six straight
points to take a lead that they would
never let go of.
The lead got as high as 22 points
in the first halt.Marathon going to
the dressing room at halftime with a
53-36 lead.
The visitors erased any hopes ol a
Pirate comeback at the outset o' the
second half, outscoring LCU P-2 in
the first five minutes o' the half to
move ahead 70-38.
Pirate point guard Mike Bledsoe
got hot, scoring ten points m the
game's last nine minutes, to prevent
any further building oi the margin
as the Pirates finished down by 20.
After the game Odom noted that
the more experienced Marathon
club simply "outclassed, outplayed
and outhustled" the Pirates.
Odom added that his club could
play, and especially shoot, much
better than the score and its 40.8
percentage showed.
"We're are much better shooters
than this he said. "Look at Mike
1 ox (0 for 8), he's a fine shooter and
he didn't hit anything tonight
1 CU opens its regular season this
Saturday when it travels northward
to take on Ohio University. The
club's first home game will be
played on December 6 when Texas
Wesleyan comes to Greenville.
Go,
For
By BOH
K I
Alt'
did
winn � .
Brown a I
the 1980 Pi
a n y
invited
the I
I eat
pla �
du
Fa
At
1
Re
Cak
Cn
l a
past v
Cha.
Rev i is
t a c h e d,
acad
� � the
n 1
Paul Osi
the U" :
the
t he
lv
172
t
m
f
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M





IHt I AS I C AKOI INI AN
NOVI MBI-K 25. 1980
P.
m
on



LMike
fine�nighier and
n this toward the
ne will be
w hen1 exas
enville,
Goalie Brown Invited
For Macabee Tryout
B BOBBKNSON
HI Spirl Information
Although his team
did not finish with a
winning record, last
Carolina goalie Steve
Brown added a spark to
the 1980 Pirate season.
Brown was recently
united to tr out tot
the U.S. Macabee
Team at Columbia
University. 1 his team is
selected from hundreds
of collegiate soccei
players across the na-
tion.
Irs outs will be con-
ducted Sen. 28-24 at
c olumbia. To qualify
tot a tryout one must
be an amateui and one
must be Jewish. It
selected for the
Macabee leant. Brown
will travel to Israel to
pla against other na-
i ions.
East Carolina coach
Brad Smith feels Brown
has a good chance to
make the Macabee
ream. "I think Steve
has a good chance. He
needs to work on his
techniques and this will
help him to gel to the
balls i- hct e pu i e
physical ability will
not
This season Brown
broke two s c h o o 1
records. He tallied 34
saves against N.C
State and collected five
shut-outs in one
season, exceeding the
old record of shut-outs
b two.
"Brown has very
good game sense, he
knows w hat is going to
happen and where the
ball is going to go
said soccei coach Brad
Smith. It he gets to
the ball he's going to
stop it, he has great
quickness and vod
reactions.
Art and Camera
526 S. Cut one he St.
IJoirn Jown
Favorites Sweep Pirates
At Region II Tournament
�Alter
"fluke"
1 A
Vollevbal
receiving a
bid tot he
Region II
lTournameni
i lu
a week ago. the 1 ad
Pirates o! last
Carolina retui ned
15-9, 15 II in the next
match, with Eastern
Kentucky claiming the
final match 15-1, 15-5.
1 astern Kentucky
and Memphis State ad-
vanced to the cham-
'Ihe tact that N.C. went, and the next time
State and North we go back we'll know
Carolina, who have what to expect
ECU senior Sharon
Perry was named All-
home with foui losses pionship round with
m the pool competi- their records in the pool
tion. portion ol the unit na
The 1 ady Piiates ment.
opened the tourney �
I hursday with a 15-10,
15-17, 15-3 loss to
Memphis S i - and
later thai day added
a not hei to North
Carolina State 15 v
15-2.
t ! V runner-up
INC Chapel Hill
punished the Pirates
won tournaments along
the eastern coast,
didn't make it to the
finals shows how tough
the competition was
says 1 c U assistant
. oach I v nn l)av idson.
"I'm i calls glad we
State at the recent
NC'AIAW tournament.
She is joined by three
players each from UNC
and N.C. State and
another from Duke.
Classifieds
R evils
Captures
Crown
East Carolina
wrestler Butch Revils
captured the champion-
ship of the 177-pound
'class in the Tar Heel In-
vitational, held this
past weekend in
Chapel.
Revils wrestled unat-
tached, as he is
academically ineligible
for the first semester.
� 'An ECU graduate.
Paul Osman, also cap-
tured a title, winning
the 147-pound class.
James Ellison was
the only Pirate who
ante oul a winner in
the consolations,
defeating teammate
Andy Heffner 4-3 in
the 172-pound weight
class.
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I





10
I HI EAST K01 1N1AN
NOVEMBER 25, l WO
The Fearless Football Forecast
ARMY 1 NAVY
11 XAS UM MH AS
RIZONA ST ATI AT ARIZONA
GEORGIA IK H AT GEORGIA
OKI AHOM STATE AT Okl AHOMA
OREGON SI S UC1 (in Tokyo)
RK 1 I HOUSTON
U 1 H 1 SAN DIEGO SI Ml
l BAMA A I AUBURN
RKANSAS M 11 XAS IT (11
MIAMI, IT M IT ORIDA
I'll 1MU KCrll VS PENN STATE
CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
(105-39)
Navy
lexas
Arizona Stale
Georgia
Oklahoma
UCLA
Houston
Utah
Alabama
Arkansas
Florida
Pittsburgh
TERRY HERN DON
Advertising Manager
(104-40)
Navy
1 exas
Arizona State
Georgia
Oklahoma
UCLA
Houston
Utah
Alabama
Iexas Tech
Miami
Penn State
KEN SMITH
ECU SID
(103-41)
Navy-
Texas
Arizona
Georgia
Oklahoma
UCLA
Houston
Utah
Alabama
Arkansas
Florida
Pittsburgh
M DuPREE(.1 KM PICKER:
. Sports EditorJOHN SI AILIM.s
(103-41)ssistant SID
NavyNavy
Texaslexas
Arizona StateArizona
GeorgiaGeorgia
OklahomaOklahoma
UCLAUCLA
HoustonHouston
UtahUtah
AlabamaAlabama
ArkansasArkansas
MiamiFlorida
Penn StatePittsburgh
Trotters Like Apple Pie,
'Good Will Ambassadors'
CHARLES
CHANDLER
"jus! saying
��; is a defii
�If. It's
American like apple
pie. Really it's like the
apple pie o' the
universe
With the Harlem
Globetrotters schedul-
ed to appca; in Minges
i oliseum on Nov. 28,
rmer ' loe
Cunningham passed
through Greenville last
week and offered his
impressions on what
beinc a Globetrottei is
'Even Gl
is a pan I a 11 aa
� v. u p. nine ha i
Harlem Globeti
Cunningham jdc
a Glob
ter is I ke nothing el!
ABMV NAVY STORE
KithMiki n-y Bern.
laCkcH. R��c��f �. P�rfc�i. J
SMtt. Combat ImH, H�. f
1M1 S. tv�� Strt�t �
in the world; and like
no other basketball
player in the world.
"You're playing on
the home team
wherever you go he
said. "You effect the
lives of so many peo-
ple
1 ormerly a high
school teammate of
NBA star Farl "The
Pearl Monroe, Cunn-
ingham said the Trot-
ters have had a tremen-
dous effect on people
for years, but added
that the players pro-
bably did not fully
realize this.
"When you consider
all the Trotters have
done he said, "it's
amazing � introducing
blacks into professional
orts, helping with
race relations It's
amazing.
"The Globetrotters
are doing now basically
the same things they
have done for years;
and people never get
tired of it. People are
still coming out to see
them. The Trotters
reach so many people.
"I don't think the
players realize then in-
fluence over people
Myself, it wasn't until 1
came back after mv
playing days that 1 saw
the effect we'd had
Cunningham retired
as an active Trotter in
1973 but returned to
the organization last
year and now serves on
the public relations
staff.
"I can see it now
he continued. "When 1
walk into a hospital or
school, when I see the
sparkle in a young per-
son's eyes, I know.
Before 1 saw the crowd
laughing and cheer
but never realized
why
The 6-7 Cunningham
noted that being a
Globetrotter was a
Rockwood Stable
Horteback Riding
MiVr. rnsi � Ktlh Si
I light ,i � I
; 7 I 4
ml li EX I Student
Downtown Ureenvltle
Across From
Bount-Harvey
Parking In
Front & Back.
Of Shop
PHONE
758-0204
time-consuming thing.
1 he team's world-wide
tour lasts for a full nine
months.
"We're talking
about 250 games a
year he said. "A
Globetrotter only gets
to be at home aboul
three weeks in those
nine months You've
got to be tied up in it to
do it
The formei "rotter
confessed that at times
the demands could
become a bother.
1 he mono) onous
feelings don't last long,
though, Cunningham
added.
"Somebody's going
to walk up to you and
make you feel special.
When you play in front
ol people that loe you.
you can't feel too
bad
"The Globetrotters
found out thev could be
more effective and
more important if they
entertained Cunn-
ingham said. 'The
Trotters have revolu-
tionized basketball,
too Heck, thev in-
vented the slam dunk
Cunningham said the
Globetrotters had a
devotion to their fans
that is rarely seen in the
sporting world.
"I'll never forget
Moosejaw he said.
"The game was played
in Saskatchewan
(Canada). We were
scheduled to play in an
ice arena It was 40
below zero outside and
20 below inside.
�' 1 he place held just
500 people and only 75
were there. We still
played the game,
though, because we felt
we owed it to those
tans
Perhaps the above
storv explains why
t unningham refers to
the Globetrotters as
Ambassadors of
Goodw ill
Weekly Forecast
Title Is Pending
Joe C unningham
I he East aroli-
nian's weekly fearless
Football Forecast
comes to an end this
week and the battle foi
"top picker" is still in
progress.
Advertising Manager
Terry Herndon had had
a stronghold on the op
position until last week
when he puked onlv six
of 12 games correctly.
Jimmy DuPree picked
ten oi the 12 winners
and moved from a dis-
tant fourth to a close
third.
DuPree is tied
ECl Sports Informa
lion Direct oi Ken
Smith tor that sj
Both have 103-41
marks foi the season (a
.715 percentage) and
are two games bask ol
Sporis Editoi c harles
Chandler.
Chandler picked nine
of the 12 winner- last
weekend tt i move ahead
ol Herndon with a
105-39 mark (.729).
Herndon's re ol
104 40 is only one game
bask and tl
22 percentage
1 lus week's p �
ol game- thai ' mature
i
Contests siU: a
Nav .
the Pin ibui
State bout arc
which the unexpeci
bee
1 tie week's k ;
chups .i- fai a
totes a
cerned are the 1"
I'M . �
rech an d M i a
1 n ida games. V
� �� and
oniv �
���
-pi.
the


i eeulai season forecasl.
vm
1980$
wQ
cg�
s��55
WNCT-TV
GREENVILLE

9 ALIVE SPORT TEAM
Carlester Crumpler Jim Woods
F
� fc
S





Andruzzi
ECU Basketball 1981-82 December I, 1981 �
Strength, Vigor Of Lady Pirate
Head Coach Brings New Heights
To ECU Women ys Basketball
By JIMMY DuPREK
Managing tditor
Basketball, to many people,
in an enjoyable game of skill
which provides exercise for
those who participate and
entertainment for those who
watch. But to Cathy Andruzzi
it's more than that � it's her
life.
"Basketball is not just
bouncing balls; it has opened
me up to a lot of things in
life says the fourth-year
ECU coach. "Basketball has
taught me that you have to be
responsible. Whether it's to a
program, your friends or just
to life in general, you have to
be responsible and take charge
of things. You have to be a
doer to accomplish worthwhile
goals
Putting this philosophy into
practice has made Lady Pirate
basketball one of the fastest-
growing programs in the na-
tion. Preparing for 26 schedul-
ed games along with post-
season competition i a
365-day-a-year "hobby" for
the confessed workaholic.
Pre-season practice begins
as soon as classes get under
waj in the fall. Often days
begin at 5 a.m. with Nautilus
weight training and conclude
alter conditioning drills that
evening. Only classes and
study hall interrupt the cons-
tant diet of basketball.
Once the season begins,
classes, travel, games and
practice leave little time for
social life � for either players
or coaches.
Demanding? Maybe, but
it's Andruzzi's opinion that
"anything worth having is
worth making sacrifices for
"I'm a very demanding per-
son she admits, "but I don't
expect any more of other peo-
ple than 1 expect of myself. If
you have a job. do it. That's
Andruzzi (At Right) Joins In With The Team In
Celebrating A Big Score
all I ask
"It irritates me to no end
Ahen people procrastinate and
don't get the job done. I'm not
going to waste mv time on
people who make excuses.
"There's too many things 1
want to do in my life � there's
no room for procrastination
Recruiting new talent for
the ECU program has been
one of the vital challenges An-
druzzi has faced in her four
years here. Prior to her arrival
it was not unusual for scholar-
ships to be offered to athletes
the coaches had not seen in
person.
"You have to have talent to
come to East Carolina she
conceeds, "but that's not the
only factor we consider. We
cannot make verbal contact
Explaining Tactics
Andruzzi is always very intent when she huddles
with her team during a game. When she calls such a
huddle, her players say, their attention belongs to
the coach.
with girls we are interested in.
so we are limited as to what we
can find out about an in-
dividual's personal hie. We
can, and do, talk to their
coaches and others to find out
if the she's a good student, a
hard worker, punctual � that
sort of thing.
"There was one girl who
had a lot of talent on the
court, but we knew through
her coaches that she couldn't
cut it in the classroom so we
marked her off the list.
"Playing basketball at East
Carolina is a total educational
experience.
"Adolescents today are less
responsible than they were a
couple of years ago, but it's
not altogether their fault.
Thev are surrounded by a
great deal of negative in-
fluences
"Negativity" and
"disloyalty" have no room in
the vocabulary of Cathy An-
druzzi.
"I'm an optimist by
nature she says. "I look for
the good things in people. I try
to eliminate all the negative
people from my life. You have
to surround yourself with the
good people of this world.
"I can't sit still. I'm hap-
piest when I'm working, or
with my family or players
The last two elements of this
statement cannot actually be
seperated. There is, of course,
her biological family, but
beyond that is her extended
family unit including her
players, assistants and other
support personnel.
The product of a "strict
Italian family Andruzzi
draws strength from ex-
periences of her youthful days
growing up in Manhattan and
later Staten Island, N.Y.
��.
Although her parents still
reside in Staten Island, they
often journey to "Pirate
Country" to see their daughter
at work.
"My parents are very sup-
portive and a big part of my
life in basketball she says.
"That's important to me. 1
know it's my life and I have to
make my own decisions, but
my parents have always been a
major influence on me.
"1 think I get a lot of my
morals, my ethics from my
father (Joseph). He's a very
strong man � not so much in
physical strength as he is
strong in character
During one road trip this
season the Lady Pirates will be
gone for over a week; a situa-
tion which could lead to pro-
blems for most groups.
"We (players, coaches, etc.)
have to be a family she
reasons. "We enjoy the op-
portunity to be with each
other.
"I think I have good kids,
but you have to remember
they're human. I don't think
fans realize those kids put
their life into basketball from
August until the end of the
reason.
"We (coaches) work very
hard to make their experience
enjoyable
The Lady Pirates have en-
joyed marked success under
Andruzzi, but the players
value their days at ECU for
more than the number of
games listed in the win col-
umn.
"She really cares a lot about
us says junior Mary
Denkler. "She may get mad
and yell sometimes, but it's
only because she wants ever-
body to be the best.
"She'd go out of her way to
do anything for her players.
She does a lot of little things
people don't realize, don't
hear about
Victories over N.C. State,
North Carolina and Virginia
and a narrow miss against
Southern Cal propelled the
Lady Pirates into the Top 20
for the first time last year �
one step closer to Andruzzi's
goal of a national
powerhouse. Three times dur-
ing the 1979-80 season at-
tendence at Minges Coliseum
topped the 4,000 mark, and
the Lady Pirates dropped a
77-73 decision to nationally
sixth-ranked USC as 4,500
watched.
"We're getting there she
admits with a smile of con-
fidence. "The program has
grown a lot in the four years
I've been here; we have the TV
show (on WNCT-TV, the first
ever for a women's basketball
program), the radio show.
"But we're not stopping;
we'll continue to grow. Our
program is all business. We
don't want people to pay us lip
service. Just give us the things
7'm a very demanding
person, but I don V expect
any more from other peo-
ple than I expect from
myself
�Cathy
Andruzzi
we need to get the job done.
"We make a plan, put it in-
to action and then re-evaluate
it and make adjustments.
We're young; we're still learn-
ing
It doesn't matter whether
the Lady Pirates are in a tight
game or running away with an
easy victory, Andruzzi cannot
sit idly as her players run up
and down the court. Officials
repeatedly warn the vivacious
ECU mentor to stay behind
the line marking the edge of
the playing surface, but as
soon as the words are spoken
she is again crowding the
margin shouting instructions
to her "Rats
"1 don't even realize I'm
doing it most of the time she
says. "When we go back and
look at the tapes of the games,
I see this person running all
over the place � including on-
to the court.
"They've said the rule
about coaches being on the
playing surface will be enforc-
ed more this year. 1 hope thev
didn't do this because ot me
she chides.
A confessed adkt requiring
massive daily doses of coffee.
Andruzzi has worked long
hours tor her program to gam
success.
"One of our goals was to
have our own identity � we
do she adds. "We don't live
or die by what happens at
other schools in the state.
We're proud of our program
and school and what we have
to offer.
"We have a state, regional
and national identity we have
never had before.
"There's no limit; as soon
as you've set a limit you might
as well pack your bags
The only bags Cathy An-
druzzi's packing are for Lady
Pirate road trips.
f�X&
The Lady Pirate Mentor
Is Often On Her Feet,
Shouting Instructions
v





10 ECU Basketball 1981-82 December I, 1981
Returnees
Are Many In
ECAC-South
Old Dominion And James
Madison Are The Early Favorites,
But Several Other Veteran Clubs
Could Peak And Surprise
The ECAC-South has been
realigned, with Last Carolina
moving in and five teams mov-
ing out.
The iop two finishers from a
year ago, Old Dominion and
.lames Madison, return,
!hough, and are solid favorites
to lead the pack again.
Following is a brief sum-
mar o each conference team.
Mann (13.9 ppg) and you have
an impressive, experienced
backcouri to combine with
McAdoo and West. Finding a
fifth siartei is a concern tuns.
though, says Webb.
"We have the four solid
returning starters he said.
"But we've got to come up
with a dependable fifth starter
and develop some depth.
"On the other hand
Webb continued, "ue will
have our strengths. 1 think our
quickness will be a positive
thing. Also, we should be pret-
ty mature
OLD DOMINION
There is "somewhat guard-
ed and protected optimism" in
the Monarch camp, says
Coach Paul Webb.
Outsiders say the optimism
should be overwhelming. The
Monarchs are co-favorites in
the league race. Some believe,
though, that Webb's team
may be alone at the top. One
national publication, Spori-
Sl lines, ranked ODU 14th in
the countrv in its pre-season
poll.
A budding tradition com-
bined vviih an impressive crew
or returnees earned such a
ranking. ODU has competed
in four post-season tour-
naments in the past five years,
the only years that the team
has competed on the Division 1
level.
A big step was taken last
year when the club handed
then-number one ranked
DePaul its only regular season
loss. ODU was the league's
regular season champion, yet
went to the National Invita-
tional Tournament instead of
the NCAA's when James
Madison rolled to victory in
the ECAC-South tournament.
Senior forward Ronnie
McAdoo (15.9 ppg, 7.9 rpg),
the cousin of NBA star Bob
McAdoo, leads the way for
Webb's club. The presence of
6-10 center Mark West (10.9
ppg. 10.3 rpg) certainly makes
McAdoo's job easier. West led
the nation in blocked shots last
season, averaging four per
game.
Add Grant Robinson (9.1
ppg and 6.3 assists) and Billy
ECU Basketball 1981-82
The East Carolinian
December 1,1981
CREDITS
Photos: Gary Patterson. Drew
Rumbley, Kip Sloan. (Cover color
photos by Patterson)
Editor: Charles Chandler
Contributions: William Yelver-
ton, Jimmy DuPree, ECU Sports
Information, ECU Print Shop
Printing: The Daily Southerner,
Tarboro.
In EC AC
South action
last season,
William and
Mary's Billy
Barnes (22)
drives on Rich-
mond's Mark
Reed. The
twosome
should make
themselves
heard before
the conference
season ends.
'Silly Fresh
play good defense and can
shoot well Campanelli said.
"I inton (Townes) is one of
the best shooters I've ever
been around
JAMES MADISON
The Dukes won the league
tourney last season to earn the
rights to go to the NCAA
Tournament. Once there, all
the Dukes did was defeat a
highly-favored, nationally-
ranked Georgetown team and
give Notre Dame all it wanted
before bowing out. All that,
says JMU head coach Lou
Campanelli, was a big step.
"It definitely meant alot
said the sixth-year mentor. "It
did a lot for the school and the
program. It vaulted us into a
position where people
recognize us as a major college
basketball team. Nine years
ago, you know, this was a
girl's school
But not anymore. The
Dukes are co-favorites with
ODU in the ECAC-South
race.
Four starters, headed by 6-6
forward Linton Townes (15.3
ppg, 5.8 rpg last season and 35
points last week in an exhibi-
tion win over Yugoslavia),
return from the 21-9 tourna-
ment squad. Included among
the nine losses was a mere one-
point defeat to powerful
Virginia.
Defense was a JMU by-
word last year, the Dukes
ranking sixth nationally in
team defense (57.2) and 12th
in field-goal percentage
defense (43.4).
In addition
guards Charles
Dave Dupont,
center Dan Ruland are return-
ing starters.
"We're working hard
said Campanelli. "But we've
got a lot of inexperienced
depth. We're trying to get
something out of three or four
guys
Positives? "We play hard.
to Townes,
Fisher and
along with
WILLIAM AND MARY
The building process con-
tinues for the Indians, who
progressed IO 16-12 last year
despite what might have been
the school's toughest-ever
schedule.
"1 think we're on solid
ground now said head coach
Bruce Parkhill. "We're head-
ed in the right direction. Our
objective is to continue to im-
prove
Improvement could be
ahead again this year, as five
regulars who filled four star-
ting positions return from last
year, leading the way is All-
EC AC-South performer Mike
St ray horn, a 6-5 forward who
averaged 11.1 points per game
last vear.
Billy Barnes (9.2 ppg, 55
steals) and Tony Traver (7
ppg) return as starters at
guard. Ken Bowen and Brant
Weidner are back to share the
center spot again.
Heading the list of
newcomers is 6-4 guard Keith
Cieplicki, twice Vermont's
prep athlete of the year and an
All-American a year ago.
Cieplicki averaged 33 points
last year for Rice Memorial
High in Burlignton, Vt.
"We have a good nucleus
this year Parkhill said. "But
we lost four seniors from last
year. We hope to counter that
with some of our younger
guys
The Indians, long a ball
control team, may try to speed
things somewhat this year.
Parkhill admits the club may
"run a little more and be more
aggressive than in the past
are the team to watch.
"George Mason said one
ECAC-South mentor, "could
he very dangerous. They have
as much talent as anybody in
the league
Despite losing leading scorer
Dave Skaff (20.1 ppg) to
graduation, George Mason
figures io be much-improved
over last season's 10-16 club.
Besides Skaff, nearly
everyone else returns. In addi-
tion, 6-10 center Andre Gaddy
is back after sitting out last
year. Gaddy has career
averages of 16.1 ppg and 9.9
rpg and was an all-conference
selection in 1979-80.
Sophomore guard Andy
Bolden is back alter averaging
16.9 points and earning con-
ference rookie-ot-i he-year
nonors a ear ago. Bolden's
backcouri partner. John
Niehoff, also returns to the
starting lineup, along with 6-4
forward Rickv Dillard.
Much o' the optimism in the
Patriot camp results from a
big recruiting year Head
coach Joe Harrington, a
former assistant under I eft
Driessel ai Maryland, brought
in 6-9 JuCo iransfei Mike
Haniin, 6-7 Cenienarv transfer
Mike Shannon and 6-8
freshman Pierre I aMitie.
See ALE Page 19
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GEORGE MASON
Ask any league coach and
he will admit that the Patriots
203 East 5th Street � Greenville, N. C.27834
Denkler
Become
B JIMMY DuPREE
t V�.lr
She came to ECU in 1978 as
a talented but unorthodox
freshman capable of providing
offensive punch off the bench
as well as comic relief on the
road. Last season she further
developed offensively, averag-
ing 14.4 points a game with a
.548 field goal accuracy mark.
Now, junior forward Mary
Denkler is cast in the role of
being a veteran leader of the
1981-82 Lady Pirate basket-
ball squad.
"She and Fran (Hooks) us-
ed to be my silly freshmen
chides coach Cathy Andruzzi.
"Now she's a junior and hav-
ing to become a leader. It real-
ly doesn't seem like it's been
that long
Does being expected to pro-
vide leadership pressure
Denkler? Hardly.
"I didn't think about it
much coming into the
season she said. "It's
something you have to get us-
ed to.
"We're a young team, but
our freshmen are good. We
have a lot of enthusiasm, but
we real!
"1 thil
we face
come y
timidate
The
to overt
the roal
friendly!
Cloiseul
first 11
"I
capablt
'Denk
personi
dominj
a lot o
The
porate
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ECU Basketball 1981-82 December 1, 1981 11
1

In ECAC-
South action
last season,
H Uliam and
Vfary's Billy
Barnes (22)
Rich-
nd's Mark
Ret i The
make
themselves
� nee
st a $i '� t nds

t keat
6 4
Head
M ke
Set AI 1 Pajje 1
MNtrv PERSONAL
d MONOGRAM JEWELRY
1
der Before
hristmas
) 1 Cfoh
1
'Silly Freshman No Longer
Denkler Having To
Become Leader Now
By JIMMY DuPREE
M�ii(M � dune
She came to ECU in 1978 as
a talented but unorthodox
freshman capable of providing
offensive punch off the bench
as well as comic relief on the
road. Last season she further
developed offensively, averag-
ing 14.4 points a game with a
.548 field goal accuracy mark.
Now, junior forward Mary
Denkler is cast in the role of
being a veteran leader of the
1981-82 Lady Pirate basket-
ball squad.
"She and Fran (Hooks) us-
ed to be my silly freshmen
chides coach Cathy Andruzzi.
"Now she's a junior and hav-
ing to become a leader. It real-
ly doesn't seem like it's been
that long
Does being expected to pro-
vide leadership pressure
Denkler? Hardly.
"I didn't think about it
much coming into the
season she said. "It's
something you have to get us-
ed to.
"We're a young team, but
our freshmen are good. We
have a lot of enthusiasm, but
we really need experience.
"I think the main challenge
we face this year is to over-
come youth and not be in-
timidated by other teams
The Lady Pirates will have
to overcome youth quickly on
the road, as they play in the
friendly confines of Minges
Cloiseum only twice in their
first 11 outings.
"I think everybody is
capable of scoring suggests
'Denk "There's not any one
person who is going to
dominate the scoring. We have
a lot of offensive talent
The Lady Pirates will incor-
porate the "motion" offense
into their routine this season
� a move Denkler looks for-
ward to.
" 'Motion' is reaction to
given situations she ex-
plains. "We still have set plays
to run, but it allows much
more freedom.
"We've still got to get used
to each other. We've got to
know what each one of us is
doing. We get along well, and
that'll help us in the long run.
We want to help each other
While working at Pat Ken-
nedy Basketball Camps this
summer, the Academic All-
America candidate strived to
develop her defensive skills
through improved quickness.
Denkler hopes to improve on
her 6.8 rebounds per game
average of a year ago and fill
the void left by the graduation
of center Marcia Girven.
"I knew I needed to work
on (defense) she admits.
"I've worked on positioning a
lot, and trying to develop
more court awareness
At the beginning of last
season Denkler and Girven
were the tallest Lady Pirates at
6-0. Now Denkler ties for third
tallest on the squad, with
junior Darlene Hedges and
freshman Darlene Chaney
each measuring 6-2 and
freshman Laura Regal also
6-0.
"We will have a somewhat
taller team than we have ever
had before conceeds An-
druzzi. "The additional height
off the bench will mean we can
give Denk and others more
rest when they need it. That'll
be important especially later in
�toto By KIP SLOAN
Denkler Drives Against Appalachian
the season.
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Supermarket, Inc.
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A. -





12 ECU Basketball 1981-82 December 1, 1981
MAMA
By CHARLES CHANDLER
"Minges Mania
Ciet used to the term. It will
probably be seen and heard a
great deal before the current
basketball season is over. At
least that is what East
Carolina coaches hope.
The idea is to create increas-
ed interest in Pirate basket-
ball, and to get that interest in-
to the confines of Minges Col-
iseum when ECU is playing a
Inuiie game.
"Our overall goal is to try
and fill the student section
said assistant coach Tom Bar-
rise, the author of the 'Minges
Mania' terminology. "We
think the crowd is as much a
part of a basketball game as
the team on the floor or the
coach on the bench
Barrise and his coaching
cohorts have contacted nearly
every student organization,
hoping that the groups will ral-
ly behind the slogan and make
the thought of "mania" in
Minges Coliseum a reality.
"Everyone we've talked to
seems very positive about it
Barrise said. "We feel the
students want to be a part of
this thing and we certainly
want them to be
A crowd is important, Bar-
rise said, but the student
crowd is most important.
"The student body has to
become the sixth man said
(he ECU aide. "Behind every
home court should be the
home court advantage. If a
team comes in here and the
crowd is not that enthusiastic,
it is a help to the visiting
team
In the past, attendance to
ECU home basketball games
has usually been meager. Bar-
rise hopes the push, and
hopefully a much-improved
team, will help transform
Minges into a lion's den for
opposing teams.
"We'd love for a scout to be
envious of our arena. We'd
like nothing more than for a
scout to go back and tell his
team 'hey, that is one heck of
a tough place to play
Barrise, head coach Dave
()dom and the staff have taken
their thoughts to the com-
munity as well. Don Edwards,
manager of the University
ECU Assistant Barrise Begins Drive To
Make Minges A More Formidable Coliseum
Book Exchange, and the
Pepsi-Cola company liked
what they heard.
Edwards and Pepsi are pro-
viding "Minges Mania"
painters caps for the student
bod.
"I'd really like lo see us
develop a big-time ai-
mostphere in Minges Ed-
wards said. "I just hope ihc
students will respond to this. I
think they'll find that atten-
ding major college basket hall
games can really be fun. And
it will help (he team so much,
too
The word "fun" is one that
Barrise likes to use when talk-
ing about attending an ECU
games.
"We hope we as a team will
be fun lo watch he said.
"But we will also be doing
other things. We're working
on having nightly contests. 1
think once the students start
coming, thev'll want to come
back
Barrise is also very concern-
ed with what some call a very
apathetic student body.
"This is my first year here,
so I don't know about any
apathy. Bui I don't think there
should be any. College is the
most fun you'll ever have. It's
no time lo be apathetic
Especially if "Minges
Mania" is to become a reality.
Both Coaches'
Shows Are Set
East Carolina basketball
coaches Dave Odom and
Cathy Andruzzi will be
featured in their own televi-
sion and radio shows during
the season.
Odom's 30-minute weekly
highlight show will be hosted
by Lee Moore and aired at 4
p.m. each Saturday on
WCTI-12, Channel 12, New
Bern.
Andruzzi's TV show will be
shown at 12:30 p.m. each
Saturday, preceding the ACC
telecasts,on WNCT-TV,
Channel 9, Greenville. Henry
Hinton will host.
WOOW radio station (1340
AM in Greenville) will aire
both of the coaches' radio
shows. '
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Hoping For 'Mania'
The ECU men's basketball team took time out
Monday to pose with the new "Minges
Mania" painters hats, which were bought by
Pepsi-Cola in conjunction with the University
Book Exchange. The hats wilt be given away
to students during the December 7 game with
Campbell. (Photo By Gary Patterson)
RETURNING to the
Pirate fold this year is
point guard Tony Byles.
A starter in i979-80,
Byles sat out last year
with academic dif-
ficulties. His is expected
to quarterback the ECU
club.
(Photos By Gary Patter-
son)
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STYLE PLUS located at East Carolina Convenience Center next to Wmn Dixie





ECU Basketball 1981-82 December 1, 1981
13
rive 1 o
Coliseum
Mania'
ptt
I, en a way
mber 7 game with
ary Patterson;
RETURNING to the
Pirate fold this year is
point guard Tony Byles.
A starter in 1979-80,
Byles sat out last year
with academic dif-
ficulties. His is expected
to quarterback the ECU
club.
(Photos By Gary Patter-
son)
on all items with
coupon
1 iod at
� ins Glory
us
Shirley's
Cut & Style
Barbers �
James, Mike & Marty
8 a.m6.30 p.m.
MonFri.
appointments only
located downtown
(within walking distance of campus)
on second floor of Minges Building
Phone 752-1855
Fashion cuts for
both men and women
Galore
Byles Returns To Bucs
After A Year On Sidelines,
Expected To Play Key Role
B CHARLES CHANDLER
SirK Idilor
"All of last year 1 tried to
figure out what was wrong.
Now 1 know; he was not
here
Last Carolina head basket-
ball coach Dave Odom was
very intent as he sat in his of-
fice and reflected back upon
last season's 12-14 record and
looked ahead toward the com-
ing year.
He spoke with optimism for
the 1981-82 Pirates. One of the
main reasons for that op-
timism, he said, was the return
of point guard Tony Byles.
Byles was a starter as a
junior in 1979-80, Odom's
first year at the Pirate helm,
but did not play last year due
to academic difficulties. He
sat out last fall semester and
returned in the spring to try
and work himself back into a
purple, gold and white
uniform.
When Byles returned to
campus Odom had very little
to say about the guard's
chances of returning. Byles
knows why.
"1 was down 21 quality
pomis said the lank 6-4
senior. "1 needed to maintain
a 3.5 average. 1 did pretty
good in the summer, but still
fell a couple of points low, I
went to the firsi session of
summer school and got
everything straight
Now that Byles is back,
Odom is elated.
"He adds so much to our
team said the third-year
ECU head coach. "When he's
got the ball it's like putting a
babe in its mother's arms.
Everything is calm and confi-
dent when he's in there. There
is a great sense of organization
when Tony is running the
show
Coming back into a pro-
gram and being asked to be a
team leader has not been a
problem Byles said.
"I've been really accepted
well he said. "As a matter
of fact, I've been accepted so
well that it adds a little
pressure. It's nothing 1 can't
handle. I'm just glad the
players have accepted me and
I'm really glad to be back
Byles averaged 5.2 points
and just below two assists per
game two years ago. He said
the scoring totals should be
higher this year.
"I don't worry about
shooting he said. "That's
not my mam job. But I do
know I have to contribute
more than two years ago. I'll
still concentrate on on passing
and ball-handling, but I'll pro-
bablv shoot more than I did
before
Byles says the current
Pirates could be better than
the 1979-80 team that went
16-11. That was the Pirates'
first winning season in five
years. "We have more
depth this year than two years
ago said the New York
native. "I think we play a lot
better together. I believe we
can have a better record
In retrospect, Byles said he
is glad his senior season was
prolonged by one year.
"I feel a lot beer on this
team than I would have last
year. We're more of a family
now. From watching all last
year I have really gotten a lo:
smarter. I expect to make
fewer mistakes and I know I
have more enthusiasm
So does his coach.
HASTINGS FORD
19.40
23.60
27.85
A n Dixie
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4 CYLINDER
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includes 5 qts. of oil and filter.
Prices are for Ford vehilcles, other makes prices may vary.
24 hr. towing service
excluding illegally
parked cars.
Day - 758-0114
CO&rn2e6r4�Hw0yth Night - 758-1541
Offer expires Dec. 31, 198V
k-





14 ECU Basketball 1981-82 December 1, 1981
Remembering A
Fabulous Five
Riley, Girven, Sikes, Rountree,
Owen; all now graduated. The
five led the Lady Pirates to a
23-7 record and a national rank-
ing last year.
Veranda Room
Happy Hour �
Fri. 4:30-7:00
Free Beef Ribs
& Tacos
Happy Hour every day!
4
Arbor Room
Restaurant
Special every
Sat. Night
A11 the prime rib
& burgundy wine
you can eat &
drink for only
$9.95
Both located at
The Ramada Inn � 264 By-Pass
-
CENTER MARCIA GIRVEN goes to the
hoop during one of the club's two wins over
arch-rival N.C. State last season. The first of
those Lady Buc victories broke States
64-game winning streak against in-state com-
petition.
GUARD LAURIE SIKES, the all
time Lady Pirate assist leader.
plaved a key role last year in direi
ting the ECU attack despite had
knee problems. She is now serving
Cathy Andruzzis assistant.
ROBEFO 1RUCE
100 VIRGIN
SHETLAND WOOL
$30
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BY NIKE, CONVERSE,
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BY BROWNING,
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& HERMAN SUVIVOR
HODGES
210 E. FIFTH ST.
752-4156
BOND'S
SPORTING
GOODS
218 ARl INC.TON Bl VI).
756-6001
FORWARD KATHV RILEY thrilled the
crowds with her sharp-shooting abilits
agressive pla. She is the school's fifth lei
scorer, despite plaing just two seasons.
Lady Pirate softball star. She is current!)
didate to win the coeted Broderick Awai

WE'RE HEAVEN
ION WHEELS!
E
Stude
EVERY TU
IS COLLEGE
with VALI
$1.0'
104 E. REDBAN
756-601





ECU Basketball 1981-82 December 1, 1981 15
GUARD LAURIE SIKES, the all-
time I ad Pirate assist leader,
plaed a ke role last year in direc-
ting the ECU attack despite bad
knee problems. She is now serving
C atrn ndruzis assistant.
FORWARD KATHY RILEY thrilled the ECU
crowds with her sharp-shooting ability and
agressive play. She is the school's fifth leading
scorer, despite playing just two seasons. Also a
Lady Pirate softball star. She is currently a can-
didate to win the coveted Broderick Award.
FORWARD HEIDI OWEN fill-
ed the role that each team must
have filled, the valuable reserve.
Owen always seemed to provide
the extra punch when it was need-
ed most.
GUARD LYDIA ROUNTREE was a three-year starter
until her senior year, yet still made the All-NCAIAW
team here last season thanks to her superb play off the
bench. During one nine-game stretch shot an amazing
68 percent. She is the Lady Pirates' third-leading all-
time scorer.
SKI
APPAREL
IY ASPEN, PACIFIC TRAIL
ZIP OUT SLEEVES
ALSO AVAILABLE
ARM-UPS
BY ADIDAS,
COURT CASUAL &
LOOMTOGS
HUNTING
BOOTS
BY BROWNING,
T1MBERLAND
& HERMAN SUVIVOR
BONDS
SPORTING
GOODS
3 K1 INGTONBI VD.
756-6001
xyxWxVxttW
Pm-Christmas Sale in Progress
Old Fashioned Fountain
Lemonade or Orangeade
Your Choice
250
ECU
Students
EVERY TUESDAY
IS COLLEGE NIGHT
with VALID I.D.
$1.00
104E.REDBANKSRD.
756-6000
All Ice Cream
200
per scoop
Hollowell's has been serving ECU students for over 50 years
in prescription service.
Sale runs Tues Dec. 1 -Fri Dec. 4
Fountain specials also good week of first two home games.
Good at Hollowell's 1 and 2 stores.
J�3 Qualify � Compemve Prices � Service
91 1 Dickinson Ave
752-7105
6th St. & Memorial Dr.
758-4104
i
�-v-





16
ECU Basketball 1981-82 December I, 1981
McLaurin Maintains His Spirit Despite Injury
?im
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
4tbiani sporu tdiior
's Saturday, November 28
� the opening night of the
season for the Pirates of East
Carolina � and senior co-
cap tian Mark McLaurin,
bothered by a severe disloca-
tion in one of his fingers, is set
to play.
The ECU Sports Medicine
department has outfitted the
Spingfieid, Mass native with
a splint and bandaging, but
the game officials come over
and look at his finger, saying
the point on the splint is too
sharp. To play, McLauren
would have to take the splint
off
There was just no way
responded coach Dave Odom.
So what does McLaurin do?
He sits on the bench and
cheers his teammates on.
"If that had been me
Odom said, "I would have
been crushed, but Mark must
have the heart of a giant. He
was very active on the bench in
support of the rest of the
team, doing the job of a co-
captain. "
It's Monday, Nov. 30, and
McLaurin has just returned
from having the injury ex-
amined. He has torn ligaments
in his little finger, and his
hand will be in a cast for three
weeks.
He admitts he feels "just
terrible but quickly adds, "I
know people who are worse
off than I am, so I can't really
complain
That's McLauren.
The 6-7 forward is the only
ECU player that has been in a
Pirate uniform for four con-
secutive years. He is the last of
the Larry Gillman (former
ECU head coach) recruits,
which is something he says
that "doesn't even cross my
mind. I'm happy with
everybody right now. 1 haven't
had any conflicts with the
coaching staff or anyone.
"It's just like I was
recruited by Coach Odom
He played in the shadow of
Pirate stars Herb Gray and
Herb Krusen for two years,
but started all 26 games last
season and was selected as the
team's most valuable player.
He finished last season with
a 52 percent field goal ac-
curacy mark, having been
above 50 percent all three
years at East Carolina.
"I'm excited, definitely ex-
cited McLaurin says about
the 1981-82 season. "In my
opinion, this could be the best
team we've had since I've been
here.
"We've improved a lot with
the new players he con-
tinued. "We have team unity.
It's just a drastic change
As for goals, the parks and
More Power where
ft counts
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Greenville
recreation major says he
doesn't have any individual
ones. "The main thing is that
our team wins. If I had to
name one, it would probably
be to see East Carolina win big
� win the EC AC South and
go to some type of tourna-
ment.
"This is my last year � my
last chance
McLaurin says the high
point of his career came his
sophomore season when the
team went 16-11, but as far as
his own success, "I can't say
I've had any. But what I've
had, I'd have to give credit to
my parents. They're far away,
but we keep in touch. They've
picked me up and given me in-
spiration
A left-hander with a sure
eye for the basket, McLaurin
was second in assists last
season with 50, two behinder
team leader Charles Watkins.
His high school career was
very successful; he was
selected for all-city three years
and all-Western Massachusetts
for two.
McLaurin says he will pro-
bably return at the end of
December, and he'll do some
running to stay in shape. And
the times he will not be able to
play?
He'll be cheering his team-
maces on, "doing the job of a
co-captain
A Proud Moment
ECU senior Mark McLaurin is pictured accepting a
plaque following the 1979-80 Pirate season. The
team went 16-11 that year, a time that McLaurin
says is the highlight of his career thus far. Despite
an early injury he hopes to make this year even bet-
ter.
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An Intense
With the departure last year
Felton to other programs. h( I heua
Odom had to "recruit" new assistant
together during last week 's exhibitia
are (L-R): Tom Barn.se. DaviA
(kneeling), Don Carter (standing) am
right of Carter). (Photo By Gary Pc
Ebajrtrc
Tonight Chapter Ten pri
the All Campus Beer Ch
Tonight's competition
nity guys.
Don't forget the finals ol
gmg Contest - Tuesdaf
Wednesda
Ladies'
Thursday
50t Admi
50t Be
Friday Aft
End of Wee
3 to7
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For more
call 752





f spite Injury
sv-
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MBO
PUMP
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fured accepting a
Pirate season. The
time that Mel aurin
'� Despite
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ECU Basketball 1981-82
December 1. 1981
An Intense Staff
With the departure last year of Eddie Payne and George
Felt on to other programs, ECU head basketball coach Dave
Odom had lo "recruit" new assistants. This year's crew was
together during last week's exhibition with Australia They
are (I -R): Tom Barnse, David Pendergrat, Odom
(kneeling), Don Carter (standing) and Herb Krusen (seated to
right of Carter). (Photo By Gary Patterson)
SbapfrrX
5th & Cotanche
in Greenville
Tonight Chapter Ten presents Part 3 of
the All Campus Beer Chugging Contest.
Tonight's competition is between frater-
nity guys.
Don't forget the finals of the Beer Chug-
ging Contest - Tuesday, December 8.
Wednesday Night
Ladies' Night
Thursday �5050
50t Admission �
50t Beverage
Friday Afternoon
End of Week Party
3 to 7 �
all beverages 50t
Saturday Night
Nickel Night
For more info,
call 752 9745
ODU, JMU
Are Favored
Say Coaches
Old Dominion and lames
Madison arc Ihe overv helming
favorites 10 battle it out for (he
E "AC-South title this season,
say the league's coaches in a
poll conducted by I he East
C at olinian.
Each coach u;h asked to
rate one through six the other
six teams in the league, ex-
cluding Ins own. Six points
were awarded for each first-
plaee vote, five foi each
second-place vote, and so
forth.
James Madison finished
with fout first place votes and
34 points total. ()l)l was nisi
behind, receiving three first-
place voles and 33 points.
illiam and Mary was pick-
ed b the coaches 10 finish
third, garnering 21.5 points.
1 as! Carolina was picked lo
finish fourth, George Mason
fifth, Richmond sixth and
Navy seventh.
l m �iii�tt Nt-yum t iimIwii !�� n
1J r�l pl��r 1 Mtr in parrnilniv
I l"Cjl Pinl�
V 4 U
1 1. !1 Hi
W l.ir �
i I I w
V
is RkUm II
Morris Hargrove Dunks Against Australians
blount-harvey
v -





18
ECU Basketball 1981-81 December 1, 1981
Ex-Marine Watkins Still Excited
X
Pirate guard Charles
Watkins fires a jumper in
action from last season.
The 25-year-old former
Marine is the team's
leading returning scorer.
Advance Tickets
To Be Available
To ECU Students
Tickets to East Carolina
men's and women's basketball
home games will be available
to students in advance, the
athletic department announc-
ed this week.
Students will be able to pick
up tickets beginning three days
prior to a particular Pirate
game. Tickets will be available
both at Mendenhall Student
Center and Minges Coliseum,
as was the case during football
season. A valid ID and activity
card will be required before a
ticket can be obtained.
The early pick-up is b ing
provided to help students
avoid waiting in what could be
long, cold lines.
Students that do not pick up
tickets prior to the game will
have to pick up a ticket at the
outdoors ticket office at
Minges before each game.
In the past students were
allowed to enter a game merely
by showing their ID and activi-
ty cards at the door. The new
ticket system has been
employed for a two-fold pur-
pose, say athletic department
officials.
First, it will provide a way
by which the department can
better market Minges Col-
iseum. Secondly, there will be
a halftime shoot-out at each
game. Ticket numbers will be
called out to determine the
participants.
The contest is being spon-
sored by Burger King. Prizes
reaching $100 will be
available.
Student seating will again be
located in the entire south sec-
tion and in both sets of end-
rone bleachers.
B CHARIKSCHAND1 KR
sp�ir1 I ilii
On a basketball team thai
finished with a 12-14 record,
one pubably would be hard-
pressed to find a "story" of
human interest.
Such was not the case on tin-
East Carolina team last year,
though. The Pirates finished
two games below the .500
mark, but that was no fault of
the man who came from a
man's world to play a bos'
game, and played it with the
enthusiasm of a young teen.
It all began last December
when then-24-year-old Charles
Watkins joined the Pirates
after a four-year stint in the
U.S. Marine Corps. It was the
New Orleans native's first
taste of college basketball.
It was not his first taste of
college, however. He attended
Louisiana Tech for just over a
year before joining the
Marines. Once there, he
played on the Marine Corps
varsity team, going on to
average 19 points in his last
season with the squad. The
next basketball he would play
would be on the intercollegiate
level.
Watkins spoke with excite-
ment last season whenever he
talked about playing with the
Pirates. He showed it on the
court as well, leading the team
with a 12.8 average and scor-
ing in double figures in 15 of
the 19 games in which he
played. The sophomore was
rewarded for his efforts by
receiving honorable mention
status to the All-Southern In-
dependent team.
Watkins' signing with the
Pirates was not brought about
after one of your traditional
go-visit-the-recruit routines.
During most of 1980 he was
stationed in nearby Cherry
Point. He often came to
Greenville to visit his fiance,
who was an ECU student.
During the summer he
sometimes played on
weekends in Memorial gym
with a number of Pirate
players.
Odom saw Watkins in
Memorial a number of times
and, to say the least, liked
what he saw. The two talked
on several occasions until,
finally, Watkins was signed to
a grant-in-aid.
Privately, Odom and his
assistants spoke excitedly
about Watkins' talents. But to
most Pirate followers the
former Marine was an
unknown.
The 6-3 guard burst from
obscurity in a hurry, though.
Soon the ECU fans had
adopted him as one of their
real favorites, taking a likine
1
Sweaters that
make
the man.
�teinie'a
to his aggressive slam dunks,
outside shooting and his
overall enthusiasm for what he
was doing.
"I can't believe this is hap-
pening to me Watkins said a
month into his first Pirate
season. "This is something
I've always wanted to do. It's
like'a dream come true
Now that the initial impact
of college basketball has worn
off, has Watkins lost some of
the enthusiasm that was pre
sent last season?
"No way the 25-year-old
junior said bluntly. "The feel-
ing is still the same. Sometimes
I can't believe this is happen-
ing to me
Watkins says it means a
great deal to him that the stu-
dent body and Pirate follow-
ing appear to take a special lik-
ing for him.
"It's a great feeling he
said. "It's something I've
never experienced. When I'm
going to class I'm always stop-
ping to talk to people who
speak to me. That's something
I really enjoy, because I like
people
Perhaps Watkins gains a
large measure of his populari-
ty from his oft-seen slam
dunks. He often goes over a
defender to aggressively pui
the ball in the hoop. Watkins
sas dunking is both fun and
important for him.
"I love to dunk he said.
"One reason is that it excites
the crowd. Another is that it
lets out a lot of my mnei
frustration. When I'm getting
ready to dunk all I'm doing is
concentrating on killing that
rim
The 1981-82 season is going
to one of change for Watkins
from his sophomore season.
The reason is the return of
Tony Byles to the point guard
position.
A natural swingman,
Watkins was called upon to
lend his maturity to the point
guard position last year. With
Byles on hand this year,
Watkins is freed to eturn
"home" to the number two
guard position.
"I feel a lot more comfor-
table at two Watkins said.
"It is what I'm used to play
ing. The thing I like most
about it is the fact that 1 will
be able t� take off on the fast
breaks and hopefully get sonic
easy layups
Watkins' opinion on how he
and his club will fare this ear�
"I really think we'll be a lot
belter lie said. "None of us
liked the losing record last
year and no we want to do
something about it
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Home Away From Home'
Cog gins Car Care
756-5244
320 West Greenville Blvd.
MEN'S SHOP
All In Co
Believe R
Continued from p. 10
Freshman �
pro ide hel
Vales averaged 25 �
8 9 rpg in i
i .
1 lini H
"On pa
we're pi
Han
like a 1
guys
played I i
"We're
yet. i
jell. V .
this year, �
vIlOW II! i ui
RICHMOND
Improvement i
by-word with the Spidei
sevet; ns. If tl
main the case replace
musi be fou Mike Pei
who led lasi year's 15-14 u
with a 22 B average la;
Gone along v. ith Pen
point guard 1) hi
o return
Also departing was
Lou Goetz, who cl ac
cept an impressive busn
ser rather than
coaching.
A Goet2 assistant last y
Dick Tarrani lakes ovei j
Spider head mentor. Ironical-
ly. Tarrani was (
coach in hi
Tarrani can cal
shooter John Schweitz I -
ppg last year) I t idership
AJso back is jui
Pehl (11 ppg, 1
Moving in tor V
point is talented Tom Bel
a transfer from Villani
Tarrani says
noi looking to repl;
��irreplaceable" Perry,
rather '� I to a ne
"A I
lasi ear wa based V
Tarrani said. "& e w
have a different -
proach now
I a; rani added
Spiders would Haw
conservative.
�� lot depends
he said. "It we ca -
tempo we c
anybody. I? not
disasterous
SAW
Head coach Paul Evans and
Ins Mids en rve the op-






ECU Basketball 1981-82 December 1, 1981 19
?
cited
urn
ioihei is that ii
of my innei
w hen I'm aeiiing
,11 rm doing is
;ne on killing thai
;on is going
m Waikins
season.
lsoi - ihe return ol
Byles to ihe point guard
swing m a n.
Wa . ailed upon 'o
. his maturity to the point
m tasi year. With
5 on hand this year,
Waikins is freed to return
ne" to the numbct two
- sinon
i feel a lot more comfor-
table al two Waikins said,
is what I'm used to play-
1 tic thing I like most
it is the fact that 1 vvill
ake off on the last
ind hopeful! get some
� layups
Waikins' opinion on how he
and his club will fare this year?
�1 really think we'll be a lot
better he said. "None o( us
. d the losing record last
id now we want lo do
net nine about it
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All In Conference
Believe Race Open
Continued from p. 10
Freshman Carlos Yates will
provide help in the backcourt.
Yates averaged 25.8 ppg and
8.9 rpg in earning All-America
accolades at Washington's
I 11til High School.
"On papei everyone's sav
we're preti gotxi said
Harrington. "Bui we're really
first-ycai team. Seven
guys on this team have nevei
played foi me.
��We're not a good team
vet. li will Jake lime for us to
jell. We might be improved
this year, but it might not
show m our won-losl record
RICHMOND
Improvement lias been the
by-word with the Spiders tor
several seasons. H that is to re-
main the case replacements
must be found foi Mike Perry.
who led las! sear's 15-14 learn
with a 22.8 average last vear.
Cone along with Perry is
point guard Doug Mills, who
chose nol to return lo school.
Also departing was head coach
I ou Goetz, who chose to ac-
cept an impressive business ot-
ter rather than return to
coaching.
A Goet2 assistant last year.
Dick I arrant, lakes over as
Spider head mentor. Ironical-
ly, Tarrant was Goetz' head
coach in high school.
1 arrant can call on sharp-
shooier John Schweii (18.7
ppg last vear) for leadership.
Also back is junior center Jeff
Pehl (11 ppg. 7.3 rpgl.
Moving in for Mills at the
pom; is talented Tom Bethea,
a transfer from Villanova.
Tarrant says the Spiders are
not looking to replace the
"irreplaceable" Perry, but
rather to adapt to a new style.
"A lot o our philosophy
lasi vear was based on Mike
Tarrant said. "We will have to
have a different kind of ap-
proach now
Tarrant added that the
Spiders would have to be more
conservative.
"A lot depends on tempo
he said. "If we can set a slow
tempo we can play with
anybody. If not it could be
disastrous
port unity to do something that
manv teams never get lo do �-
make up for past mistakes.
A long list of veterans
returns from last season's 9-16
team which had a lowly 43.3
field goal percentage.
Ihe team's lop two scorers,
guards Dave Brooks (10.8
ppg) and Rob Romanic (10.4
ppg), are back. Highly-touted
freshman Sly Mata is expected
lo challenge the pan foi play
ing time.
One of Evans' mam objec-
tives for the coining season is
increased productivity from
the frontcourt. The leadei
among Ihe big men is 6-7
sophomore t or w ard-ce n t er
Carv Price, who led the team
with a 4 rebounding average
last veat.
Evans savs his team is a
definite underdog in Ihe
IC AC -South, adding thai
Navv would like lo jell in time
for the post-season tourna-
ment.
"li would be nice to upset
some of the better teams in the
conference he said. "But the
tournament is important fo us.
At that time of the year it ju
depends on who wants lo play.
We'd like lo strive lo he at our
peak at that lime
A pair of
ECAC-South
players graced a
full page in
Street and
Smith's pre-
season basket-
ball magazine.
James Madison
guard Charles
Fisher, at
center, and
George Mason
center
Gaddy,
box, got the at-
tention. In the
right box is
another 1981-82
ECU foe, UNC-
Wilmington's
Shawn
Williams.
Andre
in left
. (GOLDEN
NAVY
Head coach Paul Evans and
his Midshipmen have the op-
Tues Crazy Tuesday
Wed Hump Nite
Thurs College Nite
Fri "End of Week
Party"
Sat "Best in Dance
Music"
Sun "Ladies' Nite"
758-4591
417 Cotanche St. (Downtown)
StUcCoy Wide
omi tiue, uxZ&
AAorehead City
Greenville
v v










Title
The East Carolinian, November 25, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 25, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.96
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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