The East Carolinian, November 20, 1980






Sfte iEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
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Sherrod Explains
VAF Bill Veto
By RICHARD GREEN
(.rnrm! Munigtr
The presidential veto of an
$11,150 Visual Arts Forum (VAF)
bill was not based on the percentage
o( students served compared to the
bill's percentage o the SGA budget,
according to SGA President Charlie
Sherrod. He added that the
legislature's failure to override the
veto Monday was not based on
percentage either.
"Mv decision was based solely on
the amount of the request Sher-
rod said vesterday. 'it jusi didn't
jive with the needs of the other
groups
The SGA approved an $11,150
budget for the VAF last week in a
close vote, but Sherrod vetoed the
bill because it "would have taken 19
percent o the total SGA budget that
has to suffice until July 1, 1981
The proposed VAF budget
represents 19 percent of $59,150, the
total amount available for ap-
propriation after deducting a
so.iKX) contingency fund and the
$12,850 executive budget.
In an editorial on Tuesday, Nov.
18, 1 he East Carolinian questioned
the reasoning for the veto.
"Nobody looked at it on a
percentage basis, said Sherrod.
"That's asinine
The newspaper also wanted to
know if the Drama and Music
budgets would have passed on a
percentage basis. The ECU School
ot Music received approximately
nine percent of the adjusted SGA
budget, and the ECU Playhouse got
about 17 percent.
When asked why the Playhouse
budget passed and the VAF bill did
not, Sherrod replied, "1 haven't
signed that bill (Playhouse) yet
Sherrod maintains that the annual
problems with a lack of funds are
the combination of an inexperienced
legislature and the first-come, first-
serve procedure of appropriations.
Other schools utilize a "unified
budget" in which all requests are
submitted at the same time, he said.
According to Eaura Jackson,
secretary cf VAF, "It looked to
me like they were afraid to spend the
fust dollar
'We needed the money from the
outset for programs in the arts
which would extend through both
VAF Meets
Following a meeting of the
Visual Arts Forum Wednesday
in Jenkins Fine Art Center,
Cindy Efird, and Laura
Jackson of the VAF com-
mented on the recent decisions
by the SGA concerning the art
group.
"For visual artists to remain
fresh, we have to continuously
be receiving new ideas,
because it is the nature o' our
work to be original. It is hard
to be original when you have
only your own resources. To
bring in new techniques, new
insights in contemporary art,
we need to have contemporary
speakers Jackson said.
"They give us individual at-
tention and give us invaluable
inspiration for our own
work Efird said.
"It was a young legislature,
inexperienced said Cindy
Efird o the VAF. "They ask-
ed us the same questions the
appropriations committee had
just asked us. However, the
figures were right before them
on a blackboard she added.
"Now everything is crowded
into Spring semester because
the money is not forthcomm-
ing Efird said.
Fall and Spring semesters Jackson
said.
"Now everything is crowded into
Spring semester because the money
is not forthcoming she added.
"The legislature is the ap-
propriating arm, but 1 have to look
at the overall perspective Sherrod
said.
The legislature has passed bills
that, when totaled, exceed the
amount the SGA has to give. Accor-
ding to Sherrod, that can force par-
tial spending of the $30,000 con-
tingency fund, which Sherrod says
should be maintained for its original
purpose � emergencies.
"Something has to be done in the
future about the first-come, first-
serve appropriations Sherrod
said. Under the present system,
some of the organizations will get
shortchanged, he added.
Health Careers
sity's Health-related curricu
arious health and medical it
Annual Health Careers Day was sponsored in part hy the ECU placement service
Photo By Jon Jordon
Students from East Carolina University's Health-related currieulums assembled recentl in the Nursing Buildiny
to speak with representatives from various health and medical institutions from across the Noutheast.
The
Media Board Decides To Appoint
Acting General Manager For Newspaper;
Approves Transmitter For Radio Station
By PAUL COLLINS
w. Sews Y dilor
The Media Board decided in its
meeting Wednesday Afternoon to
name an acting general manager of
The East Carolinian for the month
o December.
Richard Green, the current
general manager, submitted his let-
ter of resignation to the Board on
Nov. 12, saying he would finish out
the month.
The Board will name the acting
general manager based upon a
recommendation from Green. In his
letter of resignation. Green recom-
mended that Chris Lichok, the East
Carolinian business manager, be
named Ms successor. Green has in-
dicated .iat he would also support
Lichok as acting general manager.
At the meeting, the Board decided
to accept applications for the per-
manent position o general manager
until Dec. 3. All members of the
Board will consider the candidates'
credentials, and a final decision will
be made at the Board's next meeting
on Dec. 10.
Green said, "A temporary solu-
tion would be fine with me. 1 want
the best possible selection to be
made
There have been reports that
Green resigned because o irrecon-
cilable disputes with the Media
Board.
According to Green, though,
these reports are not true. "1 don't
know where all these people got the
idea that I'm leaving because I'm
dissatisfied or mad. I'm leaving
because 1 graduate in December.
I'm resigning on No 50 because I
have reached the limit ot money 1
can make on financial aid
However, Green did not deny
having had differences with the
Board. "1 did tell David Creech
(Media Board president) thai 1 was
tired of fighting with them, but
they're probably tired ol fighting
with me. too. Bui. you know, it isn't
easy having an adversary relation-
ship with your employer. I don't
think there are any hard feelings
though
Creech was noi available lor com-
ment.
In otber business, the Hoard ap
proved the purchase ol a micro
transmittor for WZMB. Discussion
of the radio station's status in-
dicated that it was not likeiv to go
on the air before late summer or ear-
ly fall of 1981.
Public Health Education
Public Health Services Increase Across Rural North Carolina
I ess than 10 years ago Eastern
North Carolina had virtually no
public health educators to serve the
population of its vast rural area, its
many small towns and crossroads
communities.
That a need existed was recogniz-
ed by experts, but there were no
bachelor's degree�entry
level�health education profes-
sionals at work in the region and no
formal academic program existed to
provide them.
Todav there are more than 80
professionally trained educators
working in dozens of local com-
munity health departments, small
hospitals and rural health centers,
organizing efforts to promote
healthy bodies, healthy minds and
healthy environments.
They are working where a decade
ago such programs did not exist at
the local level�in such places as
Aurora and Tarboro, Swanquarter
and Snow Hill, N.C serving
farmers and fishermen, blacks and
migrants.
Two thirds of these health
educators are entry level profes-
sionals and most are East Carolina
University graduates�products of a
bachelor's degree program in
School and Community Health
Education which has become the
first of its kind in the nation to
receive curriculum approval by the
Societv for Public Health Education
(SOPHE).
Dr. Robert H. Maier, Vice
Chancellor-Academic Affairs, said
the success of the curriculum "is
another indication of the confidence
expressed in a significant East
Carolina University academic pro-
gram. It is also another sign that the
university's academic programs are
in the vanguard of American higher
education
Approval of the degree cur-
riculum by SOPHE marks a "major
milestone" for ECU's large and
rapidly growing School of Allied
Health and Social Professions, says
the dean, Dr. Ron Thiele.
The program, Thiele says, "is a
major achievement in providing en-
try level professionals where they
previously did not exist in Eastern
North Carolina
"Our graduates have filled what
was a virtual vacuum in public
health education and in patient
education says Professor William
Byrd who was instrumental in
designing the community health
program and obtaining initial fun-
ding.
The program involves in inter-
disciplinary effort by the Depart-
ment ol Community Health,
chaired by Professor Don Dancy.
and the Department of Health,
Physical Education, Recreation and
Safety chaired by Dr. Ray Martinez.
Byrd interprets curriculum ap-
proval by SOPHE as showing that
the faculty and students "have
demonstrated the need, the role and
effective utilization o' entry and
graduate level health educators" in
regions such as rural Eastern North
See ECU, Page 3.
Auditor's Office Orders
State To Reduce Money
Spent Bussing Students
RALEIGH, N.C. (UPI) - The
state should stop giving what
amounts to a "blank check" to
school systems by exercising more
control on how the schools spend
money for busing, the state
Auditor's Department has recom-
mended.
The state gives school systems
most of the money they need to
transport an estimated three-quarter
of a million pupils to school every
da v. But the systems called Local
Education Agencies in the audit are
responsible for managing and
operating the systems.
"If expenses exceed the funds
allocated, the LEA simply requests
additional funds from the state to
keep the buses running said the
audit, which UPI received Wednes-
day.
"In effect, the local units have no
incentive to operate efficiently
because they have a 'blank check' to
spent whatever is needed to opeate
their system as they consider
necessary the audit said.
The state traditionally has avoid-
ed putting controls on local school
busing systems because geography.
student population and other fac-
tors make each system's situation
different, the audit said.
But management decisions also
can affect the cost of moving
students, the audit claimed. For ex-
ample, Northhampton County uses
16 quarts of oil per vehicle while
Burke County uses 65. Moun-
tainous Mitchell County uses just
two quarts of anti-freeze per bus
while coastal Hertford County uses
eight. And the per-mile cost for tires
in Gaston County is nearly five
times as great as in Gates County.
The auditors recommended two
changes. One would be to require
that systems use their own funds for
bus transportation if they exceed the
state's allocation. The problem is
that it is difficult to develop a fair
and equitable formula for dividing
the state money, the audit said.
The other change would put the
state in charge approving or man-
dating certain transportation ac-
tivities, such as where routes and
stops would be and when buses
would undergo maintenance.
New Law Increases
Benefits To Veterans
Fall Scene
The cool, crisp days of Autumn have setttled over the campus at East
Carolina University, filling the air with an exhillerating freshness.
Bigger checks for North Carolina
veterans training under the GI BUI
was one of the provisions of a law to
increase veterans benefits signed by
the President on October 17, accor-
ding to Veterans Administration
Regional Director, Kenneth E.
McDonald.
A 10 percent increase in educa-
tional allowances was made possible
by the "Veterans Rehabilitation and
Education Amendments of 1980
Education checks due November 1
for veteran-students and dependents
in training will include a five percent
boost. The balance of the 10 percent
hike will be reflected in checks due
February 1, McDonald said. Pay-
ment for training taken after
January 1 will include the full 10
percent increase.
Single veterans who are full-time
students will receive a November
check of S327�$16 more than the
October check. Beginning February
1981, these students will get S342, or
a boost of $31 over their October
checks.
The legislation also calls for ma-
jor improvements in VA's voca-
tional rehabilitation program for
service connected disabled veterans
which include a 17 percent increase
in monthly allowance in the
November checks of approximately
11,000 trainees and increased job
counseling and placement pro
cedures.
The new law also increased V
tutorial assistance payments bv 10
percent and changed the amount
VA can pay under correspondence
or flight training for students who
enroll in these programs after
September 1, 1980.
For them, VA can pav "0 percent
of the total charges for cor
respondence training or 60 percent
of those for flight training. Lhese
changes in rate of payment are ef-
fective October 1.
On The Inside
Announcements
Editorials 4
Classifieds8
Letters4
Features
Sports 9





THl; LAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 20, 1980
Announcements
GENERAL MANAGER
Applications are now being ac
cepted tor General Manager of
The East Carolinian Position will
be available as of Dec I Apphca
ticns may be picked up in the
Media Board Off ce m the Pubhca
tions Center
BLACK UNITY
Isl annual Black Unity and
Awareness Benetii will be held on
ttv 25th ot Nov 1980 t the Flam
'� : � �' 6 30 0 m The
Ben � . ��. d Dy the
D!u � � '�� md sororities as
well as SOULS and the PPHA
Proceeds will qo to black Irater
nitiet � orities and United
�NAACP
HEALTH CARE
N or 11
dina's Educational Loan Pro
. ��� �' to help yhou
Is The- Educa
Pi � ��� pi .
� � � nto
"� . �' � � iated
IS dentistry,
� � � �' . physical
.i dental hyg �
pharmacy nutrition and several
inoe from tSOO to
S6.000 pt � . � ndividual
� � uiar field
ins are repaid
practice m medi
ireas ot North
� It you are in
. am and owuic
like an api � ket, contact
" I E . . �' ll I Mn Program,
� Services, N.C
� Human Resources,
Rali '605,
SPRING BREAK TRIP
The Student Union Travel Com
mittee has planned two trips dur
mg Spring Break March 6 15th
One is to Fort Lauderdale. Florida
and the other is a Ft Lauder
dale Bahamas Cruise Prices in
elude transportation, hotel accom
modations, and the cruise For
more information go by
Mendenhall Central Ticket Office
or call 757 6411 Ft Lauderdale
Florida trip Quad hotel
room $219 00, Double hotel
'com $309 00 Ft Lauder
dale'Bahamas Cruise Quad
hotel room 8. quad cabin $499 00,
Double hotel room & quad
cabin $549 00
ECUSURFCLUB
There will be a meeting on
Thursday. November 20th in
Room 248 Mendenhall at 7 00
Plans for the upcoming contest in
Wrightsville Beach will be discus
ed Members are urged to atend
Ail are welcome
UNITY BUS
SAVE ENERGY - Ride the
bus Bus schedule for Black Unity
Dance leaving Mendenhall Stu
dent Center the 25th of November
at 6.00 p m , 8 00 p m , and 10 00
p m
AKA
V
I � � ,v 111 be
N.C.S.L.
The North Carolina Student
Legislature will meet in
Mendenhall Student Center this
Thursday at 7 00 p m in Room
221 ThereisalC this weekend in
Charlotte. NC We need as many ot
the members as possible to go to
this very important conference
Remember v�e want the Jan l C
� . held here at ECU AH
ei bet �� � sti � i to at

'PMA
BIBLE
Religious tradition says that
� on I" Fri
� � �' � Eastei Sunday
he Bi BlE says il took place over
days and 3 niahts is there a
� mswi Leai n "� truth
�� � V � � 1
. � .� �� � ��
n 24 , at 7 30
EPSILON PITAU
Epsilon Pi Tau will have a
Business Meeting Monday
November 24th at 4 00 pm m
Flanagan 102 All members should
make plans to attend We will be
voting on the new initates and will
need to make plans for upcoming
m.tiation program See you at the
meeting EPT fecorder For
more information call 757 6018
uu
Sunday, Nov 23rd, the
Unitarian Universahsts of Green
ville, meeting at Planters National
Bank, 3rd and Washington, will
have Father Phil Walsh as
speaker 11 AM brunch 12 AM
session begins Topic Proclama
tion of the K ingdom and Passion of
Jesus Christ.
GUEST SPEAKER
Dr Thomas M Harris of
Vanderbilt University, Nashville,
Tennessee will present a seminar
on "Biomimetic Syntheses Of
Phenolic Natural Products Fri
day, November 21 at 2 00 P M in
Room 201 Flanagan Building
Refreshments will be served ir the
Conference Room following the
seminar
CORSO
There will be a CORSO meeting
Monday Nov 24. at 5 p.m in
Mendenhall. rm 247 Everyone is
encouraged to come and bring
items for our needy family
BAHAMAS CRUISE
Enter the world of rum and sun
shine, take a beautiful trip to the
Bahamas, March 6 15th The Stu
dent Union Travel Committee has
already planned your Spring
Break for you so make your reser
vations now at Mendenhall Cen
tral Ticket Office Quad Hotel
Room and Cabin $499 00 Dou
ble Hotel Room quad Cabin
$549 00
S.U. TRAVEL
Plan now to enioy to luxurious
springtime trip to Fort Lauder
dale. Florida and'or on a
Bahamas " � � � You � �rt
froi .��� � . on March 6 anc
return to Greenville on Mrch
15th Just think. 10 days and 7
H'qhts of springtme pleasure For
informa- call
; N H A L L CENTi
CKET OFF ICE AT 757 6611
TURKEY SHOOT
Tonight is the night for the MSC
Turkey Shoot! You can win your
Thanksgiving turkey at the
Mendenhall Bowling Center
tonight between the hours of 7 00
PM and 10 00 PM An entry fee of
$2 00 will allow you to bowl one (1)
ball at a full set of pins on ten (10)
consecutive lanes If you can
knock down at least eight (8) pins
on iust nine (9) of those lanes, you
WIN A TURKEY! (Limit one (1)
turkey per person) You may
enter as many times as you like so
give it a try You may be a winner1
CAPSGOWNS
Caps and gowns for first
semester graduates will be
delivered Nov 18 20 in the Student
Supply Store The gowns are yours
to keep providing the $10 00
graduation fee has been paid For
those receiving the Masters
Degree the $10 graduation fee
pays for your cap and gown, but
there is an S11.25 fee for your hood
Any questions should be referred
to Student Supply Store m Wright
Annex
COFFEEHOUSE
The Coffeehouse Committee will
meet on Friday, Novembe 21, at
2 00 p.m in Room 238 of
Mendenhall Student Center All
members are urged to attend
CRAFTSCENTER
Instructors are needed to teach
several short term begmmg level
workshops or courses for the
Crafts Center at Mendenhall Stu
dent Center The areas for which
instructors are needed are
darkroom techniques, jewelry and
silkscreen Graduate or fourth
year art students, or anyone who
has sufficient knowledge to teach
a course m any of the areas men
tioned. may contact Tana Nobles,
Crafts and Recreation Director at
Mendenhall 757 6611
STUDENT RECITAL
Sabrma Coieman, senior m the
School of Music, will present a
recital of piano music Friday,
November 21 1980 at 9 00 p m in
A J Fletcher Recital Hall Ms
Coieman will perform Robert
Schumann's "Waldsrenen. Opus
82, Beethoven s "Sonata in G Ma
ior Opus 79, and Bela Bartok's
Six Dances m B u I q a '
Rhythm A native ot Burlington
N C , Miss Coieman is a candidate
for the Bachelor of Music degree
in Music Therapy She pre'� '
the rec ital in pat' � I ������ �

� student ol Di Pa
Judge Turns Down
Hijacker's Request
GRI I N S BOKO,
N.C. (I PI) � U.S.
Districi Judge Eugene
Goi : Wednesda
denied a motion b ac-
cused hijacker Samuel
len Ingram Jr. that
. i against him be
ipped b e c a u s e
leral court in North
ina lias no
jurisdiction in the case.
Ingram, who prefers
to be called lshmav.il
Siraj, is charged with
hijacking a New York-
bound Delta airliner
over Greensboro Jan.
25 and forcing the crew
fly to Cuba.
Ingra m, wearing
sunglasses in court and
carrying a copy of the
Koran, is defending
himself alter saying he
did not want to be
represented b Ray-
The
East
Carolinian
ARMY NAVY STORE
AackMCht. �-�. Aemner. A
A RteM. Deck, Flight. Snorkel �
; Jackets, Aeacaats, Parkas
SMoet. Combat Aoott, Plui. A
1 Ml S.Evans Streat �

mond Alexander, a
former Guiiford Coun-
ty district attorney who
was appointed his
defense attorney last
month.
G ord o n ordered
Alexander to remain in
the courtroom to be
available to consult
with Ingram, w h o
refers to Alexander as
his "legal assistant
Ingram has attemp-
ted to show the plane
was not over
Greensboro when it
was hijacked.
Capt. Donald L.
Vickers testified earlier
this week that both
navigational instru-
ment readings and
visual sightings in-
dicated the plane was
FAST, EFFECTIVE
INEXPENSIVE
CLASSIFIEDS
PRINT AUCTION
A variety of handmade prints by
faculty and student artists in the
East Carolina University Print
Group will be sold at the organiza
tion's Fifth Annual Print Auction
Sunday, Nov 23 The auction will
be held m the auditorium of the
Leo Jenkins Fine Arts Center from
7 until 9 p.m All items offered for
sale may be viewed in the
auditorium lobby beginning at 2
p.m The prints will include in
taghos, lithographs woodcuts
serigraphs, colagraphs and
possibly bechromate prints or
molded paper pnnts Funds raised
by the ECU Print Group through
its annual auction are used for im
provement of the ECU School of
Arts studio areas
TUTORS
EARN $4 hr or more Send
Qualifications and experience via
Campus Mail to Athletic
Academic Coordinator Mmges
Colesium. ECU, or call X 6282 to
schedule an interview
SKISNOWSHOE
All participants mus' pay their
final payment on Thursday
November 20 Meet 4 00 Memorial
Gym, Room 108
CERAMICSGUILD
The seventh annual East
Carolina University Ceramics
Guild Sale will be held Dec 3 4 in
ECU'S Wright Auditorium on the
main campus Ceramic items
crafted by students in the ECU
School of Art will be shown for sal
to the public each day from 9am
until 7 p m
NURSING
Dr Dorothea Orcm, nationally
recognized theorist and consultan'
m the field of nursing, wil be
featured speaker at a Nov 21 pro
gram sponsored by the Eas'
Carolina University School of Nur
smg's professional development
committee Her topic is "Concept
Formalizat.on in Nursing anc tt �
Self Care Model The seminal
will be in the Carol BeiK
Auditorium from 9am until 4 30
p m The seminar is open not only
to ECU School of Nursing students
and faculty members but also to
practitioner ana administrators
in the field of .ursmq and other in
terested persons Continued
education unit credits are
available upon application Fur
ther information is available from
Ahad at the ECU School of Nurs
irlfl, telephone 757 6061
MOUNT ST. HELENS
Dr Richard Spruill. ECU
Department of Geology, will .
a presentation on The Erupt
of Mount St Helens at the
Beta Phi meeting, Thursday
November 20. m Biology N 102 a-
7 00pm All interested peooi'
invited to attend
X
Hilton
Raleigh
presents
FOOTBALL
WEEKEND
Room for Two Shows in the Underground
Continental Breakfast for Two
ECU vs NCSU
$29.95 � Tax (with this Coupon)
1707 Hillsborough St. Raleigh N.C. 27605
(919)828 0811
Nov. 22,
1980
E
M'
ECU LAW SOCIETY For Students Who Want To Do Better
The ECU Law Sooet a tM
having a meeting this Ti-ursday
nigh' Novemoer 20th to oe held in
Brewster B room 303 at 6 30 p rn
This meeting will focus on the
LSAT. and a panel has Dec � -
ed to provide information
formally discuss the test Dr
Smith from the Counseling Center
will offer jnsighl on preparnu tot
and taking the LSAT and other
speakers will also be pres-
members are urged to attend Th'S
meeting should be of particular .n
terest to any student taking the
LSAT on December 6th
! HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR GRADES
I
I
I
I
I
I
Four Classes: Dec. 1,2,8,9. 7-9pm
j Limited Enrollment Call 756-5128 Evenings
a new 2-hour class from S.E.E.
.do better on your tests
.make better use of your time
.plan for the grade you want
EXPERT STYLING
FOR BOTH MEN
AND WOMEN
BY APPOINTMENT
ONLY
SHIRLEY'S
KUT & STYLE
301 EVANS ST. MALL
iMlNGLS BLD. SU1TL
206
752-1855

Atom ION IP TO
1J1K Wtlk Of
PRIONANCY
$ 76 00 "all Inclwdvt'
pr�9nancy tait. btrtf con
VI T trot, and problem pragnan cy counseling For fvrmar Infortnation call 132 0SJS
Hb, i to" ' trtt numhir the 221 2S�! bttwaen t
AMI PM waakdayt
Kalafffti MnkaTl
Health Orfan!iaien
mwatfMart�tt.
laMtefci m r �"r"
60's Rock Bash
Sunday, Nov. 23
Grernville.N.C.
CRUIS�O�MATIC
Prizes Prizes Prizes Prizes Prizes
DANCE CONTEST - When did you last I
ALLIGATOR TWIST MASHED POTATOES
BEST COSTUME - Dress for the 60's
Prizes Prizes Prizes Prizes Prizes
Doors Open At 8 p.m.
HEAR THAT 60S MUSIC Lou.e Louie. Do
Wa Diddv Didciv Devi A tf The B � Dress,
Good Goll v v - . CC Ridet A
r Of Tl
' � " � �� � " � � ' Lei Tv ��
over Greensboro when
a man told flight atten-
dants he had plaeed a
bomb on the plane.
He also identified In-
gram has the man who
hijacked the plane,
which had 65
passengers.
The hijacker alleged-
ly passed a note to
Cuban authorities
stating he wanted
several million dollars
in gold to be sent to the
government of Iran.
Ingram showed up at
an FBI office in New
York Aug. 20.
Authorities say they
still do not know how
he returned to this
country.
If convicted, Ingram
could receive 20 years
to life in prison.
ALPHA attic
SIGMA
PHI
Presents
4
&


&
GOLD & SILVER
PRICES ARE UP!
El
at the
ATTIC
FRIDAY NOVEMBER 21st
3:30-7:00
AFTERNOON DELIGHT
25$ Admission Beverages 55$
S A AD'S SHOE
REPAIR
1 I Liianaf Ave.
758-1228
Quaiih Repair
If you need money for fall clothes or football tickets, now Is a
good time to sell your gold and sliver valuables. And here's a
good way to get EXTRA CASH!
SELL YOUR
CLASS RINGS
TO COIN & RING MAN!
$
FOSDICK'S
FIGHTS INFLATION!
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ECU Program
Meets Goal
Continued from Paye 1.
"In these times ol tighi budgets and demand
lumabilit m highei education,
e are delighted thai we have met the goal. We
are d ol 'Ins progress Dane)
v-) pei cent ol more
100 School t IIied
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lo worl ive in I astern North

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school
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The Official ECU Class
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Cut Class
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Hunger Coalition
Photo Bv Jon Jordon
Each year, the Greenville Hunger Coalition and the international agency,
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iroved
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? I
�tie last (Earolttuan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
1 l KK Hi RNDON, , Kioro) i
C IIKls 1 l( HOK, B� . Mornta
DWIli Si l KIN. , Mmw
Richard Green, gm !��
Lisa Drew, � &���
Miki Noon an. wme�m
Chari is Chandler. mM�
AMI V 1 M S I l R, Producim Wwiw
David Norris, amwuh
Novembei 20, 1980
Opinion
Page 4
Appropriations
System Blamed For Problems
Alter the veto of the Visual Arts
I orum budget was upheld. The East
Carolinian starting looking into the
reasons. From what was said at
Monday's meeting, one would've
thought (and we did) that a separate
type of reasoning was used to deter-
mine the V 1 budget. According to
SGA President Charlie Sherrod,
that wasn't the ease.
But we promised to print the
percentage ot the SGA budget for
each of the three arts, so here it is:
brought up the 19 percent figure,
and Dr. Laing the 6 percent figure.)
The VAF budget was defeated
only because $11,000 was too much
money for any organization, says
Sherrod. The Playhouse bill is only
$150 less, but it hasn't been signed
yet.
So what is the real problem here?
According to Sherrod, it's the pro-
cedure used for deciding appropria-
tions � first-come, first-served.
That means if your organization can
Dept.
Music
Drama
1
Vo of Student Body
2
1.5
6
�Io of Budget
9
17
19
! 50. � hich does nol m
cludt a $30,000 contingency fee and the S12.850 ex-
it mathematics will tell you
that the ECU Playhouse asked for
. � the VAF,
and the b( I School of Music asked
for about half that much. IF A
PERCEN1 GE METHOD WERE
I SE D, the Playhouse is getting four
nines as much as VAF, and Music
about one-and-a-half times as
much.
It is obvious thai a simple method
such as this cannot be used � there
are too many variables involved.
We're glad it wasn't, but those
figures never should've been men-
tioned at ihe meeting. (Sherrod
get heard first, there's a good
chance that you can get your budget
through. But if you're one of the
last to be heard (like VAF), be
prepared to tighten your belt.
The SGA should move swiftly to
change its appropriation system to
the 'unified budget" in which all
requests are submitted at the same
time. That's the way most student
governments do it. Why must we
continue to plod along in this ar-
chaic manner which only serves to
create the same problems every
year.
AND SOME FOR YOU, AND SOME
FOR yOUt AND NONE FOR YOU'
fojeer
r-Campus Forum
No Time For Playing Games
We attended the Nov. 17 meeting of
the Student Government. Approximate-
ly 100 art students also attended this
meeting. What was under discussion was
the Visual Arts Forum bill, which we
knew was being vetoed by Charlie Sher-
rod. We were showing our support and
interest for the bill. Apparently this was
not enough.
We pay student fees just like every
other student on campus, but we get no
direct return to our major. Mr. Sherrod
says to support us by all means, just as
long as we don't ask for too much
money. Quite frankly, we're asking for
the bare minimum now.
The SGA meetings are open to all
students. So, the art school attended
along with our Dean. We felt we were
not given the full courtesy of the
legislators attention. Particularly the
president who seemed to find it
necessary to giggle throughout the part
of the meeting concerning our bill. We
come to our SGA with a matter that is
vital to us, and we are made unwelcome
and given rude treatment by some
legislators.
But talk about nonsense, here are a
tew examples of the negative debate that
defeated our bill:
One legislator stood and said that she
had several friends who were art
students, but she couldn't stand in favor
of the bill.
Another legislator felt that since he
was putting himself through school, he
didn't feel that the SGA funds could be
used to subsidize art students' educa-
tion.
And finally, one legislator stood and
said she had a friend who was a design
student, who went on the New York
trip, and the friend couldn't believe ho
much the VAF was asking for.
What these arguments have to do with
overriding Charlie Sherrod's veto on the
VAF bill is beyond us.
We know of no art student whose
education is being subsidized by VAF.
VAF provides speakers and workshops
to broaden our education.
We would say that the majority of
students on campus have a friend who is
an art student. This is not an argument,
simply a statement.
As for the legislator who knew one
person who felt that the bill asked for
too much, all she had to do was look
around and see 100 people who thought
it was a fair amount.
We were defeated by percentages and
figures. We were told we were asking for
19 percent of the SGA budget. This was
after subtracting their operating costs
and buffer. Even though we are the
fourth largest school in the University,
we are not entitled to our fair share ol
our fee money. For example, 800 art
students pay fees. Approximately one-
fourth of these fees go to SGA. This is
about $16,000. We are asking foi
$11,000. Surely we deserve that much.
SGA is wasting our time. We have
already used a semester fighting for
funds that are ours to begin with. We
don't have the time to plav SGA's little
power gameswe shouldn't have to
play them.
CYNTHIA BREWER
SANDRA MON HUH
Seniors, Interior Design
Number One Liar?
I am writing in regard to a letter writ-
ten by a Mr. Patrick O'Neill. In his letter
he states that we are the Numbei One
liar to the world
1 want to know in what way?
He also states that through hardiining
the Soviets, increasing the already insane
arms race and scraping the Salt II treat)
we are doing nothing to reduce world
tensions.
In what way did our non-interference
policy in the Soviet invasion of
Afghanistan help to reduce world ten-
sions? Are you suggesting that we dis-
band our nuclear weapons programs and
let the communists take over the world?
You also had the nerve to rundown
the ousting of the left-wing Democrats
from office. If you will recall, it was this
government which made us lost in the
world in self-respect for our nation.
Also recall what the man who was
elected to the presidency in 1976 did for
the past four years. Someone 1 greatly
admire said (after turning down an in-
vitation to the White House), "Y'all
shouldn't be mad at Jimmy. He hasn't
done anything True, he hasn't freed
the hostages, he hasn't stopped infla-
tion, and he hasn't brought about an ef-
fective settlement of the West Bank.
Now that I've got that burr from
under my saddle, if you are truly in-
terested in helping people, call me at
758-6936 (which you definitely won't).
I've got ar. idea I'd like to share with you
(which you probably wouldn't unders-
tand).
JOHN F. CADWEI I
Former 1(1 Student
U.S. Schizophrenia
c ongratulations on your issue oi
November 11. Your front page and
editorial page (including the Campus
forum) will become required reading tor
some ol inv classes. fo my everlasting
dismay, many students claim the)
"don't have time" to read newspapers
and magazines which are reflective ol
the current, real world around us. ln-
idible?
I hat single issue was like a biopsy
from the schizophrenic mind of
merica: Blacks and women have to sue
the State ol North Carolina to get a fair
shake for employment bv the Highway
Patrol; suicides may be the leading cause
vi death among teens; "low" alcohol
abuse at ECU; "cultural" problem
regarding the Media Board and the
1 edonia Wright Afro American
Cultural Center; alleged harrassmenl ol
reporters and a journalism professor.
Well, what's to worry about? This
university is going Hell-bent tor ex-
cellence and the nation just went hell-
bent for election of leadership to bring
us to "world superiority Rejoice and
be glad for the Promised I.and is in
sight! That is. unless you're female.
Black, critical of the power structure, or
whatever.
Excellence, superiority and other such
superlatives sound good. But they, like
beauty, can be only skin-deep. Integrity,
compassion and an abiding concern for
the dignity and rights ot individual
human beings are worthy goals, per-
sonally, and at all levels o academic and
national policy-making.
Some wonderful day we need a
"family reunion" to display to the
world that all Americans accept one
another, individual freedoms, dif-
ferences and all. That would go a long
way in the direction o accepting other
nations as members o the Human fami-
ly.
Keep up the uood work.
BILL BYRD
Pi ofessor,
C'ommunitv Health
Pencil
effort!
PI KM
To The Right
U. S. Human Rights Policy Is Difficult To Spell Out
U s RIDGLEY
( he word is floccinoc-
cinihilipillification and its best
working definition is "full of sound
and fury signifying nothing
Yes, it is a legitimate word in the
English language, albeit a contrived
one; and as far as anything can be
adequately described in one word,
that word describes perfectly this
country's human rights policy
towards the rest of the world.
The current Madrid Conference
involving European security is the
latest example of the human rights
lip-service this country has been
making for years. let's look in on
the conference and hear the latest:
First, the U.S. has accused the
U.S.S.R. of breaking every commit-
tment in the 1975 Helsinki accords
on detente. A U.S. official, talking
tough, said, "What we are going to
say will make our opening speech
seem mild
Griffin Bell, the leader of the
U.S. delegation, made that opening
speech, charging Moscow with
brutal repression in the Soviet
Union and "casting a dark cloud
over East-West relations" with its
invasion of Afghanistan. Specific
charges are the Soviets' failure to
honor pledges to reuinite families
and give free access to information.
But this is all tough talk�it
means nothing, and it will change
nothing. It merely continues the
substitution of rhetoric for policy
that is an outgrowth of the concept
of detente.
This emphasis on rhetoric and de-
emphasis of action was brought into
focus in the classroom last week.
The instructor asked if Ronald
Reagan would do more or less than
Jimmy Carter in the area of human
rights. It occurred to me that there
was no way that he could do less,
since Carter had done nothing;
however, he had said alot.
Though the memory fades, one
can still picture Carter addressing
the United Nations General
Assembly in hortatory voice on the
subject of human rights just four
years ago. But after irritating the
Russians, not to mention several
potential allies (most notably
Argentina), the President backed
off.
This is not to condemn
Carter�he at least made the at-
tempt to reconcile worthy ideals
with reality, bu. found it to be im-
practical. But what is wrong with
taking a non-hypocritical stance
with regard to what we say and what
we do? Specifically, 1 refer to
Poland.
Historically, this has been the
scenario repeated time after time in
that country: 1956�There appeared
to be a breach between Gomulka's
Polish regime and the Kremlin. The
country was in deep economic trou-
ble. "Many Westerners joyfully
proclaimed that Poland was pulling
away from Communism says
Senator Barry Goldwater. "Hoping
to hasten this movement, our
government began to
sendAmerican aid Goldwater
says this aid had two effects: It
helped the Gomulka government
deal with its economic problems and
moved Poland into an even closer
relationship with the Soviets.
So while criticizing Soviet oppres-
sion in that country and satellites
such as Poland, the U.S. folded at
the crucial moment and sent aid to
prop up the Polish economy for
another decade. Witness another
decade of railing against human
rights violations in the Soviet
sphere.
In 1980, we again have a crisis in
Poland in which 600,000 workers go
on strike in a country in which
rtevare supposed to own the means
of production. Again, the socialist
economic system threatens to col-
lapse under its own weight as the
people oppressed by that system
threaten to throw off the Soviet
yoke. The Russians, bogged down
in Afghanistan and troubled on the
Sino-Soviet border, are hard-
pressed to even consider putting
down the Poles. The proper
Western response?
If one is to believexhe rhetoric of
human rights, then one would at
least expect ome sort of vocal sup-
port for the Poles. But the well of
rhetoric dries up when it comes time
to take a stand on principle. One
student suggested that any en-
couragement of the Polish workers
under Lech Walesa would "give the
Russians an excuse" to march into
the country. Needless to point out
that the Soviets have shown they
don't need an excuse to march into a
country; but on a deeper level, if the
Poles are willing to take that chance
in a bid for freedom, who are we to
tell them they can't? More impor-
tantly, and tragically, who are we to
issue a clarion call for human rights,
then subsequently lend the Polish
government $670 million to keep its
economy afloat? Hypocrisy ad
nauseam.
In short, we have a situation in
which the U.S. piously calls for
respect of human rights in the com-
munist world. Then, after a decade
or so of economic stagnation and a
communist country nears the end of
its financial rope, proving the
bankruptcy of its system, the United
States props that country up for
another decade of human rights
rhetoric. One is reminded of
Heywood Broun's comment that
"Appeasers believe that if you keep
on throwing steaks to a ticr, the
tiger will turn into a vegetarian
If one thinks too long and hard
on this gulf between what we say
and what we do, it induces a deep
sadness�not a good feeling at all.
One begins to wonder if Somerset
Maugham was right when he said:
"You can't learn too soon that the
mos' useful thing about a principle
is that it can always be sacrificed to
expediency
Stan Ridgley is a senior Political
Science major with a degree in jour-
nalism from the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hilt.
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Features
I 1HI K 20 Pai
Periehi
efforts
IM-RIC
le and I'aquillo attempt lo arouse some appreeiation of their singing at the Inn of The three Cousins. I heir
arc applauded, hut the collection is slim. 1 his scene from The National Opera Company's production of I
HOLE, the tuneful Offenbach operetta.
School Of Music
Percussion Recital, Opera Planned
La Perichole, Offenbach's
delightful operetta about life and
love in old Peru, will come to life on
the stage of A.J. Fletcher Recital
Hall on Sun Nov. 23 at 8 p.m.
when the National Opera Company
brings us touring troupe of young
singers to the ECU campus.
I his ever-chanting classic has
been a favorite in the United States
since its first production in 1895
with Lillian Russell in the title role.
The present English version was
prepared by Mariece Valency for the
metropolitan Opera's spectacular
new production in 1956. The comic
romantic plot and the charming,
witty score made Fa Perichole an
immediate hit with a new generation
of opera lovers.
The operetta is based on the life
oi a real person, Mariquita Villegas,
whose debut in Lima in 1760 laun-
ched her as Peru's most famous
theatre personality. As the librettists
worked out the story. 1 a Perichole
and her friend Paquillo are street
singers in the city t 1 ima. I hey
love one another and long to be
married. However, they can raise
neither the price ol a marriage
license nor the price of a meal. Kr
does not pay in Peru But the
Viceroy does. Don Andres de
Ribeira is prowling about the city on
his birthday, incognito, when comes
upon the beautiful street singer and
falls in love with tier a! mice.
Without losing time, he offers to
take her first to supper and then to
his place. The girl does not hesitate.
She writes a letter to I'aquillo and
regretfully takes if in pursuit of
her destiny and her dinner I he rest
of the libretto works out the fate ol
these characters through vari
astonishing turns to the final happy
ending indispensable to ope
Percussion Recital
The 24-membei Pei us;
Ensemble ol the 1 asi arolina
School of music will perform a
vanetv of contemporary works in a
public concert Monday, Nov. 24 in
the Fletchei Musk center Recital
Hall.
I he ensemble is directed by
Harold Jones ol the ECU percus
sion faculty and graduate teaching
assistants Timothy Hale, and Mark
Shelton.
I heii program will include
" Vitiphon" by F. Michael C ombs.
N v- b I ou Harrison,
. Swords ol Moda I ing" by
ion Peters, Inventions on a
Motive" b Michaelolgrass, B
net arrangements ol "Peaches I i
Regalia Enchidnas Art" bv frank
Zap ; John Williams' "S
Wars Medley and 1. Combs1
"Salute to ruckers
A populai campus lization
which has performed at music con-
ventions throughout the I S. and at
other universities, the Percussion
mhie has appeared on recent
imunity arts programs in the
( arolinas, Virginia and Georgia.
Streamers: Potential Not Realized
Bv PVl I Oil INs
1
all
the
lple
d to
tlilnu!
�s the latest pro
the Fast Carol
is a play full
that never H'Cii:
uc-
of
"Stream
t i o n b v
Plav house,
possibilities
materialize.
David R .
1976 New York D
Award tor the best American play
he year, chronicles several davs
in the lives A Vietnam-era soldiers.
Inconsistent acting and a flawed
script are the production's mam
flaws. 1 rom the outset the audience
is introduced to a set of stereotyped
ers that plague the plav. I he
d by Donald Wagoner, is
t. an .r. hetypical horn
u ho touches everyone on the
del and
to take lots
showers.
Next we mee! Roger, the be
bopping blak boy played bv Keith
1 (iuillory. Eric I illey makes a
appearance as Martin the
cal soldier bent on getting
himself out ot the Army. Billy, the
young intellectual tortured bv his
identity, also makes his entrance.
Billy is played bv Scott Rodger.
Gregory Smith's Carlyle is the
fust siim of relief. Smith, portraying
a voting black soldier, is the first ac-
to deliver his lines in a natu
fluid manner.
Carlyle bursts into the barracks
shared by Roger, Richie and Billv in
search ot Roger. Not finding him
there, Carlyle storms out, but his
k ;s made.
In the next scene Wagoner,
Rodger and Guillory tall into the
"man" syndrome. I hey punctuate
each sentence two oi three times
with "man ostensibly to lend an
an of realism, rhe effect, however,
is to make the dialogue stilted and
unnatural.
Once again it is up to Smith to
vide relief. Carlyle returns to the
barracks and finds Roget alone ex-
amining the centerfold shot ot' a
white Playmate.
He pounds Roger tor gazing upon
"white puss and a discussion ot
being black and in the Army
ioiiows. Smith delivers his lines with
an off-the-cufl case thai convinces
the audience lie is in Carlyle's
words � just a "street nigger
In comparison. Guillory strains to
make Roger a credible character,
and iiotead comes of! as phoney
Yet even Carlyle is not free from
stereotyping. With lines like "It
ain't our war 'cause it ain't our
country Carlyle becomes the
Angry Black Man. He is as-
sessor of an inexplicable anger
that leaves the audience flounder-
ing. Ate we to assume that being
black is reason enough to be angry?
Herein lies ttie play's major flaw.
Issues such as racism, homosexuali-
ty and impersonality ate thrown at
the audience in quick succession, yet
none is given more than perfunctory
treatment. he typical platitudes are
Photo by GARY PATTERSON
Jimmie Walker Appears
Comedian Jimmie Walker, star of CBS-TV's Good Times, appeared at
Mendenhall's Hendrix Theatre on Tuesday night.
spewed forth, but no new light is sh-
ed on any of the subjects. Even a
climax designed foi heavy dramatic
impact cannot tie these themes
together.
Richie begins telling the story ot
how his fathei let! home when
Richie was very young. Wagoner
drops the whmev. affected tone he
had used throughout the first act.
His voice becomes natural, reflec-
tive, and tot once a scene is
rendered whollv believable.
It is Smith, though, who puts the
scene over the top. When he relates
the story of Carlyle's seldom-seen
father, Smith becomes the contused
little boy who does not know exactly
who his "daddy" is.
After this touching scene the
climax comes as a disappointment.
Set earning and overacting rule the
day, and the audience is pelted with
fashion that brings the first sense of
camaraderie to the play.
1 he overall acting improves con-
siderably in the opening scenes of
the second act when the players
seem to settle into their roles. One
scene in particular is a gem.
Richie, Carlyle. Billv and Ro
are all sitting in the barracks at
the latter three have spend a wild
evening on the town.
Along with Smith, John R
and William Tyson provide the
highlights of the tits! ac .
drunken sergeants the two ramble
about the stage in an extraordii
emotion after emotion
which ring true.
Robbms, as the ever-inebriated
Sergeant Cokes, saves the scene and
lie process steals the show.
His performance in the closing
I a erpiece
understatement that the other acl
would have been well advised to
follow. His quiet reflections upon
� nam, and hie
w the value of subtle ac
ay's saving
Burdened with heavy intentions,
"Streamers1 nevei takes off. I he
ai sub-
� to an ade-
Radical Abbie Hoffman Now Lectures
(CPS) Abbie Hoffman is a
very funny man. Nothing � six
years of being underground, terrible
psychological strain, or even the
sparse crowd that greeted him at the
University of Michigan stop on his
national college lecture tour �
seems to have changed that.
For example, he recalls the ex-
hausting obsessions of being a
fugitive: "You're always aware that
people are after you. You never
forgetexcept during orgasm
H offma n ou opportunity :
"Anyone can grow up and become
president unless you're Jewish,
Spanish, poor, black, a woman, or
from New Jersey
On the New Right: "They're just
like the Ku Klu.x Klan only they're
too cheap to buy the sheets
And on "Reaganomics The
new president's economic policies
will make it advantageous for
General Motors to move to Mexico
to make cheaper cars for the
unemployed here fo drive. Pollution
will drive the Mexicans north, which
will make for cheaper labor in
Detroit.
for all Ins clowning with the au-
dience, though, Hoffman is ge-
nuinely miffed by the press'
somewhat-jocular coverage of him
since his re-emergence. "My
greatest fear he says, "is being
misunderstood
Elementary School:
Those Cafeterias
Were All The Same
B DAVID NORKI
tatvm dniw
Cafeteria food is one of the most
common complaints in this and
many other schools. Yet. people still
voluntarily eat in the cafeterias here.
Perhaps the reason for so much
dissatisfaction is that we all got used
to complaining about food in
elementary school and never grew
out of the habit, even when the food
in other cafeterias is better.
Elementary school cafeterias are
the same almost everywhere. They
all smell like damp, lukewarm
vegetables: are staffed with weird
people (including at least one old
lady with warts); and serve some of
the world's strangest food.
The routine was the same every
day, unless there was a foodfight or
something. Lunch began with the
whole class lining up to walk to the
cafeteria. Sometimes, we couid just
line up; sometimes, we had a par-
ticularly neat teacher who lined us
up according to size or alphabetical
order. (Sometimes, it would be in
reverse alphabetical order, so Fred
Zurich could go first instead of Jeff
Aachen, for a change.)
After lining up and walking to the
lunchroom (they always called it the
lunchroom; maybe they thought
"cafeteria" was too long a word),
we'd wash our hands and get into
the food line.
Picking the day's food would be
too hard for us, so they just gave
evervbody the same thing. Of
course, you could buy extra stuff
like ice cream, chocolate milk and
sandwiches. Some people would buy
a whole bunch of extra stuff and
throw away the actual lunch.
One thing that bothered me about
our lunchroom rules was that talk-
ing was forbidden. I never have
understood how anyone could ex-
pect an entire room full of little kids
eating lunch to be quiet for half an
hour, but evidently somebody in the
school administration did. We were
told that allowing talk would
disturb us, but l never minded con-
versation with a meal, especially one
where I couldn't read or watch TV.
Those silent meals were always
reminiscent of prison movies.
Sometimes, we could get the
teacher lured into conversation,
making lunchtime talking legal until
she caught on. I suspected some of
them thought it was a dumb rule,
too.
Since there was little conversa-
tion, the children's boundless
energy was expended by playing
with the food. Remember all those
wonderful delicacies you could
make from a school lunch?
Vegetable and milk soup was a great
favorite. A deluxe blue-plate special
See SCHOOL, Page 7, Col. 1
Hoffman has never had too much
trouble getting media to pay atten-
tion to him since becoming a public
figure during the civil rights move
ment in the early sixties and then as
an anti-war leader latet in the
decade. To this day he still takes
credit for putting humor into the
anti-war movement.
Perhaps only half in jest, he spent
his time advocating 100 percent
unemployment and free sex and
drugs. He led guerilla theater groups
to the stock exchanges on Wall
Street (where he and pai Jerry Rubin
burned S5 bills for the camera) and
the ls2 Republican convention in
Miami. His celebrity peaked, of
course, while a defendent in the
Chicago Seven trial of anti-war
uiiers a? the 1968 Democratic
convention in Chicai
In 1974, he was accused of selling
to an undercover agent.
Shortly alter being released on bail.
Hoffman disappeared.
Of his ventures underground.
Hoffman makes a pom! ol criticiz-
ing lorn Hayden, tine of his co-
defendants in the Chicago Seven
. "He has no heart. He was the
only one who wouldn't help
When Hoffman's ex-wife Anita ap-
plied Hayden for a job. Hayden
allegedly told her, "Your husband is
a common criminal and refused
to hire her.
set BBIF. Paye 7. Col. 8
ECU Print Group
Holding Auction
The fifth Annual Print uction
sponsored by the PCX Print Croup
will be held in the Auditorium of the
Leo W. Jenkins Fine Arts Centet on
Sunday, Nov. 23. The prints will be
on display from 2 p.m. until 7 p.m.
in the lobby outside the auditorium.
The auction will run from 7 p.m.
until 9 p.m.
The prints will include intaglios,
lithographs, woodcuts, serigraphs,
collagraphs. and possibly
bichromate prints or molded paper
prints.
Faculty participating in this year's
auction are Mr. Donald Sexauer,
Mr. Mike hlbeck, and Mr. Michael
Voors.
Graduate students I. a u r a
Jackson, Ed Midgett, and Bette
Bates, as well as the following
undergraduate students will have
work for sale: Gram Allen, Alan
Bowling, Mike 1 oderstadt, Elaine
Miller, Maria McLaughlin, Gary
Freeman. David Norris, Don
McKey, Richard Hair, Lisa Jeffries,
Denise Click, and Kim Read.
The funds raised by the LCU
Print Group by this auction are used
to improve the studio area so every
sale is very much appreciated.
t
r
IpMMIMMMVMWmM � �(���





IHL I AS I CAROI IMN
NO 1 MM R 20, Wmi
LOUQ)G A&OOT CoLL�G(. Tht WtltD IAJW
8 s! Pfluip A)ofeei5
8; 8ur; ir svf
Three Art Shows Opening
I hree new shows will
open at the East
c arolina Universit
Museum and W.B
Gray Gallery on Sun
day, Novembei 23,
1980, with a reception
to he held in the gal lei
from p.m. to 5 p.m.
! he foui graduate
students pai ticipating
in the Group I hesis
Show are Roxanne
Reep, Margo Manning,
Roberl Dick, and
David 1 ewis.
Five sculptors will
each show five works in
the invitational
sculpture exhibition,
Five by Five, and a col
lection ol Paris Review
Posters borrowed from
the Mint Museum will
complete the new poi
turn of the gallery ex
hibition.
1 n addition t he
museum section will
continue the exhibition
ol Pre c olumbian Art
w Inch opened in '
tobei I hese shows will
be on exhibit;
through Decmebei 18
Operating hours foi
the gallery are 10 I
Monda) through Fri
dav and 1 to 4 Sundays
OH-campus visiti
should ask at the ri
Office for admittance il
the gallery is loci
during these timi
Group tours can be a
ranged b appointmi
bv contacting the A"
Office 15"
weekdays from 8 I
Happenings
1 hursday 20
� 7:00 P.M. MSC "urkey shoot in bowling,
MSC bowling centei
rrida 21
r
n Movie: Kramei vs. Kramer; Hen
I : eatre
� No 21 Women's Volleyball: A1AW
i riampionships
Saturday 22
� 1 :30 p Football: C State University,
RaU gh N.
� 5, 7, 9 p.m Movie Kramer vs. Kramer, Hen-
I heat re
Sunday 23
� Women's Basketball: Virginian lech,
liseum
Monday 24
� ' 0 p.m. Men's Basketball Marathon Oil,
M eesoliseum
luesdav 11
Wednesday 12
� I sl DA ro REMOVE INCOMPLETE
� t DURING SPRING AM) OR SUM-
MER 1980
� S Ki p m Lib -pen
� rhanksgiv ing holidays begin
� v 26 - 30 Student I. nion sponsored New
1 hursday 27
� I ksgiving Dav
S � � ifusii
Concerto Competition Finals 3
too
KroQr Sav-on
Quantity Rlghta Raaarvad
AOVEBTiSED i'fM POiif�
� � it o �-��� ia��" i�o itaxna � �qu"�ci to b� ���d'W
� �� �: � ���� n aac 'oo,�' Si�or aicap' as
�pa� ' � � "otad in th'i ad II ��a do run oui o �" iia� ��
m "�� �ou you' choict) o' a compa'ibia I ��"
��� f � �"�ct'ng ta a�"� tngi o' a -i'nch�f�
�- � m � � � � . l pufChaea tna �d�a'i tad lawn a'
� - � � ' � � � . e w. 1 3a
onct fc&S i U.S.D.A. INSPECTED � JmMm
&
WEEfcV 3
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED
10 LB. AVQ. AND UP
C0SfSf KROGER NEVER 'W
WEEi. FROZEN 16-LB AND UP
FROZEN 16-LB. AND UP
Fresh Turkey
young Tom Turkeys,
. i
v-
s-et W
& 1
icwwq
DIET PEPSI. -SpJilU
MT DEW OR Cli
Pepsi-Cola
U.S. GOVT INSPECTED
10-14 LB AVG WGT
Young Hen Turkey. . Lb
KROGER WISHBONE GRADE A'
16-LB AVG AND UP
SWIFT S 18-LB. AVG AND UP

Ret tal, Beis 1 lovd.
R a Sabrina Coleman, Piano, v p.m.
� T; Na ra Compam with
I a Pei . . 8 p.m.
� Nov. 24 ission 1 nsemblei �ncei I.
Self-Basting Turkey. Lb
Butterball nOf r'�S "Roger grade a-
Turkey00 &'b 16LB AVG ANDUP
FRESH FTtOZEN 5 7 LB AVG Sflfc lAllO llfta?in A I rj
78c
KROGER � $
Cranberry Sauce
Baking
Hens
a
Men' ilee Club l 01 cei I 8
School t Art
Pre-Columbian Art, Ceramics Small Sculpture
WPl Rl APK HAWK A
C I An htopolocv l)ep
� ersitv Museum of Art, and Private
be on display through Dec. IS
Sele ted Senior Folios o
bv 1 (. I alumni from the Printmaking
I raduate Show � ECl Graduate
� k throughout the state bv the North
a Museui I V
I raveling I-xhibition
� Greem VI im o .Art, Hours of Opera-
It) p.m. Wed. Fri. 10
iat. II a.m. - ; p.m closed on
I M 'dav. etchings and drawings bv
H Voors, a member ol the E( I School
�Fa south. Galleries, will close
Buccaneer:
� Miner's Daughter" starring Sissv
I S - 2. 4:30, 7, & 9:15 p.m.
� B j Brawl" R, Starring Jackie C ban.
- a i, 3:10, 5:10, 7:10 & 9:10 p.m.
� M 1 urn Now" PG, Starring Jill
: Michael Douglas, Shows at 1:15,
7:15, and 9:15 p.m.
Plaa
� ate Eye" PG, Starring Don Knotts
rim C onway, Shows at 3:30. 5:20, 7:10, & 9
� oast" PG, Shows at 3:20, 5:15,
� Ciena Rowlands, PG, Shows at:
5, 7 15, 9:30 p.m.
� Stai Fridaj "South of the South"
Park
� 'The Di � Dies Hard"PG, starring Bruce
a al 7:10, 9 p.m.
I riday: "Master of Kune fu"
Attic
� Ihursdav Dixie Dreggs w Bubbit
� I-dav ALPHA siV.m.a PHI "Afternoon
Delight" with Sidevvinder
� Saturday Sidewinder
� Sunday ROBBIN rHOMPSON
� T uesdav 3 p.m.
� Wednesday Iruks
� Ihursdav
Chapter
� Sunday K.A Nickle Night
� Wednesday Sigma Nu 50 50 Night
I.J.s
� Thursday Jerry Thomas Band
� Friday Jerry Thomas Band
� Saturday Billy Price and The Keystone
Rhythm Band
� Sunday '60 Rock Bash with Cruise-O-
Matic. Dance Contest and Best Costume
Carolina Opry House
� Thursday Larry Franklin Band
Also on Friday, Saturday and Sunday night. On
Sunday, doors will be open at 5, music will begin
at 6 p.m.
If you have anything that you would like to have
put in "Happening" please send them to T. Ashe
Lockhart, The East Carolinian, East Carolina
University, Greenville. N.C. 27834.
BLACK HAWK
Wishbone Turkey
KHOOEB
IN JUICf
RUSME0 chunk OP COUNTRY OVEN
Sliced

Pineapple
63c
Potato
LAYER
CAKE MIX
Kroge
pumpkin PHisbury Plus
'V
KROGER WHOLE
Sweet Potatoes
Canned Ham
4
Lb.
Can
k KROGER GREEN W
U S.D A INSPECTED FRESH FROZEN
4-6 LB AVG WGT
Lb
t
Ham Halves ! H0T 0R MILD � KS
Turkey Breast
HOT OR MILD
$228 Pork Sausage
Sliced,
FREE! Boneless
Small Peas
$109
�C'AL
SWIFT S CANNED
Hostess Ham
GENUINE
Ground Chuck.�
3
17-Oz
Cans
4
Kroger Corn 3 S2?1
WHOLE KERNEL
STOKELY WHOLE
Pickled Beets'�' 57c
"HEAVY" WESTERN BEEF
Boneless
Sirloin Tip Roast
$e48
USDA
S068
Lb.
2
WHOLE OR BUTT PORTION
Lamb Legs
QUARTER PORK
LOIN CUT UP INTO � -
Pork Chops u, 1
Holiday Poultry J Seafood
58
HOLLY FARMS FRESH
Fryer Livers . .
HOLLY FARMS FRESH
Fryer Gizzards
HOLLY FARMS
CUT-UP MIXED
Fryer Parts
RICHBROOK FRESH FROZEN
TURKEY NECKS OR
Turkey Wings Lb.
SERVE N SAVE
ALL VARIETIES $"48
Luncheon Meat .
RATH BLACK HAWK 1 Lb S 7 8
Sliced Bacon . . . ��.
BULK PACKAGED
COUNTRY STYLE
Sliced Bacon
HILLSHIRE FARMS REG
Smoked $qu
Sausage . Lb
. LONC CRAIM
ASSORTED FLAVORS
SOUR CREAM
Kroger Dips 28P?r1
KROGER
Flaked Coconut 'M19
Bag
-O
V
Miracle Whip ?CA
SALAD DRESSING � ?'
SfiFf
KPOGEB NEVEfl FBOZf N
S10 LB �VG
Fresh
Turkey
Fresh
Turkey Breast
WISHBONE BASTED
6-8 LB AVG WGT
Turkey Breast
WHITE AND DARK
Wishbone
Turkey Roast
WISHBONE
All-White
Turkey Roast e.
Cornish
Game Hens
Wishbone
Ducklings
22
$-09
$-99
$-89
$349
$369
0,1-p
$129
Lb
I b
fa
Heinz Ketchup? 99c
a Fleece Towels
H
Deli Bakery Restaurant
FRESH SEAFOOD
AVAILABLE FRI & SAT ONLY
FRESH $039
Perch Fillet i. C.
STANDARD
Fresh 8-oz$019
Oysters . pg
FRESH
Select $1
Oysterspug
FROZEN SEAFOOD
SERVE N SAVE �" J- Q 9
Cooked Shrimp PkV
ALASKAN KING
Crab Legs $A49
& Claws Lb H
FRES-SHORE
Medium �$A69
Large Shrimp pg t
2
2
VTy�.G sliced Tr
FRESHLV MADE
Creamy
Cole Slawu
CHEDOAR OR
Port Wine
Loaf
79c
$9��
Lb
SLICED TO ORDER
Boiled $9 99
HamLb C
SPICY
Genoa $Q79
Salamiib O
HOLIDAY FAVORITE
Sweet Potato
or Pumpkin Pie
CAKE Of THE WEEK-
2 LAYER 8
Coconut
Cake
$179
$329
plain or glazed
Sour Cream
Cake Donutso
S-J49
,cjc5lC FRESHLY BAKED
e$ Dinner
JUMBO
Kaiser
Hard Rolls
6 83
DON'T KAVI OVH A HOT
STOVI THIS HOilOAY
At tie TvU Z Of
We can prepare your entire holiday
meal from turkey and cornbread
dressing to fresh pie Select the size
that S right for your family
� Turkey. �-11 LB
P'KootK) walght
� 3 Pt� cofnb'��d
dratting
� i Pt giblal gravy
4 1 Pt C'�nbrry ralith
PLUS
FREE
Pumpkin or
Apple Pie
$1995
� Turt�� 16 18 Lb
pr�coofcd w�ight
Pit cofnbr��d
drafting
� 3 Pis Qibl�l Gravy
� 1 "J PU Crenbarry
tauca
PLUS
FREE
Pumpkin or
Apple Pie
$295
Sch
o
p
uoz
Whipi
Crei
Ev
KROOCR
Multiol
Bread!
Countl
Style
. 1
Angeij
Food





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ScW Cafeterias: They Were All The Same
on tinned From Page 5
could be prepared b mixing the
vegetable and milk soup with cheese
sandwiches, ice cream, spinach, lef-
tovei gravy � whatever is handy.
Most of these foods, though, were
made not for consumption, but for
throwing away after the enjoyment
o' creating them.
Frozen milk was another problem
we had to contend with, thanks to
an overealous refrigerator. Our
milk frequently came froen into
one big chunk, and would take
forever to thaw out. Chipping at it
with a straw would have helped, but
we had those cheap paper straws
that had a hard time handling thaw-
ed milk.
Weird food was the worst thing
about those school lunches. Weird
food can be defined as any food that
is unidentifiable or is identifiable
but is cooked wrong and tastes fun-
ny.
Most days, the food was really
okay, but nothing special. But, now
and then, there would be a day of
weird food. For example, there
would be beans (or "bean" � a
single pile oi beans in one solid
M milk's
f�0ZE,s)
r
lump), some sort of greens (the stan-
dard joke was that the grass had
been mowed, so we were having
greens that day) and the school's
special cornbread recine. I don't
know how they made their corn-
bread, but I hope the recipe has
been lost. If it's around, the Rus-
sians could have another dangerous
chemical weapon.
To really top off this wonderfully
unpalatable meal, there would pro-
bably be a nice, ice-cold carton ol
homogenized, pasteuried froen
milk.
The nicest meals were on various
occasions when parents would visit
the school and eat lunch. I urkey
and cranberry sauce replaced frozen
milk and weird food. I Ins also
damaged the kid's credibility, since
every parent would say, " I hat
turkey and cranberry sauce was
wonderful' How can you complain
about the food with meals like
that That would be followed by,
"1 wish I had good, hot, nutritious
meals when I was a kid W e had to
walk home three blocks foi lunch
every day
It's rough being a kid sometimes.
Specta
600 Greenville Blvd. Greenville
Open 7 a.m. to Midnight
Open Sunday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.

cy
x
TOTAL
wefW kroger QRadea'
Large Eggs
's 9uar�. you uv af w�"AN;
Arff
reeardles
'ota
tund i58rtesame
i-� h�se price �r r�"
If you can do better
We'll Triple the Difference!
'�� S��-on promim to pay you Irlpl. Ih� ditf�f�nc� In CMh H you can do
you ncKtni' waakly shopping lo, ass at any olh�f sup�'m�,�.i In Qr�nvill�
'oge. Saon can maka thu commitment bacium � h low Coat uttw
grocary pneaa plus thousands of discounts on non food mmi In dapan
mant aftar dapartmant Saa fo. yours�H tfw ,ou �a ahoppaO r s��c-
compara tha �ama itama with any oth.r G'ean.ui, ,t0r. if ttva loUl amount lot
the same items � lees at the othe- store we II -etund tr.p'e the dfference In
cash just purchase et least 25 different items totalling $20 or more � ��ending
meat p-oduclsi Only one of eech item purchased -i, be included In the com
panson It you can find any other store In town win the same items 'o- Ml
bring you- Kroger Sair-on register tape plus the other store s prtcM to
your one-stop food and drug store We II pa, you triple the difference In cash
K'oge- Se�-on snows whet s important to you that , ,h, �� rtujkino this
a.citing triple the ditfe-ence p-omise In one ess, stop cul your coift �'
Kroger Sa�-on!
WHITE HOUSE
cos
Apple Juice. 2Bt? 66�
AVONDALE
Vegetable Oil
$
'&&&
V FOX DELUXE
PEPPERONI, CHEESE OR
Sausage Pizza
Pi.isbury ,4MV
FjJW Jkroger
88� Whipped Topping �-� 11
�00OQOO0
.
KROGER
13-02
Can
Evaporated Milk
KROGER TWIN, FLAKE, ML
3UTTERMILK OR COMBO ROLLSJj
Brown & Serves
Beer & Wine
t ROSE. RHINE.
MICHELOB OR J?. BURGUNDY OR
Michelob LeDomaine
Light jTM Chablis
Jm m I Ltr ip
CHABLIS. RHINE. ROSE OR
Inglenook SO 66
Navalle BurgundyK O
WINE
Rosegarten $466
Liebfraumilchlu. H
HEARTY BURGUNDY. ROSE. RHINE OR
Gallo SO 2 9
Chablis Blanc�.0
SERVING YOU COMES FIRST IN THE
Krora vav on oai
GENUINE
Baked Foods J Dairy Foods T Frozen Foods
Idaho Potatoes
$
10
Lb.
Bag
3 $139
BAKER
POTATOES Lb
THANKSGIVING
Mums
Give a certificate for a
beautiful, delicious
Fruit
Basket
Of pick one up and give It
personally. Don t forget
yourself They make a
beautiful Holiday Tabie
center piece
99eo�
mWWF CelerY
cos
w
ssa
SWEET
Fresh
Pineapple
WASHINGTON S
D'Anjou
Pears .
WASHINGTON STATE
RED OR GOLO
Delicious
Apples
CROOKNECK
Yellow
Squash
Fresh
Coconuts
FLORIDA FRESH
SWEET TANGERINES OR
Tangelos
Sf
cos
SUNQOLD (XT)
HOT DOG OR
HAMBURGER BUNS OR
Sandwich
Bread
ORANGE JUICE
Minute
Maid . .
64-Oi
. Ctn
GOLDEN
i-tb
99
66
Mrs. Filbert's
Margarine
FLUFFY. BUTTER TASTIN BUTTERMILK
Hungry
Jack Biscuits
2$1
KROGER
T
c
Style Rolls
ImIm�m �j
A WHEAT
2a$1M
Multigrain
Brea
COUNTRY OVEN REG A WHEAT
Counti
Style I
VILLAGE BAKERY REG OR ORANGE MIST
49
Angel
Food Cake
23-01
. Pkfl
$1
oH
am
vVttV
cor?
KROGER
6
Egg Nog
$1
W-Gal m
Ctn �
89
4a&p
AVONDALE FROZEN
Orange
Juice
69
GREEN GIANT WHITE CORN. BROCCOLI
WITH CHEESE. LE SUEUR PEAS OR
Broccoli
Spears .
KROGER
Bread
Dough
BEEF. CHICKEN OR TURKEY
Banquet q
Pot PiesO
10-Oi
. . Rhg
5 Pick
1-Lb
Loaves
79
1
39
S-Oi
Pkgs
$1
FRESH
Artichokes
GREEN TOP
Bunch
Radishes
GREEN TOP
Bunch f QQc
Carrots eBch. 00
FRESH
Green 0
Onions Obc.
PRESM BOSTON OR
Red Leaf OflC
.Lettuce
Photo Of GA�?y PATTERSON
Pig-Pickhr
Ric Browning reeds Bit Grice at tin IK PiK-
Pickin1 lournamtnt. hdd al the fairgrounds last
Minda. I hi- contest raised mone for the Green-
ville Boys Club.
Abbie Hoffman
Now Lectures
Continued l-rom Page 5
Hoffman spent the
lasl few months ot his
exile working to stop an
Arm)nrps ol
I ngineers project on
the St. I awrence Rivet
His work, under the
alias ol Barry Freed,
earned him the praise
ol New York Gov.
Hughare) and Sen.
1 )aniel Mo nihan.
1 tie epei ience
Iped him decide to
come out ol hiding to
lace the drug charges.
(me reason was thai he
l he'd soon be
discovered anyway. But
he also seems to have
ssed the fun ol being
a celebrity.
"Now he sa s.
"I'm working on two
things: a ing the i ivet
and sa uik: n ass
Partly because "the
cost ol going to prison
has skyrocketed Hoi
fman is trying to make
enough to pay laawyers
tees by touring col-
leges, at a reported
4ixMi a lecture.
In Ins talks, he notes
he siili wants "to see a
social revolution Foi
the moment, though,
he's tiying to build sup-
port foi a national
health care insurance
prograi tnd for i
tionalizing the large oil
companies.
He sas the mc
which hae si frequent-
ly been manipulated b
Hoffman, are the only
political forces opposed
to the programs.
"About 42 ot 43 per-
cent ol the V
people want the oil
companies nationaliz
ed ()n the other side
are "13,000

voices: unani m 11 v
.i gainst
tionaliataion
I he way to win,
adds, is not to rush I
fat ahead ol the
populace. "You listen,
you just shut up You
listen to them. You
help them articulate the
wrongs (they see
American society)
Nevertheless, when
fie approaches the sub-
ject ol the Reagan
presidency, he's not
aboe lapsing into a lit-
tle show biz. He holds
up two tablets and say
'The doctors gax- e
them to me to make the
next four years go
awav
Nursing A u thority �
Presents Program
1 ' � 1 e s s i o n a I
l)e elopement Com-
mittee of the School ol
Nursing at ECU has
slated Dr. Dorothea I
Orem former professor
at the School of Nurs-
ing, Georget o w n
University,
Washington, D.C a
nationally known nurs-
ing theorist and consul
tant in nursing and nur-
sing education, to pre-
sent a seminar on Con-
cept 1 ormalization in
Nursmg and genet a!
theory of nursmg (the
self care model). I he
programs will be held
at Allied Health
Audi tori u mBel k
Building) on Friday,
Nov. 21 from 9:00 a.m.
to 4:30 p.m.
Dr. Orem is the
originator of t h e
general theory of nurs-
ing, which used self-
care as the central con-
cept. Self-care is in-
creasing and gaining
importance as one
health care delivery
system is shifting its
focus from disease to
health maintenance.
promotion and disease
prevention. Orem's
model facilitates the
use o a scientific ap-
proach to nursing prac-
tice and education us-
ing simple but
significantly different
framework.
An author of two
editions of her theory
book and two editions
of 'he publication on
behalf of the National
Nursing Development
Group, Dr. Orem has
taken part in numerous
national conferences
and published copious-
ly on her theory and
related topics
According to Dr.
Ahad, "C oncept for-
malization in nursing
and use ol nursing
theories in education
and practice represents
a significant and con-
tinuous advance ol m
sing sciences, this
seminar will serve as an
important reteref.ee. it
not a much needed leai
ning experience foi
nursmg faculty, and
graduate students in the
nursmg school 1 he
program is open to
selected nursmg practi-
ne rs, nurse ad -
ministrators and all
who have an interest in
nursmg as an unique
discipline
I his will be the first
time such a high rank-
ing scholar in nursing is
addressing the School
ol Nursmg faculty and
students. This event ha
generated excitement
and enthusiasm among
the graduate students.
A group of graduate
students in a nuismg
theories class has plan-
ned a presentation
which projects the pro-
gress of self-care model
into the 21st Century.
The Graduate Students
Organization of the
School of Nursing has
arranged a reception in
Dr. Orem's honor on
Thursdav Nov. 20th.
I
t





1 HI- EASTAROl INIAN
Sports
S( V 1 MHI k 20, IlMi
P
Wrestling Team Strives To Revitalize Program
from Mat! Kriin�
state of disarray.
In response to the decision the
An October 22 announcement by team established a petition and
East Carolina Athletic Director Ken begin campaigning for signatures. A
karr made this the last season o' goal of 10,000 names was establish-
wrestling for the Pirates, leaving ed. Currently 8.000 names have
team members and supporters in a been inked on the document.
ECU Wrestling: Costs Outweigh Tradition
Saturday At NCSU
Karr has made u known thai the
decision to axe the program is final,
that it was necessary to cut out the
sport's $26,0X) budget due to in-
creasing costs oi big-time college
athletics. The wrestlers have vet to
give up hope, though.
"1 was told it didn't mattei it we
had 8,000 or 12,000 signatures
said team member David Jerose,
"because the board of trustees and
athletic department had already
made up their minds.
"But because ol that fact I'm go-
ing to push my petitions to the limit
to see how much power the students
actually have.1
First-year head coach Hachiro
Oishi. a former N.C. State assistant,
said the decision made the season a
difficult one for Ins team, but added
that morale remains high.
"This is a very hard time for
them lie said. "They have been
trying very hard, though. 1 must
wonder how much longer lhe can
keep up the nice teamwork
Oishi said that he and the team
were hopeful, yel doubted how long
that could continue it nothing
changes.
"We're looking for something.
Each ot us has a small hope. It we
can't change the decision, after
Christmas could be rough on our
kids
I he wrestlers themselves are a
contused group. With 13 of the 31
team members currently on scholar-
ship, a mass transfer move is pro-
bably in the offing.
Still, problems exist, says Riek
Zandarski, who transfered fo ECU
last season
"I'm on a full scholarship now,
supposedlyZandarski said, "and
the program has been cancelled. 1
have my wife moved down here,
have no money and 1 am out of
luck
Freshman Andy Hefner pointed
out problems he might have in at-
tempting to transfer.
"1 could have gone to a lot of
other schools he said. "It's easier
to get accepted nght out of high
school than to transfer. You could
have a 3.0 in high school but in col-
lege it's different
Karr says, though, that he will
aid wrestlers in theii attempts to
find a new place to practice then
talents.
"We will attempt to assist those
who want to transfer Kan said.
"Also, all those who remain on
campus we will do everythinj
assist
Karr added thai the decision
announced in the fall rathei than the
spring to allow the athletes suffi
cient time to make whatever ar-
rangements that are necessary.
Despite having to continue with
the season, push petition and look
for a new home, the squad has
maintained a positive attitude.
Met net.
"It's had a real bad effect on the
team in general the initial shock.
The team is trying to suck
become united, and have a wini
season regardless ol what hap-
pens
Criticism ot Kan's announce-
ment, which also eliminated
women's field hockey from the
1l sports program, has come
all areas Oishi said he
received several letters from area
ool coaches supporting the
wrestling progra
Oishi noted thai I ; received a
petition containing 500 signatures
from Piti Cou DH onle
High.
Anoihct lettei cam
ington's A.J. Reynolds H
School. The Reynolds
the decision "a bif
ing that the E I program ha I
a help to programs throughout the
11 e.
Kan himself has regrets ab i
axing oi the pr
the steadily risii sts ol college
athletii le ii necessa
"I'm aware of the and
idous history lh
aid " 1 he faci
been a successful
doesn't make a
: rpe any ea

written for ; astaroinian b
Dana Seiil andharleshandler.
ECU In 'Bowl Game'
B CHARLES CHANDLER
�-li.rK I di!r
" 1 his is our bowl game
His team saddled with a 4-fc
record and no chance at eithei a
winning season or post-season ac-
tivity, ECU head football coach Ed
Emory described his team came
w th N.C. State quite bluntly.
"We won't save anything when
we take the field he said. "We're
going to lay it all out there on the
ei Stadium turf. We're going to
do whatever it takes to win
Winning may not be that easy,
though, Emory claimed.
"N.C . State has some advan-
tages he said. "With (Dick)
Kvipec and Johnny Rodeers (both
ECt coaches last year) up there.
they know about what we'll be do-
ing. Uo. they know our personnel
very well
Riding the wave oi last week's im-
pressive victory over Duke, the -v
Wolfpack should be ready come
Saturdy. says Emory.
"They'll have momentum on
their side tor sure said the first-
yeai Pirate mentor. "They've been
placing well and have the oppor-
tunity to finish with a winning
resord of 6-5
A disappointing 2S-16 loss at
home ii' Pastern Kentucky kept the
Pirates from entering the Raleigh
clash with a similar chance. That
would have been just dandy, Emory
said.
"1 was hoping I'd be 5-5 and
Monte (Kitfin. State head coach)
would be 5-5 so we could have a
shooting match to see who would
have a winning record
Now the Pirates can only hope to
end the season on a winning note.
Several injuries have struck this
week and. says Emory, the team
may be in its worst shape
manpower-wise oi the season when
it takes the field Saturday.
"We had 4" kids out foi one
reason or the otht t Ea
Kentucky Emory noted. "It will
be worse this week. It's been rough
and its getting rougher
Emory said that because ol the
juries several changes were made as
compensation. Startinj ird Fee
Griffin is out toi
he vear and the
other guard. Mike Jordon, is very
doubtful. Backup centei Billy
Parkei and reserve tackle Os
Ivson will fill the vacancies.
Despite Ins team i . md
problems w nh injuries, I m i j
his faith in the EC1 , gram re-
mained as high as ever.
"1 feel now thai EaCa '
more ready w it h a 4-6 rt
the 80's than it was 12 i
when it's record was a Ii
The former Clemson a
pointed to several improvemen
basis for his beliefs.
"Our kids have a much better
responsibility towards academics
he said. "They also are more
dedicated towards our weight pro-
gram, which lias improved itsell
greatly.
"1 feel with the young men com-
ing bask things are optimistic. It
ihey can go foi w ard vv ith
academics, weight training and self
improvement, the future should be
bright
1 mory said that with his op-
timism Lame the hope thai Pirate
tans had an understanding of just
how difficult the present season has
been.
"1 hope the people will unders-
tand tie said. "A person should be
able to see what was left here, who
we're playing and the people we're
playing with. All our injuries have
been something and will be evident
at N.( . State Saturday
Gametime for Saturday's contest
is 1 p.m. in Cartel-linlev Stadium.
t-noio b , CHAP GURLEY
ECU QB Greg Stewart, Pirates, 1 ��k To N.C. State
Riley Prepared
For Challenges
B JIMMY DuPREh
WivUnl Spurs rdilor
It's been a while since the Lady
Pirates of East Carolina crushed
Duke 99-65 in the consolation game
oi the NCAIAW Basketball Tour-
nament, but for All-America can-
didate Kathy Riley the off-season
has meant anything but a time to
relax.
A fruitful but unsuccessful trial at
the Olympic tryouts followed her
first year in the purple and gold, and
she returns as the leading scorer in
the state from a year ago when she
trailed only teammate Rosie
Thompson.
Riley was the starting leftfielder
and leading hitter on the ECU soft-
ball squad which claimed the Region
II championship, and her summei
league team, Cheat Gas of Jackson-
ville, competed in the women's
world tournament at Kinston in
August.
Even with the Lady Pirates'
season opener against Virginia Tech
coming up Sunday at 3 p.m. in
Minges Coliseum, Riley has had lit-
tle time to prepare herself due to her
rigid schedule.
"I'm up at 5:30 in the morning to
go to Nautilaus (weight training)
and then I have student teaching at
Rose High right after that the 5-9
senior reports. "We're here for
practice until nine, so I never really
have a chance to catch up
But don't get the wrong impres-
sion; Kathy Riley wouldn't have it
any other way.
"We were tired when we had the
scrimmages last week she admits.
"Even now we're tired. But that'll
improve later when the team finally
gets together for full practices.
"We've had so many people in-
jured we haven't been able to run
five-on-five except in the scrim-
mages. We haven't had a chance to
blend yet because of the injuries.
There are people just coming into
practice who we've had to wait for.
We just haven't had a chance to
play together.
"I think once we get everybody
full speed, things will start to gel
The injuries to key players such as
guards Lydia Rountree, Laurie
Sikes and Lisa Eennell, along with
forward Heidi Owen's bout with
mononucleosis has left Riley uncer-
tain as to what position she will fill.
"1 play the point some, as well as
strong forward and post when we go
to the double post says Riley. "It
depends on who's healthy as to
where I'll play
Regardless of the position, Riley's
speW will be a vital element of
coach Cathy Anduzzi's third Lady
Pirate squad.
"Our whole game is based around
the fact that we are quick says
Riley. "Even against smaller teams
we should be able to outrun them. A
lot of times we don't even set our
regular offense until we've ex-
hausted all the options of the fast
break
Riley expresses confidance in the
crop of forwards ECU will have on
the front line this season, praising
sophomore Mary Denkler and
transfer Sam Jones for their con-
tributions.
"I'd venture to say that we pro-
bably have the best forwards in the
country Riley states. "As far as
depth and talent, I don't think any
other team has it like we do
Riley assesses her own perfor-
mance thus far as less than
desireable in one aspect, but above a
year ago in another.
"Right now, my defense is pretty
bad she admits. "From the scrim-
mages, I'd have to say I'm shooting
better now than last season
TIk ' ady Pirates face a tough
schedule featuring several teams
ranked nationally in the preseason
polls. Riley anticipates tough strug-
gles with the teams which could lead
to national ranking for East
Carolina.
"It's really a tough schedule, in-
cluding teams that are in some of
Seven On Squad
New Cagers Confident
f
r&m
Riley Fires
Lady Pirate All-America can-
didate Kathy Riley heads an
impressive list of returnees.
the tournaments we go to she
states. "We have a few games which
winning could really help the pro-
gram in the long run. I wouldn't be
surprised to see us beat State this
year. They lost a lot of talent
If Riley remains healthy
throughout the season and main-
tains or improves on her 17.3 points
per game output, she may well be a
leading candidate for All-America
honors, and her Lady Pirate team-
mates could find themselves in the
midst of tourney competition.
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sport I diiur
When the Last Carolina basket-
ball opens its season Nov. 29 at
Ohio University it will do so with
seven new faces and a group o'
returnees that combined for a mere
15.5 points per game average last
vear.
Those new faces, six freshmen
and one sophomore transfer, will be
counted upon heavily to bear the
burden of possible Pirate successes
foi the next four years.
1 he group includes sophomore
guard Mike Bledsoe; freshmen for-
wards Mortis Hargrove and Bill
McNair; frosh guards Mike fox,
Herbert Gilchrist, and Barry
Wright; along with freshman center
Jet (Best.
The above group is optimistic
about this season and what the
future holds, Hargrove says.
"We're optimistic to the point
that we know we will be challenged
but that challenge is one we look
forward to accepting he said.
The Pinehurst, N.C. native
played down the fact tlrat the seven
newcomers had no college ex-
perience.
"Sure, we're young he said.
"But we've all been playing basket-
ball for at least nine years. We're
not fust-year guys in basketball, but
ninth-year guys
One oi the seven, McNair, has
high goals set for his first season as
a Pirate.
"1 would like to see us wir. 20
games this year he said. "It will
be hard for a young team, but if we
put our minds to it, it's possible
McNair. a Dunn native who led
the all scorers with 23 points in the
recent Purple-Gold game, said he
and the other newcomers had
become quite close to each other.
"All of us got a chance to meet
this summer he said. "That was
the start and now everybody's get-
ting real close. 1 can honestly say
these will be great guys to spend
four years with. We're already bet-
ter friends oft the court than on
The eventual goal ot McNaii
all the othei newcomers is a trip to
the NCAA tournament.
"1 want more than anything else
to play in the NCAA's McNaii
said. "1 will do as much as 1 can do
help make this dream a reality
McNair's team-oriented attitude
is common among the new Pirates.
The 6-5 forward feels this is best.
"I think any team i bettei with.
an altitude like that compared to a
team ot individuals
Raleigh native Mike Fox, a top
candidate for a starting guard posi-
tion, shared McNair's feelings and
said the closeness oi the newcomers
was only natural.
"1 guess we tend to get closet to
each other he said. "This ei
team is close, though. But we
freshman want to plav in some post-
season tournaments together. We
want to improve a lot ovei the next
four vears
Morris
Hargrove
n
.han
walk
lseuti
lsei
mi
Studj
I
n
ft
K
dn
I
11
M.





With Arrival Of Chairs
Student Section Increased
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 20, 1980
?
!
�1
t
jj.
I
East Carolina
basketball fans will be
greeted by some
changes when they first
walk into Minges Col-
iseum this season.
The lower level
bleachers (Sections
2.4,6,8,10,12)on ti.e
north side of the Col-
iseum have been moved
to the end ones and
have been replaced with
modern, collapsible
chairs.
The new seats will be
reserved for Pit ate
Club members only,
allowing the entire
lower level of the south
side (Sections
1,3,5,7,9,11,13) to be
reserved strictly for
ECU students.
in the past, students
had been allotted only a
portion of the lower
south side, with the
middle seats serving as
a Chancellor's section.
This year, though,
the students will have
the entire south side
and the two end one
sections.
ECU Assistant
Athletic Director for
Public Relations, Ken
Smith, says the move is
one that should benefit
everyone.
"The changes in
NORTH SIDE
34
32
30
28 26 24 22
General Admission
20
18
16
12 10 8
New Collapsible Chairs
Pirate Club Only
V 2
a
Studen
Seating
Student Seating-
ct m
o at
ef. v
o
Student
Seating
13 11 9J 7j 5
3
t
33
31
29
�Student Seating-
27'
25231
21
19
17
15
SOUTH SIDE
THE NEW LOOK: A capsule
look at the new seating ar-
rangements in Minges Coliseum
for the 1980-81 season.
THANKSGIVING
DAY MENU
Relax this Thanksgiving . let S&S do the
hard work!
Delicious Family-Style Entrees 13 in all.
including:
lender Kist Turkev choice of combread or pecan
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Savory Baked Ham uith Fruit Sam' jusl $1 89
( ooked to perfection Roast Round of Beef.
;iisl 52 05.
Juic t OUlHry Style Stedk. just S 1 69
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(jlatii (. andied Yams, just 50
lasK Baked I ((plant, just 5(V .
f laviirful Lyonnaise Yellou Squash, just 5(K
Plus 18 Tempting Desserts, including:
reamy Pumpkin Pie. iust 55
Delicious Pecan Pie, iust 65c.
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Dele table Waldorf Salad, just 65
lanqv. C ranberry Nm Jello. just 65
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just 6(K
Heavenly Ambrosia, just 75C
Plus 7 Home-Baked Bread Items
�����- ft n�
Where America Comes Home To Eat
Served (. tmtinuouslv Ih�nkstivmy Dav November 27.
11 am 8 pm
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Greenville,N.C.
4&
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Open Til 9:30 Nightly
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T5 -2
� I
'Student
Seating
seating and the chairs
should add more at-
mosphere to Minges
Coliseum Smith said.
"We're very excited
that the students have
the entire south side.
We want more student
involvement. We want
them to sit on court
level, close to the
players
Smith added that the
lower arena will have to
be filled before the up-
per arena will even be
opened.
"The idea is to ge!
the students surroun-
ding 75 percent of the
floor he said. "If we
can fill up the lower
south seats and the two
end ones with
students, the at-
mosphere will be great-
ly improved over years
past
The new-look Col-
iseum will be initiated
this Sundav, Nov. 23
when the Lady Pirates
open their season with
Virginia Tech at 3 p.m.
Coach Dave Odom's regular season game in
men's team will have an Minges will not come
exhibition contest with until December 6, when
Marathon Oil the they host Texas
following night at 7:30. Wesleyan in a 7:30
The Pirates first p.m. encounter.
NORTH SIDE
30
2826
��General Admission-1
24122
20
18
16
112 110 8 6 4 2
New Collapsible Chairs � Pirate Club Only
Student Seating
9 I 7 I 5 3
00
m
o a
ef. c�
o �
Student
Seating
33
31
29
��Student Seating�
271 251 231 21
19
17
15
SOUTH SIDE
The new collapsible chairs that will till
Minges Coliseum's north side have ar-
rived. The arrival of the chairs allowed
Photo bv ION JORDAN
for the movement of better bleachers to
the coliseum's end zone sections.
A-A Team Named
pipe dreams
M � (AV�RSry AA.C.ADE
OKI AHOMA CITY
(I PI) � hive schools,
including nationally
top-ranked Georgia,
placed two players each
on the Football Writers
Association of
America's 37th annual
All-America learn an-
nounced Wednesday.
Oiher schools with
iwo players on the
w ritcrs' squad icuded
Southern Cal, Pitts-
burgh, I C I A and Pur-
due.
Representing
G e o r g i a w e r e
placekickei Rex Robin-
son and running back
Herschel Walker, the
first freshman ever
honored b the football
writers, who have been
picking All America
teams since 1944.
Southern Cal placed
offensive lineman Keith
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Van Home and defen-
sive hack Ronnie Lou
on the writers' squad
and Pittsburgh's
players were defensive
end Hugh Green and
of fensh e li neman
Mark Ma.
UCLA's choices
were defensive back
Ken Easley, who made
the team for the third
time, and running back
Freeman McNeil. Fur-
due honorees were the
record-setting com-
bination of quarter-
back Mark Herrmann
and receiver Dave
Young.
Other members of
the writers' team in the
r mining for the
Outland were Notre
Dame center John Scul-
lv, offensive linemen
Nick Eyre of Brigham
Yung and Louis Oubre
of Oklahoma and
defensive linemen Ken-
neth Sims of Texas and
Jose Taylor o'
Houston.
Others on the
24-man writers team in-
cluded Stanford
r ec e i ver K en
Margerum; Sou
Carolina running bav
Cieorge Rogers; defei
s i v e linemen E.
Junior of Alabama ai
Derrie Nelson o
Nebraska; linebackei
David Little of Florid;
Mike Singletary
Baylor and Lawrenc
Taylor of Nort
Carolina; defensi'
back Jihn Simmons
Southern Methodist,
and punter Rohn Stark
of Florida State.
TfcEAMER
EAST CAROLINA PLAYHOUSE
STUDIO THEATRE
November 17-22, 24-25 8:15 p.m.
General Admission $2.50
ECU Students $1.50
757 6390 0
STREAMERS IS A POWERFUL MILITARY DRAM
INTENDED FOR MATURE AUDIENCES! A
THE $74.95
DIPLOMA.
Siladium rings are made from a fine jeweler's
stainless alloy that produces a brilliant white
lustre. It is unusually strong and is resistant
to deterioration from corrosion or skin
reactions.
In short, it's quality and durability at an
affordable price.
Both men's and women's Siladium ring
styles are on sale this week through
your ArtCarved representative. Trade in
your 10K gold high school ring and save
even more.
It's a great way of saying you've earned it.
IRT(7IRVED
COLLEGE RINGS
Symbolizing your ability to achieve.
The Official
ECU Class Rings
NOV.24-25
10; 00a m-4:00pm
Student Supply
Store Lobby
Wright Building
$10 I ei)osit required. Master Charge or Visa accepted
980 ArtCarved College Rings
I

I





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 20, 1980
The Fearless Football Forecast
A
V.
ECU AT N.C. STATE
DUKE AT UNC
APPALACHIAN ST. AT WAKE FOREST
MARYLAND AT VIRGINIA
SOUTH CAROLINA AT CLEMSON
SYRACUSE AT WEST VIRGINIA
ARKANSAS AT SMU
HOUSTON AT TEXAS TECH
TEXAS AT BAYLOR
MICHIGAN AT OHIO STATE
SOUTHERN CAL AT UCLA
OKLAHOMA AT NEBRASKA
TERRY HERN DON
Advertising Manager
(98-34)
N.C. State 24-13
UNC
Wake Forest
Maryland
South Carolina
West Virginia
SMU
Houston
Texas
Ohio State
Southern Cal
Nebraska
KEN SMITHCHARLES CHANDLERJIMMY DuPREEGUEST PICKER:
ECU SIDSports EditorAsst. Sports EditorLEANDER GREEN
(97-35)(96-36)(93-39)Former EC t QB
ECU 28-23N.C. State 30-21ECU 21-18ECU 17-14
UNCUNCUNCUNC
Wake ForestWake ForestWake ForestWake Forest
MarylandMarylandMarylandMaryland
South CarolinaSouth CarolinaClem sonSouth Carolina
West VirginiaSyracuseSyracuseSyracuse
SMUSMUArkansasArkansas
Texas TechHoustonHoustonHouston
BaylorBavlorBaylorTexas
MichiganOhio StateMichiganOhio State
Southern CalSouthern CalUCLASouthern Cal
NebraskaOklahomaOklahomaOklahoma
Coach Eyes New Personnel
Pirate Gymnasts Ready
"We have a strong
schedule of competi-
tion which includes
some of the toughest
teams on the east
coast head coach Jon
Rose comments of the
East Carolina women's
ewimastics team's com-
ing season.
The "79-80 squad
finished their season
with an unfavorable
11-16 record � a mark
which this year's crew
plans to improve upon.
Rose feels that the
loam will be able to
score in the 120-125
point range this year �
a vast improvement
over last year � which
will "make us a very
respectable (NCAIAW)
Division II team The
team tallied for a 119.8
mark last season at the
regional champion-
ships, a team record.
At the same meet, the
squad was edged out of
fourth place by one-
tenth of one point.
Six team members
return from last year to
strive for new records.
They include co-
captain Elizabeth
Jackson, the only retur-
ning record holder,
with a score of 7.9 in
the balance beam com-
petition. Jackson plac-
ed sixth in the 19K0
Division II state cham-
pionships on the
balance beam. Also
back is co-captain
Susan Lawrence, who
also excels on the
beam, as well as
vaulting and floor exer-
cise.
Carol Layton, a
junior returnee is ex-
pecially strong on the
beam, floor exercise
and uneven bars. Annie
Loeschke, a standout
on the unevens, returns
with an injury but
hopes to recover before
the first contest of the
Classifieds
FOR SALE
FOR SALE Technics SA S00 40
vjtfs SL 230 fully automatic
turntable with Empire 2000 E� III
Phase Linear speakers
Aluminum antennae Paid 11100,
best otter Call 752 8840 ask for
Graham
FOR SALE 197S Fiat 131 wagon
10,000 miles, manual transmis
sion, regular gas, stereo cassette,
Michelin radial1. S26S0 Contact
George or Howard Willenon.
118 WM,
FOR SALE !�72 CB 100 Honda
Many new parts very good shape
85 mpg. $300 firm Call 758 8124
FOR SALE 194� BSA 250cc, all
Stock $350 Call 752 7218 after 4:00
p m
1974 MUSTANG COBRA All
power, ar, V 4, great on gas $2395
or make offer 758 7948
MUST SELL IMMEDIATELY 10
inch Sharp black and white TV.
Great shape, $40 752 0483
PERSONAL
CUSTOM CRAFTING and repair
of gold and silver. Buying and
selling of gold and silver by Les
Jewelers 120 E 5th St 758 2127.
SUNSHINE STUDIOS offering
classes in Ballet, Jazz, Yoga, and
Enercise Special student rates
Aithin walking distance of cam
pus 754 7235
HURRY Time running out but
perfect Christmas gift offer still
open1 Special student prices $10
cancatures, $20 and up portraits,
personalized T shirts done too!
Professional portrait service Since
'974 Call John Weyler 752 5775
ANYTHING YOU CAN WRITE
We can write better Typing, pro
ofreadmg, editing Write Right
754 9944
HELP WANTED: RNs, LPN'S
and Technicians at Pungo District
Hospital needs you Opening on all
three shifts with shift differential
for 3 00 1100 and 1100 7:00. Con
tact Director of Nurses, Pungo
District Hospital. 943 2111
WANTED Female housekeeper
to live m' and free to travel Call
754 3511 daily at 2,00 p.m.
MULTI MEDIA MAKERS:
Greenville's newest creative art
service has a special Christmas of
ter: 8x10 pen and ink portraits or
characatures of your favorite per
son for only $151! Suitable for
framing A unique gift idea! Tak
mg orders until Dec 5, get your
order in now by calling 752 4277
Mon Fn between 3 00 p m and
4 00 p m
TYPING Done, Term papers.
Resumes, Thesis. Etc
Reasonable Call Jane Pollock,
752 9719
ANNOUNCING Notary Public
Reasonable rate for Convenient
notanzation Call Amy at 752 8022
TERRI Happy Birthday You
can share water glass at the
THIRD FLOOR PENTHOUSE
GPJ
BROWN: Backed down, Tooted up
and chugged the Evan Williams
Put your hal on and keep your
buzz warm Please keep your
mule m the stable when your on
the sidewalk.
BEST OF LUCK AWARD: This
weeks award goes to the Girls
Gymnastics Team as the travel to
Annapolis, Md (don't let
Elizabeth drive) Good luck with
the Terps girls. CDL
"SINCE Keep on taking your
Vitamin V as directed Drink lots
ol beer and limit sex to twice a
day YOUR ATTITUDE ADJUST
MENT DOCTOR
SPECIAL FRIEND To Michael
who will always have my love
1448
ROBERT Id like to say how
much I love you, but there aren't
enough words or time Linda
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE WANTED: Respon
sible and non smoker $95 mo and
half utilities. Five blocks from
campus Call 752 1433
MALE ROOMMATE At Tar
River Estates $115 a month, $115
deposit, two bedroom 752 9304
FOR RENT: Two bedroom apart
ment New downstairs carpet, 1' 7
bath. recently
painted,dishwasher, available
Dec I. Call 758 4015 if no answer
call 758 0942 and leave message
RESPONSIBLE FEMALE:
Roommate needed immediately.
Two bedroom apartment. Half
rent, half utilities, close to cam
pus Call 758 4017.
FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE
CLASSIFIED ADS CAN BE PUR
CHASED AT THREE LOCA
TIONS:
Student Supply Store Lobby. MWF
10:00 11:00, TTH 11.00 12 00.
East Carolinian Office, MTTH
4:00 5:00. WF 2 00 3:00
Student Organization Booth
(Mendenhall), MWF 12001:00,
TTH 1100 12 00.
THE SILVER BULLET
SALOON
IN RALEIGH.N.C.
WELCOMES ALL ECU STUDENTS
FOR THE
ECU vs. NCSU
FOOTBALL GAME
r1
I
I
I
l
I
I
I
I
I
AFTER THE GAME
BRING YOUR TICKET STUB
OR
ECU ID
AND GET
REDUCED ADMISSION
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
SOUTHBOUND
LIVE
SILVER BULLET SALON
816 MORGAN ST.
(ABOVE:CHARUE GOODNIGHTS)
834-9006
season.
Floor exercise.
unevens and vaulting
are sophomore Claudia
Hauck's strongest
events. The '79 transfer
f r o m C i e o r g e
Washington College
has shown much im-
provement since last
season. Also returning
is greatly improved
Wendy Meyer, also a
sophomore.
The freshmen are
looking to earn starting
berths on the team this
year as they vie with ex-
perienced veterans.
"All of the freshmen
are all-around gym-
nasts. They're about
equally as good on one
event as on the next
comments Rose.
Ires h m e n N a n
George and Kathv
McNcrney are the top
all-around newcomers.
Rose and his assistant.
Rod W'eston, are hop-
ing for national com-
petition for them in the
future.
30-day accounts
e�te'ciecl le's

major Creflt cerOI
illustrltion enlarges
So Specially
Hert!
hftial 'Heart
"Pefjdant
You'll Win
Her Heart With
This Highly
Personal Gift
Idea
Western Auto
Get Your Car Ready
For NCSU
Charging System
Check
Most U.S. Cars
and
Some Foreign Cars
!
I

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AvaiiaDie
All Day
Every Day
Open
11 A.M9 P.M.
Sun-Thru Thurs.
11 A.M10 P.M.
Fri.&Sat.
t
A
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famM
3005 E.
10th Street
Greenville, N.C.I
(Beside Hastings Ford)
Take Out
Service
Available
758-8550
Fast & Easy Delicious Lunches
Soup & Salad
$-99
ihicken Filet Sandwich
Baked Potato or French Fries
Chllds PlaTe
4 Oz. Chopped Sirloin
Baked Potato or French Fries
Toast
Diet Plate
4 Oz. Chop Sirloin $4 99
Cottage Cheese & Fruit I
Old Fashion Cheeseburger
$-29
No Potato
Steerburger
Banquet
& Party
Facilities
Available
Steak Sandwich
Plain, HeoDers & Onions
Mushroom Gravy,
Baked Potato or '
French Fries
Baked Potato
or French Fries
SPECIALS DAILY
NO TAKE OUTS
ON DAILY SPECIALS
Monday And Wednesday
Beef Tips
S029
Tuesday Ana ihursoay
Chop Sirloin
$189
80z.
Daily Specials Served With Baked Potato or French Fries & Toast
Item Delicious Salad Bar
FREE!
Solid Oak Headboard by BROYHILL
Plus Free Bed Frame
With The Purchase Of Any Full Or
Queen-size Of Sealy Posture Pedic
Or Posturecare Bedding
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3feM!�ttfb
K!Hrl�llniH'�i
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JL
vrt -rV �ri'F? Yy� -j,V?s � A v
RWUOIillKiiliUt IlilHia
ig w'1 m
i.
Today Thru Wed. Nov. 26th
Turner's Sleep Center, Inc.
628 S. Pitt St.
GreenviHe,N.C, 27834
8:30am-6:00pm MonSat.
Telephone 758-7332

"V � � -v RM �





Title
The East Carolinian, November 20, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 20, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.95
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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