The East Carolinian, November 13, 1980






She lEaat (Earoltntan
h
Vol. 55 No. K
Al
8 Pages
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Thursday, November 13, 1980
Greenville, North C arolina
Circulation 10.(KM)
President Carter Calls
For Education Week
w SFUNGTON, I) Presi-
Jimmy c at tei s proclamation
� American Education w eek is fui
rj ce of his "rightful sense
i onal pi iorities W iliard 11.
McGuire, president of the National
.ration ssociation, declared to
day.
I he occasion ol McGuire's state-
ment was the recent announcement
by the President marking merican
I ducation Week as the period from
No 16 to 22, and calling upon all
mericans rm "out com-
mitment to the excellence and quali
ol the educational opportunity"
is citi?.
"Fat from issuing just anothei
. monial statement, the Presideni
derlined his rightful sense ol
a! onal priorities. These
already indicated b Ins successful
ai securing more federal aid
the nation's school-children,
organizing a Department ol bduc.
tion, foi promoting education at
every level ol the national life and
for similar endeavors' said
Mc( iinre.
American Education Week is
more than 60 years old, the
outgrowth o' efforts by the Na-
tional Education Association - the
nation's largest organization ol
teachers and allied professionals �
and other organizations to highlight
better instruction as a prime na-
tional goal.
It was born in the wake ol
disclosures during World Wai I that
approximately 25 percent o the
young men called for military ser-
vice were illiterate and about 29 per-
cent were physically unfit.
Today, along with the MA. the
week is sponsored by the National
Congress o Parent- and Teachers,
the National School Boards
Association, the American 1 egion
and the U.S. Department of Educa-
tion.
Education Week is observed in
many American communities with
local proclamations, school
assemblies, parents meeting with
teachers and local education of-
ficials, and in other ways.
The National Education Associa-
tion, with 1.8 million members liv-
ing in virtually every one of the na-
tion's 16,(XX) school districts en-
courages the week's observance bv
providing public information
leaflets, books, filmstrips, audio
cassettes and reports on numerous
aspects o education and its pro-
blems, especially as they concern
parent-child learning proceses,
parent teacher cooperation, the
handicapped child, the gifted stu
see EDI CATION, page 3
Petition Growing
I he petition being circulated bv members of Fast (arolina I niersit Wrestling has at present been signed bv
about 7,(MK) persons. The team has a goal of obtaining 10,060 or 12.000 signatures on the petition. Wrestling and
field hockey were recently dropped from the F( I sports program.
Science Education
Professors Cite Lack Of Emphasis And Preparation
i- ii c rwvn . ai Mr.iihi arirk thai Mi.h Undents Undents can work with thines thev college science to

Bv M KCBRNKS
t I t Nr�� B.iriMi.
science
improve scores
math
in
in
md a lack ol etn-
as upon science in the classroom
,eal d science eduction in
secondary schools, say
lav; Caro a University
education professors.
I case ay Di.
� r. �ble "If a lack of
adequately prepa nee
"S is not included
e's pup petency test.
Dr. Floyd E. Mattheis, Scu
i du chairman. "It's i
eluded in the achievement tests,
i e faced with pressui
National Science I oundation
report prepared recently foi the
te House said the United States
lags behind the Soviet I nion, Japan
and Germany in elementary and
secondary school programs in
science
"The numbei ol young people
who s tate from high school and
colU h only the most rudimen-
tary not urn ol science, mathematics
and technology portends trouble in
decades ahead the study said.
ccording to the North Carolina
Department ol Public Instruction,
shghtlv over 5,000 recent college
graduates were certified as teachers
for the first time last year. Of these
new teachers, Coble said only about
100 were certified to teach science.
A survey by Coble and a formet
colleague, Dale Rice, showed that
elementary school teachers in North
Carolina spend only 17.19 minutes
per day teaching science subjects.
1 cachets are allowed to spend half
o' their time teaching in then cer-
tified area and the other half on
other subjects.
Science is not considered a basic
subject in elementary schools c o
ble said. "When the students arrive
m secondary schools, the teachers
almost have to start from scratch
Mattheis adds that such students
may not have advanced reasoning
abilities. "Research has shown that
a huge number ol high school
student are at concrete levels ol
comprehension Foi those at that
level, it's important to have hands-
on experience (in science) he said.
Matthei? described in Is on"
experience as "activities that involve
manipulative materials - where
students can work with things they
can see. handle and manipulate
"You need materials to work with
in addition to reading books so that
students can associate cause and el
feet, and van learn to see how many
things in their environment interact
with one another
let is one ol only two univer
itic! in the state w ith an elemen
science methods course, which, Co
ble said, "teaches how to translate
college science to elementary
levels " I tie course is required for
all elementary education and special
educa majors,
Aiso. Mattheis said, the ECU
nee education department has
begun a program i I conducting
w or! ps foi tea - on science
and development ol reasoning.
lThe e workshops will help
teachers understand how children
leai n scien.
Student Support For
Liberals Decreasing
Amendment Seeks To Cut
Minimum Wage For Teenagers
has badly hurt our nation Hocketl
says. "It is a strong victory that we
have finally removed him and his
k i n d f r o m o f t i c e . "
And while others said the former
presidential nominee still command-
ed their respect and admiration,
thev claimed his leftist policies had
become obsolete. Drew Jacobs, a
junior from Vermillion, said he
hopes the McGovern defeat spells
the beginning of the end for
liberalism.
"lfd like to think liberalism is
dead, or that it is at least dying
Jacobs says. "It is time overdue for
a change
rhose who did vote again for
McGovern did not go out and cam-
paign vigorously for his re-election.
"I supported McGovern, but it
doesn't kill me that he won't be
returning to the Senate says Bill
I ockhart, a senior from Sioux Falls.
"A lot of people 1 know who like
the senator didn't do much for him
this year
Similarly, if the downfall of
Idaho's liberal Senator Frank
Church can not be attributed to a
lack oi student backing, it seems
clear that students at the University
ol Idaho at Moscow are not par-
ticularly crushed by his defeat.
like McGovern, Church still
received a majority of student votes,
but many of those same people did
not work hard for him. The intangi-
ble effect of poorer student
volunteer efforts for both
McGovern and Church can not be
easily determined, though student
enthusiasm helped them win close
contests in the past.
Announcements2
Editorials 4 J tmnk the terms ot l,beral and
Classifieds 8 conservative have lost their mean-
j elter. 4 ings among students here says
Feat u r e s 5 Bets Brown, a philosophy major at
s ts 7 Idaho. "I don't think people really
care
(CPS) I e traditi stu
dent support for liberal politicians
was considerably weaker during the
Republican tidal wave that swept
the country Nov. 4. leading some to
believe that the student-liberal coali-
tion that has helped power most na
tional campaigns since I960 may at
last be dying.
A C ollege Press Set rvey ol
kev campus precincts where the
careers ol embattled liberals were in
jeopardy indicates that while
students still favored the old
liberals, votei turnouts and en-
thusiasms were not as high as during
prev ious elections
Nowhere was this more true than
at the University ol South Dakota at
Vermillion. George McGovern, the
darling of student liberals during the
seventies, only narrowly beat his
challenger at two student precincts
at that campus. In one, he edged
Republican Congressman James
Abdnor by onlv 36 votes. In 1974,
McGovern whipped his opponent bv
more than a 2-1 margin in the same
precinct.
In another, he beat Abdnor bv s
votes. Six years ago he won that
predominantly student area bv 165
votes.
Steve Hockett from Mitchell,
summed up the anti-McGovern sen-
timent the best.
"George McGovern is an ultra-
liberal politician of the mold which
City Council
Interested students and area
residents are urged to attend
today's Greenville City Coun-
cil meeting, fopics for discus-
sion include a hearing for a
referendum on liquor by the
drink. The meeting will be-
held at 8 p.m. in the City
Council Chambers.
Employers could pay teenagers only
a fraction of the minimum wage if
Congress passes amendments to the
Youth Act ol 1980.
The amendments, introduced by
Sen. Charles Percy, R-lll and Sen.
Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, would allow
youth to be hired at 75 to 85 percent
o the minimum wage, which sup-
porters say would decrease youth
unemployment.
The Percy and Hatch amend-
ments would only allow employers
to hire vouth below the minimum
wage for a six month training
period, "giving a chance to tt
youth on the jobs Percy told SPv
The present minimum wage is
$3.10 an hour With the proposal,
vouth would be paid between $2.33
and v2 6 an hour ccording to
present law, the minimum age will
increase to $3.35 an hour beginning
January 1.
If the minimum wage was reduced
for all persons, about 60,000 more-
jobs could be available for youth
ages 16 to 19. If the rate was just
decreased for youth, a greater job
increase could result. Percy cited
these figures during the amendment
introduction from the Congres-
sional Budget Oft ice paper. "Youth
Employement and Education:
Possible Federal Approach
The Youth Act of 1980 is a pro-
posal that would add half a million
jobs to existing federal job pro-
grams and teach basic skills to youth
in high areas of unemployment and
low income. The act passed the U.S.
House of Representatives in late
August and is waiting final Senate
approval.
1 he House version of the act does
not include dn sub-minimum wage
amendments. Staff aides say that if
the amendments are added, much
time will be spent in conference
committee which may result in the
suspension of the bill.
"If there was a differential in the
minimum wage, employers would
tend to hue young people Percy
told SPS, "let's try these federal
programs. But if we don't get
Set PROPOSAI . page 3
New Liquor Laws Fail
To Affect Accident Rates
Across North Carolina
Tobacco Festival
The Southeastern Flue-cured Tobacco Festival is now being held in Green-
ville. Among the featured events are a beauty pagent. a pipe smoking con-
test, a tobacco tying contest, a parade and a clogging contest. See Features
page 5 for a related story about this year's festivities.
RALF1GH (UP1) A state study
indicates the sale of mixed drinks in
some North Carolina counties has
not affected traffic statistics in com-
parison to counties that have not ap-
proved hquoi-by-the-drmk.
"It does seem to indicate there is
no dramatic etiect of iiquor-by-the-
drink in the areas that have adopted
it John l.acey said Wednesday at
a state conference on highway safe-
ty.
Lacey, program manager toi
alcohol studies at the University ol
North Carolina Highway Safely
Research Center, said the center
compared traffic statistics in eight
counties with mixed-drink sales and
11 other counties.
The mixed-drink counties had a
1.17 percent increase in the percen-
tage of wrecks involving drunk
drivers, he said, while the 11 com-
parison counties had an increase of
1.37 percent.
There was no significant dif-
ference in the two figures, he said.
The eight counties with with
liquor-by-the drink sales were
Craven, Cumberland. Durham,
Mecklenburg, Onslow, Orange,
Wake and New Hanover. The com-
parison counties were Alamance,
Cabarrus, Catawba, Edgecombe,
Gaston, Halifax, Nash, Vance,
Watauga, Wayne and Wilson.
The 1978 General Assembly ap-
proved a law allowing voters in each
countv to decide whether to allow
the sale ol mixed drinks.
During the debate, opponents
claimed hquor-by-the-drink would
increase the number of arrests for
driving under the influence, but
I acey said there has been almost no
difference in the number of drunk-
driving arrests made in counties that
sell mixed drinks.
Also Wednesday, Dr. Arthur J.
McBay. a toxicologist with the state
medical examiner's office, said 66
percent oi the drivers who died in
single-vehicle crashes from October
1978 to October 1979 were legally
drunk.
t
?
r





1 lit I AS C AROl IMN
() I MHl k n, IW
Announcements
GENERAL MANAGER
Applications are now being at
cepted tor General Manager of
The East Carolinian Position will
be available as ot Dec 1 Apphca
tions may be picked up in the
Media Board Office in the Public a
tions Center
ECU FRISBEE CLUB
The ECU � meet!
Aidnesday at 7 00 p m in Room
248 ot the iv Student
Center All sti lent" � fa Ulty
in
N.C S.L
CHANGE
The Department of Geography
at East Carolina University has
been renamed the Department ot
Geography and Planning The
change is effective immediately.
according to Chancellor Thomas
B Brewer The department offers
both geography and urban and
regional planning degrees at the
� � ���or s and master s levels
MUSIC RECITAL
Clarinetist B a r b a' c� Ene"
Arneth ot Raleigh senior stud) '
in the Eas� Carolina Uniwers �
School ot Musk will perform in
� i I � m, Nov 14 at 7 30
p m the A I i � ' it Mus i
Centei R �� ��� Het p'ograrr
Menoei
song
ECU SURF CLUB
Ar I
EPISCOPAL WORSHIP

3a l
ART SHOW
� � l the Farmv i
y �.
A . � � . � ' '
Noven � . � � .

-
me it.
REAL ESTATE
� . � � � . �
prol � "
poten11 a � � ' �
.
� � - . Haw
� �. �� . � les!
expert mei
Cc S

Count Board ot Reall
S'On a : ' � �' ' �
' I - '
� retui �
iv a iI � I
the Brahms Sonate Es
120 No 2 and Crl
von Webei S Concertino
� . a be aci ompanied
I i ibeth Braxton ano
. . . � � ���� ' '
and Michap:
� . st Mark Stone
AKA
fnere has been a shaht change
II . Mpha Kappa Alpha
The di � � as been moved to
s . � � i � '�� it 'he
rest I . . � I will st.ii be
the Mendenha11
Auditorium beq nn no, a' 7 00
Would any person interest in par
� : ating please I all 752 919? or
contact any Alpha Kappa Alpha
soror for details
VACCINE
The influenza vaccine is
available for students a' 'he Stu
th Center Students bet
iges 13 27 should set the vac
v ses given one month
� -s Old
, one dose Tl
(ISO I is oar
MUSIC
The East Carolina University
chapter of Sigma Alpha lota, a
professional music fraternity, wll
be sponsoring a Community Ac
tion Music Proiect The event will
be held Thursday November 13.
1980 from 6 30 to v 00 p m at the
Carolina East Mali The purpose
of the proiect is to maKe the pvrbli
aware of the different organiza
t.ons within the ECU School of
Music and how they are beneficial
ommun.ty Among the
organ,zat'ons participating are
v � � . rapy Club, the ECU
I .ipters of the Music Educators
National Conference iMENO
National Association of Jazz
Educators iNAJE'
Alpha S gma Alpf -
�,� an CIiom 1
,1 n i ACDA1
LaCROSSE
ah persons nterested in re
�� g ��, East Carolina
aCrosseClur, an i an 752 6269 for
�"formation
d the
. tors
ACCOUNTING TUTORS
g So ety will pro
. � 'utor ing s ' � es every
v, � . itternoon from 4 to 5
p m m Rawi 339 tor Acct 2401 and
25; I students
ART CONTEST
World Resear. h ln the San
D,ego Caiforma based non
profit non partisan educational
and research group has announc
eo that it s sponsor no a nation
wide art competition among high
school ano college students to find
a new. bold indentitiable logo
� ji according to Barbara
�, � promotion director for
Wc - earch All entries must
Df by midn.ght.


� . � ri
r , � , � to 1980 to be '
, � � � . v- i- � �' ' I
� .�� � � � opei ' a
� ih scl � ' oliege students
� � �. . vd in subm.ttinu
� i � a � ' � �
�, � Worm Researci
. . . , � ; . . . . � �
. . . trant reauiremen! � I
COFFEEHOUSE
The Student Union Coffeehouse
Committee urgently needs new
members tor spring semester and
next year
The committee will lose 3 4 of its
members to graduation m
December and the remaining 1 i
will graduate m May
If you enioy the Cotfeehouse and
have about four hours a week you
can spare, please apply in the Stu
dent union office, rm 234 MSC
We especially encourage
underclassmen to apply, although
we welcome all students
MINORITY
LAW DAY
The University o' North
Carolina School ot Law is sponsor
mg a Carolina Minor.ty Law Da,
on Friday. November 21 1980 in
Chapel Hill Ail mmorites con
templatmg graduate law s�ud,es
are encouraged to attend Apphca
tion forms are available in the
Career Planning and Plai � � '
rn, . the Bloxton House
EXCEPTIONAL
CHILDREN
Interested in learning more
about exceptional children
where education is heading for
them in the 80 s' If so. don ' m,s
out on this great opportunity the
Studen' Council for Exceptional
Children State Convention to be
held here on campus at
Mendenhall Friday, Nov 14 and
Saturday. Nov 15 Highlights in
elude slide shows a i � �
educators from all Over " I Stati
workshops noted speakers and
the CAswell choir All programs
revolve around the theme Special
Education ot the 80s Registration
is in Mendenhall from 5 00 to 7 00
on Pr.da, ' ' and from 8 30 9 00
on Saturday morning You den t
have ti be an SCEC member i
rend r evei i spr i �
Come I yoi ' �" v" si � '
� Idren! Registration fee S2 00
GAY COMMUNITY
" ' E 8S1 Ca I B � �' ' Con-i
h IIfl A- � � .
�� VJ �. ! I - , - ���
SUMMER CAMP
Summer Camp Employment
Day is November 18 10 3 p m ,n
the Mendenhall mult' purpose
room Students who wish summer
employment with camps should
, I- be the Cocperatve Educa
t,on office in 313 Rawl Building to
arrange interviews with
recruiters
COMMITTEES
The Oft re of the Vice
Chancellor for Student i ife is Still
pting appln ations for the 63
committee openings The various
committees tali under "�
headings Administrative Co" '
' es Faculty Senate Academic
Committees Academic Support
institutional Support Pi. - i
I . room 204 w hard ind Ml out
an application
S.U ARTIST
Applications are now be,ny
taken for posit.ot of Student Union
Artist for Spring Semester Ap
plication forms may be picked up
in the Student Urvon Office room
234 Mendenhall Student Center
Deadline November U 1980
CHESSBACKGAMMON
Whether your game is chess or
backgammon the place to be for
some friendly competition is
Mendenhall Student Center each
Tuesday even,ng at 7 00 p m
Chess Backgammon Club met l!
��. . � . �
15 on the ground floor of
Mendenhall
Anyone interested in eithet
game
fir.
wL
75?
BtSTAURANT
204 E. 5th St.
Across From
Newby's Sub Shop
Open Til 9:30 Nightly
THIS WEEKS SALE ALBUMS
ALL CURRENT RERLEASES
$8.98 Lilt for 5.99
Latest Releases By
Linda Ronstadt's Greatest Hits Vol II
Kennv Rogers Greatest H.ts S13.98 Lwl 9.99
Aerosm.ths Greatest H.ts tarth. Wind & F.re -
WANTED
"GOLD"
Student
Happy Hour
Mon-Fn 2 to 5pm
Sm. draft 35C
Lg. draft 50C
ECU I D Only
Come In and Enjoy
The Hottest Game Room
In Town
�CLSSRINGS
�WEDDING BANDS
�BRACELETS
�DENTAL GOLD
�ANYTHING GOLD
ANYTHING MARKED
1QK.14K.18K&24K
LSO NMARKED
( on
,i
'
ROAD RACE
� . �. �.
, �
fsr Carol � -� ' ' �
. .
HEALTH CAREERS
On Fi lay N
stu :�
� '�
pa" . �"� �� ��
� �
organ t z at -�� i � '
. ent rtun.l
a �� lerestc tudent
� be the N
' . " - : '
INTERIOR DESIGN
irehitect
eak at I
. � . �. .

� .� w Run 1 be held
turday Novemtw
� ��
� ii - �� Plaza


� � i
� . � � led t
�.��. ��� by t
. . . v. � �
� . � . � � �
. � � rhe event i-
. � � . �. i
�.��
: - �� I
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n out in! join ��
SNA
� . next meet I " ;
� tent N ' ���
. � �.
. �'� ntoi
� � � �.
.� � � � .
PHI BETA LAMBDA
.
Rawi
� . ket lot tr. De
ruest speaker H ninal
new otl � � � the I i � a
� i �� � at �� c mee!
Movi � " " �' A
A Thank
. ne is urged to t- . S 501
r for thi rkey it you plan

, .
leresteo I ��' �
� . Ve are a
;at;on to the ECU i I
I you ha
� � � .�
Neil Young � Hawks and Doves
(heap Trick - All Shook Up
Barbara Streisand - Cuiltv
Jacksons � Triumph
Molly Hatchet - Beatin' the Odds
Stevie Wonder - Hotter TWnJuly
$7.98 List 4.99
Delbert McC'linton �
The Jealous Kind
drove Washington Jr. �
Wine Light
Lagles Live
$15.98 List 10.99
Bruce Springsteen
The River
ALL SMOKING
ACCESSORIES
UP TO 50 OFF
UNTIL
CHRISTMAS
GREENVILLE'S
GRADUATE GEM0L0GISTS
cs

s
V
I
APPLE RECORDS T-SHIRTS
y
Re�. $4.50 $3.99 Wl i H COUPON
� We Buv Ihed Albums
� �
The lec'
� - I
DrO'U' in
Na'
Designer;
SIGN LANGUAGE
' � , � inguav
� " �
meet ����� 16
��. the n � . .
roo" � '�� rnere
� � ��
meet ana a Cap' oneo �
� ��� �' Aa' I Tl a- . film is
� � , . � � � .i ' jre' AH
� � . � .�. - en idea to a"
I anyone
may do � rtei l kno
� .
CSO
)ppor
the Set
v- � openings
� . � � � ' hith expert
� �� , � . n hemistr.
� � r i. � ii academic
� � in the
� � . on
classification, eg
und. . i � '� graduate Co � '
Dr f � . i ' A � ' �� I � .
.�i, � . � 60 " loi i-
EMPLOYMENT
�.�� David Lanooll Pi
� �
. � . ��
employment ppcrl
. � �� 6 30
� ident
Center Room 248 A
� . . � .� no Oon'i
� � �
Spons. � �� �

y of interior
SOULS
There a r � i ir meeting
Of SOULS t0n.g- I " ' I
November 13 1980 at �
� Plan to a"
RECITAL
Sherry L.nn JOI ' " '
School of Music, will prese' '
recital of1 ' H i musicMon
day ���� it 7.30 p.n" n
the A i � tal Ha
Assisted b, Brenda v � s
p.ano. and Judy Fordyce Fr.
Horn, she will perform
manr s Adag and A eg
Nehlybel's hen
:arU- , � '� Woon
and duets trom A
" Twent, T wo i �
A s'udent of Professor
Pa'
par1 �l full f the n
auiremen's to. the Bacheli � �
Musk: degree npi � n I
education
GAMMA BETA PHI
The Gamrt � Beta c" Honor
Soc ,ety will havi � � : i sup
per open to a � � � � and
pledges on Thursday Nov 13 1980
at 6 00 p m in me V- � �
Mult, purpose Roon Name!
and door p' ;� ��. � � . � I ar �
ieweiry arc .�. � be
available Bring yOUl anned
goods along with your favorite
ash and come for an evening of
special entertammen good food
and lots of tun
ACSSA
The American Chemica' Soc e'y
Student Aff hate will hold a
meeting Tuesday. Nov 18 1980 at
7 00 p m in Flanagan 202 Dr
George Evans and Dr Don
Clemenns wm speak on the use of
peat as an alternate fuel source
All interested persons are
welcome to attend
MAGICIAN WANTED
Mendenhall Student Center
would like to employ a magician to
perform during the Madrigal Dm
ners. December 2 7 Interested m
dividuais should contact Wanda
Yuhas Mendenhall Student
Center 757 MU. e�t 213 for fur
ther information Please respond
as soon as possible
SOCIOANTHRO
On Wednesday November 19
the Sociology Anthropology Club
will hold its business meeting at
?00 pm m Brewster D 302 All
members �rd interested persons
are encouraged to attend Plans
for the Christmas party on
December 3 wil'be discussed For
more info, call Anna a' 752 0824 or
Britta at 758 8867
HUNGER COALITION
" �. Coa1 ' on s open to �
gei � � � ' .a �� ' �
. 13 a" 4 00 p m at the
New - h Center 953 E 10th st
PROTECTIVE
SERVICES
Pat Capps will speak on Protec
t.ve Services ottered in Greenville
Monday night. Nov I7,a'7pm at
244 MSC Refreshments will be
served Everyone is invited to
n �
. 18 ft m 10 3 p m
TURKEY SHOOT
� � � i, � .
stoil ' rkey snoot to be held
ter on Thui ay
November 20 1980 trom 7 00 p m
until 10 00 p m An ent fi .
a' .ou to bow
ball at a full set ot p.ns or '� i
' .� lanes if you can
- at east i jht 8 pins
- of those lanes you
, ' RKEt I ' ��� !
� � -i . i � � pet soi
You my enter as mat � I
you like so come over ana test
� - you could be a wmner'
SCIENCE ED. CLUB
The Sc iencc Education Club will
meet Nov 19th in Flanagan Room
307 Mr 0en K,nqst) .
giassblower tor thf Dept of
Chemistry, will demonstrate ar
tistit ana technical glassblowmg
skills Refreshments a be serv
ed at 3 30 and the demonstration
a I begin at 4 00 All are invited to
attenc
GEOLOGICAL
SURVEY
ruiting � � ! its a' wish 1
. . �� irei
tieidi ' ��' - � -�;��'
�� . :� . . ' � ' ' .
. � I i! forma
� . . � .
jva - the Careei Plani
. . . � n! Centei lo ate
the Bloxl H .
HUNGER COALITION
(H .� ' �
a meet � � '
4 00 P m at fh� Mi ��� entei
953 I � ilition it
ope- ' � '�
I .on the pr Jl � �� '
. and world hunger s.
, p �� � . �� . f v I I
a � I Harvest N � . "
FAST
E a; r year tr e Green
Hungi � ilit � ' �� �
tionai agenc . Oxtam Amei
sponsor a fast on the Thursday
� �
you save by not eating is donated
for scit help proiects to aid hungry
people become seit sufficient
P an to fast' Stop by the table out
� Book Store on Nov 18th or
19th 'o s,gn up
ATTENTION
I he Kaslar olinian
welcomes all campus
organizations to submit items
to the Announcements sec-
tion. Due to our space limita-
tions, however, all future
submissions should be no
longer than 50 words. Hand-
written submissions will also
no longer be accepted. Items
must be submitted no later
than 1 p.m. on Mondays or
Wednesdays.
s Mark & Melanie Smith tm
J.O. DAWSON CO.
GR .EWILLt
PIG
PICKING
TOURNAMENT
SPONSORED BY THE ECU FRATERNITIES
WILL BE HELD AT THE PITT COUNTY
FAIR GROUNDS ON SUNDAY,NOVEMBER
16 FROM 1p.m. TILL 5p.m.

ECU CAMPUS
FAIRGROUNDS
HASTINGS FORD
10th ST.
ABORTION
The Fleming Center has been here for you since 1974.
providing private, understanding health care
to women of all ages at a reasonable cost
Saturday abortion hours
Free pregnancy tests
Very early pregnancy tests
Evening birth control hours
The Fleming Center we're here when you need us.
Call 781-8880 in Raleigh anytime.
THE FLEMING CENTER
PIG IS $3 PER PLATE WITH Vz THE PRO-
CEEDS GOING TO THE BOY'S CLUB OF
PITT COUNTY
SPONSORS
Student
Special
Reduced Admission
Specials Thru The Nite And
The Rock-n-Roll Of
Avalanche
Jeffery's Beer and Wine
Deli Kithen
Garris Evans Lumber Co.
University Book Exchange
Nautilus
U-Ren-Co
Dominoes
J.C. Penney
Gallery of Homes
Rum Runner Dive Shop
Pizza Inn
Jolly Roger Dance Hall
Jefferson Florist
CO. Tankard Co.
Dunn's Body Shop
Keel's Peanuts
The Traffic Light
Biscuit Towne
Jefferson Standard
Stereo Village
A Cleaner World Cleaners
Pantana Bob's
Pepsi-Cola
Margaux's
King Sandwi h
Attic
Big WOOW Lucky 13
The Mushroom
Robinson Jeweler's
The Treehouse
Hair by Nature's Way
Heilig-Meyers
Famous Pizza Ph 758-5982
Sonic
Sportsworld
Sharpe's Formal Wear
Roffer's
The Pipeline
Coffman's
The First State Bank
The Wash House
Larry's Carpetland
Home Builders
Piggly Wiggly
Hair Designer
Kappa Sigma
Hearts Delight
Jason's
Abram's Bar-B-Que
Bob Barour Honda
Alpha Sigma Phi
Fosdick's Seafood
The Book Barn
McDonald s
The Trophy House
Soot Raleigh Aviation
?
F





IHL I AS I C AKOI 1NIAN
NOVTMBF K 13, 1980
ur
I
lANDS
I .0
kHKED
ion
Would
Wage
Education Week Observed
Continued from page 1
cot results, and the
youth unemployment
continues to go up,
then se have to try
some other approach.
We have not helped the
problem, it has been
111111 Percy said.
Substituting young
people who would be
paid below the
minimum wage for old.
more costly workers,
would not be permitted
under either proposal
1 he amendments also
include penalties foi
employers who fire
south employees before
the training period is
finished, and hire other
young people in order
in gam a continual ad-
vantage of the lowei
minimum wage.
The amendments
would not affect those
w ho have been
employed for at least
six months, but only
those who are just
beginning or have just
started in the job
market.
A substantial
numbei of young peo-
ple would be affected
b the Percy and Hatch
amendments, accor-
ding to Rita Pfeiffer,
Hatch's legislative
assistant. Hatch tried
to attach his proposal
to the Youth Act in
committee, but failed.
He will tiv to amend
the act when the Senate
meets in the middle of
November.
Opponents feel that
Hatch is trying to stop
the Youth Act. "It was
a tactical amendment
to stop the youth bill
before the elections
said Mark Thennes,
director of the National
Youth Work Alliance,
a Washington youth
advocacy group.
The fate of the
Youth Act may rest on
whether to pay young
people less than the
minimum wage. "We
have never supported
one (a sub-minimum
wage), and many of the
Democrats will not sup-
port one either said
Karen Ignani, staff
m�mher for Sen.
Claiborne Pell, D-RI.
The Carter Ad-
ministration is oppos-
ed to paying youth
below the minimum
wage according to Kitty
Higgins, White House
Domestic and Public
Affairs staff member.
"Minimum wage is
not the problem. Ac-
cording to businesses,
the problem is that they
don't have the basic
skills that we have em-
phasized iti the Youth
Act Higgins said.
Some employers in cer-
tain job areas can apply
to the U.S. Department
of labor to pay youth
below the minimum
wage, but "very few
do she said.
The National Youth
Work Alliance is
against these new
amendments to lower
the minimum wage, ac-
cording spokeswoman
Mary Degonia. She
said her organization is
planning to send out a
legislative alert to its
membership to inform
them of the proposals.
A spokesman for the
United States Student
Association, Frank
Principi, told SPS that
"we believe in the
minimum wage for all
students. USSA will be
following the legisla-
tion very closely in the
next
cipi
few weeks. Prin-
said that USSA
also fought against a
portion of the Higher
Education
Reauthorization Act
that would enable
employers of college
work study employees
to pay the students
below the minimum
wage.
Final decision on the
amendments and the
Youth Act will be made
after Congress
assembles for its lame
duck session.
Continued from page 1
dent, and other facets of education.
In his declaration President
Carter said:
"American Education Week af-
fords all of us time to think about
the needs, the importance and the
hopes for education. And it gives us
a time to acknowledge the ac-
complishments of an education
system that serves more than 58
million young people and adults.
"We have much to be proud of �
our schools, our teachers and the
administrators who make the system
work. But there is more progess to
be made and more work ahead ot
us
McGuire, noting this year's
education week theme, "Education
in the 80's � Preparation for the
Future emphasized that the total
community is the major beneficiary
of concern for the individual that is
the goal of good teachers.
Good teachers, and a proper
preparation for the future, said
McGuire, mean � among other
things � working actively for
education by supporting school
bond issues, fighting school i.ude!
cuts, keeping class sie low, over-
coming stereotvpes about the han-
dicapped and, finally, imparting a
respect for education as a lifelong
activity.
General Nutrition Centers
America's Best Nutrition Values are at GNC�Over 800 Stores from Coast to Coast
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wtaminC BRAN raisins
UNC-G Officials Postpone Film
In Light Of Klan Proceedings
i f��cials
at the Universit) of
North Carolina at
Greensboro cancelled a
Wednesday night show-
ing of the movie "Birth
of A Nation" after
students protested dur-
ing an earlier showing
of the controversial
film.
The 65-year-old
movie, which critics sav
in demeaning to blacks,
had beer, scheduled as
part of a film series
sponsored by the I NC
G historj department
but will be shown latei
a part of a regular
class. a sc h o o 1
spokesman �-aid.
1 he film depicis the
birth of the Ku Klux
Klan during t h e
Reconstruction period
in the South after the
Civil War.
Between 20 and 30
.dents, mos them
black, picketed outside
the s c h o o! I i b r a r s
w ednesda afternoon
while the first of two
wines
rhere were no in
cidents. i one point.
the protesters asked to
entei the auditorium
where the film was be-
ing run. but campus
police let used.
"It's not favorable
to oui campus or the
community for the Film
to be shown at this
time said spokesman
I arr Moon, a history
graduate student at
UNC-G.
1 he university
should be a little more
sensitive to the cir-
cumstances surroun-
ding this trial he said.
referring lo the trial of
si (Clansmen and Nais
accused of killing five
communists last year at
a "Death to the Klan"
rally in Greensboro. A
jury completed its
fourth day of delibera-
tions in the case
ednesda) w ithout
reaching a verdict in the
22-week trial.
Jerrv Wi
the campus
director tor
said the demonstration
was "all very
peaceful
"We're very, very
conscious of the situa-
tion in Greensboro
he said.
following the after-
noon protest, history
department Chairman
�nn Saab cancelled the
evening showine of the
movie, made in 1915
and considered a classic
because of its
c i n e m a t o g r a p h i c
techniques.
Dr. Saab said the
scheduled as
the history
film was
part of
department series "to
stimulate an objective
discussion, but we
didn't want to would
the feelings ot our
black students and
create a setting that
might cause a lot of
hoopla.
"We are not endors-
ing the film in any man-
nei bv showing it she
said. "We are trying to
show a selection of
films in order to ll-
lustrate the history sub-
jects our students are
studying
m
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4





Qttft iEaat (Eartfltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Rk hard Green, ��,
It RR Hi RNDON, .
Chris I ic hok, mw
David Sevi rin. , w.
Aniia Lan aster,
en iiiwiv
Lisa Drew, �,�, i,i,�
MlM NOONAN, �s�for
Chari is Chandler, s om
David Norris, F���r� mm
Novembei IJ, ll'M
Opinion
Page 4
Mixed Drinks
Greenville May Get Chance
At long last it appears that the ci-
ty of Greenville might have the op-
portunity to otc on mixed drinks.
The Greenville City Council will
hear a second request tomorrow
from the Greenville Area Chamber
of Commerce for a referendum to
be held on the controversial issue of
liquor by the drink. The first re-
quest was made on July 10, 1980.
The state legislature passed a law
last summer allowing municipalities
within counties that have already
defeated the issue to vote again. On-
ly the municipalities that voted in
favor of liquor by the drink may
hold the referendum. In the county-
wide referendum last year, Green-
ville residents approved the the issue
by a 2 to 1 margin, but the county as
a whole defeated the question.
State law forbids a referendum to
be held closer than 60 days to a
general election, and the city council
tabled the first request for early fall.
If approved tomorrow, the vote will
probably come in early spring.
The issue, if not made into a
religious or emotional one, is sim-
ple: It all comes down to personal
preference. Those wishing to con-
sume mixed drinks should be allow-
ed to do so, and those opposed to
mixed drinks would still have the
freedom to abstain or choose
another beverage. In addition, li-
quor by the drink would provide the
most efficient method of dispensing
alcohol � by the drink rather than
by the pint, quart, or gallon.
Greenville citizens overwhelming-
ly voted for liquor by the drink in
the county-wide referendum. Now
it's time for the Greenville City
Council to allow its constituency to
determine whether mixed drinks
should be sold within city limits.
Lame Ducks
Now there is another endangered
animal species � the Lame Duck
Congressman. Although large
numbers of them still exist, they will
soon all limp home for the winter.
ARE U&IN6
NERVE GAcAND
GRM WARFARE-
-isH
THEY'RE
VCATiN6 EVERY
PRINCIPLE OF
PtCLrtCY AND
MORALITY?
AND WE'VE
LET OURSELVES
t YEAR&
BEWND
THEM!
(CHOKE i
15
r Campus Forum
'Let's Show Pride, Spirit9
g)Te-n 'c
I'd like to share something with you
that I think will make your year at Easl
Carolina alot more enjoyable. Being a
former student and athlete at E.C.U. in
the 50's, 1 can remember how excited
everyone was during football season.
Not only the players but the students as
well. The banners, the pep rallies, the
dances after the game, etc. You know
it's not easy being a football player in
college today. The days o practicing a
couple hours a day are gone. Now it's a
tremendous stress on these young men
mentally as well as physically. It takes
total dedication on one's part to be a
good athlete. The football players and
coaches here are dedicated, but who
cares, where is our school spirit? What
happened to the pep rallys, the bon fires,
the dances?
In spite o' what you hear, the players
and the coaches need you. To play for
ECU is not enough, it's the people who
make up the university we need. You as
stuents also need them. They want you
to belong; to be a part of their growth
when they win and when the) loose. Ask
yourself, how man) players do you
know? These young men give you
everything they have 7 days a week.
Shouldn't we at least show them how
much we care'1 What's that song
"United We Stand. Divided We Fall"?
Boy is that ever true.
1 can remember in 1954, we were
boarding a bus to go to Tampa. At the
time we were 3 and 4. 1 he bus left at
a.m. lridav morning, we were down.
tired, and disgusted until we got to the
gym and saw about 300 students who
were there to see us off. What a feeling
that was, not only for the players and
coaches, but also for the students, who
were, in fact, a big part of our team.
All over the world, there has been a
lack of spirit, not only in sports, but in
life, let's rebuild that spirit at ECU.
Let's support our football team and all
our athletes. Let's join together and
become a real enthusiastic family again,
so when someone says, Where do yo go
to school?, you can proudly say E( I
We as adults and alumni have dedicated
ourselves to help supporl football at
last Carolina Shouldn't you do the
same
1 had the pleasure o going to Miami
this past weekend with the team. For the
first time in a long while, I was on the
sidelines with the team. I musi sav I was
impressed with the calmness dud cool
way in which our coaches handled
themselves. 1 thought they did an ex-
cellent job ot coaching; and the players
performed as well as one could imagine.
It was a great game. I only wish I could
have helped them. 1 wish you could have
been there' What a lift l� see young men
put forth such an effort!
Okay now, we have two games left;
1 et's show the entire state that Pride and
Spirit are alive and forever abounding at
1 .( I
I'll be there, will you?
LOl HALLOV
1 ECl playei and now cheerleader
More Day Football Games
The time is long overdue for Last
Carolina Football to be played under the
ravs of the fall sun instead o the beams
of VEPCO's lights
Our program is major college toot-
ball, it is Division 1. and it is on the
move. To continue playing night foot-
ball diminishes the rich collegiate tradi-
tion of playing on the gridiron on Satur-
day afternoons. As many know, the
great majority ot NCAA Division 1
teams do abide by the tradition and ex-
citement o playing day instead ot night
football.
It certainly makes sense to schedule an
early September game at night to com-
pensate for the heat. But as the semester
progresses, fall weather renders day
ditions that are more suitable :
ball.
There are two reasons why I feel EC 1
should play da toot ball: public I
finances. Bv playing night gan
scores and press coverage d
the state's Sunday papers j �
under the sun we would gel ��
coverage in main newspapei
needed publicity for our pri
games would help increa
It might attract a larg
and friends from the l I thai
would come and enjoy I
have plenty o time
westward. Ot course
money.
1 Inally. I think night I
keeping with the trad
Division 1 football h
play under the light
It God had a
played at nigh He
miner's lights on th
CH R1 11 SHI v
Forum Rules
The Eastarolinian weU
expressing all points ��� ifa
drop them bv our offu e in tht
Building, across from Joym
For purposes o) verification, a
must include the name, mo
classification, address, phone �
and signature oj the authorfs). 11
are limited to two typewritten p,
double-spaced, or neatly printed.
ters are subject to editing tor bn
obscenity and libel, and no persona
tacks will be permuted, I etters b) tht
same author are limited to one eat
da vs.
Bl
J
I
Tw
1

To- J
f
I

(
ne
j
sent
j
1
American Journal
SEEDSCAM: The Next Crisis For American Farmers?
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
Given all the crises that are wracking the
world these davs, would it surprise you if I
told you there is another crisis cm the way
� and that it stems from something as
seeminglv mundane as the seeds ot com-
mercially grown plants Yes, there is a
coming global seed crisis, the consequences
of which could eventually rival the con-
flicts over energy and inflation in
seriousness.
The cause of the crisis is the
monopolization of the sales of seeds of
popular new hubrid plants by a few seed
companies, which are themselves being
swallowed by giant chemical firms at an
alarming rate. The cornering of the seed-
market � call it Seedscam � results in two
things: First, it further concentrates impor-
tant sources of our food in the hands of
multinational corporations known mainly
for their devotion to raising profits. Se-
cond, it reduces the availablility of seed for
traditional varieties of plants, thus reduc-
ing the genetic diversity that critics of this
trend believe is essential for maintaining a
reliable world food supply.
In Western Europe, Seedscam has been
hugely successful. Plant breeders on the
payrolls of major corporations have
developed hybrids bred for high crop
yields and patented by their parent com-
panies. Most firms that haven't developed
hybrids of their own have been forced out
of business. "In West Germany writes
Barbara Snyder in the trade journal
'Whole Foods "95 percent of all varieties
offered for sale are patented. All cereal
varieties in the United Kingdom are
patented
If megacorporations such as ITT, Mon-
santo and Union Carbide � which have
recently bought up most of the major
American seed companies � have their
way, a similar situation will soon take root
here. Corporate lobbyists are aggressively
promoting amendments to the 1970 Plant
Variety Protection Act that would allow
American corporations to patent seeds for
hybrids. With the corporations pushing
these new products, traditional seed-
varieties would almost certainly become
scarce and expensive, as they have done in
Europe.
The proposed amendments � H.R. 999
in the House of Representatives and S. 23
in the Senate � were originally alloted on-
ly one hour of public discussion and were
expected to pass easily earlier this year. But
opposition from environmentalists and
consumer advocates has delayed con-
sideration of the bills.
Critics of patenting plant life oppose the
economic concentration that passage of
the amendments would encourage, fhev
also question the wisdom of reiving on on-
ly a few varieties of staple crops in global
agriculture. Such a policy, they argue,
could result in disasters like the famine
that decimated Ireland in the 184()'s when
blight wiped out the one variety o potato
that Irish farmers had cultivated, causing
two million people to starve and forcing
many others to flee the country.
Critics o Seedscam also point out that
many of the new seed-varieties have been
developed to respond to powerful chemical
l�TTVC�
(Mt.o-s.
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iflMUICMfflHWItlBUmmiUU
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fertilizers � fertilizers that just happen to
be manufactured bv the same con
glomerates thai market the seeds Hie
widespread adoption ot the new hybrid
America would cripple the potential of
organic farming as an altrnative
chemical-intensive agriculture, since
organic growers would necessarily get p
results from chemical sensitive seed � the
only seed that would be easily available
from commercial sellers.
Observes Barbara Snyder, "Foi
millenia, farmers have provided most ot
their own seed, selecting the best ot then
plants each year and allowing them to
reproduce. Hybrid seed, however, must be
rebred each year from its original parent
plants (the identities ot which, bv the vav,
are kept secret), so the grower has to buy
new seed from the company each season
Coupled with the rising costs of fertilizers,
pesticides, machinery and gasoline, the ad-
ded expense of growing seeds can often
be enough to put yet another village farmer
into debt or totally out of business
Critics of plant patenting ask consumers
to write their federal representatives, urg-
ing them to oppose H.R. 999 and S. 23.
They also encourage garderners to save
some of their seeds, in the hopes that this
could provide the basis of a modest "gene
bank" for traditional plant-varieites �
which could die out should Seedscsam suc-
ceed. "Once this genetic material is gone
warns Snyder, "it is gone forever

David Armstrong, author of "American
Journal, " is a syndicted columnist for col-
lege newspapers.
OrKa
Musid
Presr
the pj
t
r
' � �





HI I s i k U 1M
Features
a I Mill K ! � 1981
Bette Midler Plays
Joplin-Like Singer
In Film: The Rose
Beiu Midlei maj no! he a great and managed by an unsympathetic
01 a subile avi'ess oi an ex imotor, 1 he Rose leads a
'� �� she has proven nomadic, self-destructive existence
. ol the mosi vibrani ol whet cstatic highs are followed by
viciously depressive lows. Drinking
heavily and popping pills, she
. newcomers in hei first t
Rose
us tictionahed account ol a d
ches foi someone to
'C i
- � s aay ana Saturday
tjjj a! 5, s. and 9:30 in
idenhall Studententer's 11
ea - . stu-
tctiv
M
� her, but even love isn't enough.
Midler's sensational film debut
gets suppori from Frederic
Apocalypse Now) as the
lovei who tries to save her; Man
the manager-promotei who
as .i meal ticket. Hut the
. belong- to Midlei. Her stunn-
a.l style and stage presence
burst the screen in her musical
�"v as an actress, she proves
L e n t e i
acuity and
. D the
nmitl
num
Mi
- rhe � his role by bringing her
singing rock stai who charactet to lite with intensity and
oncile public adulation with passion
Midlei can hardly be contained by
i wide screen. She not only blasi-
nit he; main numbers with blistei
but -he aKo attempts
deeply rooted loneliness.
ana ei
net
Jimmie Walker
Coming To Hendrix
This Tuesday Night
�s IIU
rninj
om
Mtstage,
as
ronclad contract
See B� II . page 6, col. 7
relevision star and comedian Jimmie Walker will be appearing in the Hen-
drix Theatre of Mendenhall Student (enter on Tuesday, Nov. IX al X p.m.
Tickets are SI.5(1 tor 1(1 students and S3 tor the general public.
Jimmie "JI Walker, who this
yeai enters his seventh season as the
star otBS TV's Good limes, will
invade the stage ot Mendenhall Stu
dent Center's Hendrix Theatre on
Tuesday, Nm. IS at MX) p.m.
Walker, who has regularly played
before packed houses in 1 as Vegas,
and throughout the United States
and c anada at leading nightclubs
and colleges, is considered by many
to be one ot (he finest, most enter
taining stand-up comics anywhere.
Walker rose to prominence as the
star ot Good I lines after he va-
spotted b) a talent booket in a si
New yotk nightclub. Television
however, is not Jimmie's specialty.
�s great as he is as "J.J Jimmie's
heart and best performances are still
on stage in front of a live audience.
Stand-up comedy is a craft not easi
ly learned he notes, and 'here are, in
fact, a greal main more brain
surgeons in the world than there are
stand-up comedians.
Walkei became an overnight sen-
sation and his catch-phrase,
Dynomite, caught
echoed throughout the country. Be-
ing a hit comedy the
same as being a stand
and Jimmie Walkei fell he had not
reached his goal I hree year? ago he
di opped the w ord lynoi lite"
from his vocabulary people
would separate Wall
formei from J.J
t haracter he p
Jimmie co-starred
Poitiet and Billosby
directed film, I et's Do li .
wonderful review- He continues to
guest frequently on telev i
ty shows and specials, the Tonight
Show. and Hollyw
"He's a rare gem, imic, a
superstar says Sidney Poitier,
the young comedian.
Tickets for E.( I
SI 50, and -
public.
Be there when Jimmie "J J
Walkei brings a stellat explosion of
laughter to the la- C arolii
pus.
Tobacco Festival
Parade, Pageant Highlight Events
lue-C'uied
j 1980-81.
� High
Di isa Ann Jordan.
ngelia Dee Moon,
fane Ly dia Sharpe,
Reidsville; Malanie June Vick,
Rale d Karen ard,ove Ci-
wiuuei
o
i obat.
N(

Conic ol the Southern Flue-Curec
Tobacco Festival, contact Kayc
Hampton al "52-4101.
Othei events o the Southern
Flue-Cured Tobacco Festival in-
clude
e winner of the Tobacco Pipe Smoking Contest, which
Queen Contest will receive a will be held at the 1 indet Box at the
mal scholarship Carolina Easi Mali at 7:00 p.m. on
. I . bacco C oloring Friday, Nov. 14.
Generatoi ol Norfolk, VA. I tie Prioi to the ECU Eastern Ken-
festival pagaent has been sanctioned tucky football game at 1:30 p.m.
( preliminary contest Saturday, the Tobacco Festival
Parade wil begin at al 11:00 a.m.
81. I he parade will be routed down
Fifth Sti eel
n- On Tuesday, Nov. 18, a Tobacco
Tying Contest will be held at 11:00
stival a.m and a Tobacco Spitting Con
ble at test wil be held al 12 noon Both
yden, events will take place on the stage al
:omi
Ban!


�use
n
reel the Farn
aza irginia ville.
na East Mall; Clogj Contest will be held al
Savings & 1 oan- the Carolina Opry House at 8:00
ngi Blvd ; and the Greenville p.m. on Wednesday. o. 19.
bei ol ommerce-14th Members of the Green Grass Clog
et, all in Greenville. For addi- gers will also perform and judge the
nonaj information on the Queen's contest. Admission is $2.00.
The New England Of Robert Frost
Hewitt Joins will appear in Hendrix Theatre, Mendenhall student (enter on Nov. 13 to personally present his
travel film I he New England Of Robert 1-rost. 1 he program, which is slated to begin at X p.m. i the tirt
event of the luXII-XI Mendenhall Student (enter I ravel-Adventure Film Series. I his tilm combines the poetry
of Robert Frosl with the lives of others living in New England today.
Eccentric Relaxation
Studying Hobbyists: A Fun Hobby
By DAVID NORMS
tfalnra t (Mloi
Hobbies are a wonderful way to
waste time and relax, without feel-
ing guilty about it. There are two
major kinds of hobbies; one is con-
structive (building models, painting.
etc.) and the other is purely self-
indulgent (listening to record wal
ching 1 V and so on).
Kids seem to be more likely to
have hobbies than older people; by
the tune people get out of school,
they are too burned out to have
many diverse interests.
One hobby that many ot us had as
kids was building models. 1 was a
prett serious model-builder until 1
giit into high, school. (A serious
model-builder is one who built
models tor tun and not just so they
can buy ait plane glue.)
My dressei at home is still covered
bv a forest of model ship masts ris-
l
dustv plastic
J,
hips
v; owd .i dusty
an plane
ing Irom a I
hulks. Several
(with
miscellaneous iui -
table nearby.
Actually, 1 built
and cat model- ships, but
model ships are less likely to he sub-
jected to demolition dei by o
pi actice will a BH .lie coi-
ners ot the closet and behind the
bookcase are an astounding numbei
of fragments oi these unfortunate
plane and cai n
1 should mention that the saiviv
ing model ships speak t arc sail-
ing ships; die model World War II
battleships would float, and conse-
quently were destroyed in various
naval engagements 'ought in nearby
creeks.
Ship models wcie a barj
because two oi three dollars w
buy a pretty nice one. and it would
take days or weeks to finish painting
all the little details and add the tigg-
ing. A model car was tun to build,
but usually only took a hour or so oi
snapping parts together.
Model rockets were also a nice,
constructive hobby. The mam pro-
blem with them was the wmd cat-
ching them when the parachute
opened, and sweeping the whole
rocket into the very top o the tallest
tree on the block.
Cooking is a good hobby to lake
up. It otters the opportunity to have
tun while doing the work you ought
to be doing.
In the same vein vacuming and
scrubbing floors would also be prac-
tical hobbies, but thev aren't hkelv
to be fun tor too many people.
Collecting things is a hobby most
people have in some form or other.
AImost everybody collects
something � icords, comic books.
coins, stamps, u .
insulators from telephone poles,
postcards, smashed-up m ars,
empty wine and liquoi botl
any one ot a thousand things.
Collecting things is a hobb
tails into both ot the ma
categories I mentioned 1 is
structive, enabling the hobbyist to
build up a collection ot something
that he can be proud ol. but l! b I
self-indulgent because evet
lects only the things they wa
I oneliness and isolatio
pitfall the serums collec
sometimes has to put up with Have
you ever tried to talk about yout
collection ot postcards avJ stamps
from. say. the Portugese colon .
Seibia or I ithuania? It's surprising
ho� many people have absolutely
no appreciation foi such specialized
collections.
.tTARfOiG leour COLUTGI thc Harp Wm
M PNfD AjWis
Organ Recital
Organist Robert Irwin. member of the hast Carolina I niversity School ot
Music faeultv will perform in recital Sunday. Nov. 16, at the rirst
Presbyterian Church here. The recital, set for 3:38 p.m is free and open to
the public.
it Alum
OUGHT to afrJQ� fouie
THESIS bWCMrtT
k&
SHIAJG ThT 2H5V �!�
IS A SrvflV BOOK 5Nif
THtT ��ST Uj TO ST)T.

i
r





HI ! ST M1 ll N
t i t MMl K 13, 198(1
Happenings
Campus Events:
Robert ! rosi" M
i t New I neland of
Rose" 1 len
. i State Cham
I
uckv, 1 icklen
Hendrix
School oj Art
(hi 26 Vov. M
Pre i olumbian Art, Ceramics Small Sculpture
and rextiles from the ECl Anthropology Dept
Duke University Museum of Art, and Private
c ollections to be on display through Dei. 18
Print Retrospective � Selected Senioi Folios of
Prints b ECU alumni from the Printmaking
I )epartments collection.
rraveling Graduate Show ECU Graduate
Students' work throughout the state b the North
(. arolina Museum ol Art's rraveling f xhibition
Sen ice

Movies
. MM
Plaza
" I he wakening" (R) shows at 3:15, 5:15, 7:15
and 9:1 5
"1 ovinj � iples" (PG) Shows at 3, 5, 7 and 9
"The Exterminator" (R) Shows ai 3:15, 5:15,
7:15 a 9:15 p.m.
Him aneer
"The Big Hi awl" tR) Starring Jackie Chi
Shows at 1. 3, 5, 7 and l) p.m.
"It's M luin" (R) Starring Jill Clayburgh,
Michael Douglas, Charles Grodin Shows at 1:10,
3:10, 5:10, and l).m p.m
'AH hen Stranger Calls (R) 1:15, 3 15, 5:15,
7:15 and 9:15 p.m.
Starting Pi tt the Buccaneer: "Gloria
"Private I ves "( oast to Coast
1 ridav si l I
irda 111! ST ATI
Sunday Bl ST1 R BR iWN (I Shi;
i TOMMY li. AND i
VVednesda Bl Bl I
1 hursdav Dl iUBll
I hursday V Ills,
! riday Dl I Bl R 1 Mo l.INT
irday I
H SI R li �
lay Al �. NORTH STAR
NORTI
Wednesda I RI
n GRASS Cl
BOYS
: lav EAR I
Bette Midler Plays
Joplin-Like Singer
In Film: The Rose
ntinued
N
Sund .
M

Nightlife
ttic
o si. ! ! I Rs CiOl D
I hi;
si I
a i
N T R
Coffeehouse Presents Leopold Perry
v
Ma
. u
Dirt 1 eopold' metiet
le the my stic -melai
ve song with a
nary an111
� w iden the sc
in p : al sune
i,
eui!
Prim Croup
To Hold
Auction
. : eed
i
i
iired c
the U.S.
. pen .
e 111 am p, Daryl
and John Oates,
Cheecl
em Garcia,
pare
and
and
u wit
Ken
his I
1 i V
k Is have
ibly com-
h Cat Stevens
h Carradine,
yrics bring to
' r k ol
rhi aw
pre iou Cofl eehouse
gagement noted
. e pi esence
htful n
interpretatit
usual, the Student
Union Cot tee house
c ommittee wiii also ol
:� ;ets of si
i hence s en
i
V. 1CJ5M 1 KU u I'OS
PRICE II.NH 1 w�� each additional rorOC tor

d 5 0 . 1 -

C a .
h. . . C -
I
M dg

M
Mc I
Freei Noi

I i i Print ' .
Concert:
Super Grit
And Snuft
r h e Super Grit
Bat
il
Wright Auditoriun
lf al
�� � �
will be presented h the
Student Union Special
C oncerts Committee.
I ickets can be purchas
ed at theentra I �
(! fice, Apple Records,
and The Musk Shop,
v1 .50 foi 1(1
students and $3.00 foi
the public.
Come In And
Enjoy Our
24 Item
Salad Bar
sm. Salad w meai $.99
lg Salad Bar $2.50
Unlimited Trips
Salad Bar Open: 1 ;00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.
IJSTAURANT
LOOK' l�
LET'S &� f�hk
y
CaJHO '
ABOHTiOMJ P TO
imwinof
� iff ttWH
t �

P v �h:ii
ftataifH �tiw
Hdim Orttnm
.f ifinti- 'r, Kiinvm i
THE SHOE ROOM
402 S. EVANS STREET hours
ON THE DOWNTOWN MALL m
752-1268 monsat.
WOMEN'S SHOES
select group 3pr. $15.0
3 pr. MEN'S TENNIS SHOES
$18.0
10 Off ALL OTHER SHOES
HANDBAGS 10 OFF
THURSDAY �SATURDAY NOV. 13-15
SHOES FOR THE ENTIRE
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�vfo
GOLD & SILVER1
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TV
TT
P





ys
er
:astmg
re � s
S
A
IPOT
ER
ION
'ES
IELETS
IINT
$
1 HI 1 AS1 C AROl INIAN
Purple-Gold
Set Saturday
Sports
NOVI MBl R 13. 1980 Pag7
By CHARLES CHANDLER
1 he Easl Carolina men's basket-
ball team will be on public displa
foi the first time this Saturday when
the club holds its annual Purple-
Gold intrasquad game and. says
tiead coach Dave Odom, the
defense may outshine the offense.
�Right now the defense is certain-
ly tan her along than the offense
Odom said. "Our halt court defense
has been especially impressive. It is
a lot bettei right now than it was last
yeai at this time
1 he lull courl defense i another
matter, Odom sas. "Our full court
defense was better last year at this
�lage than it is now. I hat doesn't
worry me. though, because 1 know
it will come
With the defense ahead of the of-
fense, the young Pirates are having
problems getting the firepower go-
ing.
"We know what to do on of-
fense Odom claimed, "but
because our defense plavs with so
much intensity we're having trouble
getting our timing down
The second year head coach add-
ed that he felt these early problems
could develop into advantages later.
"Unless oui offense is a lot worse
than 1 think it is, these early pro-
blems will be an asset to us later. 1
certainly hope we won't face a
whole lot more pressure than we've
faced already in pi act ice
Odom's Pirates lost their top
three scorers from a year ago to
graduation and return only two
part-time starters, forward David
Underwood and center-forward
Mike Gibson. Other returnees in-
clude 6-11 center Tom Symanski,
forward Mark McLaurin, and non-
scholarship guard Greg Bat son.
"As always we're looking to these
upperclassmen for our scoring
leadership Odom said. "We've
been keeping close tabs on the way
our scrimmages have gone and these
upperclassmen have definitely been
the leaders thus far
Of the newcomers who might pro-
vide some early offensive punch.
Odom cited a pair of freshmen who
will play the big guard position.
�'Barry Wright (6-5) seems to
have a knack for being in the right
place at the right time. Michael box
(Raleigh Sanderson High grad) also
has shown an ability to score and
has a real fine shooting touch
A total of seven newcomers have
joined the Pirates and will see public
action in Minges Coliseum for the
first time this Saturday in the intras-
quad contest.
For the Purple-Gold game, which
will begin 30 minutes following the
ECU-Eastern Kentucky football
game (which begins at 1:30 and
should end approximately three
hours thereafter), Odom has split
his club into two n on -
inner changeable squads.
Emory Praises
EK's Colonels
In Pirates' Wednesday practice, freshman Bill McNair
shoots over junior David I ndenvood (34) as sophomore
guard Mike Bledsoe (10) looks on. (Photo b Jon Jordon)
By CHARLES! HANDLER
pnrt� I rtilir
Following an impressive vet
disappointing performance against
Miami's powerful Hurricanes last
Saturday in the Orange Bowl one
might figure that the Pirates and
head coach I d Emory would be fac-
ing a letdown this week when they
host Division I-AA member Eastern
Kentucky. Such is not the case,
though.
"They won the national cham-
pionship last year in their division
Emory pointed out. "And they've
got a great, great football team
again this year
The first-year Pirate mentor said
that the Colonels compared
favorablv with one of the better
squads on ECU's 1980 schedule.
"They're just as good as
Southern Mississippi he claimed,
"and better than the Dukes,
Richmonds and William and
Marys
The Colonels have jumped to a
7-2 mark this season and have
out scored their opponents 233-92.
The Pirates, though playing a
tougher schedule, are 41 his does
not mean that the team has given up
hope on a winning season, Emory
says.
"Our goals are still alive. We set
the goal o' having a winning season
in the transition year and beating
North Carolina State (game on Nov.
22). We can still do that but those
goals ate ail wrapped up in this
Saturday afternoon
Emory added that practice had
been good this week and that the
team had a positive altitude despite
continuing injury problems.
"Our guys are not looking tor-
ward to anything but becoming 5-
on home turf
Saturday's game marks the last
home appearance foi 12 Pirate
seniors, including star back- An
thony c ollins and fheodore Sutton,
along with All-America linebacker
candidate Jeffrey Wan en.
I wo other seniors, guard Wayne
Inman and defensive tackle Tim
Swords, will not return next vear
but are injured and cannot plav
against the Colonels.
As has become the norm, the
Pirates have several regulars ques-
tionable tor the weekend's game.
Defensive tackle Hal Stewart in-
jured his knee against Miami and
will be out for at leasl this .seek and
maybe next. To compensate. Emory
has tinned Doug Smith from defen-
sive end to tackle
Guard 1 ee Griffin was also in-
jured again the Hurricanes and is
lost tor the reason. Starting tackle
1 ootie Robbins is questionable aftei
having missed practice all week with
an ailment.
Reserve QB 1 arry Brobsl also will
not plav due So a knee strain.
Ficklen Stadium garnetime is 1:30
p.m.
Fourteen Seniors Bow Out Saturday
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Inman
Freer
Davenport
Holley
Sport- r dlliir
"In the last four years they have
given you a 15-3 home record and a
treasure chest full of excitement to
go along with it
A note went out to all the students
living on bast Carolina's campus
tins week from Pirate head football
coach Ed I mory. The note concern-
ed 14 seniors who will be making
their final appearances in Ficklen
Stadium this weekend when the
team hosts Pastern Kentucky.
Emory's note asked all students
to attend the game in support of all
these seniors have done for ECU
football.
Those 14 seniors were interviewed
this week and were asked two ques-
tions: 1) "Looking back on your
four years of football at ECU, what
is your most memorable moment?
2)What is the biggest lesson you've
learned, or what have you gained
most, from playing college football?
The responses:
Wayne Inman (Guard, Hope
Mills, N.C. native. Third learn
Associated Press All-America in
'79. Injured in second game of 'SO
season and missed remainder of
senior year. H ill not play Saturday).
Most Memorable Moment � "It
would have to be playing in the In-
dependence Bowl my sophomore
vear. The offense had been struggl-
ing that year and the defense had
got all the credit. We went in there,
though, and put over 30 points on
the board. We just blew them
(Louisiana Tech) out. It was great
Biggest lesson � "These four
years have taught me what it takes
to be a winner both in life and on
the field. At moments I have really
reached down and gave it all I had.
I'd never done that before
Theodore Sutton � (Fullback;
Kmston, S. C. C urrently second all-
time leading rusher in Pirate history
with 2,654 yards. Seeds 236 yards in
last two games to take over top
spot.)
Most Memorable Moment � "The
chance to go to a bowl game
(Independence, '78) and being voted
MVP in it is my biggest thrill. This
finally gave me the opportunity to
really participate after being a walk-
on here
Biggest Lesson � "In football we
are all are taught to pull together
and be one. Football has really
taught me alot when 1
with the game of life
James freer (Safety; Rocky
Mount. X.C )
Most Memorable Moment
"Playing in the Independence Bowl
was a big thrill. My senior veai has
been really special, though. I've
seen how you can grow from a shy
freshman to a senior that provides
leadership
Biggest lesson "I've gained a
lot from meeting so many guvs from
all ovei the Mate and all over the
country
Vern Davenport (Split end-
pacekicker; Grifion, N.CJ
Most Memorable Moment
"Being captain for the Carolina
game last year (79) and seormg in
it
Biggest Lesson - "I feel that every
circumstance thai can happen to me
in life has alreadv happened to me
white playing football here. I've fac-
ed adversity, pressure and have had
to deal with both the bad and the
good, both winning and losing.
Football has taught me how to han-
dle all these situations
Willie Holley (Cornerback; Eden-
ton, X.C.)
Most Memorable Moment
"Going to the Independence Bowl. 1
saved a touchdown pass in it. The
game might have been much closer
if 1 hadn't done it. It came on
fourth-and-five with us up by one
touchdown. If they had scored the
game would have been tied
Biggest Lesson � "I've met a lot
of special people and friends that 1
know will be there to help me out
when I need them
Cliff Williams t Defensive end;
Fayettville, N.C.)
Memorable Moment � "Starting
last year (479). I'd always wanted to
contribute and 1 was able to. I'm
also thrilled because 1 got to get an
education through football
Biggest lesson � "I've learned
what hard work, determination and
pride can do for you. Things might
be rough but you must keep on go-
ing
Chuck Jackson (Linebacker;
Fayettville, N.C.)
Most Memorable Moment � "M
freshman year. The guys around
iliel it then had a lot o influence on me. I
was nisi turning into a being a col-
lege player then
fiiggest lesson "The most im-
portant thing is that you have to
have a lot of discipline
Rodne Vlien 'Punier; Hender-
son, V( )
Most Memorable Moment
"Beating S;a:e in my first game
ever. That had always been a big
rivalry and it was great to win a big
game in my first game
Biggest lesson "It there's
something you want to do and it
you want it bid enough; hang in
there. It can be done. Some o my
goals and some ol the team goals
have come true and some haven't
since I've been here. But as long as
there is hope, one day it will hap-
pen
Jeffrey Warren (linebacker;
Snow Hill, N.C. Leading Pirate
tackier in 'SO; All-America can-
didate.
Most Memorable Moment � "I
had a real good hit in the In-
dependence Bowl m sophomore
vear. It was the beginning of the
success in my career. It was then
that 1 realized I could play college
ball
Biggest Lesson � "The ability to
try the impossible, to go out no mat-
ter how bad things look. You win
some and you lose some but you've
gin to keep trying
Rocky Butler (Defensive end;
Greenville)
Most Memorable Moment �
"Beating Duke so soundly (35-10) in
the first game o this season when
we weren't expected to do
anything
Biggest lesson � "Football has
helped me break a lot of barriers
between people. The people you
meet are something else. There's
fraternities and all. Sure, they get
close but it's just not the same as
that certain feeling you get when
you spend four years with a bunch
o guys. Those cold winter mornings
in the weight rooms and those hot
spring practices really bring yo"
close together
Nate Wigfall (Defensive tackle;
Jacksonville, N.C.)
Most Memorable Moment �
"Getting my academic eligibility for
this season. I really had to work
hard to be eligible tor my senioi
vear
Biggest I esson Football is not
an easy game to plav. Everybody
can't do it. The season is full of
work and is a vear round thing. If
vou have a winning season, though,
it's all worth it
Bill Lamm (Kicker; Satellite
Beach, Fla. Currently the tilth all-
time leading Pirate scorer with 15$
points.)
Most Memorable Moment The
first time 1 kicked three field goals
in a game (against Texas-Arlington
in '8). That was also the first time
my Dad got to come up here to see
me play
Biggest lesson � "I've been
taught a lot o discipline. 1 needed
to be. 1 used to have a real problem
with curfews
Tim Swords (Defensive tackle;
New Martinsville, W, Va. Five-year
senior. Injured and will not play
Saturday).
Most Memorable Moment
"When we tied Carolina (24-24) last
vear. We should have beaten them,
though. We heard so much about
how bad they were. Heck, we kicked
them all over the field in the second
half
Biggest Lesson - "Football works
on you mentally. I'd have to say I've
grown up a lot
Anthony Collins � (Halfback;
Penn Van, N.Y. Currently fifth on
the all-time FCC rushing list with
2,116 yards).
Most Memorable Moment
When I gained over 1,000 yards
(1,130) last vear. I hat's every
back's goal. Also, being mi the
number one rushing team in the na-
tion last season was a big thrill. It's
something vou can alwavs look back
on
Biggest Lesson � "Learning how
to be a man has been the big thing
for me. Pve had to adjust to being
on my own. Coach (Pat) Dye taught
me a lot abou; being a person, a
man. It's something I'll always be
thankful for
Swords
Wigfall
As Emory's note says, all of these
seniors are something Pirate fans
can "be thankful for
Sutton
Collins
Allen

T
I





8
nil 1 sl v XKOllMW NOVEMBl K 13, liwi
The Fearless Football Forecast
EASTI RN Kl Ml'kN I ECU
1)1 kl A I N.C. ST ATI
VIRGINIA 1 UNC
C I EMSON A I MARYI AND
WAKE FOREST Al SOUTH CAROLINA
rEXAS A&M AT ARKANSAS
1 si l MISSISSIPPI SI All
GI ORGIA Al AUBURN
SHlNGTON M SOI I ill RN i 1
MISSOURI Al OKI HOMA
PI RIM 1 1 MICHIGAN
NOI Rl DWll Al 1 ABAMA
TERRY HERNDONCHARLES CHANDLERKEN SMITH)JIMMY DuPREE
Advertising ManagerSports EditorECU SID iAssistant Sports Editor
(89-31)(88-32)(87-33)(84-36)
ECU 20-13ECU 27-13ECU 21-14ECU 28-10
N x . StateN.C. StateN.C. StateN.C. State
UNCUNCUNCUNC
MarylandMarylandMarylandC lemson
South CarolinaSouth CarolinaSouth. C arolinaSouth Carolina
ikansasArkansasArkansasArkansas
Mississippi StateMississippi StateMississippi StateMississippi State
GeorgiaGeorgia(ieorgiaGeorgia
Southern CalSouthern CalSouthern C alSouthern Cal
OklahomaOklahomaOklahomaOklahoma
MichiganPurdueMichiganMichigan
AlabamaAlabamaNotre DameNotre Dame
GUEST PICKER
Dr. KEN KARR
ECU Ath. Dir.
ECU 31-21
N.C. State
UNC
Maryland
South Carolina
Arkansas
Mississippi State
Georgia
Southern C al
Oklahoma
Purdue
Alabama
Face Former ECU Assistant
Pirates Open Against ODU
I ntra mural Corner
B JIMM DuPREE
lit�n� NO'trK i d
One
�, ai oltna's
cessful
the years
sw imn
1980-81
to uphold
tioi
Boi
woi
has
been
the
nises
that tradi
men
and
h
Saturday
M l r.
against
of Ol
Ih
must

A .1
Nai at oi ium
the Monarchs
Dominion.
formers Bill Fehling
and Ted Nieman and
the women must oxer-
come injuries and il-
lness to several ke per-
formers. Along with
Nieman and Fehling,
senioi standout Kelh
Hopkins is no longer
with the Pirate natators
alter having qualified
tot the Olympic trials a
year ago.
Aside from those
losses, the Pirate men
return experience at
most of then top posi-
tions. Senior Jack
Clowar leads the team
in the sprint events,
while junior Doug
Nieman returns as the
top performer in the in-
dividual medley.
Junior Scott Ross
and freshman Jan
Wikland of Sweden will
anchor the distance
events, with sophomore
Matt McDonald tops in
the breaststroke and
Pern Newman strong
in the butterfly.
"We've got some
good perfomrers in
each event said
Scharf. "It's going to
depend on what the
other people behind
ihem in the events do.
The men will be kind of
in a building year.
" 1 hey could surprise
us he added. "We'll
eo as far as they want
to
The Lady Pirate
swimmers are lead by
sophomore A11 -
American Tami Put-
nam, whose specialty is
listed as the individual
medley. The versatile
performer also turned
in standout efforts in
the breaststroke during
the 1979-80 season
Other top prospects
Classifieds
for the Lady Pirates in-
clude freshmsan Jen-
niffer Jayes in the
backstroke and
soph o m ore Su sa n
Hanks in the freestyle.
Top sprinters for the
1 ady Pirates are
sophomore Al 1 -
American Carol
Shackletl in the 1M.
and freshmen
freestylers Mori a
McHugh and 1 ori Mc-
Queston
Students who have signed up for
co-rec volleyball are reminded that
the original schedule of games and
times has been revised, due to
changes in the availability of court
space. New schedules are on hand in
the Intramurals office in Memorial
Gym.
I he entry dates for the Miller-
EC U Pre-Season Basketball Tour-
nament will open Monday, Nov. 17
and close Nov. 24. Only the first 62
teams will be registered to pla. The
tournament will be held on the
weekend of Dec. 5-7, and there is a
S5 entry tee for the teams
Round-robin competition in bi
soccer and co-rec flan football
end on Nov. 20. The all-cam
playoffs will be held the folio
week.
ECU Statter- and facu
members are invited to con :
the first Faculty-Staff Racquethall
Tournament at ECU. Applications
arc in the intramurals office. I here
is a S3 entry fee
Congratulations to the Renegades
and the Hole-ln-()ners. lsw 1'
Putt Champions'
Spik
ers 'Block'
Pembroke State
!
s:
1 umbei
1 adv
I mat
V
1 5
mat
m then
before the NCA1AW
Tournament hich is to
be � i in
tgh.
� A
coi i I had
e mental lapses,
d let assistant
1 m Davidson. "Our
I ng game was
stronger; we've
been woi king on that in
"Sharon tPerry) and
Dale (LaVant) had
some good strong
blocking
"It's a big plus for us
ng into the sta
toui nament havi n g
won this match
(.uilom Crafting
and Hepinr
FOR RENT
CHRISTIAN FEMALE Si -
responsible roommate for turmsh
� �a trailer S65 month halt
Ul liti� 756 8664 alter00 pm
RESPONSIBLE FEMALE
ROOMMATE Needed im
mediately Two bedroom ap.v '
ment half rent halt utilities close
to campus Can 7Sfi
FOR SALE
FOR SALE Technics SA 500 60
Aas SI 3C lull, automatic
tutntabu Aith Empire 2000 E III
Phase Linear tpeal
Aluminum antennae Paid i'lfjO
B.s' oiler Call 752 8860. ask lot
Graham
FOR SALE 1973 CB 100 Honda
Many new parts �ei v qood snap.
85 MPG V300 Firm Call 758 8U4
FOR SALE Alvarei Guitar. 7
months old With case iJJO
758 6302
FOR SALE �6' Ford Falcon
runs qood qas save' Cai' Gem
.697 leave message
FOR SALE Navaio Indian Con
cho Belt ana Squash blossom
necklace with bracelet 758 5692
PERSONAL
CUSTOM CRAFT ING and repair
of qold and silver Buying and
sellmq of qold and silver by Les
Jewelers 20 E 5th St 758 2127
SUNSHINE STUDIOS offering
classes in Ballet Jan y oga and
f . � i c I SI M' Cial Indent rates
Within walkmq distance ol cam
pus
PERFECT CHRISTMAS GIFTS
H.qh q i.i' I, !o�. cos! portraits.
caricatures T htrt! people pets
name it John Wey Ier
S77S
ANYTHING YOU CAN WRITE
car '� bett� i Typing pi o
ofreadimj � fill eq write R.ghi
756 �946
HELP WANTED RN s. LPN s
and Technicians al Pungo Distr id
Hospital needs you Opening on all
three shifts wth shilt differential
for 3 00 II 00 and 1 00 7 00 Con
'j(i DirecfOi ol Nurses Pungo
District Hospital 943 Jill
DOMINO S PIZZA Now hmng
part limi hi , Musi be 18 have
own car and insurance mus be
willing to work weekends Apply
Original Handcrafted Jeivelry
in Silver and (wold
120 t 5 ��.
(.reenvdl Y( 27834
1
CURRY
COPY
CENTER OF GREENVILLE
� ANS ST MALL
- 33
RESUME SPECIAL
Buying and Selling
Gold and Silver and Coin
758 2127
25 $13.50 plus tax 50 $16.60 plus Tax
includes typing,second sheets & envelopes of your
Ichoice (8'rxll black ink) prices good thru Nov. 30
RECORD SALE
in person 1201 Charles Blvd
WANTED Female housekeeper
to live m' and tree to travel Call
75 3511 daily at 2 00 p m
WANTED Ride to Baltimore
Maryland or anywhere north on
I 95 on the 21st or 22nd of
November Will share driving and
enpenses Call 758 5666
STEVE Have had a qre.ii lim
with you the past lew weeks but
had an even better time with your
roommate Saturday niqht Your
still nice but I M NOT
AVAILABLE ANY MORE
SREWAROS Lost small brown
leather pouch great sentimental
value Call Karen at 752 0247
CONGR ADUL AT IONS L v n
Wordsworth ol Tn Sigma Soroi i
ty. the new Miss Rock, Mount
Geep
FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE
CLASSIFIED ADS CAN BE PUR
CHASED AT THREE LOCA
TIONS
Student Supply Store Lobby MWF
10 00 11 .00, TTH II 00 12 00
East Carolinian Office MTTH
400 5 00WF2003 00
Student Organization Booth
(MendenhaM; MWF I 2 00 ' 0C
TTH 11 eo 12 00
ATTIC ATTIC
Souths No. 6
Rock Nightclub
TRUR FRI.
SUTTEER'S
GOLD
SAT CHRYSALIS REC. ART.
THE STATES
sun. THE FABULOUS
KNOBS
t-Rtt ADMISSION FOR
ALL PERSONS WEARING
ATTIC T-SHIRTS.
o
Ae
v
I
Save up to $3.00!
Major label LP's! Top artists!
Many, many selections in this special purchase. Classics included!
Hundreds of records! Come early for best selection!
NOV. 17-19
STUDENTSUPPLY
STORE
WRIGHT BUILDING
OWNED AND OPERATED
BY EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
The Contest: The Rules:
Domino's Pizza will award
free, 50 large pizzas to the
winning male �female
dorms purchasing the most
pizzas during the 7-day
period starting Nov. 9 and
running through Nov. 15.
(coed dorms included)
The pizza sales will be com-
puted on a per capita basis.
All Pizzas Include Our
Special Blend of Sauce
and Cheese
Our Superb
Cheese Pizza
12" cheese $3 65
16' cheese $5 35
Domino's Deluxe
5 items for the price of 4
Pepperoni. Mushrooms,
Onions. Green Peppers,
and Sausage
12 Deluxe $6 45
16' Deluxe $9 55
1. Carry-out orders and all
deliveries will be counted if
we are given your dorm ad-
dress.
2. Any pizza over $7.00 will be
counted twice.
3. The winning dorm's Resi-
dent Advisor will be notified.
Announcements will be
published in the East Caroli-
nian Nov. 18, 1980.
4. The location and the time
of the party will be conve
nient to both the winning
dorms and Domino's Pizza.
5. The 50 pizza will be one
item pizzas. The winning
dorms will have the choice of
item. The pizzas do not have
to be the same.
The Vegi
5 items for the price of 4
Mushrooms. Black Olives
Green Olives, Onions and
Green Peppers
12" Vegi $6 45
16" Vegi $9 55
Any 1 item
Any VkVi
Any 2 items
Any 3 items
Any 4 items
12"
$4 35
$4 35
$505
$575
$6 45
V3"
$6 40
$6 40
$7.45
$8.50
$9 55
Ou- drivers c�"y �u tua" S20 00
Limited 0'very area Pnc�t do not
-viude �eoicatie a� t�
Additional Item
Mushrooms Pepperoni
Green Peppers Anchovies
Ground Beef Sausage
Double Cheese Ham
Black Olives Onions
Green Olives
Extra Thick Crust
Hot Pepper Rings
12" pizza70
16" pizza $105
Greenville hours.
11:00-100 Sun -Thurs.
11:00-2:00 FnSat.
Fast
Friendly
Free
Delivery
758-6660
1201 Charles Blvd.
t
A
T
-�-�
i





Title
The East Carolinian, November 13, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 13, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.93
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/57301
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