The East Carolinian, November 18, 1980






�he iEafit (Earnltntatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
ol.55No3 LH �
H Pages
luesdav, November IX. PHO
(Greenville, North arolina
( initiation 10.000
Jury Finds Defendants Innocent
Kl I
v
t NSB( R ,n.c a im)
trial inNorth e arolina
Monda with clerk
oice thai
e neaut houl the coui -
B 1he verdict that
KNazis inno-
.
undei way
- a nu. all white six-
six-womanbeen
Nov 1 1 he
lication they
irdict until jury
:K Manduley, a
M
escoi ted I the chambei s
Supei ioi c out i lodge lames
1 ong ai 4:50 p.m.
1 ven then, some courti oom
Wayne Wood noi guilty ol
feloniously engaging in a riot
Mis Dooley said, glancing at the
jury. "You find the defendant
verdict had Roland Wayne Wood nol guilty oi
been reached, notim- thai the jury the murder" ol each ot the slam
had been quitting its deliberations communists, as she listed cash in
day. Mandulev alphabetical order.
Mis. Doolev then read the same
tund p m eat h
returned to the jury room and the
full jurv filed into the courtroomm
at 5:10 p.m. aftei the last defense at-
toi ney ai i iv ed in coui t.
"as
verdicl foi each ol the othei live
defendants.
Jurors sat expressionless as Mis.
.w was handed Dooley read the verdict.
l0 an. s:i3 p.m rhe defendants sat behmc
he
said the prayed silently as Mrs
Dooley began reaching the verdict
and some cued when it became deal
they would .ill go 11 ee.
I hen families, sitting six rows
behind them, sobbed openly. Some
family members began crying once
it became apparent a verdicl had
been reached even before the jury
had entered the coui troom.
Once the verdicts were read, I ong
allowed the families to embrace the
d e t e n d a n t s .
I he three prosecuting attorneys
stared straight ahead as the verdicl
dai the verdicts and defense table, erect in then black
swivel chairs. I hey held hands and were read.
e attorney Robert Cahoon -Security, which has
em to Mrs. Dooley.
You find the defendant Roland defense
een nehr
throughout the nial, was mere i
foi the verdicts iv five
uniformed and pi 'lice
officers lined three rooms ol
courti oom.
dditiona
stationed jusi �
I ong made it clt
�a ould be tolerated.
I ong kept repot tei s
tioom until all the
tead.
I he n ial was two we �
thai r this yea
Gold
Jisrup-
� the courthouse
� al
ked by the
: I lohn
' I
I
k. ;
City Council
m
Calls For
Liquor Vote
s PAl 1 I Ol 1 INs
n Si �. t diloi
� by the drink
ivay Greenville.
( ouncil approved by
4-2 I hursday a requesl by
. . Restaurant Associa
� ng the matter before the
nville in a city-wide
m.
I denied a similar
. when two ol its six
rhe vote at
Keci ai
� council
approve the
d .
n
the North Cai olina
ra Assembly approv eu
all 'wing certain sities to
ed bev. ei age v otes.
� 979 a � wide
dl : k
in Pitl ounty. In
ever, the vote was in
lim Mallory of Easi
a felt that the referendum
have little effect on the
" 1 he law pro
ale of a
he explained,
see ii ha ing much effect
- meeting opponents
ged the council to
go by the way of peti-
I � ; . available to the
' ave required 20 per-
� ol the registered voters to sign a
Brewer Said To Be
In Running For Job
B m bbii hoi i IM,
si � 11 �
eceived ovei 2hi up;

I
Easi a' o; ��� Univc M r, stepped di
( hancellor rhomas B. Brewei is a Octobei
finalist foi the posi ol presideni
the University ol I ouisv ille, an-
nounced sources last Friday
Brewei. ch; ' I
ilina foi the past three
t!
hop. i repla
In an intervu
New and Ol Brewei
; Easi
11 ustees, i
interest
I ouisville
�. ti a a -

be ex
aveled to 1 ouisville W� - happy EC I
Chancellor Brevier
inten iew . 1 le could noi b
i eached foi comment lasl
1 he University ol I ouisville has a
loo membei search committee ii
viewing applicants foi the posi
ol presideni So far,
made u
members, administration and fa
� ule on
:re.
Brewe
view, "I would
youi sell. 1 l toked
ECU Visual Arts Forum Suffers
Setback From Student Government
etiti( for a referendum.
rtumbei ol local ministers
ition to liquor by the
rinl a suggested that an
te would indicate sup
�rt foi ileol mixed beverages.
cilman W illiam Madden Jr
a minister, felt otherwide. He
! my firm conviction that
i and other members of
council face tonight is noi
i nol we will credit the
: Greenville with the
� cidc the issue.
and on both sides
ie here tonight and in our
indeed has the right to
nviction, pro y son.
� .en should have the right
his or hersell al the ballot
� added.
I � mbers voting in favoi ol
ferendum included Hadden,
, McKee, Joe Iatt and 1 ouis
lud) Greene and Clarence
Gray were opposed to the matter.
According to City Manages 1 d
Wyatt, the earliest possible date foi
referendum would be the first
week in March. The date will be of-
ficially set by the Pitt C ounty Board
ol Elections.
Wyatl also noted that it the
referendum is passed it will mean
additional revenue for I'm County
because ol an additional tax. but he
indicated that the revenue would not
necessarily filter through to Green
ville
Bv II ion (,RU
I he ECI Visua Arts Forum
(VA1 iffered a legislative setback
day w Studeni c iovern-
meni Association tailed to override
a vet pilations request.
In a veek, theSGA
v tdgei foi the
i . which was $4,600 less than the
amount they originally asked for.
Howevei. SGA Presideni c harlie
d el oed I he amended
budget, noting in a memorandum to
the SGA 1 egislature that, " The
VA1 bill would have taken 19 per-
cent ol the a SGA budge: that
has to sun ti July I, 1981
rhe Vi ual Arts Foi um is made
up ol nine groups that represent
cash ol the depart merits in the 1 C I
School ol rhe VA1 sponsors
exhibil i speakers and
workshops connected with various
ait media It is funded by an annual
and from SGA monies,
which come from studeni tees.
Speaking on behalf o the VA1 ,
i)i. Richard Eaing, dean ol the
School ol Art, said that the ECU art
school was "the besl school in the
university and thai the V'AF's ac-
tivities helped promote the reputa-
tion ol the school.
"Easiarolina University is nol
known all ovei the I nited States,
excepi foi those groups thai
penetrate the I v 1 aing told the
studeni legislators. "When we do
something important, we announce
ECU Police Beat
n are

: Sw;

SGA Votes
To Approve
Budget
Bv It RRN. (,H
1
S(
�C. 1 egislature voted M
appropriation
n � tudent gi
Ml Pla use, described
int Pro! � N �ti Pa
I inn ol the N.
comments to
� 00! thestu-
lled bv the
it and invite people from all ovei the
count i v
I aing aKo noted that the art
school's budget has not increased
this year, making it "more im-
perative" foi the VAF to continue
its programs.
Opponents of the bill argued in
debate that the relatively large V Al
requesl would take away money thai
could be appropriated to other stu-
dent groups later in the school year.
"As president, I fell I had to look
at the perspective o all OU!
SGA Metinjj Monday
standing room only.
students said Charlie Sherrod
"The art majors here make up
about six percent of the studeni
bodv. "here are groups at school
who will be asking for money latei
on. We wish we could give everyone
everything thai thev ask for. but 19
percent until .lulv seems unaffor-
dahle "�
Sherrod based his 2cJ percent
figure on a total ol about $59,000 in
SGA funds which does not take into
account $30,000 that the legislature
has set aside as a butter sum
Doens ol art students crowded
into the SGA's meeting room in
Mendenhall Student Centei to
the debate on the bill
I egislators who suppoix the bill
argued generally that the 1 is a
worthwhile student group thai has
helped ECI and its art students by
providing functions and activities
thai the School of An cannot tund.
()nc legislatoi. an out o! -st;
student from New xoik. said she
See AF, Pac 3.
Greenville Resident Charged In Larceny
B MIKI NOONAN
Ni �n t dmir
Z rwo Greenville residents have
t "lG InSiQG heen a'tcsied and charged in con-
J Immmmmmmmm nection with the breaking and enter-
ing o the Student Supply Store
which occurred Oct. 2s. One suspect
has been charged with breaking and
Announcements " entering. The other has been charg-
Editorials 4 ed with possession o stolen proper-
( lassitieds ty after receiving a class ring from
1 etters the other s'lspecl and attempting to
1 ea tires sell the ring to a local jewelry trader.
sports ccording to police reports, on
Nov. 12, at 9:30 a.m the 1 (I IM)
received a call from an employee ol
the Coin and King Man located on
401 Evans Stifeet. The caller told
police a male was attempting to sell
a women's ring believed bv the
employee to have been one stolen
from the Student Supply Store on
Oct. 25.
Two officers dispatched to the
business arrived in tune to find the
suspect had already left the store.
Aftei five minutes, however, the
suspect returned with another male
and the rmg was at this time ten-
tatively identified as one that had
been taken from the Student Supply
Police described the ring as a
women's 10-karat gold display ring.
The two men were taken to the
ECUPD foi questioning.
one suspect, Wells, 20, ol 910
Douglas Avenue in Greenville told
police he had accepted the ring as
payment of a persona! debt Horn a
man identified as Jimmy Alan
Wilson o Greenville.
Wells and Wilson both denied
having knowledge ol the breaking
and entering of the Student Supply
Store Wilson, however, did admit
having the ring in his possession al
the time the two exchanged the ring
in place ol the personal debt
Wilson furthei told police he hd
bought the ring "from a dude" on
W Fifth St.
Wilson was ai tested foi break
and entering and larceny and in-
carcerated in Put County Jail under
a $5,000 bond COurt date has been
set foi No W.
Welb was charged with posses
sion ol stolen property and placed
under a SSX) bond. Well's court
date lias been set for Wx 10.
Police estimate the value ol the
recovered ring at S12(
1 i. I f Music a
id for pi
up
bands and
rh e ECI
� ally SI 3,350,
lower
Mr. Parker.
ill ol the b

iery and other
supp � hy the drama
depa
Parkei sai ' ,n
has forced
the ns planned
this yeai into smallei facilities
"BOX 'Mu. !o
be low beca I the -mallet
litres Parl explained, d
ding thai "next year, the Playhouse
wou lor help
ccording Parker, 75 perceni
of the box office receipts come from
sales ol the $1.50 student tickets
"Nobody wants to raise (thai
puce) Pat k.
When asked i! the Playhouse
would be discontinued it thev did
nol receive the money, Parker
replied, "No bui said he didn't
know where thev would get the
money,
I he appropriation to the ECI
School ol Musi, was originally
700, a figure which included
$1,600 in salaries to faculty
members involved with the or-
chestra, rhe SGA Appropriations
Committee cut the salary request
and made othei cuts before presen-
ting the bill to the legislature for a
vote
t
i





THl- EASTCAROI INI N
NOVIA1B1 R IX. 1W0
t
Announcements
GENERAL MANAGER
Applications are now being ac
cepted tor Genera! Manager ot
The East Carolinian Position will
be available as ot Dec 1 Appnca
tions may be picked up in the
Media Board Ottice in the Pubhca
tions Center
BLACK UNITY
The 1st annual Black Ufl '� a '
Awareness Beneti will bo held on
the 25th o Nov 1980 at the Flam
,ngo Dissoteque at 6 30 p m The
Benetit is to sponsoreo by Mn
bla It �' '� " M r�d sorori' i
wei, . id rhe PPHA
pr0 �� go to black. �� �
. , . es and I
Mm I � INAACP
ECU FRISBEE CLUB
The Fnsbee dub will have �n
rational meel ng ' i
N . II �' '
Mendenhall room ?8 "� �
I cH'f sonv . . m
OHicei s a be � � '�
HEALTH CARE
interested in going into the
care field' North
Carolina s Educational Loan Pro
gram may be able to help vhou
with eduction costs Tne I
t.onal Loan Program pi �
loans for students going into
medical and othei '�� � "
studies such as den
� � fie optome'r . P"t
LACROSSE CLUB
All those who are interested m
the ECU Lacrosse Club are needed
for attendance at our first meeting
Tues . Nov 18 at 6 30 in room 104
of Memorial Gymnasium
r
HISTORY
Phi Alpa Theta the History
Honor Society m cooperation H
the Dept ot History will be having
a guest speaker on Wednesday
Nov. � � -i .it 7 00 p m m
the Richard C Todd Room
Owing Brewster Di William N
peat nderwat
History The pul ited at no
, . ��� A be
- � I
ECU SPORT CLUB
will be a meeting on
Thursd . N l)th in Room
j4� Mend) nhall a' 7 00 Plans tor
OiSt t �
att
SKISNOWSHOE
All participants must pay their
final payment on Thursday,
November 20 Meet 4 00 Memorial
Gym. Room 108
PSI CHI
Ps. Ch. Nat
for psychology will meet Wed
Nov 19 at 7 15 m Sp 129 A maie
and female homosexual will
d.scuss sex roles and related dit
f.culties AM members and in
ted, mature guests welcome
INDUSTRIAL
DEVELOPMENT
What kind of industrial devi
ment do we want in the Grei
P M County a-v.iTht
Women voters will address tl
question at an opi I "foes
at 8 p.n �' �' �
� . � pers the
PPHA
P�
Spean
therapy nu
phar'� � �
others Loa
4000 pe'
depe' '
of s �
through c
underserve
Caro
terested m I
ig dental H�
- - i
n $500 t
I Nortl
I you sre in
program and owuld
BIOLOGY
ita
like an application pa. ��
the Ecuational Loan I
Division of F �. Serv es NC
Department of Human Resoun �
P O Box 12200 Rale u' N 17605
telephone 919 733 2164
SNA
The next � � ' - I the ECU
Student N rses Association will be
Tuesday Nov !Bth at 7 00 m tne
Nursing Auditorium Caroi Co�
present a I ir ' r w
followed by d.
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Phi Beta Lambda w � � �
Tuesday November 18th in kA
103 Tickets for the December
al wiii he disti buted ��
members so they
SCIENCE ED CLUB
A � .
- �� . a ten �� afi ��
ind techi a g is! b ���
stns 1� '� a be serv
ed at 3 30 anc 'he demons
a I � . It 4:0 �"� ire invM
Merchar
near C
� -
Compie
Biology '
m e m be r -

abou' c y.
ropear si "
nge c-
n a v
� �, spt akei
forest rang.
Pond - '
' he proqra

free �
series . red

II
PRINT AUCTION
I . � � . rtivei
G'oup a �' - d a' the
� Cente
� � Clark Branch Reait,
an official from Nati
Resources and n n
�pment An intei esti I
sons are invited to a
ARTISTSERIES
Student Union Ai list
��. �. � � ' on Wednes
�, embei � it 6 00 p m in
Room .i � Student
enter. A �����.�
attenc:
FILMSCOMMITTEE
Room 238 i" �
attend
COFFEEHOUSE
. . '���
N

CAPS GOWNS
Caps ami gowns tor lirst
ster gra itet be
delivered Nov 18 20 in the Student
Supply Store i iurs
to keep pi c v H � S10 00
gi adi atii fee I
these receiv Master!
Degree '� ��

-� . �. � . s .���� nood
Any gues' � Si I be i � ��� rred
to Student . . � �
Ann. �
ROSE
The "�
wilt be I
hall Pli
nl ormation dest loi i oom
� i -
sir
Stuck '
tor " � � I tin
� ��
working A '
ludent-
TURKEY SHOOT
M
� V N �
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Phi Beta Lambda
. � i Rawl 103 ' � -
for the December social w
� �

STUDENT RECITAL
Sabr.na Colema
il of Musu will present
la t piano music Fri I
mber 21 1980. a' 9 oo p rr
A.J Fletcher Ret I Ms
Coi. man v
Schun .�.�:��
62. Beetl .���
. Bai � �
i1
� E
N
� � �

partial full entoi
� for tl
i student of I Pa � ' '
S.U. TRAVEL
to ei
' p to Fort Laui
i � i .ind or on
.
March (
eturn I �
I think a
; ' I
� ' "lion
MENDENHALl EN ��
E AT 757 66t I
!
PKE
molded pap�
. the ECU
unds �
. " -
attend

MAGICIAN WANTED
Mendenha ' ' � '
�. . to employ a m,i .
. � � tl Madriga D.n
lers December 2 7 Interested m
l.viduals should contact Wanda
yuhas Merc, nha ludenl
lenter 757 6�!1 e� 213 tor I
mation p � � � � � - pond
is soon as .
SOCIOANTHRO
On Wednesday November 19.
the Socoiogy Anthropology Club
will hold its business meet.ng at
7 00 p m in Brewster D 302 ��
members and interested persons
are encouraged to attend Pars
for the Christmas party on
December 3 will be disc ussed For
more info, call Anna a' 752 0826 or
Br.tta at 758 8867
REAL ESTATE
A real estate .nvestment
seminar designed for real estate
professionals lending officers and
pote � ' " a be off
0 Eas' Carolina University
Wednesda. Nov 19
The program 'i be d rec te
James R Hawkins A cr
mayor of Durham Hawkins has
more than ?1 years ot professional
experience in commercial and .n
come properties
Co sponsors of the seminar are
the ECU Division of Continuing
Education and the Greenville Pitt
County Board of Realtors Ses
sions will be held at the Ramada
Inn
Topics to be discussed include
characteristics of real estate in
vestments forms of real estate
ownership cash flow determina
tion and analysis measuring in
vestment returns and syndica
t.ons
Fjr-lher information about the
semmar is available from "Real
Estate investment Seminar
Division of Continuing Education
East Carolina university Green
viiie. NC 27834
PHI ETA SIGMA
member! ' Ph Eta S g
a
A t" .�
Aenclenhflll
nee! rg in
on Tues Nov
18
and dc
Conve'
Studei
meet i
7 00 t
Georg
Cieme
I � ��
ACSSA
.
fianagan 20.
is and Dr Don
ipeak on the use of
�rnate I
�d persons are
end
EPISCOPAL WORSHIP
Ar episcopal service Of Holy
be celebrated
Tuesoa. � " rig Nov 18 m the
chapel of the Methodist S'uaent
entei 15th Street across from
Garreft DormThe service will
be at 5 30 P m with the Episcopal
Chapla � �'� Rev Bill Hadden.
celebr.i- � g
INTERIOR DESIGN
Raleigh architect Joseph
Flowers. A i A will speax at Eas
Carolina University Nov 19 in a
public program on the restoration
0 the Andrew Johnsc birthplace
� n Ra �
The lecture, scheduled tor 1 p m
in Room I32n of the Lee Jenkins
F ine Arts Center, is open o all m
lerested persons Sponsor of the
prog- � ECU chapter of the
National Society ot Interior
Designers
Women May Sue
Army In Fight
To Get A ward
(UPl) A woman who
could have been the
first female to win the
prized Special Forces
Green Beret said she
was denied the insignia
because she is a
woman.
She has not sued the
Army, but said she
would if a grievance she
has filed is not satifac-
torily resolved.
In August, officials
of the U.S. Special
Forces training school
in Fort Bragg, N.C
flunked Army Capt.
Kathleen Wilder, 29,
on the final part of a
course which would
have earned her the in-
signia.
But Ms. Wilder, of
the West Bank Loui-
siana community, said
she passed the covert
operations f ��
cise and filed a
grievance charging sex
discrimination.
Brig. Gen. F. Cecil
Adams, commander of
the 1st ROTC Region
at Fort Bragg, was
assigned the investiga-
tion. He will determine
how long investigation
of the complaint will
last, a spokesman said.
Col. Ola Mize, direc-
tor of the school, re-
jected Ms. Wilder's re-
quest for a grade
change. Mize and his
commander, Brig. Gen.
Joseph Lutz, recom-
mended the woman
retake the part of the
test she flunked.
Ms. Wilder srid she
was not offered the
same option of a
makeup test routinely
given to male officers.
��� � �
Remembei
. �. it Mi
TUTORS

MOUNT ST. HELENS

� �


-
nviti
PHI SIGMA PI
� . � � i . �
�����. A
at Par�.
AKA
- ��
� '
. embei . �
� � ' 00
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November 22,1980
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I Ml I SI.K( NA
NOW 11il R 18, 1980
-ERS
1
in
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RS
A N S L P
c
601
I69
602
FANCY
llOUS

r
Burial Grounds Uncovered
(I PI) rennessee Valley Authority
has asked foi an urgent pow-won
with the Cherokee Indians to see
what the tribe wants to do with the
remains of some of then ancestors
dug up during completion ot ihe
lelhco Dam.
The I85 Cherokee skeletons have
been a sore spot with the North
Carolina tribe in its latest fight with
the U.S. government. The Indians
sued rVA tot flooding lelhco.
which the Indians said was the
"sacred burial grounds" ol their-
forefathers.
I he Cherokee remains arc now
tucked awa in a University ol Ten-
nessee museum.
r Chairman David Freeman
asked, c herokee Chiel John A
Crowe for the meeting in a lettei
made public Monday. Freeman said
rVA wanted to gel the In
dians'views on the reinterment ol
the remains and also talk about
other ways to possibly memorialize
the tribe.
Freeman said he hoped to talk to
the Indians about "projects and
programs which could aid in mark-
ing the place ot Cherokee history in
the valley.
"We need to meet as soon as
possible because of the urgent and
conflicting demands on the limited
funds available to I 1 reeman
told C roue in the lettei.
Freeman told Crowe he'd he e
to meet him in Cherokee. N.C
any othei place the chiel desires.
I ribal plannei Bob Blankenship
said the tube had not fully discussed
the meeting.
"1 don't know what we will do.
1 he council next meets Dec �? and it
will have to make a decision
Blankenship said
I he I ittle 1 ennessec Valley
flooded by the controversial 1 ellico
Dam was once t!
a thriv
ing ( herokee nation. I tic Indians'
capital o! Chota was on the shore ot
the clear blue rivet that snakes its
way through East 1 ennessee.
� Before the floodgates on the dam
were closed last vear, the Indians
asked I A to reburv all of the
skeletons m then original giaves
with lull ceremonial honors.
But TVA refused, citing too little
;me and the original graves were
coveted bv the 16,000 acre lake.
I he bones of the 185 Indians are
actually only part ot the dilemma.
Skeletal material from Vf? othei i'
dividuals was found in the rellko
region and some ol these bones date
back y,(XK) years. The bones and
other artifacts were dug out o
numerous Indian villages discovered
m the lelhco area, which an Interior
Department repon called one of the
nation's most significant ar-
cheaoloiiic.il regions.
UJUJ

H�
U
UJz
LL U. UJLU Ol
X LU
U.Z
Col. Sanders Comes
Off Critical List
A Touch Of Class
ECl I risbee enthusiasts Peter 1 auberl (L), and Michael (otter (R), demonstrate their diverse talents
with the plastie disk in Memorial (,m. Both students are in the proeess of organizing the 1(1 I risbee
Club whieh meets I uesdav night at 7 p.m. in room 248 Mendenhall student (enter. Here 1 auberl and
(Otter freestyle, one of the many facets of the sport.
Application Deadline Approaching Soon
1 ecembei
i
appli
cauoi
Ab
out
:50
women wii
e
dead one-day workshop in selected, she said. They will include
April tor North unemployed and underemph
women interested in women scientists and college
in science, mathematics, anj junior women majoring in
engineering and social science. science, mathematics.
The workshop will be at Meredith or social science.
College in Raleigh on April 4, 1981. Postage-paid applications
Research rriangle Institute tRl'h available from North Carolina
will conduct the workshop under a ege and university offices ol conti-
il horn the National Science nuing education or career planning.
1 oundation.
'lace said
ii ri
iversitie
-
tould
K e �
stil
arc
ute. 919-
W oinen
e i n foi
Mai)
i yloi at
riangle In-
541-6324.
1 OU1SV1U I Kv
il I'll olonel
Harland Sanders, the
foundei ol the Ken-
tucky fried Chicken
Corp was off the
ieal list today and in
go d enough spirits to
complain about his
food.
But doctors caution-
ed the silver-haired
founder of the multi-
lion dollar last food
chain was still seriously
ill in his battle against
pneumonia.
' 1 he colonel has
been taken ofl of the
itical list John Cox,
a spokesman fot Ken
iuckv Fried Chicken,
said Sundav. "He is sit-
ting up and talking with
people and even com-
plaining about the
tood, which in the col-
onel's case, is a good
. n.
( ox said Sanders s
looking much bettet,
�h still seriously
ill. But he said physi-
cians have slopped
iking predictions
- u t Sanders'
recovery p e r i o d
because he keeps sur-
prising them.
lo fully appreciate
M you had to see him
Ihursday and Friday,
he was on the brink. It
is phenomenal
Sanders, 91). slipped
in and out o' con-
sciousness Friday and
was placed under ox-
ygen.
He was admitted to
the hospital a week ago
with a bladder and
kidney ailment, and
had been responding
well to treatment when
h e d e v e I o p e d
p n e u m o n i a . T h e
pneumonia attack was
his third this vear.
Sanders, who has
held numerous jobs
before developing his
secret recipe tor tried
chicken into a multi-
million dollar fast-food
industry, sold out tor
$2 million in 1964 to a
w'oup headed by John
V. Brown Jr now
Kentucky's governor.
In 19"1, the firm was
merged with Ffeublein,
Inc a liquor
w holesaler . tin t
Sanders was kept on
the payroll at a
reported salary of
$250,000 annually to
promote the tried
chicken div ision.
VAF Upset
Over Vote
SPORTSWOKLD
COLLEGE NIGHT
Tuesdav Night
Continued from Page I
learned about ECl
through the VA1 's par-
pat ion in a Portfolio
Day at Pratt Universi-
!v .
Ben Singleton, who
opposed the bill. said.
�'1 don't think the ques-
tion is whether they are
a worthwhile group,
but the amount ot
�ney involved1
After about a half-
hour ot debate and
p a r 1 i a m e n t a r y
manuevers, the motion
to override Sherrod's
veto tailed bv a 16-28
vote, with two absten-
When Speakei of the
1 egislature Pegg
Davison said thai the
VAI would now have
to re-submit a budget
request, an art student
w ho at tended t he
meeting shouted back,
"We will as he let!
the room.
6:30-10:00
Bring I. D. and
Get In For Only 11.25
Dew it with
Mountain Dew
'inns.
Rockwood Stables
Horseback Riding
m Miles east ��' llh s'
1 lighw a
ii
714
1(1
AHMV MAVY STOU6 B
RackcxcM ��!�. �oi��rc.
� ���. Otc. P�g�A Snorkel �
g Jacket. PIKMH. PtrkM.
ShMt. Combat Soot. W�
1M1 S. e�aii��r�t
CAROLINA
OPRY HOUSE
PRESENTS
SAAD'SSHOE
REPAIR
I id ,t. Avf
B 1228
Qualilv Repair
THE
LARRY FRANKLIN
BAND
WED.NOV. 19-SUN.NOV.23
WED.NOV.19-LARRY FRANKLIN
BAND
& THE GREENGRASS CLOGGERS
WITH THE HOME TOWN BOYS
$2.00 ADMISSION
THUR.NOV.20
Riggan Shoe
Repair Shop
Downtown Greenville
758-0204
Aero The Street
From Biount-Harvey
I 11 W. 4th Street
Greenville. N.C.
LADIES NIGHT
LADIES $1.00
SUN.NOV.23
DOORS OPEN AT 5:00
LADIES FREE
MEN $2.00
L
Mountain Dew from Pepsi Coia. the totally
different soft drink with the lemony-fresh flavor
that's like nothing else you ever tasted.
Bottledt. PCI StCOtAf
iNGCO f Greenville Ire 1809 Didf "son Avc Greerwill NC
under appt frorr PfPS'COlNC





(Bift fcwt Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Richard Green, �.�
It RRV HERNDON, Outcto, oj idveriiuxg I-INA DREW, cm �-
CHRIS 1 ICHOK, Busuictt Unas Mlkl NOONAN, ��$ Edtiw
David Severin, �.��� Chari es Chandi t r. Vi�ma�
11 l NCASTER, prodNciKw, um� DAVID NoRRIS. � ��
fysujufL.
Niucmhc! IS. 1SS0
Opinion
Page 4
VAF Budget
Sherrod's Veto Upheld
For 'All Our Students'
In an SGA meeting yesterday,
student legislators dealt out an ex-
tremely short-lived brand of reason-
ing to the Visual Arts Forum
(VAF), which represents nine
groups in the ECU School of Art.
The VAF came to the SGA this
year, as usual, for money. Though
the group cut S4,6(X) from their
original request, the Legislature
voted not to override the veto that
SGA President Charlie Sherrod
placed last week on the subsequent
$11,150 request.
Apparently, the legislators
followed Sherrod's reasoning,
which was based on the premise that
such a large request would cut into
money that other student groups
would ask for later.
Shortly afterward in the same
meeting, the ECU Plavhouse receiv-
ed $10,000 (original re-
quest:S13,350) and the School oi
Music got $5,100 (originally
$8,700).
There is little doubt that these two
organizations needed the monies
that were appropriated � they pro-
bably could have used more. But
how can the SGA let those bills pass
while stifling the VAF bid because
"six percent of the student body"
(art students) are asking for 19 per-
cent of the budget? That's what
about forty angry art students (and
probably many more) would have
wanted to know if they had stayed
to see the rest of the day's work.
That budgets must be trimmed
according to student fees is a simple
fact of life, but such a flimsy excuse
cannot be accepted. It makes one
wonder about President Sherrod's
campaign platform promises to
"the arts
If the percentage method that
defeated the VAF bill were applied
to the ECU Playhouse and the
School of Music, would those ap-
propriations have been approved?
You can rest assured that The East
Carolinian will have those figures
for the Thursday edition.
While President Sherrod is look-
ing "at the perspective of all our
students he is tacitly forgetting
the $30,000 buffer the legislature
has set aside. Sherrod's explanation
for making the VAF take up the
slack will be very interesting.
We agree with Dr. Richard Laing
that the ECU School of Art is one
of the best in the university; indeed,
it is among the best in the nation.
When the SGA singles out one ex-
cellent school to bear the brunt of
budgeting, someone's priorities are
out of whack.
Greener Pastures
Dr. Brewer has been at ECU for
only three years and it appears that
he's already seeking greener
pastures. We award Quote of the
Week to the fellow who told us
Monday, "When you become
chancellor of a university, you are
married to that university. Dr.
Brewer just went out on a date
CHEER UP. JIMMY. UlSToRY
WCRK& IN FUNNY WAYS-
REMEMBER, YOU MADE THE
FCRP PRESIDENCY LPCK GOOD!
Campus Forum
'Screwed To The Wall'
S-SSSss
1 am writing this on behalf of my
boyfriend who, upon withdrawing from
dear ole EC, was promptly screwed to
the wall. Getting out of this place is pret-
ty tough�it takes a craftsman's skill.
Signing papers, getting signatures of
people you never heard of�the famous
ECU "runaround After this madden-
ing experience your refund check is pro-
mised to arrive at your door within 2
weeks. Six weeks later the check arrives
after making 5 long-distance calls to ask
where the check might be. The astute
people in the cashier's office told m
boyfriend the first time he called thai
they never heard oi him. The second and
third week he was assured that his check
was being "processed The fourth
week the check was in its "final stages
The fifth week the voice at the end of the
telephone line told him that his check
had been ready for a "long time The)
were waiting for him to come by and
pick it up. He finally persuaded her that
living two hours away "picking up" the
check wasn't that simple. She said that
was no problem; she would put it in the
mail. The check did arrive�S40 short. It
seems they calculated the refund from
the last oi October instead oi Oct. 3.
when he withdrew. Does the administra-
tion realize that the student body pays
their salary? Do they just not care or is u
simply ignorance? Do they think that all
students are wealthy? If our payment to
them was five or six weeks late we would
probably be relieved of our duties as
students accompanied by several nastv
letters. If there's one thing ECU ad-
ministration hates, it's irresponsibility.
MIRIAM C.RISSOM
Sophomore, Education
Support For Basketball
1 thought 1 would write this letter in
hopes that it would provide some in-
spiration for students to support East
Carolina basketball.
I understand that at ECU football
takes the spotlight, and there is nothing
wrong with that, but those of you who
are familiar with the relatively small
crowds at ECU basketball games will
understand what I'm talking about when
I say that those crowds aren't nearly
what they should be. I often wonder
how many students realize that we even
have a men's and women's basketball
team. I think it's rather ironic that we
can pull twenty to twenty-nine thousand
to an ECU football game, but are doing
good to get two thousand to a basketball
game. It is great to support ECU foot-
ball, but why not support ECU's other
sports too? Its a shame to have a
university oi nearlv 14.XK) and onlv get
2(KH) to a basketball game and some ot
those aren't even students. Come on
now , we can do better than that! Minges
should be full tor ever home game.
You've heard all that stuff about how
much a good home crowd can help a
team win, well, it true�in football,
basketball or art other sport.
Whatevei a student's excuses are foi
not going to basketball games the) can-
not be cos! oi lack of qualil) teams. All
students gel into home games tree with
their ID. As foi the teams, ECU's men
had their first winning season in five
years lasl yeai 116-11 and the women
had a erv successful season (21-9). I he
men upset South Carolina and Illinois
State last year. 1 he women scored more
points against Old Dominion, the na-
tional champs, than any other teams the
Lady Monarchs played Certainly hoth
teams are deserving oi our utmost sup-
port. Coaches Dave Odom and Cath
Andruzzi have pui together two high
class programs, teams thai we as
students can be proud ol and should
support.
The men have a young team this year;
this should give us an added incentive to
support them. As for the women, the)
are going to have one of the toughest
schedules in the nation including home
games with Old Dominion. N.C. State,
and Southern California, all of which
are nationally ranked. I his should give
us another incentive for supporting
them.
On campus 1 always hear students
wanting to have a "big time" athletic
program. We'll have to have a "big
time" mentality to have a "big time"
program�and that means supporting all
sports, let's keep Minges packed this
season. The women start their season
against Virginia Tech. at 3:00 p.m. on
November 23, and the guys start
November 24 at 7:30 p.m. against
Marathon Oil in an exhibition game.
Hope to see you there!
CHAR I SSAUNDERS
Junior. Histor)
Hope For The Future
On Tuesday, Nov. 4, McGovern,
Bayh, and Culver were voted out of the
Senate: Reagen was elected. On Tues-
day, Nov. 11. you printed a letter from
Patrick O'Neill. O'Neill, upset by the
election, frustrated and angered by some
popular lies that played a large role, ex-
pressed healthy indignation at
widespread selfishness in the United
Slates. The following words help explain
the situation to me; maybe they will help
hu and his sympathetic readers. The)
are from Inch Ffomm's Beyond The
Chains Of Illusion. Fromm, a
psychoanalyst, may be best known as
author ol 1 he Art Ot 1 oving.
"Ihis need to be one with others
(man's) strongest passion, stronger than
sex and often even stronger than his wish
to hve I-or this reason the individual
must blind hiniselt from seeing that
which his group claims does nol exist, or
accept as truth that which the majorit)
savs is true, even it his own eves could
convince him that it is fal herd is
so vitally important foi the individual
that their views, beliefs, feelings, con-
stitute reality for him, more so that w
his senses and his reason tell him
I here is almost nothing a man will nol
believe � or repress � uhen he is
threatened with the explicit or implicit
threat ol ostracism
" hile man is afraid oi complete isola-
tion from his social group, he is also
afraid of being isolated from the
humanit) which is inside him and which
is represented bv his conscience and his
reason. To be complete) inhuman is
frightening, even when a whole societ)
has adopted inhuman norms of beha ior
The ability to act according to one's
conscience depends on the degree to
which one has transcended the limits of
one's society and has become a citizen of
the world (Emphasis added.)
For me, Fromm here clearly expresses
ideas which help me understand the past,
election, and help me hope.
C.A. WEBBER
Math (Ret.)
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes tetters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop (hem by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted. Letters by the
same author are limited to one each 30
daw.
In a gnppinj
(hroat ol Si
production
ictnun, U A

To
���"��� �
Th










Gi
"Perhaps 100 People Will Starve As You Read This Article"
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Here we go again � another arti-
cle on hunger. You've heard it all
before: the statistics, the estimates,
the pleas. Why do we have to hear it
again. Because the recently released
"GLobal 2000 Report" to the presi-
dent has presented the most horrify-
ing developments yet. This three-
year study conducted by the Council
On Environmental Quality and the
Department of State (yes, our very
own State Department) predicts a
population increase to approximate-
ly 6.35 billion by 2000. Currently
there are just over 4 billion people
on our planet. This increase coupled
with other expected environmental
decays assures a greater disparity
between the haves and the have-
nots.
In 1978 President Carter formed
his own study group to deal with the
hunger question. The 1980 final
report of the Presidential Commis-
sion on World Hunger was also far
from hopeful. The commission's
bottom-line message was clear:
Continued lack of concern for the
hungry could have grave im-
plications for all nations, including
the United States That's where we
come in. Now we're talkling about
our survival � not some person
hundreds of miles away. Until now
hunger was something we saw in
pictures or heard about on televi-
sion. We never expected it to go
beyond the media.
Richard Barnet, a noted foreign
affairs specialist, calls hunger and
malnutrition ' the hidden holocaust
of our day In his recently publish-
ed book, The Lean Years: Politics in
the Age of Scaricity, he says, "It
(hunger) is avoidable, and because it
is avoidable it is as much an indict-
ment of this generation of
bystanders as Hitler's Holocaust
stands as an indictment of the last
Why does Barnet use this analogy?
Human suffering speaks for itself:
28 deaths per minute occur as a
result of hunger. Perhaps 100 peo-
ple will have died, as you read this
article. The division between rich
and poor keeps haunting us. Arthur
Simon, author of Bread for the
World writes, "New York City,
with a population under 8 million,
has an annual budget almost the
same size as that of India, a nation
with 600 million people
Quotes and statistics don't even
begin to tell the story. The Presiden-
tial Report accuses the United States
and other developed countries of
placing a very low priority on
alleviating world hunger Many
hunger activists note the high levels
of military assistance to these
developing nations when so many
basic human needs are still unmet.
Many multi-national corporations
have emerged on the scene and fur-
ther add to foreign economic
downfall by reaping incredible pro-
fits. Lester Brown in his book,
"World Without Borders" writes:
"Too often companies have taken
undue advantage of cheap raw
materials, cheap labor, and various
tax havens in order to maximize
profits The complexities keep pil-
ing up and action needs to be taken
now. The Presidential Report
recommends that the United States
make the elimination of hunger its
"primary focus" of the 1980's.
Global 2000 states further "There
are no quick fixes" and that some
form of international cooperation is
a must. One solution that has been
given high recomendations from
both, relief organizations and the
developing countries, is the in-
troduction oi a "new international
economic order that benefits
everyone. This idea was first men-
tioned in a United Nations declara-
tion in April oi 1975.
It fundementally calls for a
greater cooperation between coun-
tries to help bring self subsistence to
the poorer nations. Other actions
can be taken by Americans on a per-
sonal level. Too often individuals
feel helpless amidst such an over-
whelming problem. Many relief
organizations and political action
groups invite participation on a
local level, stressing the idea of the
whole human family.
OXFAM-America, the American
I
arm of the very successful British
relief organization, sponsors a na-
tionwide fast every year on the
Thursday before Thanksgiving. The
fast asked that participant, go
without food for 24 hours and make
a donation to hunger relief.
Through events such as this one they
try to call attention to the hunger
problem and help educate people.
Ted Howard, an active member of
"The Hunger Project" states: "The
challenge before us is enormous.
Hunger can be ended by the turn of
this century Let's meet this
challenge.
Patrick OWeili is a member of
the Greenville Peace Committee and
the Greenville Hunger Coalition.
GRI 1
for l
will be
fOOl w
watei
1 h
is espex
centt
an East Cai
ol -Vr
"It's swr
here sa
spokespersc
retreat
"We're exri
Bu-
brick aquedul
water ftom il
plant. The tl
wool, will K
t





5r
F
dual
w nat
he is
lplicit
8ER
Ma:or
d South ters
and
iber
MenP"ges.
ted.Alllet-
'or rci (
personalat-
bythe
ach
ie'
cessful British
jponsors a na-
vear on the
nksgivmg. The
irtiapants go
ours and make
unger relief.
i they
: Hunger
i i al people
member of
ites I he
is enormous.
'he turn of
f meet this
p member of
mil tee and
ilit ion.
1 HI I SI . Akol INIAN
Features
N()! MBLR 18, 1980
Page 5
Streamers Presented By
Drama Department
GREENVILLE�The Vietnam
War, probably the most important
issue in America during the past 25
years, is the setting of "Streamers
a serious drama by David Rabe to
be produced by the East Carolina
Playhouse Nov. 17-22, 24-25.
"Streamers is concerned with
the average young American male,
thrown into a conscriptive military
situation in which individual worth
is totally ignored. The internal con-
flicts of five draftees are por-
trayed�their failure to live up to an
image of heroism and their inability
to cope with that failure. Issues of
race, impersonality, homosexuality
and brutality are part of the turmoil
in the play.
In 1976 "Streamers" won the
New York Drama Critics Award as
best American play o the year
along with rave reviews from major
critics.
Its ECU production is directed by
Cedric Winchell, a new member of
ECU's theatre faculty, who brings
to campus a wide range of ex-
moment. Gregory Smi h of Wash.ngton holds a knife to the nencePin actine direclinB, writing
t Rodger ol Jacksonville. Both appear in the EC I Playhouse and teaching Dr. winchell has ap-
"Streamers a serious drama about American soldiers in the peared ,n more than 30 TV shows,
intended for mature audiences. "Streamers" will run Nov. ,nree fealure films and numerous
at 8:15 p.m. in East Carolina University's Studio Theatre. stage productions in New York and
Los Angeles. He has been a direc-
Tom Robbins' New Novel
Still Life With Woodpecker
Thoroughly Entertaining Story
ting instructor at three universities
and headed an award-winning ac-
ting company in Los Angeles.
Among his publications is an
analysis of the use of psychological
projections in "Streamers Win-
chell, who received the PhD in
theatre history and dramatic theory
from UCLA, comes to ECU from
the University of Washington.
Among his all-male cast are tour
veterans of U.S. armed forces. Per-
formers include drama majors
Donald Waponer of Winston-
Sal em, Gregory
Washington, Keith
tnd Chap Gurley of
of
of
S m 11 h
Guillorv
Jacksonville a
Raleigh.
Also appearing are Eric Tilley,
Wilmington; Scott Rodger,
Jacksonville; John Robbins,
William Tyson and Jim Ensor,
Robert Willie, Nor-
and
liam
Greenville;
VII V.v.11 t lllv IWH'VI I " I I I H, ,
thport, I ong Island, N.Y
Mark Zimei, Croton, N.Y.
Streamers' is paving new
ground in eastern North Carolina
commented Winchell. "It makes us
reconsider easily submerged issues
such as war and draft registration,
which are especially significant now
in the light of recent world ten-
sions
Scott Parker, general manager of
the ECU Playhouse, noted that the
play is "a powerful military drama"
and is intended for mature au-
diences.
Each of the eight performances is
scheduled for ECU's Studio Theatre
at 8:15 p.m. Tickets are available at
the Playhouse Box Office,
757-6390
France's Claudine Beccarie
Stars In Film: Exhibition
In a gripping
throat of Scot
production of
Vietnam War
17-22, 24-25
B DOUG QUEEN
Matt M nlrr
The old saying that college-
students never have time to read
seems to hold true at ECU. Yet dur-
ing vacations and weekends when
are ahead in our academic work, it
is pleasant to pick up a book and
relax. Xo do this properly depends
on the book. It would be self-
defeating to peruse Kant's Critique
of Pure Reason or Defoe's Journal
ol the Plague Year when all we want
i- a pleasant sojourn in reading that
doesn't overwhelm the rational
faculties. Hence, the great demand
tor historical romances. Harlequin
romances, and the Harold Robbin's
brand of so-called literature.
These books rarely are worth the
paper and ink in them. They do
nothing to illuminate the mystery oi
life and love and art. They are facile
in the shallow sense. But there is an
alternative. There are books that are
facile but not shallow, well-written,
and worth the time and effort plac-
ed into them. One such book is Tom
Robbin's new novel Still Life With
W oodpecker.
The jacket blurb states that, "Still
Life With Woodpecker is sort of a
love story that takes place inside a
pack of Camel cigarettes. It reveals
the purpose i' the moon, explains
the difference between criminals
and outlaws, examines the conflict
between social activism and roman-
tic individualism, and paints a por-
trait of contemporary society that
includes powerful Arabs, exiled
royalty and pregnant cheerleaders
It also deals with the problem of
redheads Quite an order. passion; Tequila, the buzzard god
Whether Robbins achieves a com- who copulates in midair with tlie
pletion of this "portrait"he paints is ascending souls of dying virgins; te-
debatable, but getting there is all the quila, firebug in the house oj good
fun. taste; O tequila, savage water or
sorcery, what confusion and
mischief your sv, rebellious drops
do generate.
Robbins has a fine sense of the
language and his prose is never dull.
More than once, however, he suc-
cumbs to the tyranny oi cuteness,
which styllistically weakens the
work considerably.
The strongest part of this novel is
the plot. Mention Tom Robbins to
people in the know and they will
regale you with tales of zany plots
from his two previous novels:
Another Roadside Attraction and
Even Cowgirls Get The Blues. The
man is most creative when he sets
his characters moving through
chains of cause and effect that obey
no laws but those oi the author's.
Despite the weakness of the cute
passages, Still Life With
Woodpecker is a thoroughly enter-
taining story with hundreds of
asides from the author, sometimes
an irritating intrusion, on
everything from pyramids to te-
quila. The "tequila" aside could
have been written by Bil Shepley,
and this review ends in dedicating
the aside to Bil:
Now, tequila may be the favored
beverage of outlaws, but that
doesn 7 mean it gives them preferen-
tial treatment. In fact, tequila pro-
bably had betrayed as many outlaws
as has the central nervous system
and dissatisfied wives. Tequila,
scorpion honey, harsh dew of the
doglands, essence of Aztec, crema
de cacti; tequila, liquid geometry of
Screened at the Cannes and New-
York Film Festivals in 1975, the film
Exhibition was the first "hardcore"
porno movie (adults only) to be
shown at the New York Eilm
Festival. Exhibition will be screened
this Wednesday night, Nov. 19, at 8
p.m. in Mendenhall Student
Center's Hendrix Theatre. This
special movie presentation is spon-
sored by the Student Union Eilms
Committee.
Admission is by student ID and
activity card or Mendenhall Student
Center Membership Card. Follow-
ing the film, coffee and doughnuts
will be served in room 221 of the
student center. All students, faculty
and staff seeking others with whom
they might discuss the film further
are welcome.
Exhibition is an attempt to ex-
plore, in documentary fashion, the
lifestyle and philosophy of France's
premiere porno rtar, Claudine Bee
cane. Truly a woman oi contradic-
tions, Ms. Beccarie is a product of
the convent (she was a Cadet of the
Virgin) and the reform school,
where she was unjustly imprisoned
to cover up her rape by her uncle.
Claudine Beccarie
An admitted bisexual, she is anx-
ious to promote bisexuality as an
alternative lifestyle, yet she refuses
to discuss her political persuasions,
as she considers politics too
personal" to be discussed, even
among consenting adults.
Casual about her participation in
various sexual entanglements within
her films, she is. for the most part,
the monogamous partner of a man
10 years her junior � a porno queen
who remains on close terms w.iih her
mother.
She is a woman of principle. That
is, Beccarie disdains foul language
and absolutely draws the line at per-
forming sex acts with animals or
film producers. She will carry on,
either solo or in various combina-
tions, almost any other amorous ac-
tivity, provided it is being filmed by
professionals and the price is right.
In the film, the heroine may be
observed, shedding tears in closeup,
as she tells how she was raped by her
uncle when she was only 15. This
assault precipitated a descent into
prostitution and an unfortunate
marriage in which her soldier hus-
band insisted on having a child
against his wife's express wishes.
"He tied me down on the bed and
everything she reveals. All of this
occurred before Claudine's ascent
to stardom in a series of quickies
produced by Erance's newly
burgeoning porno industry.
One of Claudine's most
remarkable skills is a knack for con-
stant searching of the soul even as
more accessible parts of her body
See FILMS, Page 6, Col. 1
Campus Capsules
A Brief Look At Other Campuses
A Room Inspection Policy is
under scrutiny at Western Kentucky
U. A group of students is seeking
the help of the American Civil
Liberties Union in protesting the
policy, which requires two announc-
ed inspections of dorm rooms for
fire hazards each month. The WKU
student government defeated a
resolution asking that inspections be
abolished but may seek to have the
policy made more standard.
Validation Stickers on student
identification cards are often abus-
ed, say Ohio State U. officials.
Since 1970, students there received a
fee card and a validation sticker on
their identification card when pay-
ing fees. A study by a sports office
there showed, however, that under
the sticker system, many ineligible
people were using university
facilities. OSU students must now
carry both ED. and fee cards, until
a new validation system is
developed.
.4 .S7. Louis Hotel offers students
a 10 percent commission on every
room they book for friends or fami-
ly members. In a student newspaper
ad, the Clayton Inn says students
can beome "booking agents" and
collect 10 percent of mom and dad's
room price�after they've checked
out. of course.
Student Politics is now offered
for credit at the U. of Florida. An
interdisciplinary course allows those
in student government or other cam-
pus activities to get one academic
credit for their work. To get that
credit, however, students must at-
tend every Student Senate meeting,
work on committees and produce a
research paper or project that
focuses on campus issues.
A "Party Patrol" run by the In-
diana Stale U. Student Association
attempts to head oii problems bet-
ween partying students and their
neighbors. Students are asked to
report anv upcoming parties to the
patrol, leaving a phone number of
an individual who can be contacted
in the event of complaints. The
patrol also advises hosts about
alcohol laws and gives tips for keep-
ing noise and littering complaints to
a minimum.
A fraternity that had its charter
revoked by Rider College is suing to
have it reinstated. Former members
of the Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity
are seeking an order for the school
to "show cause" what the frat was
ordered disbanded. Among com-
plaints against the house at the time
of revocation last July were reports
that members vandalized their own
house by lighting bonfires in the liv-
ing room and engaging in
"anti-social behavior
A Volunteer Fire Department is
housed in one dorm at Antioch Col-
lege. All 15 residents of the hall are
firefighters, and their equipment
garage is attached to the building.
The department works as a first-
response rescue and attack squad
and is backed up by the township
fire department.
Monthly Installment Billings will
be mailed to students at Southern
lllinois-Carbondale beginning next
term. Although the option of paying
fees and tuition through a monthly
bill is expected to be a popular con-
venience for students, it will also
mean a big administrative load and
increased postage bill for the univer-
sity
Gigantic Tapestry
Art Teacher Has Big Project
GREENVILLE - In his spare time
for the next year or so, Joe B. Buske
will be weaving a ninety-six square
foot wool tapestry into a design
depicting symbolically the gift of
water to a sprouting plant.
The design, which Buske created,
is especially for a religious retreat
center which commissioned Buske,
an East Carolina University School
of Art professor, for the work.
"It's symbolic of our ministry
here says Carolyn Massey, a
spokesperson for the religious
retreat, Aqueduct, at Chapel Hill.
"We're excited about it
Buske's design depicts a yellow
brick aqueduct delivering life-giving
water fiom its source to a growing
plant. The tapestry, of hand-dyed
wool, will be eight by twelve feet in
size and hang on a wall of the con-
ference center.
The design took several months
"through about three or four
stages Buske says. "Now 1
estimate it will take about 18 mon-
ths to complete He will work at a
special loom, fixed at a height of his
knee from the floor, in ECU's Leo
W. Jenkins Fine Arts Center, and it
will be one of Buske's most
challenging projects.
"It's biggish, maybe not gigantic,
but definitely biggish" for a woven
tapestry, says Buske. He will work
slowly and carefully. "It's a
monster. The size of the thing, the
scale, just scares the hell out of
me.
Buske studied ceramics and
sculpture at the University of Texas,
then as a high school teacher in
i
Dallas took up weaving in night
classes because most of his students
already knew pottery and weaving.
"Any teacher who didn't was out to
sea he said.
"I remember riding 20 miles on a
bus to get to my class Later, he
returned to the university to get a
master's degree in Fine Arts and
came to ECU in 1967 as an associate
professor of art education. Weaving
in his spare time is an avocation and
he has tapestries in private collec-
tions both in Texas and North
Carolina.
For the Aqueduct project, Buske
studied the room in which the
tapestry will hang and chose deep
maroon for the background. Colors
and texture will be important.
"It is very, very challenging he
said.
Joe B. Buske, East Carolina University artist, shows the design planned for square foot tapestry he will weave
for a Chapel Hill religious retreat. Aqueduct. The tapestry will be of hand-dyed wool, depicting a yellow brick
aqueduct on a deep maroon background.
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Jimmie "J.J was spotted by a talent
Walker, who this year booker in a small New
enters his seventh York nightclub. Televi-
season as the star of sion however, is not
( BS-TV's Good Jimmie's specialty. As
limes, will invade the great as he is as "J.J
stage of Mendenhall Jimmie's heart and best
Student (enter's Hen- performances are still
drix Theatre on Tues- on stage in front of a
day, Nov. 18 at 8:(X) live audience. Stand-up
p.m. comedy is a craft not
Walker, who has easily learned he notes,
regularly played before and there are, in fact, a
packed houses in Las great many more brain
Vegas, and throughout surgeons in the world
the United Stales and than there are stand-up
Canada at leading comedians.
reigning queen of gestion that she might this Friday and Satur nightclubs and colleges, Tickets for EC I
French pornography. find anything day night is -Academj � considered by many students are ' 0, and
YI T0L0 w Ajor
70 N0j� -TO f COLLCtf I
Jimmie Walker
Appears At Hendrix
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SU Films Presents Exhibition
( ontinued Irom Page 5 rather more proficient
ly, at leas! for th.
are being set upon by a cameras, with members distasteful about hei Award winner for Besl to be one of the finest, $3.00 for the genera
batter ol lovers. She o! ne own sCV rhe film proceeds in daughter's profession Picture, Kramei vs. most entertaining public.
to thmk being bisexual alternating episodes, and cheerfully affirms Kramer. The film will stand-up comic Be there when lim
Art and Camera
526
hi St.
CD
n makers'
m off-
Wherc .
( laudine?"
e is finishing
emak-
film about the making
ot a film in 'his ase
Talent Competition
planned Wednesday
gives one a Daiance.
ween ;r- director, .lean own sex life continues
Exhibition is typica Krancoib Davy, and vigorously, rhis con-
oi a good deal ol Beccarie to scenes in
Continental wnjcn slc an(j other versation is so wildly
regulars in the por- out of keeping with her
nography trade are person and her sur-
directed, again b roundings that she ma
seems ;vl a documentary about Davy, in what would be instantly become
. and he private life, profes- for them a routine pro another person in the
scent etfect on sional careei and jecl (m whose story an-
nul performs iical views ol the diences would like to
Beccarie admits in have told.
one interview that she
would prefei to be a ,llm critic Richard
comedienne; she would Corliss calls Exhibition
also like to direct films, "an act, not ol inde-
in order to promote the cent exposure, but of
general practice ol human revela
1 he Student Union Judges for the event bisexuality. But tionClaudine Bec-
rity Arts Commit- are: business is business. carie could easily be the
is sponsoring their Mrs. Selina Forbes, I here is a scene with Stanislavsky of
nnual Ialent retired music teacher in Baccarie's mother in porn. .
� petition on the Greenville citv which the eider woman
nesday, Nov. 19 at School system; Mrs. depreciates Davy's sug The populai film foi
in Room 244 Derrie land, office
managei foi E. aJ'ii;v s �- �
Mendenhall Student land, M.l). and Mrs
( enter. Admission is I loise Beech, wife ol
00; tickets will be on attorney Harvey 1
� he door and Buck ol the 1 C I
will be limited Board ol Frustees.
i 200 people.
dditional informa
Prizes will be award- nor, may be secured by
I, witl -� to contacting Ronald
first place winner, Makweer, Minoi
nd place Arts Chairperson, ii
� im, r a &15 to the Room 234.
�winner. Pla- Mendenhall. His office
awarded to hours are 3-4 MW1 and
dinners. 11-12 TT1
I.J Walker br-
shifting Horn talks bei to them both thai hei be shown in Hendrix an'wnere mic
j Walkei rose to pro- mgs a stellar explosion
minence as the star of o laughter to the last
Good limes alter he Carolina campus.
1 heatre at 5,
p.m.
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Sports
NOVl MMI K I8, 1980 Page
E. Kentucky Upends Pirates, 28-16
ECU Coach Emory Expresses
Grave Disappointment At Effort
�&siwe
B CHARI ES CHANDLER
"I'm glad you guys can't sec in-
side o me. It would be an awful
poor sight
1 he disappointment fell by last
Carolina head football coach Ed
Emory was clear as he spoke to the
media at his post-game press con-
ference following a 28-16 loss to the
defending N( Division I-AA na-
tional champion, Eastern Kentucky,
Saturday.
�"1 was disappointed in out inten-
sity in the first hall by both our ol
tense and defense Emory said.
"( oming in here 1 felt like we would
play with much more intensity and
aggressiveness than we did
I he loss upped the Colonels'
record to 8-2 as they set then sights
on a second successive national title.
Ihc Pirates fell to 4-6, ending any
chances they had of having a winn-
ing season.
"I'm verv disappointed that we
can't in goal of having a
winning season in the transition
year the first-year ECU mentor
said. "It had been my goal from day
one
The chance of achieving that goal
were dented on Eastern Kentucky's
firsi drive ol the day. Colonel
quarterback Chris Isaac mixed up
running and passing plays excellent
lv as the club moved the ball 66

culminated the march,�
from four yards i. 1
touchdown. David 1 lores added the
extra point as the llels went up
7-0.
The Pirates1 e ensuing
kickofi and thread to match
Eastern's teat. A 17-yad pass from
ECU quarterback Greg Stewari to
split end Larry O'Roarke was the
big plav in a drive that moved ft
the ECU 20 to Eastern's 28.
I he Buc drive abruptly ended at
the26, though, when halfback Mike
Hawkins fumbled following a two-
yard gain.
1 he shoe switched to the other
foot mid way through the second
period when Eastern QB Isaac
tumbled on his own 46 with the
I'iiales' Chuck Jackson recovering.
ECU got as far as the Colonel
iluce but had to settle for a a
20-yard field goal from Bill Lamm,
cutting the margin to 7-3 with 6:57
remaining in the first half.
Eastern Kentucky added another
score before half time. The Colonels
took over on the ECU 45 with 1:31
remaining. Two passes from Isaac
to end David Booe covered 2K
yards and another to Steve Bud
went foi 17 as the visitors moved
quickly downfield.
I he drive ended with a 11) pass
from Isaac to flanker Jerry Parrish
that covered three yards. It came
with but 11 seconds left before inter-
mission and pushed the Colonels'
halftime lead to 14-3.
1 he Pirates came out smoking in
the second half, Anthony Collins
setting the pace with a ard
kickoff return.
From there Stewart directed a
well-balanced drive that ended with
halfback Harold Blue taking a pitch
and gomg ovet from two yards out
to narrow Eastern's margin to
14-10.
ECU had one more drive in the
third period, moving from their own
21 to the Colonel 4 before having
to punt.
Easl took o cr on its w n
threw the dagger that all but
destroyed ECU'S hopes o victory,
Isaac launching a 54-yard bomb to
Booe that gave the Colonels first
and goal on the Pirate eight.
Three plays later Isaac hit tight
end Chris Curtis from two yards out
as Eastern went ahead 21-10.
1 he Pirates took the ensuing
kickoff and vied to narrow the
margin but onlv got as tar as the
Eastern 36 before Bill 1 amm was
mailed on to punt.
I amm's pun; sailed into the end-
zone, eivint the Colonels possession
on their own 20. After moving to
the 33 the Colonels dug a big hole
for themselves, being penalized 15
yards that brought on a third-
and-25 situation at the 16.
The final dagger in the Bue's
hopes was then thrown, Isaac
threading the needle in the ECU
defense as he connected with Bird
on a 29-yard pass play that gave
Eastern a first down on its own 45
with just over eight minutes left in
the game.
The Colonels rode the current of
the emotional pass completion into
the endzone, fullback Dale Patton
diving ahead from one ard out for
the clinching score with 3:48 left to
put Eastern up 28-10.
The Pirates added to their point
total on the ensuing possession as
OB Stewart passed for 78 yards of
an 80-yard drive that ended with a
TD pass from the freshman signal-
callei to split end Reggie Harden. A
two-point pass try failed as the final
margin remained at 28-16.
Colonel coach Roy Kidd was
understandably estactic following
his team's win. "This is a great,
great win for uC he said. "We're
getting more and more experienced
every week and that's certainly a big
factor in why we're playing so well.
In fact, 1 believe we're playing bet-
ter now than we did last year when
we won the national champion-
ship
The loss brought to a disappoin-
ting end the home careers t 14
EC I seniors, following the loss the
disappointed Emory said that he
took the blame for the loss.
"I accept full responsibility for
this game. 1 didn't push real hard on
getting the guys up for this one. 1
didn't think I had to. Because o the
great tradition we've had here 1 felt
the desire to have a a winning season
would be plenty enough. I'm very
disappointed that this didn't turn
out to be the case
The Pirates travel to Raleigh next
week to face N.C. Slate in their
season finale.
Freer Gets 'Boozed'
Eastern Kentucky split end l)aid Booe hauls in one
of his three receptions in the Colonels 28-16 win
Saturday as ECU cornerback James Freer fails in a
deflection attempt. (Photo by Jon Jordan
Frosh McNair Gets 23
Gold Downs Purple, 61-54
ECU freshman guard Barry Wright goes over junior center Mike (iibson
for a lay up in Saturday's Purple-Gold inlrasquad game. The Gold team
won. 61-54, with Wright scoring seen points. (Photo by Jon Jordan)
By JIMMY DuPREE
-C spurts 1 dilor
"It's a new year with new faces
ECU head coach Dave Odom
summed up the feeling o many
Pirate basketball fans after Satur-
day's 61-M victory o the Cold over
the Purple in the annual public
scrimmage.
"1 told the players before the
game that my number one concern
was for them to look like they knew
what to do said Odom.
"To do the right things on the
court you have to know what to do
first. And they showed just that in
our scrimmage
The Pirates return only five
veterans from last year's squad
which posted the first winning
record since 1975. Of that five, only
juniors Michael Gibson and David
Underwood started with any
regularity.
The Purple-Gold game did,
however, produce a number of
bright spots foi Odom and his staff.
Freshman Willie McNaii led all
scorers with 23 points for the Cold,
while freshman guard Mike Fox led
the Purple with 14. McNair, a 65"
Dunn native, connected on eight oi
nine tiled goals and seven of eight
free throws.
Point guards Herbert Gilchrist
and Mike Bledsoe emerged as top
candidates at that position, with
Odom characterizing the race as
"neck-n-neck" for the starting
berth.
Junior guard-forward Mark
McLaurin aided the Purple with 14
points, while Underwood added 14
and Bledsoe eight for the victorious
Gold squad.
"1 want Mark (McLaurin) to be a
little more offense-minded and take
his shot more said Odom. "He
did it more tonight than he has, but
we'll work on that
Odom praised freshman center
Jeff Best for his performance
underneath the boards saying he
"may well beoui most pleasant sur-
pi ise thus far.
�"Best played harder tonight than
I've seen him plav said Odom. "I
think he'll be readv to see some ac-
tion this year
Offensively, the Pirates staved
away from the last break offense
they would ordinarily rely on. 1 he
move was designed to prevent
fatigue caused by the limited
substitutions available and to "keep
the game from getting out o
hand
"I think we have nine or 10 ge-
nuine players Odom offered.
" I his will be something new for me.
1 was pleased with all our individual
plav in the scrimmage. Die veterans
showed good leadership and the
newcomers arc getting into the
system real well.
"Strangely enough, out perimeter
defense is better than our post
defense and that's where our
veterans are. 1 know they'll come
around though.
"1 his year's team is ahead o last
year's team defensively, and I think
we played good defense the second
hall ol last year. It won a lot of
games for us
Odom feels the extra year he has
had building the programs helps
build a more desirable player-coach
relationship.
"We are obviously a very young
team he said. "But this team is
more my people, also. I hat's not to
cast anything negative on last year's
crop, but this is my crop. Even those
ere before I did are mine
w
,i came ner
now and we've worked awefully
hard this year on establishing a close
coaching relationship with them.
"When I correct a kid, I want him
to feel that I'm doing it to help him
so he can help the team
The Pirates' first action against
outside opposition is a Monday
scrimmage with Marathon Oil at
7:30 p m. in Minges Coliseum, with
the first NC -A contest November
29 at Ohio University .
Now Vie For Title Repeat
Colonels Thrilled Over Victory
By JIMMY DuPRFF
ImMmM spTls f dilor
While Eastern Kentucky's jS-16
win Saturday over East Carolina in-
sured the first losing season since
1 s 1 for a Pirate football team, it
reinforced EKU coach Roy Kidd's
faith in his team's progress and
potential.
"That was a great win for our
school Kid said following the rain
drenched contest. "We're not very
well known around here, but 1 think
that was more of an advantage for
us than a disadvantage. A win like
this does a lot for our players and
fans
The Colonels were greated as they
came off the field by a small con-
tingent of faithfuls who traveled the
distance from Richmond, Kentucky
to Greenville. Both players and fans
dike savored the victory over an
NCAA Division I-A foe.
While EKU followers cherished
their 'upset' victory. Pirate coach
Ed Emory summarized his feelings
concerntg the game in a somber
lone.
"By far, this is the most disap-
pointing game of the season for
us he said, " because you have to
face the reality that you cannot have
a winning season
Eastern Kentucky is the only Divi-
sion l-AA opponant the Pirates
have scheduled in recent years, but
the Colonels were national champs
in their division a year ago and came
into Ficklen Stadium with a 7-2
record and a tie for fifth place na-
tionally.
The Colonels win over the Pirates
is likely to raise the question of a
switch to Division 1-A status for
EKU, but Kidd quickly dismisses
that possibility with an "economic"
approach to the problem.
"It just wouldn't be practical for
our school at this time he ex-
plains. "Right now we're limited to
65 scholarship players on our team.
The division allows 75, but our con-
ference (Ohio Valley) allows only
65.
"Schools in that division (I-A)
give out 90; we're just not ready to
take a step like that
The Colonels amassed 374 yards
total offense as on 60 plays, while
the Pirates managed only 341 yards
Set COLONELS, Page 8, Col. 4
Stewart To Blue
ECU halfback Harold Blue (23) waits to catch a pass
that was hurled to him from quarterback Greg
Stewart in Saturday's loss to Eastern Kentucky.
Blocking for Stewart on the play was fullback
Theodore Sutton (36). (Photo by Jon Jordan)
t
I





8
1 HI EAST C ROl INI AN
NOM-MHl'R IS, 1980
Volleyball Team
Gets Surprising
AIA WInvitation
By JIMMY DhPREE
sMinni sptirl ditw
Attention all
members of last
Carolina's volleyball
team: at the decree of
the A1AW Region I!
tournament selection
committee, Christmas
comes early this year.
Despite a 16-25
overall record this
season, the Lady
Pirates of ECU will be
leaving this afternoon
for Highland Heights,
Kentucky where the
will compete in the
A1AW Region 11 Tour-
nament as an at-large
entry.
"It was like a
million-to-one shot
says ECU assistant
coach Lynn Davidson.
"It really should not
have happened, but it
did.
" 1 here were a lot of
little things which had
to go just right for us to
get (a bid), and the
just seem to have fallen
into place
The Lady Pirates
competed over the
weekend in the
NCAIAW Tournament
in Raleigh, losing in
their opening game to
Appalachian State
15-8, 15-13 before
defeating Duke 15-9,
15-9 to insure the
would not finish in last
place. They were
eliminated from the
double elimination
event with another loss
to ASI , 15-11, 15-13.
The complex series
of events which led to
their invitation to the
regionals had already
begun, as Morehead
State failed to comply
fully with application
rules by not having
their entry post-marked
"as of the Monday
prior to their state tour-
nament
UNC-Chapel Hill
lost to N.C. State in the
finals of the North
Carolina tourney, but
the Heels received an
at-large bid on the
strength of their record
and schedule. State
champions
automatically receive
an invitation to
regional competition.
Eastern Kentucky
claimed a solid lock on
another at-large bid as
did the University of
Tennessee, which left
one remaining slot. Ac-
cording to Davidson,
South Carolina would
have probably received
a bid had they made ap-
plication. But even that
went in favor of the
Pirates.
"Middle Tennessee
had a better record
than we did explains
Davidson. "But our
schedule is much
stronger than their's.
It's really strange that
some of the teams did
not bother to put in
bids.
"I had planned to at-
tend the tournament to
go to the regional
coaches meeting; I
never expected to be
taking the team with
me.
"Seriously, a team
with a record of 16-26
who hasn't won a tour-
nament and came in
fourth in their state
toul namcut; who
would think a team like
that would go to the
regionals
Appearantly. many
of the Lady Pirates had
ruled out the possibility
of regional invitations.
Davidson slated she
had a length) debate
with one player over
the phone to convince
her there really would
be practice Monday.
"Don't get me
wrong Dav id son
hastilv adds. "I'm ex-
cited about going. To
our underclassmen, this
is going to be a learning
experience. It's a real
plus to have kids who
have national tourna-
ment experience.
"A lot of people
don't understand how a
thing like this could
happen, but it's not all
that unusual of a situa-
tion. I simply put in the
bid because 1 felt it was
part of my duty to the
team here and to the
region
The Lady Pirates will
open competition
Thursday at noon
against Memphis State.
Other teams in Pool II
are UNC-Chapel Hill.
N.C. State and Eastern
Ken tuck v.
Women Tankers Win
SLAM l
ECU freshman forward Morris Hargrove slams one home with authority
in warmups before Saturday's Purple-Cold intrasquad game. The Gold
team went on to win as Hargrove aided the cause with four points.
(Photo by Jon Jordan)
By JIMMY DuPREF
East Carolina trimm-
ed Old Dominion 77-62
Friday in the women's
portion of a dual swim
meet, but the Monar-
ches returned the favor
as they upset the Pirate
men 61-52.
"1 thought our
women did a very com-
mendable job working
as a team said head
coach Ray Scharf. "We
only had nine out of 12
in the water, but I think
all of our girls gave
good showings
Freshman Sally Col-
lins posted new varsity
records in the 200 and
500 freestyle, while
freshman Jennifer
Jayes added new
records in the 50 and
100 backstroke.
Junior Julie Malcolm
established a new mark
in the 50 breaststroke.
Freshman Moria
McHugh finished se-
cond in the 100 free,
but her time of :54.86
was good enough for a
new ECU record.
"Both our relays
swam good times
Scharf added. "I'm
real proud of the way
they performed. In
fact, Collins' time was
actually better than two
of the guys we had in
the water
Scharfs enthusiasm
does not carry over into
his discussion of the
men's performance.
"On paper, it would
appear that the dis-
qualification in the
third leg of the last
relay (400 free) cos! us
the meet says Scharf.
"But it's my opinion
that they lost the meet
long before the last
relay by poor attitude
and lack ot determina-
tion.
"The thing about the
false-star! in the relay
was that he had enough
of a lead that it didn't
matter
The next meet for
both suuads will be
Monday in Chapel Hill
against the rai I feels of
North Carolina
"If the) don't swim
better againstarolina
than they did Friday
Scharf savs. "it's going
to he a long ride ba
to Greenv ille
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Colonels Happy
With Big Victory
I
I
PRICE �1 00 foi 15 words. 05 tor
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� Make checks payable to The Ef
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� Abbreviations cou' as one word
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I MAIL TO
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f
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I
( ontinued From Paie 7
on
his
Blue Gets TD
ECU halfback Harold Blue scores his club's
first touchdown of the day Saturday in a 28-16
loss to Fastern Kentucky (Photo by Jon Jor-
dan)
snaps. Kidd attributes
players determination and progress
in recent games for their perfor-
mance.
"Our defense is playing great;
they have all season long for us
Kidd praises. "The key to our suc-
cess for the past three games has
been the way our quarterback (Chris
Isaac) has played. He hit some
passes today when we had to have
them and made a couple of first
downs himself running the ball
Kidd expressed disappoint only
with the his defense's failure to stop
the Pirates' last drive which ended
with a 15 yard touchdown pass from
quarterback Greg Stewart to wide
receiver Reggie Harden. The veteran
coach also expressed fear ECU was
set for a comeback when Anthony
Collins returned the second half
opening kickoff to the Colonels' 43
yard line.
"It kind of scared when when the
guy had that long return of the
kickoff Kidd said. "The crowd
got behind them and you could see
the momentum start to swing over
to their side.
"I see so many times on Saturday
when one big play really makes the
difference in the outcome of a
game. It may be a play that doesn't
even lead to a score, but it gives the
team the drive it takes to win
The Colonels close out their
regular season next week at home
against Morehead State with hopes
of another shot at the national title
on then minds.
"We re getting more and more
experienced every week and that's
certainly a big factor in why we're
playing so well said Kidd. "In
fact, I believe we're playing better
now than we did last year when we
won the national championship
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 18, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 18, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.94
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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