The East Carolinian, November 6, 1980






(She �a0t Carolinian
Vol. 55 No. 20
10 Pages
Serving fi East arolina campus community ince 1925
�Thursday, November 6, I'JXo
(ireenville, Northarolina
( in ululion MI.IHXl
East Wins Senate Seat In Upset
RAJ 1 U . M
Republicans, knocking oil p
in n � kini ;
u
'111
E as t had
land u I d
sun :
tv.
m the 11 a
ken b ice Pi esident
ish
lor M

Las
rtald Reaca
p ecinct i
can p u
I
Moi
� nall pulling ahea I
M irly toda Mot gan
lie's predomina
b ack precincts in the Easi and the
Piedmont
ai ,i cu"
i of the e'
uallv at close 'all.
I out ol .ti M :
ns. the '
I ;
rial C lub, the bi partisa ves, but M ��.
founded b N ported the piane until Pi
ol her ' - relied d
se Heln
Morgan, who traveled Morga I
the closing week dso made a
. accused the I ast financii � Easi
ting to bus the S �
tie raised .
M � �'
n
lign ol deliberately distorting
id called I i ' �;
11 i v e
i
1
II ' ; � .
: lie B- I
the ma le ol msei
Morj
East r them I

East I
mmitiee I
East Overcomes The Odds,
Wins Election To Senate
i s s
M

Bi I I KK t.K N
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"Whei e be i
we knew tha
Easi
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Correction
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Nov. 4 ed
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1
bove: senator-elect John East, formerly a political science professor at campaign. Pictured with I asl are h.s wife. Sis,
Kl reflects on the lony senatorial campaign now behind him. Below Marts andhip.
hn fast poses with family, who wen a great help to him throughout the
and their two daughters,
i.m. Wedi e day a hen
E a had
'�� wly
� oximai
a r cast
untry

��
campa
waited at
Repu Ca Head

" i
re fu
I :
ECU Police Beat
Bicycles Sent To Raleigh; Gunshot Reported
Bn MIKI NOON N
(
rplu
I i l) had atten
wnei e bicycle by
p and "ever)
able way but with no results.
Mam ' bicycles had in a
On The Inside
Announcement
Editorials
lassifieds
1 etters
Sports
IeRoux
bit. c le bein i - d ofl m a sim
fa rej istei the bil i ���
rafl accordiri � I he
.Mined in the I niversi
trail . ilations
;r malicious inci-
police rep iris, in
i � aim" fii ' the
i' appi oximai
I ; 1 uesda when an uniden-
: pei s hi sh l .t steel inai hie
. I ullei through a fourth 11
window ol ycock Dormitory
rding to the polio �rt,
I ean 11 llai d, resident advisoi,
who lives in room 4M Aycock was
I by Ricky S. Chua, 19, ol 440
ycock that someone had shot a
ol some type and that the bullet
: gone through the top ol the
wind �� 'hua's room I he bullet
broke the mirroi ovei the
� in hua's i o m m
4 dice speculate the shot came
9 from the Southwest cornei ol lones
4 Doi mitoi ti om I he foui th floor.
N I lie projectile was described by
5 police as "a steel ball aboul the
ol a mat blc
A Truckload Of Bicycles
to be auctioned ofj in Raleigh.
Allied Health's
Annual Career
Day Scheduled
By Mlkf NOONN
S. �.
Per
ovei 6! hospitals ai
sti tut ions I
assemble I
University of Nursii I Ei
, Novembc - x
Health c areers Day
Sponsored by ' - i a
i and Placen ei v
junction with
eS of Allied H
Social Professions, V
Heaith areei Dav -
students
related fields a chance
what careei oppoi
available throi -
1 he careei da �
from 9 45 a m to 1 p.m
hallways ol the Nursing B
1 ables, displays and boo
se: up w ith the representatives i
ning each cue
"It is a needed experience 11
seniors, it can be a very interest
experience foi Fresh m a n ,
Sophomores and Juniors said
Furney K tames, direc
(. areei Planning and P
Serivce
"It's not just foi seniors V
classifications can come and fi
out where the opportunities are he
added
Among the prestigious instituions
sending representatives to the
Career Day are John Hopkins
Hospital ol Baltimore. Maryland;
Piedmont Hospital ol tlanta,
Georgia; and Duke. N.( Memorial
and Baptist Hospitals ol North
C arolina. 1 hese institutions are sen
ding representatives to talk with
nursing majors about potential
careei openings as well as students
from other medical-related cur-
ricula.





I HI I AM CAROI IMAS
NOWA1BI R6. ISO
Announcements
ECU SURF CLUB
Then, win be a rry I
Thursday night in the t
M Dorm at 7 p 111 We will
discuss issues itx I "� upcoming
� 1 Myrtle Beach this S
interested pel S
wet ome to stti
GAMMA THETA
UPSILON
Beta S01
���
ting a me- N �
5:00 in Bit ��� � - � a
be made h 1 '� �
ARTIFACTS
ides works I
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-
ALPHA DELTA MU
N
COLLEGE LIFE
ART EXHIBITION
The Student Union Art Ehib
tion Committee will meet on
Thursday November ft at S �
p m in Room 238 o Mendenhall
Student Center All members are
PROGRAM BOARD
dent Union Program
� - ia meel on Vonoay
S . � � bei 10 at 4 00 p m in
1 41 � v tdenl .in student
�, 1 Ml membei in 1 � I �.
ACSSA
in Chemical S
Stud ��� '� ft hold a
- � � � Monday No. 10
� � � a laaan .v: i �
ft A "
JOB SKILLS
WORKSHOP
� . 1 . � . ��
� sand
A -
pd by the Career I � �
� � Pla � � �
6 "interview ng
� �� .
� ' �
r i ted 1
t Service phorM
ROAD RACE
lai Cai
I , Pitt Plaza V
.
Road f
ile Run Run 1
���� 15
tar t and
: �
� � �
;

-
� V

RAFFLE
Wm SSCO 00 in records tapes ot
your choice trom the Record Bar
m Easter Seals Holiday S5O0
Record Rattle Tickets each
SI 00 Your group can buy and or
sell tickets (sales prize S1S0 00 in
records! or register by mail to
day Call Easter Seals 114 E
' " '�� Str el ?S8 3230
s
STEREO
How to Buy Stereo Equip
I a one session workshop ol
lered by East Carolina University
Nov 10 will help potential buyers
of audio components learn about
the Sul ' � 'ore making a pur
hase
The program is designed to help
�� m . � . minate the confusion
surra � �� 1 sounding
systi ms a' � ' k ai �' 'h ,n'
popu � �. I sd and high
� �� �. �� 5 syss
Further information about the
. , � IN
� � � - . - I Cor
�� on ECU Green
. ������:� '57 &H3
ART CONTEST
I Researcl 'he San
Calif on 1 based non
, , . � p, fjjj,
1 1 research grouf has announc
ed that il
a � 1 hiot
� � �
a new bold mdentifable logo
iesig � � hng I B
� ' for
earch All entrn must
be received ' � oh'
De � � � � I 1980 1 � � 1 BibH
lor the IS � :�
pen to a

1 1 write ART
��� � Resea
stitute, San Oieg � � .
LaCROSSE
starting (he Easi Cai
HUNGER COALITION
a meel ' rsday. Nov 6 an
. 14 p.n .����
.
TheCo- �
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,KA
KAPPA DELTA PI
. s'�
,
PPHA
-
SEVINAR
'
FELLOWSHIP
ACCOUNTING TUTORS
LEC1 URE SERIES
cso
'
ART SHOW
DESIGN LECTURE
. �
SCHOLARSHIP
Indianapolis, Indiana To tor
ther the belief that a strong future
begins today m the schools, Larry
�" Welke president of the Interna
tional Computer Programs inc
ICPI has announced the third an
nual iCP Scholarship competition
' he award will be made to a com
puter science or computer
tef nnology student tor the 1981 82
collegiate school yea' The
scholarsh p will consist of one
year's tuition plus education ex
penses up to a maximum of $5 000
paid to the U S college or univer
sity o the winner s choice
The ICP Scholarship Com" ��� �
is composed of highly qualified
men and women from throughout
the computer industry They will
base their selection on the stu
dents accumulative grade pomt
average in his or "��� � eld of
study overall grade point
ivi ' iO' need lot rtanciai aid
participation ,n data process nu
'
a

A
FAST
related activity

awards An or gina
the final '� st
S a :�
,igh Nan AAannig CA 'man
� � � . �,���� � . � Awards
- �� , � 31
CHESS BACKGAMMON
Whether you' game s r-
: at tqammon the p:ace to be or
some friendly 1 ompetition is
hall S'udent cei '
Tuesd ly evi ning a" 00 c �
ss B i kgan �� Club meet
weekly 1 the Coffeehouse R
15 � � , � � '
�" � A-
TABLE TENNIS CLUB
���
� playet ���'
rodents. 1
� �
� . � � - �
redi � � " � �
of ability are represented S
,OU t � �
- � � . peopl " the
lays
S U. ARTIST
�. 1 iri ��� �
� " � '
rtist f

v Mi St
. � � . � - �
AKA
� �
� � � - ��
� � �. . it it tc
� -
CHANGE
1 he 1
I .is' Carolina I
.�� d Piann
� anoi �� ��� �
� ling � � � ' � " �
B Brewer T hi 1 of I
. , raphy
' " �
POETRY FORUM
' � 1 ECU Poetry Forum a
18

' �
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. �
SPORT CLUB COUNCIL
����� � � "
rt
1 .
'

FOOSEBALL
Register now to
Mendenhall Student Centers
ACU 1 AH Campus Table Soccer
' he double eii"
tournament will be held
� lay November 19 at 6 00
p m in the MSC re "a
Open to ECU Studei
na' � ' ft one (1
open dout � lean
sent ECU at the Assoh at on of Col
ege unions Internationa R �
V t ,1 � ent al East Tenn
Sta ' ���
� ��
. �
. �
. � �. � ,
. ��
dent�

� . �
Billia
� � '
EPISCOPAL WORSHIP
� �-
A
. �. .
� .
. ' '
PHI ALHPA THETA
1 � � - , v i no, a
. -
� � scussion ha �� '
� � � �
SURF AND SAND
� .

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� � �
J0hr ; � v .
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'
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" �

MUSIC RECITAL
.
� '�' �
Friday '� �
I
I D. INTERNSHIPS
STEREO
DC WINTERIN
� � �
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t. ��
with a
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GEOLOGICAL
SURVEY
St
Ft
RE8EL
VACCINE
.
nt Healtl
�. let 1
n two doses g
- -
' � '

����

my other chi
� '
' � �
AUDITIONS
REBEL WORK
� ���
ATTENTION
Iht ravi� roIinia�
welcomes .ill campus
nranialinn 1" submil iienis
tn 1 he nniiumemenK sec-
tion. Due to mir vpjit limita-
tions, however, all future
vubmivtioni vhuuld be no
loRget ihan 50 words Hand-
written Mibmissions will �lso
ni Imiiitr ht .11 1 i u ii
nuM b submil
- 1
t dnesdai s.
NOW THRU
FRIDAY
20 OFF SALE
OUR
CONTINUES
P
U.B.E?
- �
SO U L S
�. . - �-
V- � � Plan 1
. . ni ' - '
CAREERSER VICES
� �
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� �

' �
SUMMER CAMP
� ' -
�.
purpoSf
� � '
�� '
�� . � . . �
- �� � � . '
COMMITTEES
-
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� - � �
� -

AUTOMATION
MUSIC
- - . . -
' � A
'
- to 00 I
1 East Ma
to make ti
a a � "�
a �� �� � E
v - . rtow they a
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ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each o' iese aavertised items is rocjuirexj to be
read'y avai'atee fof sale in each Kroger Savon e�
cept as specifically noted in this ad if we do run out
of an item we will offer you your choice of a com
oarage item when available -enacting the same
saymgs or a -aincheck which will entitle you to pu-
chase the advertised item at the advertised price
witli n � ' days
on
Copy'ig-
K roge- Sav or
Quantity B-g'its Rese-ved
'ems and Pnces
Effectivo Wwd Nov 5
Sat Nov 8 i960
GRE
E � I
A
Ca
- -
Blanks are to rx
Educat
- .?���
154 - . -
� . . . � � � .
�. . � �- - . �'

� j enter. Room �0� ipe gt
LSAT
The l � '
a �� if East
. � � .
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.
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SIGMA TAU DELTA
Check out these low prices
E
C
T
- �� - ��
1 �- ry. will meel
��, .
�. �
' �- �
� � �- -
NOVV. � A
14 ' - �
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Violent Crime
rders i i
ased b

H
�e� "
. e " - '
� �. went up a thei
it i stk
728,
question thei s, w
much iongei i! this can
Sad - Republican Party and K
Reagai hink a t'evs thousand lives arc
e sei . � - . t-1 keep
GOP plait n ays man-
c isioi ' armed
means Id
We don't otr. such
mandatory sentences, but we don't think they ill
much. The jai 5 .re full oi people and
violent crime continues to increase
We considei the protection of individual rights
a vital dement m this country, and we view with
suspicion any government action which would in-
fringe on those rights. But foremost among the
rights enjoyed K freedom loving Americans -
life lueif. v . necessity subor-
dinate. -nd when thousands of hoes are being
snuffed out every year, il is the duty of govern-
ment, whk society has formed to move to
protect its citizens.
10 p
volved
and beai ai
dator
felonies he
abuse of this
�jfc c Lisas fliVByf.XABORTIONS .P TO tlth WilKOf PMtONANCY 1' 76 00 ���� iiKi���ve' pregnancy t�jt birtf coo tro4 ano prociem pre�n�n Cy CO�n�iif�(j For fvrtt�r 1 �vorrnation can til 0sJ5 1 ton f rce ni mt"�r IOC Wl J5�l Bt'wttn f v s p v weekdays MM'tti Or��nuJv i"ttiMniiS' ItMimm. c ����

v
Hand Engraved
f PewterWeart
And Chain
Pictured Items Only
NONE SOLD
TO
DEALERS
OPEN 7 AM TO MIDNIGHT
" ,w Ptionm 754-7031







I HI t AS! i AKOLIMAN
NOVI MBI.R6. 19H0
Student-Sponsored Boycott Helped
Force Unions Into Factories
11 one union
organizer is right, not
many of the students
who participated in the
boycott of J.P.
Stevens, Inc thought
the effort would actual-
ly force the giant textile
manufacturer to allow
a union in its factories.
But now, a week
after the huge firm
signed its first labor
contract with the
Amalgamated Clothing
and Textile Workers
Union, union officials
point to the student ef-
fort as an important
part of the 17-year
struggle over workers'
rights, which w a s
perhaps the most
significant of the post-
war era.
"They (the students)
were exceeding!)
helpful says Paul
Minkoff, the union's
campus coordinator.
"They were a big part
of the broad coalition
which fought the cor-
porate world
The major parts of
the settlement include
recognition of unions
at ten J.P. Stevens
plants, as well as at any
of the company's 70 or
so other factories if the
unions win labor elec-
tions there. The com-
pany also agreed to an
8.5 percent pay hike for
Us workers at its
Roanoke Rapids, N.C
facility, and retroactive
payments of $3 million,
Oi about SI 000 per
worker.
One ot the new
organization's first ef-
forts was to get
students involved in the
struggle. Minkoff was
one of the first to bring
the boycott�which
had somewhat unsuc-
cessfully limped along
since 1965�to the cam-
puses.
"1 knew some facul-
ty members at Colum-
bia so I called them and
arranged a meeting
he recalls. "Then, 1
called student
organizers. They
created a committee,
passed out leaflets and
one thing lead to
another
The Columbia chain
reaction was repeated
at colleges and univer-
sities across the nation.
At its peak, Minkoff
says, the boycott move-
ment had spread to
nearly 150 campuses
and their surrounding
communities. Mostly,
it was a student and
faculty effort with only
rare support from ad-
ministration officials
and the schools' gover-
ning boards, he said.
"In many cases, the
trustees at schools
pleaded neutrality, say-
ing it wasn't the
responsibility of the
university to take a
stance Minkoff says.
"But that was clearly a
way of them standing
behind their own in-
terests, which were, of
course, business ones
"Sometimes the
Board of Trustees at a
particular university
would openly support
the boycott, but most
of the time, our help
came from students
and faculty through
campus-wide petitions
or student government
votes Minkoff says.
" I hat's just not the
way things are done in
i his society, the
students kept telling
us he says.
Thai perception of
societ) and the business
community's inflex-
ibility was the most dif-
ficult obstacle to ovei
come, but he said it was
done b pointing to the
student victories in the
civil rights and anti-wai
m o v e m en t s of t h e
1960s.
"We showed that it
everybody worked
together, something
could be done. If public
opinion became strong
enough, people would
have to pay attention to
it Minkoff says.
Rather than pushing
the students to focus
most of their activities
on their respective cam-
puses, union coor-
dinators in New York
urged student boycott
leaders to organize in
the local communities
s u r r ou n d i n g their
schools.
It was through that
type of local participa-
tion that the boycott
proved to be most ef-
fective, Minkoff says.
He says the financial
damage suffered by the
textile company was
minimal compared to
the agitation and
discontent that the
students helped spread
across the country.
Wrestling At ECU
won 7 go without a fight.
Plains Plans To Welcome Home Jimmy
B J.W BARROW
i pi
PLAINS.Ga.
Even before the final
votes were counted
Tuesday, President
Carter's supporters in
Plains began making
plans foi the "biggest
party ever" to wecome
him home despite his
defeat for foi reelection
by Ronald Reagan.
1 he small southwest
a town was loyal
to the end. giving
C arter more than 500
votes to 16 7 tor
Reagan. And Tuesday
night President
Carter's friends said
they hoped the presi-
dent would return to
Plains to live when he
leaver office Jan. 20.
something he said he
intends to do.
"We'll have the big-
gesl party ever. It will
be every bit as large as
the partv we had for
him in 1976 when he
won said Maxine
Reese, a local merchant
and leader in the
S u m t e r Count y
democratic party.
Mrs. Reese said the
party will be held the
day after Carter leaves
officer and will be in
the streets of Plains
"because we can't find
a building big enough
to hold it
But other than the
prospect of a partv.
Plains residents had lit-
tle else than the bitter
loss to Carter's oppo-
nent on their minds.
His brother, Billy,
said he was very disap-
pointed at President
Carter losing although
he was happv thai Sen.
Birch Bayh, D Ind
also suffered defeat.
Bayh had been chair-
man of a Senate com-
mittee investigating Bil-
ly's Libyan business
dealings.
"1 was very pleased
thai Sen. Bayh was
defeated he said.
"Of course, that puts
another Republican in,
but 1 was still very, very-
pleased to see that guv
lose
Bill) Carter didn't
join other Plains
residents watching the
returns on television.
He was at the Americus
Sunner Cou n t j
Hospital where his
daughter Jana Theus,
was in labor with her
first child and he listen-
ed to a transistor radio
outside the. maternity
ward.
"I talked with Jim-
my before the results
were announced and I
haven't talked wih him
since he said. "I was
very disappointed as I
listened to the results,
but 1 thought he made a
good concession
speech
�'Miss Lillian'
Carter, mother of the
president and Biilv, was
also in the hospital.
recuperating from a
broken hip. She watch-
ed the election results
on television but had
no immediate com-
ment .
Residents said they
did not expect a big
decease in the volume
of tourist trade in
Plains from foui years
ago when Cartel was
elected.
Huiih Carter,
ih
president's cousin, said
the tourist trade has
bottomed oul in Plains
and saui the city's
lifestyle already has
changed as much as is
going to.
"People think thai it
Jimmy loses, we're .
ing to dry up and die
But that isn't so
He and othei
residents said Carter's
living in Plains will
continue to insure the
town hasn't been
forgotten.
Io h n Pope, an
original peanut brigade
organizer, said he
believes Carter will
return to Plains and
make money by wilting
and speaking.
East Carolina University Prof.
Circulates Report On OPEC
To All Chase Manhattan Banks
GREENVILLE
report on the impact oi
OPEC nation's profit
surplus on the world's
economy bv Dr. Oscar
Moore ol the Last
Carolina University
School of Business
faculty is being cir-
culated to all branches
ol the Chase Manhat-
tan Bank.
Dr. Moore's study,
"The Role of Interna-
tional Banking in the
Recycling of
Petrodollars was
delivered at the recent
ninth annual con-
ference of the Atlantic
Economic Society in
Boston, at a session
chaired by Bluford Put-
nam. Chase Manhat-
tan's vice president.
One of the world's
largest banking firms.
Chase Manhattan has
887 branches in 67 na-
tions around the world,
including a Russian
branch located in
Moscow.
The Moore report
emphasizes the impor-
tant role banks around
the world perform in
correcting the
economic imbalance
resulting from the swift
rise in OPEC oil export
prices.
Oil-producing na-
tions have billions of
dollars to invest, and
the rest of the world
needs capital invest-
ment, Moore noted.
While several schemes
of "recycling'
petrodollars have been
attempted, the
"international banking
system has done most
of the recycling of
petrodollars to the non-
oil producing develop
ing countries he said.
"The OPEC oil crisis
has completely changed
the structure of non-oil
producing developing
countries.
"Public sources of
finance have declined
in importance while the
private sources of
finance, particularly
the finance provided bv
the international
banks, have gained in
importance
Except for Iran. In-
donesia, Algeria and
Venezuela, OPLC na-
tions are generally
" I o w absorbers of
goods and services
from the rest of the
world Moore said.
In the past five yeras,
OPLC members had a
surplus of $240 billion
"to be invested outside
their own countries
"Of this nearly $50
billion went to the U.S.
mainlv in the form of
bank deposits and
Treasury securities, in-
cluding a minoi
amount in direct in-
vestments.
"Another S95 billion
went into banks in the
Eurocurrency markets
ol which 60-65 percent
was in dollars; about S
billion, in loans to in-
ternational lending in-
stitutions; and S10
billion, into assets in
the United Kingdom,
other than the Eurocur-
rency deposits.
�'The important
point to note here is
that
thi
OPLC
members chose to leave
such a large portion of
their funds with the
commercial banks
Moore said.
"While the
pre-1973-74 borrowers
were the multinational
corporations and other
banks, the post-1974
borrowers arc govern-
ments and various
public entities in the
less developed coun-
tries
1 he banks ability to
b ecom e e ffec t ive
leaders in the new
economic situation is
large due to new
"mechanisms for
large transfers of
funds. such as
"syndication ol inter-
national banks said
Moore.
Moore, a professor
of economics at ECU,
has research interests in
world gold markets and
the impact of oil sup-
plies on the world's
economy.
THE OFFICIAL ECU CLASS
RINGS ARE
ON HAND.
Headquarters for your ArtCarved College
Rings is your Campus Bookstore.
Trained assistance by Store
personnel helps you chcxse from
a wide selection of ring styles,
stones and special features.
Don't leave college empty-
handed.
WU1KVED
COLLEGE RINGS
Symbolizingyotu ability toachievt
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
WRIGHT BUILDING
$10 00 Deposit rt-quired.
�1980 ArtCarved College Rings
RESEARCH
PAPERS
10.278 on file � all subjects
I � lablel for your up-tod -�����
� i �� research i ' � I
serial ' - � � �
RESEARCH ASSISTANCE
02O6F
Los Angeles. Calif 90025
� 478226 or 477 6227
If it's sick to love a pen,
then the world's going crazy.
ppened to se ef first Then lawyers, bookkeepers, waitresses
ii . . . � � � eautyofoui
� Razor Porni : �
Some peop.e U I I i - o jet so emotiona . i . red witt our
per- � � � izy 1 te a Pilot Razor Point pen that write
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� � . neta ir thai - � � ts point from goin . .
If it is crazy. t ��� a whole iot of peopie In fact, we
mderstand that I t Raj t n has whal I I ikes to score e-
points with football ; lyi
It also comes to our attention that i
coaches are fans of the Pilot Finelinei
Along with all the other Razor
Point features, the 69C
Pilot Fmelmer has
the strength and
inve to g tl � i h bons
It's hard to res.it a ;
� holds th e a Pilot
PILOT
fineSne marker pens
SET YOUR ALARM!
IT'S TIME FOR
VIRGINIA CRABTREE'S
ANNUAL SUNRISE SALE!
STARTS TOMMORROW FROM
7:00am - 9:00pm
GOODIES
PANTS - 1.90 SHIRTS- 1.90
SKIRTS - 1.90 DRESSES - 1.90
COATS - 9.90
THE ITEMS ARE LIMITED GUANTITIES
ONLY ONE PER PERSON PER
CATAGORY.
ITEMS PUT OUT AGAIN AT 1 2 & 6
COATS
ENTIRE STOCK
20-70 OFF
PEA COATS-49.90
SPORTSWEAR
3 3-70
OFF
DOWN LIKE VEST
REG $23.00 & 33.00
SALE 18.40 & 19.90
IZOD PANTS fcOFF
GLORIA VANDERBILT
PANTS ft OFF
LONG SLEEVE PLAID
SHIRTS - $4.90 & $5.90
VELOUR TOPS V-NECK
AND CREW NECK -$7.90
SWEATERS
$4.90 AND 5.90
WE WILL CLOSE
TODAY AT
3:00 TO PREPARE
FOR THIS
SALES EVENT
VIRGINIA
ssza&tee
EAST
mm
PUT SALE ITEMS
ON LAY AW AY
OR USE M.C
VISA,OR
AMERICAN EXPRESS.


. t �,�





Ottie lEaat (Earoliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Richard Green, �m mm
Tl-RRY HbRNDON. Ortctotaf idmrtamg LlSA DREW, , ����
Chris Lichok. jb ���,�� MlKI Noonan, i.
GtORCU HETTICH, cnuiauun Unqn CHARLI S CHANDI IK,
Anita Lanc astir. Proa David Morris.
Novembei 6. 1980
Opinion
Pul'c 4
John East
Uphill Fight For Former Prof,
Resounding Republican Victory
Undoubtedly, the biggest election
upset that occurred Tuesday was the
defeat of incumbant Democratic
Sen. Robert Morgan at the hands of
Dr. John East, former ECU
political science professor.
Dr. East entered the race as a
dark horse candidate. He was an
unknown Republican running
against an incumbant Democrat. It
was the longest uphill battle that
anyone could face in this state
where Democrats outnumber
Republicans three to one in voter
registration.
Needless to say, East's appeal
went across party lines and bucked
traditional voting patterns. Robert
Morgan is not a George McGovern,
but evidently the people of North
Carolina felt that he was a bit too
liberal for us.
Dr. East is an articulate and in-
tgelligent man who has always had a
firm grasp on the issues. He holds a
B.A M.A PhD and a degree in
law. An educated man with his men-
tal resources will be a tremendous
benefit to North Carolina and the
U.S. Senate. Those who are ac-
quainted with Dr. East know him as
a scholar and a gentleman, a warm
and kind person with much compas-
sion.
The Democrats did everything
possible to hurt East, notably the
ballot rigging by the Democratic
dominated state Board of Elections.
That was probably the low point of
the campaign and the height of dirty
politics.
John East's time has come. He is
a fresh face, new blood, with a
dynamic vision of the future. He is
keenly aware of the greatness of our
people and what they can ac-
complish. Like President-elect
Reagan, he believes that our best
years lie ahead of us, not behind us.
East is a man who, unlike his oppo-
nent, will vote his conscience. He
will look to the next generation in-
stead of the next election. That is
what separates statemen from
politicians.
East is first and foremolst a Jef-
fersonian. He believes with his heart
and mind that government is best
which is closest to the people and
"government is best which governs
least Dr. East is certainly correct
in that statement.
This election was a victory for the
farmers, the small businessmen, and
the middle class who must bare the
burden of heavy taxation to support
a bloated ineffective and unrespon-
sive federal goverment. With
leaders like John East, we will
hopefully have a government that
listens to the will of the people more
and to the bureaucrats less.
The most significant effect of
East's election to the Senate is the
emergence of a two party system
that is long overdue in North
Carolina. With the two party system
perhaps we can have goverment by
the people instead of backroom
Democratic political bosses that
have dominated the county cour-
thouses for nearly a century in our
state.
Dr. East is a sign of hope, the
hope for prosperity and security in
an unstable economic environment.
He offers hope for the restoration
of pride and patriotic spirit. The
students of ECU should be happy
for and proud of Dr. last in his
hour of victory.
Party's Over
The 1980 election year has been
one of the most vicious in the
history of the United States, but in a
very off-hand and seemingly effec-
tive manner. The things you saw on
television either galvanized your
beliefs or made you sick.
Whichever, the commercials are
over, and now we must sit back and
watch closely to see how many pro-
mises are broken and forgotten.
Let's hope it's less than ever this
year.
Now we can concentrate on fin-
ding out who shot J.R.
MUGGING9 You INSUIT me! I'm a freedom FiGhTer
rai&ing Funds for me H�l.y CAU&E OF AVENGING
THE MURDER OF THE TAINTED EXILED PREIDEl
OF MY NATIVE KVMAIN WHO WA� BuTcHERE-D BY
THE INFIDEL CROUTON LIBERATION FROHT ON
THE ORDERS OF TE TERRORISTS OF THE
RUBELLA RESISTANCE LEAGUE. NOBODY
DOES MUGGINGS ANYMORE!
cTTEJN '8o
ROIKV MTN-
THE WORLD
ASSKNfff
KHQM5INU
r
Campus Forum
Publications 'Not Doing Enough'
This communication is directed to the
Media Board and al! campus publica-
tions which fall under its auspices. More
specifically The Easl Carolinian and The
Buccaneer. M focus is on these two
publications mainly because the are
supposedly the ones which more ac-
curately depicts the Student life on the
ECU campus. I stress and underscore
the word supposedly because having
been a part of that student life and now
a senior, 1 must bear witness and testify
to the fad that I tune yet to see the true
student life through the aforementioned
publications. Now, I have been lead to
believe as recently a a week oi so ago
there was an article printed in 1 he last
Carolinian, in the editorial section, tl
the Media Board is capable oi represen-
ting the entire student body. Weil if the
coverage oi minority activities and func-
tions that I have seen and presently am
witnessing is supposed to be representing
the minorities, then apparently we
minorities just cannot recognize
ourselves as we are.
Now this is not to su that an effort is
not or has been made. But it is to sav
perhaps you are not doing enough. I
know that there have been many, many
tunes when I fell that coverage oi
minorities was inadequate. But now 1
just feel 1 have remained silent long
enough. Perhaps if those who shared my
opinion had only stated our case and
driven our pom: home long ago. the
representation would be more fairly
covered.
When I opened the most recent Buc-
caneer. I was eaget to find a picture oi
my colleagues and myself. Color was not
in my mind; just the fact thai as a stu-
dent I too would have some memory o
my accomplishments to look bask on.
However, I was severely disappointed.
To be more specific the article on the
ECU's Drama department production
of "Tor Colored Girls Who Have Con-
sidered Suicide When The Rainbow Is
Enuf From neither the picture nor the
write up could you tell four other
women and myself were even in the play.
No names, no picture, and we worked so
hard for that show. Law of statistics is
against the probability, that the 2
characters photographed just happened
to be the only two white girls in the play.
Common sense goes on a little further to
state that since the theme o the play
centered around black women, black
women would be good subjects ot a pic-
ture to depict the play. Ask anyone who
saw the play, and ask whom do they
remember from the play? If for no other
reason, the rainbow oi seven women
should have merited the other characters
some recognition. An apologv and
amends should be made, but they cannot
come close to adequately compensating
the damage we feel has been done to us.
This is just an example of the
representation we minorities receive.
Despite the fact that we turned in events
two weeks prior to the event, The East
Carolinian and Buccaneer staffs failed
to cover them. Some of these events are
block shows, the Alpha Phi Alpha
Fraternity State Convention, and the
Kappa Alpha Psi Halloween Carnival
for the Boys' Home. If what the Media
Board has been doing is representative
of me please refrain from representing
me in the future.
PENELOPE ALFORD
Editors' Sole: The ECL Media Board
has no control whatsoever of the
editorial (ie, news features, sports) con-
tent of the newspaper, and it never will.
Publications editors have seldom had
many "minority" employees. Since
August 1979, only three minority writers
applied to and worked for the
newspaper. This lack oj concern hurts
the newspaper and the student body. Hut
there is little that the Media Hoard can
do about apathy with or without a
minority represntative.
Practicing Yellow Journalism
I read the editorial of October 30 with
disgust. I he charges against Mr. C alder
were made without any prooi ot
evidence. These amounted to a vase o
innuendoes that were malicious, ot ten-
sive, and mendacious. I have been on
this campus tot the last two years, and
have frequented the area o the I edonia
Wright Afro-American Cultural Center
without ever seeing an excess ot litter,
nor have 1 witnessed the unruly behavior
mentioned in the article. Many of the
people 1 have spoken to have cor-
roborated this
It someone has a grievance, it should
be aired betore the proper forum, and
not be tried and tudg-ed in tl
newspaper. This amounts to "yellow
journalism'1 aki:
1 nquirer
1 he campus newspapei should ma
a highe
RENI I BARNWEI 1
H; il gy, l're Mcd
Editors' ote: The 0 t � trial
was based on nothing but facts and ��
reasonable concern (hat tilth had tH
done about the situation at the I i
Wright Afro- imerican Cultun
I he disturbances near thi
been going on tor somt � �� �
"the proper forum" has (!��
Mr.alder commt ntt d tha
a problem, but h I that i. �
"politically touch) thing hence,
passed the buck to Rudolph I
The East Carolinian printed thi
and editorial in an attempt to tor, �
authorities to do their jobs
vellow journalism, be prepare .
of a lot more.
Former Transit Manager Rebuts
Facts, Praise For System
Per taming to the editorial on the tran-
sit svstem that appeared m the Nov. 4
edition ot the East Carolinian, there
were several gross mistakes.
lust o all. the transit managers were
not tired. Ihev were not re-appointed.
Mr. Sherrod said on several occasions,
most notably at the SGA banquet, in
front ot most of the SCA and the
chancellor, that he was re-appointing me
as his transit manager. He consequently
did not and 1 am no longer the SGA
transit manager.
The editorial reported that the transit
records disappeared from the office.
Granted, the records were removed from
the office. What the last Carolinian
tailed to mention was that the records
were returned less than 24 hours later.
Only my personal effects were kept.
The East Carolinian repotted that the
drivers went on strike as a result o the
"firing They did not strike, ihev quit.
Ihev were insulted by Mr. Shetrod's
about face.
The editorial also said that there have
been no accidents. Mi. Francis is no
longer driving a bus as a result ot hitting
a sign and knocking a mirror o and
also getting a ticket tor pulling out in
front of a policeman while leaving Easl
Brook Aprs. Our transit manager is not
allowed to drive the buses he is suppos-
ed to maintain!
On the subject of pay raises. 1 tried to
get the drivers a 15-cents-per-hour pay
raise. At the time, the legislature had to
approve this raise. They denied it on the
grounds that it was not fair to the other
student workers and that the system
could not afford the raise. Since then the
drivers have been given a 40-cents-per-
hour raise!
On the subject of the new bus, 1 ten-
tatively ordered it last March. All that
needed to be done was wait until May
and see if we had the funds to pav tor it.
We could have had it Sept. 1 1 lost my
job before that date. We had alteadv
bought a new van as the first tangible
step towards acquiring safe vehicles. (As
opposed to the editorial statement that
the new bus is the first new vehicle.)
The new transit advisory board men-
tioned was one of the first suggestions 1
made to Brett Melvm when 1 was ap-
pointed as transit manager. The SGA
I egtslature passed a bill, unanimously,
that would establish this board. Mi
Sherrod, waiting until aftei the last
legislature session and the last issue
the fast Carolinian for the spring tern
vetoed this bill. He then got a revised
version passed in the summer legislature
(consisting ot the SGA president, vice
president and treasurei.)
The editorial also commented on the
possibility ot the OR! I system work-
ing on the buses. 1 had been negotiatii .
with the former GREAT manager since
September 19"9 on that subject. At the
time they did not have the facilities to
service the buses because GREA1 is
opening a new. much larger
maintenance facility.
As usual, the last Carolinian has used
its power oi the press to defame a non-
insider and to pat their buddies on the
back. It is a shame they can't research
their editorials bettei K they print
them.
Char lev. Nikv and Danny aren't the
only ones with a better idea
1 EONARDB 1 1 EM1NG 111
Formei SO 1 ransil M
Editors Note The state records to
which Abshire refers were not relumed
within 24 hours, but within a tew days
and were not intact, aca rding to present
transit authorities
Nicky Francis did not hit a sign while
driving a bus, however, ht did get a
ticket and put himself on probation as
an exatuple to drivers
In a transit adsvisory board meeting
last week, Greg Davis, a GREA1
employee and the first trans manager
at ECL. said the transit system vw-
operating better than ever, according to
a state research report We auree with
Davis and stand by our statements.
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Jovner Library.
Letters must include the name, major
and classification, address, phone
number and signature of the authorts
Letters should be limited to three
typewritten pages, double-spaced, or
neatly printed.

r





I HI I AS I CAROL IN! AN
Features
I MM K 6, ko
Page �
1
s
or
nth
LeRoux Attic Show
Taped For Cable TV
By DEBBIE HOTALING
siaff Wnirt
After waiting patiently for what
seemed like hours, Tom Haines,
owner of the Attic, stepped out onto
the stage to make sure the cameras
were ready to roll for Capitol-
recording artists LeRoux. The ten-
sion mounted with the cheers and
shouts of "let's Go" from the au-
dience as he introduced the band.
Opening their concert with a cut
from their third album "Up Jeff
Pollard led the group into "It Could
lie Ihe lever Pollard, lead singe:
and guitarist for I eRoux never
wavered in his enthusiasm and
energy, even able to keep the au-
dience going through three encores.
Whether the audience never wan-
ed in its involvement and en-
thusiasm because of 1.eRoux or
because of the filming being done
for sale to Cable I V. no one knows.
But the energy was there tot almost
two hours and anyone who attended
Capitol recording artists I eRoux played the Attic Tuesday night, Nov. 4 to an enthusiastic and appreciative au-
dience. This was the second concert in a series of three that was filmed for national broadcasting by (able TV. Ac-
cording to Tom Haines, owner of the Attic, this series is the "largest video venture ever done in orth Carolina
Pictured from left to right: Ton) Haselden. guitarist; Bobby (ampo, bongos, flute, and horn player: Jeff Pollard,
lead singer and guitarist; Rod Rodd, ke boards and clavinet; I .eon S. Medica. bass; and David Peters, drummer.
As The Popcorn Flies
Movie Audiences Provide Entertainment
Bv DAVID NORRIS
Nitv ie day's greatest
entertainment Voui ticket
money pays for not one, but two
shows � one is the film and the
other is a sometimes mote in-
teresting live si tiled the movie
audience.
Probably the first nine 1 really
came to appreciate the complex
diversities ol movie audiences was
the time 1 went to see three straight
showings of Butch C'assidv and the
Sundance Kid. r ach of the three au-
diences had then own special
characteristics that made them, to
say the least, interesting.
first show was the kiddie
matinee, which was the most active,
clamorous and am . audience to
watch. It's j hat the au
dience was so much fun, since most
the film's dialogue was drowned
m the general pandemonium
generated by a hundred little kids
left without aduli ision. Pop
corn boxes make a pretty loud
thun well as spray popcorn all
over the place, when they bounce
off of somebody's head.
Audience participation is fine foi
Ihe Rockv Honor Picture Show,
but is virtually unheard ot to' Butch
Cav. or was until that showing.
Ihe kids in the front row had
brought along toy guns and were
running around shooting people, in
addition to throwing boxes ol pop-
corn aii ovei the front ten rows.
After doing a competent job ot
destroying the theatre, most of the
kids managed to find theii wav
through the wreckage and leave the
theatre, ending the fun of the
matinee (and their parents' brief
acations as well.)
Ihe second showing was quieter.
A half-dozen nuns sat together in
one tow. 1 he kids were gone, or too
burned out to make any racket. This
was a good showing foi watching
the mov ie, tor once.
Ihe thud and last showing I saw
was like the second, except there
were a good many people who were
dressed up. Presumably, either they
liked to dress up or were going to
dinnei alter the movie. Neithet the
nuns or the dressed-up people threw
many boxes ot popcoi n
lo get the most out of watching
an audience, it is necessary to have a
good viewpoint. Itv not to sit
behind someone who is taller than
you are, since this blocks youi view
of both the screen and the audience.
(Unless I sit on the trout row, I
always end up with tall people,
often with big hats, in front of me.)
So tar, 1 have mostly talked about
the audience as a group. But, the in-
dividual members of the audience
are each interesting in themselves.
I suallv, people at a movie fall into
one ot a number of categories.
Besides tall people who sit in
from of you, the categories are bas-
ed on the kind of noise that the peo-
ple make to ruin the movie for you.
One ivpe ot person always asks
stupid questions during the movie.
When, foi example, Humphrey
Bogart appeals on the screen, they
ask who that guv is appearing on the
screen. It a gangster is shot three
hundred times and tails out ot a
window and crashes onto a fruit
stand ten stones below, someone
always asks, "is he dead?"
The ideal companion of the per-
son who asks stupid questions is,
naturally, the person who keeps giv-
ing stupid answers. I his is the kind
of person who gets Bogart mixed up
with say, .lames Cagney, and
violently argues his point all during
the movie, which in all likelihood is
a Clint bast wood western.
Some people give dumb opinions
without being asked a dumb ques
tion. I hev are usually psuedo-
intellectuals who have a mixture of
accurate film histotv facts mixed
with some obviously (to anyone
else) preposterous rubbish. You can
convince them that they are wrong
about some of their facts, but they
cling forever to their preposterous
rubbish, and keep repeating it. One
of these people might think that
Gone With Ihe Wind was the first
sound film ever made, produced in
1900 and was filmed in three days �
and no amount of patient screaming
will ever change their minds. Unfor-
tunately, much of this patient
screaming is done during the movie.
Other people do not pretend to be
film experts; they really are. No
matter what film is being shown,
they know all about it, the directoi
and the cast. Some ol peo
can tell you about screenwriters,
costumers, the musical scores and
probahlv the studio's night wai
chman. While telling you all this
stuff during the movie, they also
often tell you about the ending and
all the surprises along the wav
see AUDIENCES, page 6. col. 1
Being There Is Here; So Is
Fantastic Animation Festival
How Chance the gardenei
becomi hauncey Gardinei over-
night, friend ot diplomats, con
fidante ol the President, passive
love: of the vivacious Eve (beautiful
wife of powerful businessman Ben
Rand), is the substance of Hal
Ashby' s Being There, a
social political sexual satire ot
almost heroic understatement and
restrained hilarity.
I he film will be shown this Friday
and Saturday night at 5, 7:15, and
9:30 p.m. in Mendenhall Student
Center's Hendrix Theatre. Admis-
sion is by ID and activity card or
Mendenhall Student Center
Membership Card. The film is spon-
"Being There Peter Sellers' film, will be shown in the Hendrix Theatre
Friday and Saturday nights at 5, 7 and 9 p.m.
the concert will agree it was one
of the best concerts evei staged in
Greenville.
Every song I eRoux played struck
familiarity to most of the audience.
Their third song of the evening,
"New Orleans Ladies" from their
first album, and "Get It Right The
First Time" from then third album
following had the majority of the
audience singing along on the
choruses.
There was only one short break in
the concert which lasted approx-
imately three minutes � long
enough to switch the film in the
cameras.
Bobby C ampo, bongos, flute,
and horn player, kept the audience
entertained not only with his ver
satile talents on his instruments but
also his facial expressions and antics
on stage. Such enthusiasm packed
in such a small package was amaz-
ing.
Remaining in control ol the au-
dience all the wav through the third
encore, 1 eRoux introduced their
last song of the evening. "Waiting
For Your I ove
"Roll Away Ihe Stone" was the
only cut on their third album thai
was not played in the conceit A
new twist in the band's producing,
Jai Winding produced their latest
album while then first two albums
were produced by bass plavei I eon
S Medica,
Once going bv the name
"1 ouisiana I eRoux the band has
shortened its name to just I eRoux.
lonv Haselden, guitarist, explain-
ed 'We changed it ma t rid
i1 the regionalism. I think it's n
convenient.
"Actually, it was supposed to be
I eRoux to begin with but there was
already anothei band going bv that
name so we had to add I ouisiana to
avoid a legal hassle. Eventually, that
othei band faded out so we were
able to go back to just I.eRoux
I eRoux has been playing back-up
to the Doobie Brothers recently.
1 hev came to Greenville directly
from Pittsburgh, PA.
"they're great to work with
said Jett Pollard, lead singer and
guitarist. "We still have another
two weeks with them
Playing back-up does not
necessarily mean that this group is
not as qualrv-based as the Doobies.
David Petersdrummer), Rod Rod-
dy (keyboards and clavinet) and
lonv Haselden (guitarist), all con-
tributed to make this band one of
the most versatile in style vet coor-
dinated in their abilities to bring
together a first-class concert.
LeRoux, as always, managed to
blend together jazz, cajun, blues,
and rock n roll in such a way that
appealed to all members of the
audience.
Unlike the band's first two
albums, Rod Roddy participated in
the writing ol most of the songs on
the third album.
"We're really pleased with the
wav the album turned out Roddv
said. "1 co-wrote many of the songs
with Jeff
What some people mav not
realie is that this concert may never
have been it it had not been for the
efforts ol Janet Gaino, publicity
manager ol the Attic; Tom Haines,
owner of the Attic; and Sam Swet.
president of Preston Productions.
Working in conjunction with Cable
I V, these people have set up a series
ol concerts to be filmed at the Attic
fo� television. The first in the series
ol concerts was the Carolyn Maas
concert, and of course, I eRoux was
their second.
"Right now we're negotiating
with the Pointer Sisters as the third
pilot with Cable Haines explain-
See LeROUX, page 7, col. 7
Handicaps Do Not
Prevent Relationships
sored by the Student Union Films
Committee.
I hrougnout its more than two
hours, "Being There" is a perfectly
controlled one-joke movie � or
maybe one-and-one-half joke
movie, because after the elderly
Rand dies and the president reads
from his writings at the funeral, you
begin to understand why Chance's
homilies find such ready sympathy
in their world.
But the joke depends upon certain
assmptions. Chance is wholly a
literary creation, combining as he
does nearly total innocence with in-
tutitive charm and � though he can
neither read nor write � a standard
American stage diction, presumably
learned from listening to an-
nouncers on TV. Sometimes the
assumptions are pushed a little too
hard.
For a short time after the Old
Man dies and the maid has packed
her things and gone, Chance the
gardener remains in the big old town
house, alone behind the high brick
wall with its well-tended plants and
shrubs and his brightly colored,
ever-shifting images on television.
But then the lawyer comes and
tells Chance that he must leave. And
so, neatly dressed in the Old man's
finest things, he walks out of the
shuttered house in which he has
See LATE, page 6, col. 1
By DANANE1LL
sufl Wnlri
Human Sexuality is "one of the
most powerful tools of human
behavior according to Thomas
O'Mooney, leading author of the
book "Sexual Options for
Paraplegics and Quadriplegics
Sex is an element of that sexuality.
It's a physical expression o' yourself
and, like all emotions, can be con-
veyed in as many ways as the minds'
imagination is capable of creating.
Traditionally, says O'Mooney,
much of American society has
upheld that "sex consists of putting
the penis into the vagina and that all
the rest of the rich range of human
sexual responses � oral, manual
and skin stimulation � are abnor-
mal But a small minority within
this culture views sex on different
terms � the handicapped people.
After a person has been disabled,
there is cause to reevaluate old
ideas. Tim Tourtellotte, a graduate
student in English, says he's "trying
to put all the pieces together of be-
ing a human being Redefining
their sexuality is an important part
in that puzzle for handicapped peo-
ple.
Sex itself is undergoing a revolu-
tion. New discoveries are being
made (or more correctly old con-
cepts are being uncovered). How
readily and openly is America ac-
cepting modern values? Through
the eyes of the handicapped the pro-
cess is slow. "1 hope there will be a
day when you won't knock on my
door and ask to talk about sex and
the handicapped" says Tim.
For the disabled person the act of
sex is not the problem, it's conten-
ding with a majority of able bodied
persons who are sexually handicap-
ped. "People don't think of us as
sexual people says Melanie, "and
we are "One popular misconcep-
tion freshman Brian Rangeley
says, "is that people who break
their backs or necks can't have sex
at all This is just as false as the
impression that all people in
wheelchairs are just alike.
James Breeze, a senior in the
business department, says "Even if
it looks like the same handicap ex-
actly, it does not necessarily mean
they have the same physical
dysfunction Some people in
wheelchairs have all sensation, have
intercourse and experience orgasms
just as others have no feeling and do
not. There is a wide range between
these extremes.
Disabled men and women, by
concentrating on a physical stimulus
and amplifying the sensation to
their minds, can achieve a level of
satisfaction. Their partners' reac-
tion to their own stimulus enhances
their pleasure.
"The ability to see them have a
very, very good time gives me a lot
of satisfaction and reinforcement
says Roy "It shows me I can give on
an absolute level
"It's touching" says Brian. "Not
just so 1 can feel something, but
touching in order for her to enjoy
my touch
Sex is a pleasant experience, but is
it not more than a means to an end?
rim feels that the mechanics are not
that important, "Whatever you
have, vou are going to use. Sex is
important, but intimacy is more im-
portant, "Whatever you have, you
are going to use. Sex is important,
but intimacy is more important
Brian adds "Intimacy, it's a big part
oi sex. Sex is something you can en-
joy for a short time and then it's
gone. If there's intimacy, it's not
something you feel from someone,
it's something that you feel with so-
meone
The road to intimacy is not easily
travelled. A person must know what
they have to offer in order to give.
Roy savs, "We are a lot more aware
Sec HANDICAP, page 6. eol 7
Winston-Salem Hosts
Piedmont Crafts Fair
One hundred twenty-five craft-
smen from across the Southeast are
exhibiting and selling their work at
the 1980 Piedmont Crafts Fair,
Nov. 7, 8, and 9, at the Winston
Salem Coliseum. Hours are 10 a.m.
to 9 p.m. Friday and Sat irday, and
1 to 6 p.m. Sunday. Admission is
$2.00 for adults and SI .00 foi senior
citizens and students through high
school.
More than a dozen of the ex-
hibitors are showing at this year's
fair for the first time. New clay
work in porcelain, salt-glazed
stoneware, and low-fired earthen-
ware will be seen, as well as new
lines of handmade rugs, wearable
clothing, fiber wall ornaments,
woven tableware, and jewelry.
Along with this new work, a
greaat variety of crafts from ex-
hibiting members of long tenure is
to be seen: stained and blown glass,
leather, wood, metal, and paper.
New trends from experienced
leaders in their craft include scup-
ture in clay, metal, and wood; pain-
ting and drawing on fiber, clay, and
glass; and extraordinary uses of or-
dinary materials, like plywood for
mirror frames. Baskets and hand-
made books are further innovations
in traditional media to be
represented.
Many of the exhibiting crafts peo-
ple are prize winners in galleries,
museum, and competitions all
across the United States: Bryant
Holsenbeck in basketry and David
Nelson in clay, for example, won
top prizes at the 1979 Philadelphia
Craft Show; Cynthia Bringle and
Norman Sen u I man are in
"American Porcelain an exhibit
opening at the Renwick Gallery of
the Smithsonian Institution the
weekend of the fair.
Work by many of the exhibiting
members of Piedmont Craftsmen,
Inc not shown at the fair this year,
will be featured in The Craft Shop
at 300 South Main Street, including
large fabric panels by Ed Lambert,
rugs by Alice Schlein, wearables by
Mary Elinnor Riccardi, wall hang-
ings by Cynthia Hilgendorf,
tapestries by Silvia Heyden, glass by
William Bernstein, pottery by Tom
Turner and Katie Bernstein, prints
by Paul Harcharik and Donald Sex-
auer (of the ECU School of Art),
metal by Jan Brooks Lyd, construc-
tions by Maria Artemis, and clay by
Sally Bowen Prange. The Shop will
be open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. during the
fair weekend, including Sunday.
?
f
i
t





1HI t AM . ROl I MAN
() t MBI K 6, 1980
Happenings
Thursday 6
� 3:00 P.M. Soccer: .C. Weslyan, Home.
� 8:00 P.M. Minority Aits Film Series: A Storm
of Strangers, I edonia S. Wright Mro American
Cultural Arts Center,
� 8:00 P.M. Womens Volleyball: UNC-CH,
Chapel Hill
Krida 7
� 5:00, 7:15, 9:30 P.M. Movie: Being There,
Hendrix Theater,
� 11:30 P.M. late Movie: Fantastic Animation
Festival, Hendrix Theater.1
Saturda 8
� 12:00 noon - 3:00 P.M. Family Tun Day,
� 4:00 P.M. Football: University ot Miami.
Ha
� 5:00, 7:15, 9:30 P.M. Movie: Being I here,
Hendrix Theater.
sunda
� 2:00 P M Soccer: Coker College Hartsville,
(
Handicaps Do Not
Prevent Relationships
School of Art
Monda 10
� 6:00 I'M MSC All-Campus Table Tennis
Tourn; foi AC I 1. student Center Multi-
purpose room,
� 8:00 P.M Special Event: Gil Eagles, "The
Entertaining Psychic Hendrix Theater.
Tueda 11
� 7;00 p M MSC Bingo Ice Cream Part Stu
dent c ei . Multi-purpose Room.
� 7:00 P.M. Women's Volleyball Pembroke
I ni . Pembroke, N
Wednesday 12
� 8:00 P.M. Artists Series: Carlos Montoya,
Hendrix I heater.
lhursda 13
� mo p.M f A Film: Dewitl Jones "The Ne
land of Robert 1 rost" Hendrix Theater.
Oct. 26 -Nov. 16
Pre Columbian Art, Ceramics Small Sculpture
and Textiles from the ECU Anthropology Dept
Duke University Museum of Art, and Private
Collections to be on display through Dec. 18
Print Retrospective � Selected Senior Folios o
Prints by ECU alumni from the Printmaking
Departments collection.
Traveling Graduate Show � ECU Graduate
Students' work throughout the state by the North
Carolina Museum of Art's Traveling Exhibition
Service.
School of Music
� No. 6 Rick Vizachero, string bass. Junior
recital, 7:30 P.M.
� Nov. 11 Sigma Alpha lota Musicale. 7:30
P.M.
� Nov. 12 Artists Series: Carlos Montoya, 8:00
P.M. Hendrix Theater Tickets: Students $2.00,
Public $5.00
� Nov. 14 Barbara Arneth, clarinet, senioi
recital, 7:30 P.M.
� o. 14 Ira Jacobs, voice, senior recital, 9:00
P.m.
Buccaneer:
� "When a Stranger CAUs" R. Shows at 1:15.
3:15, 5:15. 7:15 & 9:15 p.m.
� "The Firsl Deadly Sin" R, Shows at 1:10,
3:10, 5:10, 7:10 & 9:10 p.m.
� "The Creeper" R, Shows at 1. 3, 5, 7, c 9
p.m.
Plaza
� "The Awakening" R, Shows at 3:15, 5:15,
7:15, & 9:15 p.m.
� "Motel Hell" R Shows at 3:15. 5:10, 7:05, .v.
9:00 p.m.
� "Loving Couples" PG Shows at 3, 5, 7 & 9
P. m.
� Starts Friday "The Exterminator" and
"Coast to Coast"
Park
� "Fists of Vengance"
Attic
� Thursday SUGAR
� Friday TAINT (Pegasus)
� Saturday TAINT (Pegasus)
� Sunday THE EAZE (Mug night)
� Tuesday ASLEEP AT THE WHEEL
� Wednesday ZIGGURAT
� Thursday SUTTERS GOLD
Rathskeller
� Thursday WAYNE AND CHARl IT'S
BI UEGRASS JAM
� Saturday Gl ISSON
� Monday Backgammon Tournament
� Tuesday Dart Tournament
� Wednesday KURT FORTMEYER
� Thursday WAYNE AND CHARLIE'S
BLUEGRASS 1AM
Chapter
� Sunday KA Nickle Night
� Wednesday Sigma Nu 50 50 Night
� Frida A D Pi End of the Week Part)
J.J. s
� Thursday Bll 1 BI IT
� Friday BILL BI I 1
It you have anything thai you would like to have
put in "Happening" please send them to I. Ashe
Lockhart, The Easl Carolinian, East Carolina
I niversity, Greenville, N.C. 27834.
(Ontinued from page 5
ol ourselves, what we can do and
what we can't do
"It's not until you lose something
that you realize what you had" says
Roy. James says "I'm smart enough
to know what I can teel and what 1
can't It' you are taught all these
things you think that it is going to be
one certain way It's better to
learn it through experience Thai is
a point to consider.
lor the female paraplegic and
quadriplegic, society's molds
become a trap. In his book.
O'Moonev says "The stereotyped
role of a passive woman combined
with the sexless stereotype of a per-
son in a wheelchair seems almost in-
surmountable
Teresa Turner, a married
quadriplegic doing her graduate
studies at ECU, remembers "guys
that I dated I think were jus:
curious. They wanted to tind out tor
curiousity, not tor the sake ot a rela
tionship just for the novelty
it
"Communication, according
Thomas O'Moonev, "is the essence
o! any relationship
� The mam asset" says Bill "is be
ing open minded. It always has been
Because you have to explain
what's going to take place. I have
keep my mind open to their qu
tions so I'll be able to make them
understand let them km
you're not a freak and everything
ting to go just like if you were
walking around
"Sex: it's real" says Ierry I
"You are vulnerable. Suppose wh
u are lying there she laughs and
walks away
"All that you have in this world"
says Roy "when you're lynu I
buck naked is what you see
Late Show: Fantastic Animation Festival
HylRITHON
Continued from page
pei ot T ve's chauffeur-driven Committee presents the widely ac
and both of the Rands are mi- claimed Fantastic Annual ion
,M1 IOU
n with his utter lack Festival as a one-showing-only Yugoslavia. Also featured are fr
W a
Bei

ien ini o l - icoi
Rand, the richest, most
businessman in all ot beneath.
nse, a directness, refreshing special late show in Mendenhall Stu
city that, in tact, exactly dent Center's Hendrix Theatre
expresses th simple mindedness
prize winner at the World Festival
ot Animated film in Zagreb,
m
tland, "French Windows" (with
music bv Pink Floyd),
Animation bufts wil
eei
becomes the Rands'
te .r: itely by treat this Friday, Nov. ' at 11:30
cideni with the reai p.m. when the Student Union films
Audiences Provide Fun
Foi the tist tune, prune samplings "Moonshadow " (with music byat
of the new directions the animated Stevens); and from merica,
1 rea' film is taking can be seen in one another Academy award nominee.
"Cosmos Cartoon" (with music
Planets").
( ontinued from puue 5
I'M ook! He's the
lerei "This
serious fill your peaceful
and laughs ai ever viewing ol a gangster
showcase anthology. Selected from
over one-thousand nominees from Hoist's " I he
around the world, sixteen animated
short films (most are bv artists in
then 20's oi early 30s) are being
presented togethei in one feature-
length program called Fantastk
Animation Festival.
Knin ation is fine art on the move
,ina' Fat A nimation I estivi
its well deserved u ibute.
n
really stu
e killer
the key
. vi in ruining
the enjoymeni ol
movie '
�found, important.
n the mo k 11
it's too hard to pick out
the pt ot ou nd
statements, he'll just
i . at CV CI Vtill
A not hei
being shot three hun-
Ired times can be intei
upted bv the question,
�Is he
.1�
featured aie many international
award winners including cademy
Award nominee "Risk Me and
"The last Cartoon Man a lust
Doors open at 11:25 p.m. Admis-
sion tot the film is I ident 11)
and activity card foi students and
Mende nhall Student Cei
Membership c aid foi faculty and
staff memb(
560 EVANS
STREET
SUBS
Steak & Cheese $195
.Steak & Mu�hroom S 1 95
Meatball Sandwich $1.75
Reuben 1 85
Hot Sausage $1.75
Roast Beef S 1 95
Cold Sub $1.45
GREEK DISHES
Gyro Sandwich SI.85
Souvlakia Sandwich $lSr
Gyro Platter $195
Marathon Special $2 35
Greek Salad $1.75
Athenian Style Chicken S11.2S
Aegean Grilled Cheese .95
SANDWICHES
hamburger .75
( heeseburger s
hot Dog S .55
Chicken Salad Sandwich $
Chicken Salad Plate SI 75
Barb-Que Sandwich 5 95
rish Sandwich 95
Shrimp Kggroll � 65
Chicken Breast Sandwich $1.25
GREEK PASTRY
BakUsa 85
Calataboudika .65
rj.
PIZZA MENU
SMALL 12 LARGr. 16'
CHEESE PIZZA S3 05 S4.95
ANY 1 ITEM S3.50
ANY 2 ITEMS $3 95
ANY 3 ITEMS U W
ANY i ITEMS
$5 70
$f, 45
$7.20
$7 95
ADDL ITEMS S 45 I
( HEESE
MUSHR(M)M
GROUND BEH-
GREENPEPPER-
HUI PEPPERS
ANCHOVIES
PEPPEKUN!
SAUSAGE
OLIVES
MARATHON DELUXE
I
Pepperom. Onions. Ground Beef mashrooms.
1 irenn Peppers
MARA I HO.N SPECIAL $1.55
The Perfect Size For ONF Person'
a v I u mi
use them.)
Bv t
people dor.
about the i bein
shown. Thev talk a
through the movie
vpe ot
Watch moviegoer always
sent i the inv isible cry-
1 hink about
� almosi e e i
u ie v ihi no sec
ipic
ATTIC
see is m-
upted bv bab
zing ai one I
another. Bui. when you
mm around and look.
about"TV shows, recent ou can ne)'er se� the
pan thei movies, squalling infant.
- ne each Sometimes, it i
above type ol person possible to see a movie
everj movie without havi ex-
demands serious, plained, I to n
�ncentration. being explained to so-
The "loud laugher meone else. 01 having
plagues man) jatres. boxes ol orn
Never doing the oh thrown ai � - I om the
vious thing (like alien- balcony. I hat is the
ding a comedy), the nice thing about televi
"loud laugher" always sum. The trouble is that
even in your home or
nN
o
Senior
Recital
Held
r I Nt-ws Hum jii
(.Ki Will! �
Double bassist Rick
Vizachero ot Fayet-
teville, a junior student
in the hast Carolina
University School of
Music, will perform in
recital Thursday, Nov.
6. at 7:30 p.m. in the
Fletcher Music Center
Recital Hall here.
His program will in-
clude the C o r e 11 i
Sonata in D Minor,
Rossini's Duetto for
Violincello and Con-
trabass, Proto's Sonata
1963 and Paganim's
"Moses Fantasy
Vizachero will be ac-
companied by pianist
Catherine Styron and
assisted by faculty
cellist Selma Gokcen in
the Rossini composi-
tion.
A student of Jack
Budrow, Viachero is a
candidate for the
Bachelor of Music-
degree in performance.
His parents are Albert
and Freda Vizachero of
Fayetteville.
WANTED
"GOLD"

�CLaSSRINGS
�WEDDING BANDS
�BRACELETS
�DENTAL GOLD
�ANYTHING GOLD
ANYTHING MARKED
10KMK,18K&24K
ALSO UNMARKED
The Contest: The Rules:
GREENVILLE'S
GRADUATE GEM0L0GISTS
Domino's Pizza will award
free, 50 large pizzas to the
winning male �female
dorms purchasing the most
pizzas during the 7-day
period starting Nov. 9 and
running through Nov. 15.
(coed dorms included)
The pizza sales will be com-
puted on a per capita basis.
1. Carry-out orders and all
deliveries will be counted if
we are given your dorm ad
dress.
2. Any pizza over $7.00 will be
counted twice.
3. The winning dorm's Resi-
dent Advisor will be notified.
Announcements will be
published in the East Caroli-
nian Nov. 18, 1980.
4. The location and the time
of the party will be conve-
nient to both the winning
dorms and Domino's Pizza.
5. The 50 pizza will be one
item pizzas. The winning
dorms will have the choice of
item. The pizzas do not have
to be the same.
o
Sv
�? r
I
fines r Mark & Melanie Smith HA�ZV
JEWELERY J ti
IN m AllillUfcil ft A
GREENVILLE
I.D. DAWSON CO.
All Pizzas Include Our
Special Blend of Sauce
and Cheese
Our Superb
Cheese Pizza
12" cheese S3 65
16" cheese $5.35
Domino's Deluxe
5 items tor the price of 4
Pepperom. Mushrooms
Onions, Green Peppers
and Sausage
12" Deluxe S6 45
16" Deluxe $9 55
' 160 Domino s P'HA
The Vegi
5 items for the price of 4
Mushrooms. Black Olives
Green Olives. Onions and
Green Peppers
12" Vegi $6 45
16" Vegi S9.55
Any 1 item
Any 2 12
Any 2 items
Any 3 items
Any 4 items
12"
$4.35
$4.35
$505
$575
$645
16"
$6 40
$6.40
$7.45
$850
$955
Additional Items
Mushrooms Pepperom
Green Peppers Anchovies
Ground Beef Sausage
Double Cheese Ham
Black Olives Onions
Green Olives
Extra Thick Crust
Hot Pepper Rings
12" pizza $.70
16" pizza $1.05
Greenville hours:
11:00-1:00 SunThurs
11:00-2:00 FnSat.
Our d'1 - i�� ����- " i I2OO0
Limited denv�" diea PnoM do not
include � saies tan.
Fast
Friendly
Free
Delivery
758-6660
1201 Charles Blvd.
(,ii
Ihe
for
t





ps
e jusi
find out
ike of a rela-
; noeh oi
ding to
i �
1 na
que:
326
I HI I AS!AROl INIAN
NOM-MBI K6. 19K0
and the time
II be conve
the winning
ano's Pizza.
will be one-
The winning
the choice of
k do not have
t
endly
e
llivery
-6660
larles Blvd.
LfjjtNjMG foovT CpLLCGt Di� fto lAJjy
bv Vaw Nm
hi, kkxchxx
HATTOOk YOU
SO LoQ?
All j
visitors'
LeRoux Attic Concert
Taped For Cable TV
�p �"ir. jii

H R? ;
BPtV"B
"X" i
'SSSHSB" ' S BBK. X,��V rrrHrrrS HH9I � taRRRRI tWBT?-
Gil Kagles, noted hypnotist, will demonstrate his talents in the llendrix
Iheatn- on Monday, o. 10 at 8 p.m. Tickets arc SI.50 for students and S3
for the public.
Hypnotist Gil Eagles
Appearing At ECU
Hi
rized and astounded
I C I Student Union
Sp a I vents Committee presents
Gil Eagles Show, demonstra-
of l.SP. and hypnosis, on
- 10. at 8:00 p.m. in the Hendnx
I heat re. Me
( enter.
den hall Student
Gil Eagles is known as "the enter-
taining psychic" and "the world's
tastest hypnotist.1 This dynamic
showman will present an exhibition
demonstrating his incredible
abilities of E.S.P. and hypnosis.
Gil Eagles has already appeared
on more than 300 college and
university campuses throughout the
United States and C ananda. He has
also battled countless thousands on
tour continents. Now, through re-
cent television and concert platform
appearances, he has established
himseli as America's foremost
entertainer and lecturer in the field
ol l.S.P. and hypnosis.
Gil Eagles' thrilling show uses
total audience participation without
confusion or collusion. This com-
pelling and dynamic showman will
skillfully and tastefully guide his au-
dience through the amaing and
fascinating possibilities of the mind.
The names, numbers, innermost
thoughts, and personal questions
that will be revealed and answered
are those actually held in the minds
o the audience � all strangers to
him. With miraculous speed and un-
surpassed timing, Gil Eagles will
unleash his hypnotized subjects in
hibitions, resulting in a side-splitting
hilarious event. Good taste and
respect for the privacy of his au-
dience alwas prevails.
Gil Eagles was born and raised in
Tanganyika, bast Africa. He was
educated in I ondon and mined to
the United States in 1960. It was
while still in Africa, at the earK age
ol thirteen, that Gil Eagles first
realized his sensitivity with
clarivoyance, and there he practiced
with the local natives (he speaks
Swahili fluently), lor ovei twelve
years Mr. Uagles has been a serious
and avid exponent of hypno-therapj
as it applies to the medical and
psychiatric professions. Mr. Eagles'
self-hypnosis and mind control
seminar-workships are now receiv-
ing national acclaim.
Tickets are priced at SI.50 lor
ECU students and S3.00 for the '
public. All tickets at the door are
S3.00. Contact the Central Ticket
Office in Mendenhall Student
Center for further information.
AHH iM GofO' Hon�

r�e'S Ajoftopw tfc��"TtKf&HT'
HA,
P
If
ARMY MAVY STORE
Backpack. ���, Softer,
t Ff4. 0�ck. FlioM Snorkel �
Jck�H. P�acoa��, Parkas. J
Shoe Combat Boon. Plu.
1MI S. EvantStroat �
SAAD'SSHOh
REPAIR
1 I i Grande Ave.
758-1228
Quality Repair
?
CURRY
COPY
CENTER OF GREENVILLE
412 EVANS ST. MALL
(919) 752 1233
RESUME SPECIAL
25 $13.50 plus tax 50 $16.60 Plus tax
includes typing,second sheets & envelopes of your
choice (8' 2x11 black ink) prices good thru Nov. 30
ABORTION
The Fleming Center has been here for you since 1974.
providing private, understanding health care
to women of all ages at a reasonable cost
Saturday abortion hours
Free pregnancy tests
Vary early pregnancy tests
Evening birth control hours
The Fleming Center we're here when you need us.
Pan 781-6680 in Raleigh anytime.
THE FLEMING CENTER
Continued from pajje 5
ed. "By the way, HBO is also very
interested
Janet Gaino is the coordinatoi
between Preston Productions and
the Attic and was one of the leading
factors in making this concert possi-
ble.
"It was a lot oi hard work. But
we're all very excited about it
Gaino said. "Hopefully, and 1 do
mean, hopefully, we'll be able to get
the Pointer Sixers. We're working
on it
LeRoux plans on coming out with
another album within the next six
months.
"It'il be May or June at the
earliest. We'll be taking January off
to get a fourth album together
Pollard said.
Although Jetf Pollard couldn't
pinpoint a time when the band
would be returning to a very recep-
tive Greenville, Rod Roddy added
quickly, "I'd like to say "soon
That's better than saying "I don't
know We really enjoyed the
Greenville audience last year and
we'd like to some back as much as
possible
CHAPTERS
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1 Ml I-AM � -XKOI ll W
Sports
I MBl k ' Pl
Stewart Status Unknown,
Two Freshmen Move Up
B CHARLES CHANDLER
spttrts tditor
rhe condition ol ECU starting
quarterback Greg Stewart, who was
injured in last week's 31-23 win ovei
William and Mary, was still ques
tionable as oi Wednesday aftei
noon.
Stew ait became the team's stai
signal-callei when regi
on Nelson was ruled oul
the season due to "instability ol the
k" late iast week
Stewart stepped in against
William and Marx and performed
admirably, leading the Pirates to
highest rushing total of the
season. The freshman QB reinsured
tough, that had bothered
him i in the yeai and may miss
this Saturday's game with pow
Mian ! a
"It's a situation where
ed if ou do dnJ damned it you
don Pirate coach Ed Emory said
at his Wednesday luncheon "We've
got three games left to play and we
don't want to lo anything this week
would hurt Greg physically or
that would harm his chances ol
playing against Eastern Kentuck)
and C Siate
Emory said he and team physician
D .lames Bowman along with
Sports Medicine director Rod Com-
pton would evaluate the situation as
soon ;b possible. In the mean time,
though, freshman 1 any Brobst is
the scheduled Saturday starter.
"1 will probably tell the squad to-
da (Wednesday) thai Stewart will
no play Emoi
to gel theii min
thai bil
itv.
no
'We've got
led foi
guys to
k hoping
I ii turns
bothersome but that lu lias not lost
hope. "It is real tender right now
he said Wednesday afternoon. "It's
not bad when I walk but when 1 try
to run and cut it's an entirely dif
ferenl mattei. I'm yet,
though
With the possibility ol his play
in Miami's Orange Bowl againsl the
powerful Hurricanes looking ques-
tionab I i erback
said he could only wail orry
"It's bother ii "he aid.
"I've been looking � i I lav-
ing in the Orange Bowl all year.
"I've been thinking aboul the
jury and ever
that I've bee my
homework a k. I want to
. sis the ankh
there would
Stewart's
�ssarv), Brobsi
ich.
a
school player ol the yeai in Savan-
a i yeai and once ran a 9.7
100 yard dash in a state track meet.
Ba - up Brobst will be
freshman Hob Miller, who Emory
says is not as fast bat has the better
throwing aim
"They're both nood athletes
moi said " I he problem is that
neither has received very much prac
tice time. Neither has had many
repitions ai all
I he situation the Pirates now
. with three freshman as the
quarterbacks, is evidence ol how far
6 program has to go,
En aid.
"II im w here
you warn it, it should be awfully
freshmen oi sophomores
ot, especially at quartei
back Youi starting lineup should
be dominated be juniors and
. We d � luxury
1(1 quarterback Grey Stewart
injured his ankle versus VSilliam
�and Mar and ma miss the
Pirates' yame with Miami this
weekend. Photo by hap
(� tirk v
Warren Fights Back With Big Year
U S DuPRr.l
v s sea
1 he told
�'�
North i Wa
� ��� .
ild be me. I I
knov it
w
I
to play. 1

No doubt numerous Pirate op-
-
tl
al pi counted


irates 31-3
rankt. N and 17
. . .
� i ai

w. oot
: es you see a
al er a
e he
lay.
"With Wa ies bat k
you just it play. He's
one of i ' inebackers foi his
country. 1 think Amos
vrence) and Keven (Bry
t ol
respect '�
With tackles 1 mi Swords and
rge Crump along with weak
y 1 reddie Jones lost for the
been needed, it'll be needed in
nexi few w .
I
. �
and North i
season Wa
"We"
.
who may

they
keej
I e s � I
sori. peo
pie we dep
and I think we had
(freshn
work fi
"1 te.
Jeffrey
arrtn
NFI

"It 1


a
"As 1
games, i I expect any V ai
" I f y
and g-
Evei el alw .
1 thought 1 could play w
besi
fa
Aould � � aced
leffre W i
Emory Wants
Winning Mark
B CHARLES CHANDLER
This is the week to get back to the
"top of the ledger E I head
coach I'd Emory preached at his
Wednesday press luncheon as he
spoke oi his team's trip to the
Orange Bowl this Saturday to face
powerful Miami, Fla.
"We haven't had a record above
500 since our first game of the
season (a win over Duke) Emory
said. "We've struggled all year to
stay even and now we want to do
better than that
The first-year Pirate head man
realizes, though, that the task ahead
of his club, which stands 4-4, is a
difficult one at best.
"Miami has been ranked as
highly as 13th this year he noted.
"They're a great, great team with
super talent. It will take our best
and more to beat them
The Hurricanes won their first
four games of the season and
jumped into the national rankings
following a 10-9 upset win over
now-third ranked Florida State, a
club that earlier had demolished
ECU, 63-7.
The club has fallen on hard times,
though, and has now lost three
games in a row. The key here is that
all of those losses have come against
highlv rated opposition.
The losses have come against
Notre Dame, Mississippi State and
Penn State, al! members of this
week's top twenty. Notre Dame is
ranked fust in the poll.
"They have ran into some very
tough games and have lost three in a
row said Emoi y. "1 hey've beaten
some people too, though. They beat
Houston early in the year and are
the only team this season to beat
Florida State
The Hurricanes are coached by
former Miami Dolphin assistant
coach and Baltimore Colt head
coach Howard Schnellenberger. He
is assisted by former pro quarter-
bask Earl Morrall. These two men
have evidently taken the pro game
to the college ranks. Emory says.
"On offense they are truly a pro
team. They run out of all different
sets and throw the football a great
deal
Though his club faces the
possibility oi facing the Hurricanes
without the services of starting
quarterback Greg Stewart (ankle in-
jury), the Pirate mentor said the op-
portunity was an excellent one.
"It's good for a young team like
ours to go play in the Orange Bowl
against a team like this. It's also
good to know that the University of
Miami will be coming to Ficklen
Stadium next season
Gametime in the Orange Bowl for
Saturday's matchup is 4 p.m.
Schnellenberger
Hurricane Coach Has Illustrious History
Theodore Sulion Breaks Tackle
l he Miami, 1 la football team
thai 1 a! Pirates must
face this week tself
into the national
season Give I Howard
Schnellenbergei m
I he se same
to the Hun icanes I; and led
a voting team to a 5-6 record. In-
cluded among rhe five wins, though,
was an upset
powerhouse Penn State.
i �� S( finelU
things underway. Upsei wins ovei
Houston and !
followed this season. Foi third-
ranked 1 SI the 10 9 loss to Miami
is the only flaw in a 7 ! record
Schnellenberger's Miami club is
now 4-1 on the season following
consecutive losses to Notre Dame.
Mississippi State and Penn State.
All three ol those teams are ranked
in the nation's top twenty Notre
Dame tops the lisi
Before the losses the Hurricanes
chmbed as high as ! 3th in the na-
tional polls.
Before becoming Hurricane head
coach Schnellenbergei made a name
foi himself in the professional
ranks. He same to the Hurricanes
directly fi he Ml 's Miami
Dolphins.
Foi much ol the I970s the
Dolphins became synonymous with
exciting, innovative football and
Schnellenbergei played no small
part in then story.
He ei ved as tacl Doi v
top olfensivc
mastermind . lioy
i devist
plans !
per feet 17-1 1972 and
ei BiwI Y 1 hampi
"Howard Schnell da
b foi the v
"He is a 1
has a I know ledge ol th
and docs a good job in pi
arid presentation
While a o as;
iellenb� . nly servsd
undei Simla bur also George Mien
ol the 1 os Angeles Rams, in the col
lege ranks he was the lop offensive
assis i the legendary lk
Bi yam al abama foi se
yea
I he I960s were marked by
Alabama's astonishing talent at
quarterback, where Schnellenbergei
successfully recruited such greats a
Joe Namath and Ken Stabler to the
Crimson lide.
1 ollowing the Dolphins' 1972 s
cess, Schnellenberger was ottered,
and accepted, the head coaching job
if the Baltimore Colts He served in
.hat capacity through part of he
1974 and returned to the Dolp'iin
told in 1975.
He was with the Dolphins from
that time until his appointment as
head coach of the Hurricanes. His
two year r :cord here is 9-9 coming
into the game with ECl

FOR

-
v I
�OB
tMMI
-
15 M
NE Al
� m
'� 43
Sib'
I
I
I
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I
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I Ht I Si KOi IMAN
V I MHl K 6, 1780
I
lfc
WBBJI-
4 Loofc ,4 ECU's Casualty List
Editor's Vole: 77jc �i�tv situation on the
19S0 ECt football team has reached drastic
proportions, with 29 persons now out for the
season Jhe photos below show some of
those affected and others who have missed
some time.
Defensive end Doug Smith (92) was suspended tin two games but has
returned. Defensive tackle George Crump went down in mid season,
further shortening an already short defensive line.
� .
s
Starting () Carlton Nelson is out with
"instability of the neck" and faces a long
ioad bask.
All-America guard Wayne Inman (left) suffered torn ligaments in his
knee in a freak practice accident while OB Greg v' ibove) is d
tul foi this weekend.
Fosdick's
INCREDIBLE
Monday:
Fish Fry all you can eat 1.99
Tuesday:
Salad Bar ayou can ear 1.99
Wednesday:
Shrimp Creole ail you can eatl .39
Thursday:
Chowder and Salad
ail you can eat .99
Friday:
Fish Fry all you can eat 1 .99
Reserve running back Marvin Cobb went
down in preseason
Miami Past Full Of NFL Stars
Sunday Lunch Special:
MOM'S DAY
All Mothers EAT FREE
(when accompanied by family
of 2 or more)
ALL YOL CAN EAT SPECIAL
� � ' ndau I hut
ill- m I losing you mo our
$2.50
fOSDICKS
I890$eafood
w e
n M
a kins:
Charles
Chandler

Ml
� '� l k George
Minnessota Viking stai
i - Chuck Foreman, now
lates 'lave with ilie New England
e and Patriots, also was a
National Hui ricane grad.
1 iiieman was a kev
ol figure on several Viking
make Supei Bowl teams and
Ottis is Miami fifth all-time
. ol the rushei. gaining 1.631
S rdinals. yards from 1970-72.
named 1
� the yeat qua
af tei Mm a w as quite a fixture
n the with the Hurricanes
rushing and holds most all ol
superstar the school's passing
Wal I a records.
V lers - Miami's Another quarterback
: 'usher, starred for the Hur-
5,331 yards ricanes some years ago
)11 He is the and earned All-
H . cane back in America honors in the
eclipse the process. That man.
1,000 yard ban er, Iran Curci, is now the
1.266 m head football coach at
ieason. Kentucky.
Anderson is not the All of the above
a bad ; �me stalwarts played on the
m Miami. Formei offensive side of the
football, rhere have
been some defensive
greats at Miami too.
()ne ol them rates as
one oi the Nil all-
time greats. A defen
sive end at Miami. I ed
Hendricks went on to
become an all pro
linebackei with the
Bah imoi e Colts and
now stars foi the
Oakland Raiders. Hen-
dricks was a three-time
H u i r i c a n e All-
American.
.lust a tew years ago
the Denvei Broncos
reached the Supei Bowl
on the strength ol their
"Orange Crush"
de tense. Spearheading
that defense was middle
guard Rubin Cai tei. a
former Miami stalwart.
Carter was an All-
American that went on
to make the cover of
Sports Illustrated with
the Broncos.
Former Miami
defensive back Burgess
Owens now displays his
talents with the
res urgent Oakland
Raiders who have
bounced back from a
Louple ol bad yt i .
are again at the top ol Housi
and
V Ison notch iyei
the Ale Western Divi- Whniev were Irafted a Miami's past. In addi
sion.
couple ot veai ago bv tion to then players
1 he niosi recent ot the Cincinnati Bengals Hurricane coa
Miami's All-Ameiican
tui ned pio is defensive
tackle Eddie Edwards, the t
and weie billed as the H o w a r d
e twosome ot Schnellenbergei
quite a background
is j
sad o i
Baltimoreoils and
served on Don Shula'
with the Miami
Dolphins dm
days ol
l I970's
"A Great
Seafood
Restaurant"
231 S Evans St � G
reenville
r�3l�IIM3
XO�3i
sft
Classifieds
sS
FOR SALE
FOi SALE PEARL Snare drum
6i14 m $335 new Best Offer
Call '58 M7�
FOB SALE Tecrm.cs SA 50C 60
wills SL 330 fully automate
turntable with Empire 2000 E III
Phase Linear speakers
Aluminum antennae Paid $1100
twst offer Call 753 8860 ask tor
Graham
New Electric Range
Refrigerator at fan
Call Mine Turner at
Filibuster II multi
752 8860 ask for
FOR SALE
and 1� cu ft
tastic price
?$8 7333
FOR SALE
band Best offer
Kevin
FOR SALE 173 Fr.dgidaire
Washer Dryer Stack Unit
2.3' juS'j ft 5 lb loads uses 320
volts Good condition $!00, leave
name and number at 7S6 5333
FOR SALE 1972 CB 100 Honda
Many new parts, very good shape
15 MPG $300 Firm. Call 758 8124
NEAR UNIVERSITY Good con
ditton, can be used as private
home without change or by lock
� ng doors, is three apartments
with separate entrances Price
40O0 Always rented Call
7$J 4M7. Mrs S H Skinner
FOR SALE Breeding dog
Siberian Musky I year
Papers female
blue
old.
eyes
beautiful and healthy 7 58 5865
Reasonable
FOR SALE Alvarei Guitar, 7
months old With case $430
�58 6302
PERSONAL
CUSTOM CRAFTING and repair
of gold and silver Buying and
selling of gold and silver by Les
Jewelers WOE 5th St 758 2137
SUNSHINE STUDIOS offering
classes m BaMet Jan, Yoga, and
Exercise Special student rates
Within walking distance of cam
pus 756 7235
PERFECT CHRISTMAS GIFTS
High quality low cost portraits,
caricatures. T shirts, people, pets
you name il John Weyler
753 5775
ANYTHING YOU CAN WRITE
We can write better Typing, pro
ofreading, editing Write Right
756 9946
HELP WANTED RN's. LPN s
and Technicians at Pungo District
Hospital needs you Opening on all
three shifts with shift differential
for 3 00 11 00 and 11 00 7 00. Con
tact Director of Nurses. Pungo
District Hospital 943 3111
DOMINO S PIZZA Now hiring
part time help Must be 18. have
own car and insurance, must be
willing to work weekends Apply
in person 1301 Charles Blvd
FOR RENT
MALE ROOMMATE(S)
WANTED To share two bedroom
apartment at Cypress Gardens
One mile from campus $370 rent
split evenly Utility bill ranges
from $35 $50 Call Don at 753 9571
or from 10 00 p m to 1 00 am at
753 4133
ROOMMATE To share two
bedroom house one block from
campus $78 plus one third
utilities 758 0375
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED
ED Stratford Arms Apartments.
Rent including utilities $140 ECU
Bus pick up 756 7499
CHRISTIAN FEMALE Seeks
responsible roommate for furnish
ed trailer $65 month, half
utilities 756 8664 after 9 00 p m
FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE
CLASSIFIED ADS CAN BE PUR
CHASED AT THREE LOCA
TIONS
Student Supply Store Lobby, MWF
10 00 II 00, TTH 11 00 13 00
East Carolinian Office, MTTH
4 00 5 00 WF 3 00 3 00
Student Organnation Booth
(Mendenhall). MWF 13 001:00,
TTH 11001300
�jpO�I?
I Classified Ad Form .
I
I PRICE $1 00 for 15 words, 05 for
� each additional word
I
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I
Make checks payable to The Eas
Carolinian
Abbreviations count as one word
as do phone numbers and
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I MAIL TO
The East Carolinian
Classified Ads
Old Sou'h Building
Greenville. N C 37J34
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WNCT-TV
GREENVILLE
w i
9 ALIVE SPORT TEAM
Carlester Crumpler Jim Woods
?
� r





10 rHE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 6. 1980
The Fearless Football Forecast
ECl 1 MIAMI
WAKE FORES! A I DUKE
UNC M C EMSON
N i STATE Al PENN STATE
RUTGI KS Al VIRGINIA
LSI Al l ABA MA
ARIZONA AT WASHINGTON
GEORGIA AI Fl ORIDA
SOUTHI RN MISS AI AUBURN
SOUTHERNc Al AT STANFORD
HOI STON M rEXAS
ARKANSAS 1 BAY I OR
IF.RRY HERNDON
Advertising Manager
(79-29)
Miami 28 14
Wake Forest
UNC
Penn State
Virginia
Alabama
Washington
Georgia
Southern Miss
Southein ("al
lexas
Baylor
KEN SMITH
ECU SID
(78-30)
ECU 14 10
Wake Forest
UNC
Penn State
Virginia
Alabama
Washington
Georgia
Southern Miss
Southern C'al
lexas
Bayloi
CHARLESCHANDI FR
Sports Editor
(78-30)
Miami 21 7
Duke
UNC
Penn Mate
Rutgers
Alabama
Washington
c icot gia
Southei n Miss
Southei n �. al
1 exas
Bavloi
JIMNh llul'KI t
Asst. Sports Editor
(75-33)
Miami 12 14
v ake 1 ores)
l N
Penn Slate
ii ginia
Alabama
w ashington
koigia
Southei U Miss
Som lui iial
1 exas
�i 1- ansas
(.1 isl IMCkt-K
KU II HRI-NM-K
WKAI l
Miami II '
s ake I orest
l N(
Penn State
Virginia
Alabama
Washington
i ieot gia
Southei n Miss
Southei n C al
l exas
Ai kansas
Steelwheels' Host Tourney
Basketball has long
been a favorite
American sport, but
the variet) of basket
ball which will be
played in a tournament
this weekend at Minges
Coliseum is different
from that which most
spectators are at
customed.
I he Greem llle
"Steelwheels" will be
hosting a wheelchaii
basketball tournament
Novembei 7 8 in
Minges.
The team posted an
impressive 12 3 recoid
a year as an indepen-
dent, but since has join
ed the Carolinas Con-
ference and will face a
20 game conference
slate with three torn
naments.
Don Dunn, a formei
1 asi Carolina I Inivet si
t student, attempted
to build interest in a
wheelchaii basketball
i earn in Gi eem ille
about foui years ago.
His efforts proved
futile because ot little
interest. Don is now a
membei of the
Charlotte wheelchaii
basketball team.
Richard Hudson, a
graduate student at
I ast Carolina Ifniversi
t. once again tried to
drum up interest in a
wheelchaii basketball
team about a yeai and a
halt ago. Richard, a
paraplegic himself, was
employed at the Voca-
tional Rehabilitation
Centei in Greenville.
His attempt to form a
team was successful
enough in the beginn
mi: to recruit about six
to eight players. B the
summei of last yeai,
the taem had as many
as twelve players and
was looking bettei al!
the time.
I he only problem the
team laced at this point
was acquiring the
necessary game equip
men! . I unds w et e
greatlv needed in this
aiea. I ave Cayton, the
dynamic person that
she is, and Durwood
Harris, ownei of Harris
Supermarkets were two
people responsible foi
raising some ol the
money needed by the
St eel wheel team
logether, they raised
$2,500.00 to be used as
the team saw tit the
money was foi pin
chasing new
wheelchaii s.
In August ol last
yeai, the Si eel wheels
-tailed then hist
season. I he team con
sisted ol seven
membei s hoin dii
teient areas ol Eastern
Noi t h Carolina.
Members cam from
Belhaven, Kinston, Pitt
County, Snow Hill,
Greenville, last
( atolina Ifnivei sit v,
and University ol
Noi t hai oli na at
Chapel Hill. 1 he learn
membei s weie Richard
Hudson (playei,
coach), James Bieee,
I hei on Move, I mi
Hams, llbeit Allen,
Maurice Brown, and
John Butt
I he Steelwheels are a
membei o! the
Carolina Wheelchaii
Basketballonleience.
Mhei membei s ol the
EXPERT STYLING
Fl W BOTH MEN
AND WOMEN
BY APPOINTMENT
ONLY
SHIRLEY'S
KUI & STYLE
MIM .is IUI .nj11L.
&
conference are Raleigh, losi to Raleigh bv only
W i n s ! o n Salem, two point
Charlotte and Green I wo members ol the
ville, South Carolina, team received awards al �
In their first season, the the tournament,
Stcclwhecls played .t Richard Hudson and
total ol 24 games, win lames Breeze Hudson
ning 9 ol those games was named oach i
and losing Is the Yeai and Breee
Considering thai this was named Must
was the lust yeai the Valuable Playei
Steelwheels palyed in Pirn Harris returns as
the conference, then the Greenville team's
record is one they can leading scorei form la I
be very proud ol In the season with a 1
conference tournament average, followed bv
held ui Charlotte, the Hudson with 10.4 and
Steelwheels were noi rhcron Moye at ,J
expected to do as well
as the othei teams but,
surprisingly they beat
Winston Salem and
I utlimi rtifltnff
and HrfMttr
Original lltuult tufted Jeuvlry
in SUvvr mi� (,
120 r S it
l.irrntillr, 27B34
Hi mix � i��t Selling
(jold �iut Silvrr and Coin
7S& 1127
J
Accepts Free Agent Status
Baker Turns Down Offer
Los NGELES
(I PI) 1 os Ange
Dodders' outfielder
Dusty Baker, seeking
top dollar for his vast
skills, turned down, a
reported five yars, $3.5
million dollar contract
offer by the Dodgers
and will seek his for-
tune in the free age
draft.
Bake considered a
leading candidate foi
the Nati mal 1 eagu
Most Valuable Playei
Award this year, made
the decision I uesday.
Dodger owner Peter
O'Malley said the con-
tract would have made
Baker "one ol the top
10 paid players in
baseball and the highest
paid player in the
history o 1 the
Dodgers "
O'Malley thought it
was on oiler Baker
couldn't refuse.
Negotiations bet-
ween Baker and his
agent. Jerry Kapstein,
and the Dodgers broke
down duringhte aftei
noon Both sides em-
phasized the meting
was held in a friendly
climate and Baker said
he hoped the Dodgers
would exercise theii
right to select him in
the re-entry dratt in
New York on Nov .18.
"We will continue to
maintain an open doot
policy tor Dusty and
his agent but I'm no!
optimistic we will
satisly then request
O'Malley said.
Kapstein said it was a
cordial meeting.
"We had an ahonest
difference ol opinion
between gentlemen
he said. Since "we
came into today's
meeting hoping to
icach an agreement but
couldn't he added.
"Both Dusty and I
hope the Dodgers eer
vise then i ight to select
him in the re-entry
dratt
Baker, 31, who is eluding 17 game winn
seeking anothei multi ing iuts. He went to the
eai contract following Dodgers in a deal with
the expiration ol a Atlanta in W6
previous foul yeai deal His Dodgei team
with the Dodgers, bat mates regard him and
ted .294 with 29 homers Steve Garvey as the
and had 97 RBI, in lacdinp candidates foi
; fie N I ' s M s! ()'Mallev and am
Valuable Playei Award panis was attorney Bob
despite the taci the Walker. Manage) lorn
Philadelphia Phillies I aaorda also ;� pre
won the World Series, sent at Dodgei Stadium
Sitting in foi the where the team'
Dodgers at ruesday's is located but he did not
meeting along with attend the meetinj
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 6, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 06, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.91
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/57299
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