The East Carolinian, November 4, 1980






She i-aat (ftaroltnian
Serving the East arolina campus community since 1925
oi. s St m
l(� Pages
I uesdav, NomiiiIh r 4. I�80
(ireenville, Northarolina
( iinil.ili'Hi (.()()()
Board Of Trustees
Plan For High-Rise
Hx Mlki N(�( W
K.
I
al An ui'
be

i
one
K.t let ic
meed that because
Nisons and inerea
N( . the
Iroppcd b the I mivei
he NCAA i
I �
i
M
A Trio In Costume
bv JON jOBCis
Ihest thin girls were among (he man l I students who enjoyed dressing up r��r Halloween l-nday niyht
Downtown was opened t�i the lirst time in five vears. I In- bear? He is contemplating hi long winter hibernation
while at the same lime, college students are contemplating theirs
Solar Energy Exhibits Highlight Greenville Energy Fair
;d Sola
In the Solar Cl
i
equipn
Mm
� I
L
equ
Wall
K f
.
Election Day '80
Politicians Arrive At End Of Campaign Trail
Increase In Financial
Aid Availability Raises
College Enrollment
on
' V
t'dueat i
reent
11

univei
the
ases to
imbina-
job oppor-
wth
reliel to
� . 10,000
West
: "a has .
.helter.
V ai Betty Sud
' � ' � 2.6 percent
.i :
dged
.idem
� c
help
�pulation
see-
but
ive also
� AI
to come.
the
yeai old
2d perceni
K l 1 l(,ll
H
e H
ballots 1 ik
the le
'he 1976 presid
has described
ters wi
� 60
ying
e Mondas He
Campaign I ever
Old political campaign buttons, slickers, posters, pamphlets and the like
make up a sizable collection of nostalgia tor Donald I oilins oi the East
Carolina I niversitj library science faculty . oilins has thousands oi items
of memorabilia trom social and political movements oi the past century.
For an article about this interesting collection see page 5
i
fat right
sl
' I omoi: iw . : are
say wru ant
al ma

Hunt said
is oi extreme
the state's tobacco Indus
"Jimmy Carter has stood
dooi ol a tobacco warehouse
W ion, North C arolina and said, as
lout' as he is preside
re will he a fedei a
co proj " Hun: said.
Hunt also noted theartei
minnistration has supported oj
ing ol tobacco markets
which he said "could be the salva-
tion oi the North Carolina : i
John East, Republi
foi the I S Senate, and I. Beverly
I ake, GOP candidate for governor,
held separate news t
throughout the state Bill c obey,
Republican candidate foi lieuten-
tant cine; nor. campaigned in the
eastern pan oi the sta
Among 'iie chargei- by 1 a I
� "liberal big city newspaper
editors are letting Robert Mo
get away with murdei in his te
sion ad where he claims the Se
has passed a balanced bud
� "Mr. Morgan's wasteful
foreign Aid spending weaken- .
economy and out national sec n
� "Mi Morgan has also voted
allow inter national agencies like the
World Hank to give American tax
dollars to 1 idel Castro's Cuba
A m one h e a rges b
Republican Party Chairman Jacl
1 ee:
� "Mr. Morgan and his friends a
the Boa; d ol Elections
tampered with tomorrow's eleel
ballot in an attempt to keep the ;
pie trom electing a Republican Con-
gress to work with Re
Reagan
Among the charges byobey
Green is "the candidate ot the
special interests and professional
politicians
� "The big utility companies, the
maioi banks and the lobbyist are
� I
g a 44
.
: ;�:
:
The Election
In A utshell
(PRl SIDI NTIA1 El 1 ri(
Rer R Id Re;

4 - S
memb e, 33 se
aw A � mds
ol and
(( ONGR1 SS) V a
Den
i
� .
t 01
R e p u b I i v
(Ci 1 RN RS) W asl
it 10
ips in
ioda '�� .
' .
jnts loscp i . oi
M Dix Le Ra oi
. i
On The Inside
incemt
1 ditorials
.sifieds
' ers
1 ROTC
1 Os
4
9
4
3
s
EXERCISE YOUR RIGHT TO VOTE
t





1 Ml 1 S1 C ROl 1N1AN
NOYIMB1-K4. W80
Announcements
FRISBEE CLUB
' ' � t ' A

; �� � lal
lU Fnsbee
a students
�ioom
ACCOUNTING TUTORS
The Accounting Society will pro
vide tutoring services every
Wednesday afternoon from 4 to 5
p m in Rawl 339 tor Acct 2401 and
2521 students
AID. INTERNSHIPS
The Ageni tor international
Development tA I D s now ai
rig appl ic ations tor the
Wintei 1983 lass ot interns
AIDs intern p pqram is a two
jrograi to train
. � i OH . e S
sf ion
'
� ; "�
planning
. and
si h �
EPISCOPAL WORSHIP
I Holy
.�
. . 4
� �� v- �� list s'udent
from
' � , s. . . .�.
with the I
. . �� � . Bill Haciden
. I �
MUSIC
' � �
�. . ber 13
� - - . al the
� �
ik e the put
, . . . ; .
�. .
. � � � � � . V :
GRE
LSAT
SIGMA TAU DELTA
.
KAPPA DELTA PI
� Eta ' I Kb
� �
� � ���
�� tei

� �
Avaitaoie
All Day
Every Day
Open
11 A.M9 P.M.
Sun-Thru Thurs.
11 A.M10 P.M.
Fri.&Sat.
CSO
The Center tor Student Oppor
tunities (CSO) In the School of
Medn.ine has immediate openings
for qualified tutors with expertise
m math physics and chemistry
You must have an academic
record of hrah performance n the
subiect area Wage based on
academic classification, eg
undergraduate graduate Contact
D' Frye 217 Whichard Annex or
call 757 6122 or 6075 for an inter
i A
RAFFLE
A n i500 00 in records tapes ot
your ihone I'om the Record Bar
n Easter Seals Holiday S500
Record Raffle Tuxets each
SI 00 Your group can buy and'or
� kets isales prize J150 00 in
or register by mail to
. Can Easter Seals. IU E
� d Street 758 3230
STEREO
How to Buy Stereo Equip
ment. a one session workshop of
tered by East Carolina University
Nov 10, will help potential buyers
ot audio components learn about
the subied before making a pur
chase
The program is designed to help
the novice eliminate the confusion
SI -rounding good sounding'
s,stems which has arisen with the
popularity of stereo and high
fidelity music systems
Further information about the
'stereo equipment' program is
available from 'he Office ot Non
Credit Programs Dvision of Con
no Education ECU. Green
ALPHADELTAMU
There will be an Alpha Delta Mu
meeting Thursday November 6 at
6 30pm at Western Steer This
win be a business meeting as well
as initiation for new members
Dutch treat dinner guests are
welcome AH members please at
tend i
HUNGER COALITION
The Greenville Hunger Coalition
will meet on Thursday, Nov 6 and
Nov 13 at 4 00 p m at the
Newman Center, 953 E Tenth St
The Coalition is open to anyone m
terested in studying and acting on
the problem of local and world
hunger We are currently planning
the Fast For A World Harvest,
Nov 20th
ART CONTEST
, � i Res ai ' n e San
Dieg a tornia based rcn
pro ' ' . �r1 san educationa1
and �. . � jri uj ' as announc
� �� � v sponsoring a nation
A an mpetit imong high
dol and college students to l"0
I �. � � ab � logo
ig to Barbara
promot hrectot for
A d research All entries must
b received by midnight
ber 30 1980 to ;h e - I �
isjx first pi
npetil ! pen 1
ege students
nterestec 'ing
� f( i
'
COLLEGE LIFE
AH students are invited to hear
Tom Lowder (psychology
graduate from University of
Texas) speaking on
'Extraordinary Living " Free ad
mission and special music on
November 12 1980, Wednesday
8 30 p m m Mendenhall Multipur
pose Room Sponsored by Campus
Crusade For Christ
BAKESALE
There will be a bakesale
Wednesday Nov 5, from 9 a m to
2pm in the Allied Health lobby
Yummies for your tummy
ECU SURF CLUB
There will be a meeting this
Thursday night in the bottom of
Scott Dorm at 7 p m We will
discuss issues about the upcoming
meet in Myrtle Beach this Sunday
Any interested persons are
welcome to attend
PSI CHI
Psi Chi will hold a meeting Wed
the 5th. 7 15 in Speight 129 Guest
speaker win be Mr Fumi James
of the ;Ob placement office He will
discuss tob availability in
psychology and related fields
Refreshments will be served All
new members and interested
guests are welcomed
GAMMA THETA
UPSILON
The Be'a Sola chap'e' of Gam
ma Theta Upsilon will be conduc
ting a meeting on Wed . Nov 12 at
5 00 in Brewster C 203 Plans will
be made tor the Nov 16 Blood
Bowl' AM GTU members are uro
ed to attend
FELLOWSHIP
The Fountain ot Life Christian
.vs' ; a meel Wednesday
� -iv� at 7 p.m in Ledonia Wright
Afro Culture Center Come ou'
and enioy some good Christian
fellowship
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Ph. Beta Lambda w meel
� 4th a' 4 p m ii
Rawi 103 There will be a Quest
PHI ETA SIGMA
LaCROSSE
ROAD RACE
' - � Coast a Carolina T r a
P,ti Plaza ��-��
� ,���. i NC are soon
S ring a 7 V e Road Race ana a
V � Run Run to be held on
.��� �- 15 198 a'
v 15 g rn The mtes a,ii start and
� at Pitt Pia;a
�,�. � � awards a be
. ' �� i � � ' � � �
� is m is to the
. � � : . male
. . � ige group
Cm presented to the
. la � � ' ' � " � '
temai � � '
� be divided into (
ji-oups
v. � � �� � '� I by the Pitt
ua Merchant a be
� iway i drawing to be held
mmediately f low rtg he finish
� � f v . � Over 90 mer
handiv rwards will be given to
. �� � . � '
��, � i, - �. eveni � t4 oo
ECU students, faculty ana
� iff . . ouraged 'o par
pa ti Entry blanks are
iva al � from Pitt Plaza mer
� . � � v ft � V Rec office
n 204 Men ria � � mnas'um
� � -r the crowd
S.U. ARTIST
Ape , al oni �� � tow � '
'aken for pos ' I I SI
�� s' tor Spr ' '� 0
phcation for ms ked up
in the Student Union Office room
234 Vendenhall S � '
Deadline November 14 IV
The Student Union Ma
jor Attractions Commit
tee will meet on Wednes-
day, November 5, at 4:15
p.m. in Room 238 of
Mendenhall Student
Center. All members are
urged to attend.
SRA
The. a bt -an SRA meeting a'
5 00 Tuesday. Nov 4 in the con
ference room n 'he basement o
Aycock dorm All SRA member
are urged to attend
PHI SIGMA PI
Tau Chapter of Phi Sigma Pi Na
tionai Honor Fraternity will hold
its monthly business meeting at
6 00 p m Wednesday in 132
Austin Brothers are urged 'o a'
tend the first pledge meeting of the
semester at 5 00 p m Wednesoa,
in 132 Austin
FAST
Each year the Greenville
Hunger Coalit.on and the mterna
tionai agency, Oxfam America,
sponsor a fast on the Thursday
before Thanksgiving The money
you save by not eating is donated
for self help proiects to aic hungry
people become self sufficient
Plan to fast! Stop by the table out
Side the Book Store on Nov 18th or
19th to sign up
ART EXHIBITION
The Student Union Art Exhibi
lion Committee will meet on
Thursday November 6, at 5 30
p m in Room 238 of Mendenhall
Student Center All members are
urged to attend
PROGRAM BOARD
The Student Union Program
Board will meet on Monday
November io. at 4 00 P m in
Room 248 of Mendenhall Student
Center All member s are urged to
atteno
CAREER SERVICES
Mark Your Calendars Take A
Giant Step Workshop, November
11 and 12, 3 5 p m 221 Mendenhall
Student Center A seminar which
will help you take a giant step in
to your future " Learn about
career services available to you a
a freshman, sophomore, iunior or
senior Don't miss it!
SUMMER CAMP
m met Camp E mi 1 me
Day is Novembet 18 10 3 p rr
the Mendenhall mult �
room Students who wish su"
employment with . an I
come be 'he Cooperate I
t.on office in 313 RdAi Bl
arrange nterv ews a ll
� . -
COMMITTEES
T he Office of the v �
Chancellor tor S'uden' L �� - s1
accepting apt ,� OnS tor �h�- 63
� , � �
nmittee: � � � �. � � � �
.�.�������� Corrnt
let s Faculty Sei at �
Com ��� � . ' '
� � � Support Pleasi
by room 204 Wl hard and f
JOB SKILLS
WORKSHOP
Due t : ���' � the i
����
. . g � � shops has
� . . � . � �. .��� .
. icemi ' �� �
�, nbei - ind t ����.
�� s piannec I I
, � md the Preparation o �� �
Resume at 3:00 p m
Sions w ii tit- held on bo"
Rawi 107 An seniors are nviti It
attend p ae emeni Set - �'
number is 757 6399
MOVIES
Acnt.on all jew'Sh students'
On Tues Nov 4 Shalom :�
shown a' 8 (- - "�'� Ledonia
A- SJh1 Afro American Cu
Qer ���Net' A StOf ' I
Strangers a be st a" al 6 .
n 'he Cultural Ce
AKA
rheta Alpha ChapH"
A.pha kappa Alpha will be S(
sor:ng a Student of the Year con
test Friday. Nov 18 a' " -
Mendenha' Aoditot tin- A
an, nterested person p , �
lac1 one Of 'he AKA sororities or
al 752 9192 Entry dead � �
Nov 13
PHI BETA LAMBDA
' Be'a I an bda a meel n
tues lay N . �� n :�� � �tt at 4 i -
in Room R103 Then a a
guest speaker from Carolina
Telephone & Ti'ieu'aph Atl
dance by all m. re
questea
ter��
Steer
H
s
M&�
3005 E.
10th Street
Greenville, N.C.
(Beside Hastings Ford)
Take Out
Service
Available
758-8550
Fast & Easy Delicious lunches
Soup & Salad
$-99
Diet Plate
4 Oz. Chop Sirloin
Cottage Cheese & fruit
Ihicken Filet Sandwich
Baked Potato or French Fries
Childs PlaFe
4 Oz. Chopped Sirloin
Baked Potato or French Fries
Toast
Old Fashion Cheeseburger
S-J29
No Potato
Baked Potato
or French Fries
Steak Sandwich
Plain, Peppers & Onions,
Mushroom Gravy, Q
Baked Potato or V M & ?
French Fries
Banquet
& Party
Facilities
Available
SPECIALS DAILY
NO TAKE OUTS
ON DAILY SPECIALS
Monday And Wednesday
Beef Tips
$229
Daily Specials Served With Baked Potato or French Fries & Toast
Tuesday Ana ihursaay
Chop Sirloin
89
8 0z
30 Item Delicious Salad Bar
Alpha (Samma JRbo
Kortij (Harolina ialf niurraUg
Tight Cerebral Palsy'
fetei

rtfl
Lite Great State Professor Race'
DATE: November 9, 1980
(Rain date November 16, 1980)
Time: 2:00 P.M.
Place: NCSU TrackField, Raleigh, N.C.
For the past two years Alpha Gamma Rho Fraternity at NCSU has sponsored
the "Lite Great State Professor Race Its main purpose is to help combat a
dreaded affliction-Cerebral Palsy. It's also a fun event both for participating
professors and their sponsors.
There will be two divisions consisting of a one mile run and a 10,000 meter run.
Participating professors will choose which run they would like to enter. F.ach
participant will receive a "Lite Great State Professor Race" T shirt. The 1st,
2nd, and 3rd place finishers in each race will receive trophies. The organization
from each school which raises the most monies and those that sponsor the winn
ing professor of each race will also be given awards.
ENTRY FORM
Please print name and address
Entry fee: $25.00
Sponsored by
Enclosed.
Will pay day of race.
(Name of organization or mark "self)
Check Appropriate School:
NCSU
INC
DUKE
ECU
Please send entry form and check to: ALPHA GAMMA RHO
r . North Carolina State University
or contact: 2:m Hiilsborough Street
Barry Herndon 758-9025 Raleigh, North Carolina 27(
Terri Bosher 752-9151
v.VFRYONE IS A W1NNF.R IN THK FIGHT AGAINST CEREBRAL PALSY

ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each ol these advertised 'terns Is required to be
readily available (or sale in each Kroger Sav-on e
cept as specifically noted in this ad II we do run out
of an item we will offer you your choice of a com
parable item when available reflecting the same
savings or a ramcheck which will entitle you to pur-
chase the advertised item at the advertised price
withm 30 days
on
Copyright 1980
Kroger Sav-on
Quantity Rights Reserved
Items and Prices i
Effective W�d ov 5
thru Sat Nov 8 1980
Pictured Items Only
NONE SOLO
TO
DEALERS
OPEN 7 AM TO MIDNIGHT
"�� o�N Sunday 600 Greenvie Blvd. - Greenville
"�� ra.flrrwi Phon 75$-703i
t





I HI IAS! ROl INI AN
MAI MBI K4. 1980
AFROTC Cadets
Gain Appointments
Outstanding cadets
1� last Carolina
University's Air Force
ROTC detachment
have been appointed to
cadci staff leadership
positions.
Cadet Majoi
rhomas Gill, son of
Mr. and Mrs. William
Gill of Statesville, has
assumed the position of
c a d e t g i o u p c o m -
mander. He will be
responsible for the
training of approx-
imately 165 cadets and
the overall manage-
ment of the AFROTC
cadet corps
C adelapt. John
Maiquis McTillmon,
son o Mr. and Mrs.
Ross Mc I illmon of
Greensboro, has been
appointed inspector
general.
� N" graduate ol
Ragsdale High School,
Jamestown, he is a
political science major
at ECl dnA expects to
graduate in 19S1 He is
head manager for the
ECU Pirates football
team.
Cadet Major Rebec-
ca Turner has been ap-
pointed deputy com-
mander for operations.
1 he daughter of I t.
Col. (Ret.) and Mis.
Frank Padilla of Fayet-
tevtlle, she is a 1972
graduate of Balboa
High School in the
Panama (anal one
She is an honor stu-
dent at ECU and a
sociology major who
expects to graduate
next spring.
Cadet Majoi Michael
1 aw rence Helsabeck.
new dep ill c om
mdei foi the coi ps, is
the son ol An 1 orce
M Sgt. (Ret.) di. Mis.
Don Helsabeck of
Goldsboro.
He is a graduate
of Eastern Wayne High
School. computei
science major at ECU,
Helsabeck is a senioi
and a recipient of an
Air Force scholarship.
He is a member of Phi
Mu Epsilon honor
society.
Cadet Capt. Jackie
McKenzie, newly-
appointed Arnold Air
Society commander, is
the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Jack Mckenie of
Pinehursl.
His memberships in-
clude Phi Alpha Theta
honor society, the Stu-
dent Government
Association Appeals
Hoard and the
Lutheran St udent
Associat ion .
( adei C apt. James
Burnette Jr special
project officer, is the
son of Mi. and Mrs.
James I la Burnette of
inchestei. I enn. and
a 1975 graduate of
Dunn High School.
Dunn. N.C.
He is a rrembei of
the I au Kappa Epsilon
fraternity and a senior
industrial technolog)
major at ECU.
Committee Halts KA OS
Oregon State's Stu-
dent Activities Com-
mittee voted recently to
stop the playing of the
game K.A.O.S. (Killing
As an Organizing
Sport) because it was
"potentially harmful"
to the student body and
the rest of the com-
munity.
The committee ruled
that the nationally
popular fad would be
dangerous if allowed to
proceed during the fall
term.
"We felt that it could
scare a lot of people
says Tom Lindstrom,
co-chairman of the
committee. "People
are up in arms around
here about it. We've
had a lot of rapists and
other criminals roam-
ing around. It wouldn't
be safe
OSl"s Experimental
College had heiped
organize a K.A.O.S.
game on campus, using
student funds.
Under the game's
rules, students�who
are called
assassins�are provided
with a victim's class
schedule and physical
description. The victim
is usually followed by
the assassin who tries to
make a "hit usuallv
with a soft rubber dan.
It the hit is made suc-
cessful, the victim is
knocked out of the
game, which proceeds
until one assassin is
left. That person, of
course, is declared the
winner.
Nbtice Notice Notice
We Are Again Serving
Fresh, Tossed Salads For
Your Convenience.
Soda Shop No. "Croatan
Arms Race
Photo by GARY PATTERSON
Passing The Sue
Aim Pickette. 1981 Buccaneer Assistant Editor, helps pass out the
popular new yearbook. A cop) of the BUC is available at the Student
uppl Store for all students who were enrolled for an part of the last
academic ear.
Visiting Professor Dispels Popular Myths
raking as his topic
"The Arms Race, the
Economy, and Infla-
tion John Swomley
last Frida night at the
First P r esby I e r i a n
Church exploded tour
popular myths: the cur-
rent arms race is not
primaril intended to
defend the United
States; the S o v i e I
Union is not increasing
its armaments taster
than the I tnited States;
i he emphasis on
military development
has weakened us;
military bases hurt the
onom ol the com-
munity in which the)
e located. His conclu-
sion therefore is in
agreement with Nobel-
prize winning
economist Wassily
I eontief's: the arms
race keeps the poor in
poverty. It is highly in-
flationary.
Di Swomlev (Ph.D
Political Science), Pro-
fessor of Social Ethics
at St. Paul School of
rheology.
onlv a snia
this countr
noted
I fraction of
's oil comes
from the Middle East.
Why not fill that gap
with Mexican oil? W ell,
Mexican oil is state-
owned, and t here
would be no profits to
the oil companies in its
sale. nd the military
monkey on oui back
gets fatter while West
Germany and Japan.
fai less burdened by
arms while far more
dependent on Middle
1 astern oil, outproduce
us in civilian sector
after sector.
"Big oil' exemplifies
the influence of big in-
dustry on government.
Swomley illustrated
this with the young
preacher's situation. In
his congregation are a
businessman who can
aft ord to give the
church $10,000 a yeai
and a yard man who were then rebutted in
can afford $25. Whose turn. For instance, the
adivce does the minister huge Soviet expen-
pay more attention to? ditures foi armaments
Eisenhower's farewell owe much to figuring
warning seemed pres- what it would cost us to
cient, as Swomlev carry out their program
noted what a large � "To put the USSR
piece of our economy is behind in the arms
within the military- race Swomley joked.
industrial complex.
The above rebuttal
of the first myth was
supported in more
detail. 1 he other myths
"all we have to do is go
back to draftees at $75
a month � Their
large armv facing
China, comparative
W arsaw-NATO
budgets, and navies,
and our technical effi-
ciency were other fac-
tors considered in ex-
posing the second
myth.
Similarly, uncoopted
scholarship has little
difficulty with the third
and fourth myths.
Swomley is the author
of five books, including
The Military Establish-
ment 1 96 3 I.
Pizza inn
AMERICAS FAVORITE PIZZA
PIZZA BUFFET
ALL THE PIZZA AND
SALAD YOU CAN EAT
Moru-Fri. 11:30 2:00
Mon. � Tues. 6:00 8:00
758-6266 Evening buffet �2.79
Hwy 264 bypass Greenville , N. C.
Over two million people in
Eastern North Carolina Now Receive
A Clearer,Brighter Television Picture
from WNCT TV Channel 9
LA KOSMETIQUE
UNISEX SALON
2800 EAST 10th STREET
IN SHOPPING CENTER WITH
J.D.DAWSON CATALOG SHOWROOM
SPECIAL
THROUGH
NOVEMBER 30th
ALL DESIGNER
HAIR CUTS $6.50
FOR
MEN AND WOMEN
WE ALSO SPECIALIZE
IN TOTAL HAIR
CARE FOR THE
BLACK WOMAN
CALL 752-3419
ask about our
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HENNA CALIFORNIA CURL
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CURLY PERMS HIGH LIGHTING
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MON. thru SAT.
ryjt
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4
timui.
HAPPY
DAYS
AGAIN
GUNSMOKE
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She last (Eawliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Richard Green, cmr
TERM HERNDON, Dhcm, a 4r� LlSA DREW. , m E�or
Mike Noonan. wm b��
Charles Chanm.fr, emf
David Norris, tammfn
Chris LlCHOK, Btei�us mm�
George Hettich, �mmmmmt
Anna Lancaster, ��.�� mmm
Novembei 4. 1980
Opinion
Page 4
Transit System
TTs Better Than Ever
The SGA transit system was
literally a wreck last Spring when
Charlie Sherrod was elected presi-
dent o' the student government. At
that time he inherited a bunch of
wrecked buses, astronomical
maintenance and repair costs, and a
shakey transit staff.
Shortly alter his election, Sherrod
tired the two transit managers who
had served in the administration of
former president Brett Melvin.
Alter this bold but necessary move,
all oi the transit records mysterious-
ly disappeared. Then the drivers
threatened to strike and to shut
down the bus system in protest of
Sherrod's decision to fire the old
managers.
To his credit, Sherrod stood his
ground and appointed Nicky Fran-
cis and Danny O'Conner to take
over the transit system. The bus
drivers were as good as their word
and they went on strike. Francis
moved quickly to obtain city bus
jvers ' k :ep the system
operating. As a result of this quick
and commendable action, not one
student was deprived of transporta-
tion. The buses rolled on schedule.
Since Francis and O'Conner took
over, there have been no accidents.
Maintenance costs, which once con-
sumed nearly 30 percent of the total
transit budget, have been cut by 26
percent. Some of the old drivers
who went out on strike have return-
ed. 1 his year the drivers were given
their first'pay raise in many years, a
raise well deserved.
Also, another bus has been
ordered, reportedly the first new
bus ever purchased by student
government that will undoubtedly
serve the students more efficiently.
Things are looking good now and
they look even better for the future.
A transit advisory board has been
created to offer advise and profes-
sional guidance for the system.
Gary Davis, the first manager of the
SGA transit system, is serving on
the board. He is presently
associated with the city transit
system. Davis can offer much need-
ed and necessary advice concerning
operating costs and equipment pur-
chases.
There are plans to have the buses
serviced by the city instead of a
private car dealership. This will
reportedly cut repair labor costs by
one half.
A long needed change will also
occur April 15, 1981. The transit
manager's position will cease to be a
patronage plum. Future transit
managers will be screened and ap-
pointed by the advisory board. This
will ensure merit as the basis for hir-
ing rather than political loyalties.
Ford isn't the only one with a bet-
ter idea.
ITS yOU& MOVE!
VA
v3
r-Campus Forum
Concerned Parent Urges Action
Vote Today
Because of the diverse opinions of
our staff, we were unable to come
up with a majority endorsement for
a presidential candidate. We opted
to present a variety of views to keep
students informed. Now it's up to
you. Vote for the candidate of you
choice.
I think it is the most ridiculous thine 1
have ever heard of for an institution of
higher learning to permit the condition
to exist as reported in The hast Caroli-
nian regarding noise, drinking &. cursing
next to the infirmary & near the library;
not withstanding tins condition being
present tor several years, but the tact
ihat Rudy Alexander (whoever he is)
stating that it takes several complaints
bet ore he gives a slap on the wrist.
To think that the college chancellor or
the board of trustees would permit a
condition such as reported to exist where
doctors and or nurses cannot reach the
infirmary in emergency situations is un-
thinkable.
I think every student should bring tins
to the attention of their parents 1 bet a
plugged ruckle it will not take three com
plaints to Mr. R. Alexander to get Ins at
tention.
LH. CRANE
t A Parent)
Tarboro. N.C.
dent bod) and not foi certain Creek
orders. One would think thai from the
last letter pertaining to the reserving ol
seats, the rule on that issue would be
clear, but evidently it is not.
Upon arriving at the game, we were
abruptly told by the KA Fraternity that
we would have to leave our seats. We
replied that the reserving ol seats is no
longer allowed, and in fact it nevei was
to have been permitted in the first place.
Deeming it best not to cause trouble, we
finally left our seats. We did feel thai we
and oui parents were being socially
abused.
Speaking for mysell and other
students of the university, I think thai all
students and then guests should be
allowed the enforcement ol this rule to
guarantee equal seating. 1 also think thai
a folio up investigation bv the propei
authorities is in order.
How Rl) BROWN
Junior Class President
Political Science
Seats Still Saved In Ficklen Reward For Stolen Hat
As a part of the non-Greek communi-
ty, I feel that Ficklen Stadium seating
should be open to all portions of the Stu-
Atter the ballgame Saturday night, 1
grabbed my old faithful redneck cowboy
hat and proceeded downtown to join the
multitudes at the Elbo Room wnen I
got inside, 1 suddenly realized thai so-
meone had jerked nn hat from my head.
� nal was thousands oi miles from
a s it was merely a beat up straw
cowboy hat with a nasty almost red,
white and blue band holding it together.
The hai was rolled and bent up on the
sides and bent down in the from and
back. 1 he inside was h� Jtrtei by
folded, yellowed piece ol newspaper that
enabled the thing to stay on my head,
ruction! brim had been torn away from
the band bv hard times, but with loving
care 1 had sown it back together.
1 ittle value do 1 have foi many
material things besides mv old mustang
and mv hat mot necessarily in tl
ordei . 1 can bui hope that 1 have touch-
ed the heart of the abductor ol mv
coveted hat. It so, eithei call 752 9490oi
just diop b suite 417 Belk and throw
the old hat into the hall (y
it).
Placing a monetary value on m hai
friend is a trauma within itself. But I
would gladly pay ten dollars or more to
anyone who could lead to the reunion ol
me and mv hat piece.
Kl() PRIM 1 1 E
Junioi. ons
Why Vote Carter?
Why Vote Reagan?
B CHARLES SUNE
The current presidential race is no
different on its face than any other.
Both sides have assaulted the elec-
toiate with their individual bombast
and rhetoric, somehow managing to
present their stands on the "issues"
amid the attacks and promises.
Much to the candidates'
displeasure, realistic solutions to
our nation's ills are rarely reducible
to pithy slogans.
"Ay, there's the rub as Hamlet
said. Complex problems defy
simplistic solutions, and therein lies
the fault oi the Reagan platform.
As we enter the final decades of
this century, we are, as a nation, too
quick to follow any man who can
glibly offer punchy one-liners as
cures. Similarly, it is easy for a can-
didate to offer the popular answers.
I hat approach may have worked 30
years ago. when Reagan waxed reac-
tionary, but it is unacceptable to-
day. Columnist David Broder wrote
recently that it is going to be
tough to govern this country in the
next four years. Budget deficits,
high rates of inflation, loss of pro-
ductivity and deterioration of our
industrial plant all point to con-
tinued economic problems
I hose who believe any single
political philosophy will usher in a
new era oi prosperity should re-
examine their positions.
��(an we afford four more years
oi Jimmy Carter?" as Reagan sug-
gests?
Better we should ask "can we af-
ford four years of Reagan's
economic proposals based on the
Kemp-Roth tax cut plan a plan
which has been described as
"oodoo economics" by George
Bush and "irresponsible" by
Business Week.
No doubt, many will vote for
Ronald Reagan because they think
he is best fit to "put this country-
back on the right track They will
be disillusioned. Granted, Carter
hasn't solved all of society's
maladies, but don't be snared by the
Reagan approach simply because it
is an alternative. That it may be,
but it certainly is not a realistic alter-
native.
The lvnchpin of Reagan s entire
program for reshaping the federal
government is the Kemp-Roth tax
cut plan. All other proposals de-
pend upon passage of this plan.
Under the plan, the economy would
be revitalized by taking the money
that would have been paid as federal
tax and reinvesting it.
Reagan proposes a 30 per cent tax
cut, spaced over three years. At the
same time, however, he promises in-
creased defense spending, full
employment, and decreased intla-
tion.
It can't be done.
Though it's a nice enough dream,
it is unrealistic. Business Week said
the proposal would be a com-
pletely irresponsible way to ap-
proach the federal budget problem,
and it would generate an intlation
that would destroy the value of the
currency . � � � Kemp-Roth would
add $100 billion to a deficit that is
already dangerously swollen. It
would'touch off an inflationary ex-
plosion that would wreck the coun-
try and impoverish everyone on a
fixed income
Reagan's plan would primarily
benefit such traditionally
Republican constituencies as the
wealthy and the corporate. The
"little man" Reagan constantly
refers to would be forgotten.
Conversely, Carter's tax cut plan
offers the necessary investment in-
centives for business, as well as cut-
ting the taxes of those who need it
most - lower income Americans.
such a proposal would cost. It's
easy to promise "whatever it
takes but it is infinitely more dif-
ficult to deliver on that promise.
This haphazard approach is in-
herently unsound. It's ironic that
the candidate who preaches reduced
government spending as vehemently
as Reagan would offer defense a
blank check.
President Carter, on the other
hand, is quite specific in his defense
policy. He proposes that an addi-
tional 25 per cent be spent on
defense during the next five years.
Combined with the last three and a
half years, that would mean an ad-
ditional 35 per cent in defense spen-
ding during the two terms of his ad-
ministration.
Carter has, and continues to, in-
stitute new programs such as the
Rapid Deployment Force and the
MX Missile System.
President Carter has, during the
past four years, reversed the trend
under the previous Republican ad-
ministrations that decreased defense
spending.
By STAN R1DGLEY
"Nothing can bring you peace but
the triumph of principles
Ralph U aide Emerson
No one can solve this country's
problems with simplistic answers.
Jimmy Carter knows this. Sadly,
Reagan has yet to realize it.
Reagan's response is to promise
all things to all people and "tell
them what they want to hear Jim-
my Carter offers the only realistic
answers to our problems.
On defense, Reagan promises
"Peace through Strength and
harks back to the era immediately
following the Second World War,
"when no nation on Earth dared"
violate our peace. Those days are
unmistakably gone forever, and
with them goes that type of carte
blanche defense policy.
Reagan suggests spending
"whatever it takes" to assure
American military superiority. This
is simply a latter day version of the
old 1950's "Fortress
America'Mdeal. Reagan, however,
is not at all specific as to how much
Charles Sune is a junior Political
Science major from Raleigh. He has
been active in the Democratic Party
and was nominated as a delegate to
Democratic National Convention
last summer.
The real choice in today's
presidential election is one of prin-
ciples, and that is something the
Democratic Party loathes to admit.
For two months we've seen per-
sonal invective thrown back and
forth between Republican and
Democrat, and this continuous ex-
change has tended to obscure the
fact that each man represents a par-
ticular philosophy � one with
which he will guide the country the
next bun years if elected.
Both candidates want basically
the same things for this nation �
full employment, low inflation,
strong defense, and equal oppor-
tunity for the citizenry. What they
differ on is the means bv which
these ideals can be acheived.
Both parties have proffered then
specific proposals in their platforms
which were hammered out at their
respective conventions, but more
important than specifics are the
frames oi references from which
these programs spring.
Perhaps no better illustration can
be made oi the difference between
the two positions than that oi the
problem of urban decay.
The Democrats' solution to the
problem is to pump money into an
Urban Renewal Program � we've
seen this the last four years and it
has not worked in the South Bronx.
By contrast. Republicans have pro-
posed the creation of "free enter-
prise" zones in blighted areas in
which tax incentives and othei
measures would be used to entice
businesses into these areas to rebuild
them and provide real jobs for the
inhabitants, not makework govern-
ment jobs.
The Democratic tendency to
spend money it does not have is at
the heart of most of 'his country's
national problems � inflation,
unemployemnt, low productivity,
budget deficits. G.K. Chesterton
stated the Democrats' affliction suc-
cinctly: "It isn't that they can't see
the solution. It is that they can't see
the problem
Jimmy Carter has repeatedly ac-
cused Ronald Reagan oi offering
simplistic answers to complex ques-
tions. But Reagan offers us fun-
damental answers, reaching to the
heart ol our problems. 1 he basic
difference is that Republicans see
the cause ol most of our problems
ultimately as fiscal irresponsiblity
by the federal government
Democrats do not.
Undei Carter, the U.S. economy
has hit its highest inflation rate since
Wot Id Wai 11, it- highesi tax rate in
U.S. history, the largest number ol
unemployed since the Great Depres-
sion, and has seen a steady rise in
the consumer price index and a
steadv decline in real wages. I his is
the legacy of Jimmy Carter the last
four years. Ronald Reagan offers a
fresh alternative methods that
WO! k.
Admittedly, Republican pro-
posals are bold and innovative. An
example is the much-maligned
Kemp-Roth 30 Perceni las Reduc-
tion Proposal. Democrats say it is
unworkable Cartel himsell called
it "ridiculous" and they trot out
then experts to sa why. Vet Nobel
Prize-winning economist Milton
Friedman supports the proposal
along with a battery oi other promi-
nent economists.
But Kemp-Roth is perhaps less
vulnerable to criticism than the
Democrats" extravagant progarm to
provide 800,000jobs at a cost ol SI2
billion. Money foi that program will
come from just two sources - the
taxpayer's pockets and the treasury
printing press. This country doesn't
need more play money m circula-
tion.
But even allowing that Kemp
Roth is found to be even partially
unworkable after Reagan's election
(Or the jobs program found un-
workable after Carter's), these two
proposals send a signal to the
American public as to how these
two men will repond to problems
while m oiiwe. From Carter, it will
be more of the same. If re-elected,
he will offer mote and more oi the
old "New Deal" solutions to
modern dilemmas � that is the
frame of reference from which his
party operates.
But Reagan and the Republican
Parts subscribe to no bankrupt
policy. Republicans realize thai only
bv holding spending and taxation to
a minimum can government keep
the value oi the dollar intact � and
that's the suresi way to reduce
unemployemnt and inflation.
As for the individual, the
Republican Party tuts traditionally
been the champion of individual
freedom. While the Democrats deal
in symbols, Republicans deal in
substance
1 he Democrats call foi coercion
ol civic leaders and the state- in
their ratification of the Equal Rights
Amendme n I; Repu blican-
"reaffirm oui Party's historic com-
mitment to equal i ights and equahtv
for women and support the en
toicement o all equal opportunity
laws and urge the elimination
discrimination against women
The Democrats have called I
the establishmeni ol Martin I uthei
King. Jrs birthday as a national
holiday - nice symbol. Republicans
are concerned with, what happens to
blacks the othei 364 days ol the
year; then platform promises to
"open new opportunities foi black
men and women to begin small
businesses oi then own bung
strong, effective enforcement ol
federal civil rights statute- and
ensure thai the federal governemnt
follows a non-discriminatory system
oi appointments, v the Party ol
1 incoln, we remain equally and
steadfastly committed to the equah-
tv ol rights io all citizens regardless
ol race
A vote io Reagan today is a vote
for the traditional Republican prin
ciples ol equality oi opportunity,
equal justice undei the law, and
basic rights and freedoms undei the
constitution. A- Emerson said, only
the "triumph of principles" can br-
ing us peace, and only m this
Republican was can the essential in-
gredient of the American way ol life
be preserved � and that essential in
gredient is freedom.
The choice is clear.
Stan Ridgley is a senior Political
Science major with a degree in jour
nalism from the University of Worth
Carolina at Chapel Hill
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1 HI I S1 (. AROt INI AS
Features
Vl MM K4. 1980
Page 5
Hunting For Fossils: A Sedimental Journey
�. :
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c
i
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rntial in-
B DOUG QUEEN
Stafl Wriln
One ot the mosl remarkable peo-
ple I've mei ai East Carolina was a
geology student by the name of Jack
Mason. Jack, 01 Rock as we called
him, ua. the paragon of fossil
hunters. I vividly remember dropp-
ing by Jack's room in I'instead
man) a Saturday morning and fin-
ding him preparing foi one of his
"expeditions Alter much coercing
by Jack to overcome my basic reluc-
tance to anything more strenous
than leading. 1 finally agreed to ac-
company him on the Grand Tour ol
Pitt Count) fossiling.
tici packing apples, water-jugs,
man) papei bags with rubber bands,
and even a toothbrush into his
knapsack, I thought we were going
to sta for a long time. The
ush cei tainl) did nothing to
alia) n j basic mistrust of the
dub n it) of "fossiling (m-
l) latei did 1 understand the use of
the toothbrush when 1 witnessed
Jack's skillful hands brush away the
accumulated sediment of five-ten
mi
on years to unearth a perfect
specimen of Turritella. It was an ex-
quisitely delicate spiral gastropod
thai went from a large chamber to
the tiny tip with all the grace that
nature lavishes on even its (to our
sometimes cumbersome eyes) minor
members.
I remember Rocky handing the
Turritella up to me saying that 1
could keep it because he had
millions. Although he didn't literal-
ly have millions, he had enough. As
for myself, I stood on the bank of
the far River with a ten-million year
old fossil in mj hands, not knowing
what to do with it. Since that time.
I've fossiled almost ever) known
outcropping of fossils in this area
and have learned what to do with
mv finds, and more importantly,
how to appreciate them for what
the) represent.
The greatest find in fossiling for
the beginner is the ubiquitious
shark's tooth. The massive Car-
charodon, ancestor of the present-
day Great White Shark, had teeth
that often exceeded six inches, and
sometimes obtained the length of
eight inches. Truly, this was a
Man) different types of interesting fossils can be found in the dreenville
area. Five of the most common fossils are illustrated here. Clockwise from
upper left: Turretella. tooth of a carcharadon (Great White Miark), Sep-
tastrea (coral), Pecten and Glemeris.
ic Pleistocene some
monster ot
million years ago. This particular
fossil can be found in the Yorktown
Formation which crops out by the
I at River at the bottom of the sand
cliffs off River Road in Greenville.
Although finding a "monster"
tooth up to six inches is exceeding
rare, the smaller variety can be
found almost without looking at all.
Just scramble down the sand cliff,
be careful (because a slip means a
swim) and start looking.
A rudimentary inspection will
reveal about three layers of sand
and gravel composing the cliff. The
top layer is all sand that has a few
fossils but are too recent to have
been effectively fossilized. These
will often disintegrate at the touch
of a finger. The second layer is
gravel that will yield hundreds of
tiny shark teeth of various grades of
lit hiat ion (fossiliation). You may
find the long, sharp, scimitar-like
teeth that after a couple of million
years ate still pointed enough to in-
flict a wound.
lor those of you who want to
forego the rigors of scrambling
down precipitious sand cliffs, there
is an alternative. Walk, or drie, to
Green Springs Park.
Walk over the bridge and in-
vestigate around until you come
upon a natural spring that flows our
of the hillside. This isn't the
motherlode, but it is fun and can oc-
cassionally offer up an interesting
piie for the diligent.
But mv favorite spot is
underneath the bridge beside the
Stop and Go on Tenth Street. It is
dirty and mess. and I advise that
any searcher be equipped with stur-
dv pants and rugged boots. It is here
that you'll find the exotic
Glycimeris with its beautiful flutings
cutting dramatically across the axis
ot the growth rings. Glycimeris is a
bivalve thai can be used for
anything from an ashtray to a
Calder-like mobile. The only restric-
tion is vour imagination.
It is also here that you can find
another bivalve called Pecten. I too
can serve as a collectible or an art
object or a "what you will It is a-
fine a shell as you will find on the
beach with the added attractioi
possessing an age calculated in
millions of years.
What is the value of looking tor
and collecting fossils? Well, there is
a monetary value associated
some of the finer, rarer species oi
Sec fossil . page 6, col. I
Election Collection
Teacher Collects Campaign Souvenirs
The Grapes Of Wrath
John ford's classic 1M40 film. Hit- drupes of Wralh. will he showing in the
Hendrix Iheatre in Mendenhall Student (enter this Wednesdav night, Nov.
5. at 8:00 p.m. Kased on John Steinbeck's novel, the film stars Henrv Fon-
da and John C arradine. I he discussion group which was to have been held
after the film has been cancelled.
B FRANCEINE PERRY
K I t�, Hurrau
GREENVILLE � Campaign
lapel buttons, posters and bumper
stickers are a familiar sight
nowadays, and most of us will
relegate these items to the trash can
after Nov. 4.
But for political paraphernalia
collector Donald Collins, owner of
500 campaign buttons, the
ephemeral tokens of politics are bits
of history that should be preserved
and enjoyed in future years.
An interest in history sparked his
enthusiasm for campaign materials
20 years ago. An associate professor
A dvice For Students:
Coping With Leases
f'iiifoi note: this is the second
in a of urrides serving as a
ff-campus housing. It is
as a service far ECt
students by the SGA presidential
i ahii
When you rent an apartment,
ign a lease or a ren-
ent. It is a legal contract
you, the tenant, and the
to the terms and con-
ditions oi youi tenancy. A lease has
eim (usually 9 months or
a year) during which the rent is fix-
i jointly and individually
I -� . ii cotenants) agree to be
resp tor the rent to the end of
the term, even if you move out,
s It;o landlord agrees in writing
�me othei arrangement.
An unwritten tenancy agreement
is a month-to-month contract. You
can end tenancy and move out
anytime after giving 7 days written
notice from the first of trie month.
The landlord can raise the rent � or
ask you to move out � on the same
7 days notice.
leases and rental agreements
slate conditions which are binding
upon you and which you should
understand before you sign. Does
the rent include water, gas, electrici-
ty, etc.? Be sure any verbal
agreements with your landlord are
added in w riting to the lease. For ex-
ample:
When is the rent due? Is there a
penalty for iate payment? Is there a
grace period? What deposits and
fees are required? (Cleaning,
This Week: International
Jewish Arts Festival
Held On ECU Campus
or Political
n our
I his week on campus, the annual
International & Jewish Arts Festival
is being held. I he festival, planned
brate the ethnic minorities on
oui campus, is sponsored by the
Student 1 nion Minority Arts Com-
mittee
On fuesdasy, Nov. 4, students
will be treated to the film "Shalom'
h will be shown at 8:00 p.m. in
the 1 edonia S. Wright Cultural
Center. The compelling story of
Israel from its beginning to the pre-
sent is told in this comprehensive
documentary. Photographs and rare
movie footage depict the earlv
Zionists, the plight of retugee Euro-
pean Jews after World War 11, and
the exhilarating proclamation of the
state of Israel in 1948.
On Wednesday, Nov. 5, enjoy the
various foods the world has to offci
as samples of at least 25 different
dishes from around the globe are
brought to ECU. The International
Foods festival, which will begin at
7:00 p.m. in the Multi-Purpose
Room of Mendenhall Student
Center, will offer such dishes as as
Hungarian cabbage rolls, Jewish
blintzes, won ton soup, along with
many others. Tickets will be
available at the door for $1.00 to the
first 100 patrons.
"A Storm of Strangers" followed
by a discussion will bring to a close
the Jewish Arts and International
Festival week. The film is a series of
prize-winning ethnic films designed
to help Americans rediscover their
roots. The purpose is to introduce
America's different ethnic and
racial minorities to each other, but
more importantly, they reveal ethnic
minorities to themselves. Prepare to
weep and laugh at experiences sup-
plied by members of each minority
who were involved in all levels of
creation in this project. The film
will be shown Thursday, Nov. 6 at
8:00 p.m. in the L.edonia S. Wright
Cultural Center.
Damage, Security, Key). What are
the terms for refunding deposits?
Do your roommates have to be
approved by the landlord?,Can the
rent be increased if the number of
tenants increases? What about
guests? When does a guest become a
tenant? What happens when one
roommate leaves school or becomes
ill? Is sub-letting permitted? Is there
a fee for sub-letting0
Who has the right of entry to con-
duct inspections and how often?
Who is responsible for cleaning and
maintenance? Will the landlord take
care of the lawn or garden? Is writ-
ten permission required to decorate
the place? Will the landlord provide
paint? What kind of picture hangers
are allowed? (Tack and nail holes in
walls account for many deductions
from security deposits).
Are there any rules concerning
conduct, quiet hours, etc.? Are pets
allowed? Do you have an option to
renew your lease for a specific
period at a fixed rent? Here are
some things you can do to prevent
problems:
Do not sign a lease that is for a
period longer than you actually plan
to stay. Sometimes landlords prefer
a 12 month lease but will agree to 9
months instead. Dates starting the
period of tenancy are written on the
contract.
Read and keep a copy of your
lease and make sure it is completed
and signed by the landlord or agent.
Make your rent payments and
deposits by check and specify on it
exactly what the check is for : $300
to Jane Doe � $150 rent for
and
$150 security deposit Money
Orders and Travelers checks are not
good because the original copy is
not returned to you after payment.
If you have to pay by cash, always
get a receipt. You have the right to
one. (If you pay by check, your
cancelled check is your receipt).
Your receipts, records, and any cor-
respondence with your landlord
should be kept until you have mov-
ed out and received any deposits to
whirh vou are entitled.
of library science at Fas! Carolina
University, Collins has a PhD
degree in history form the Universi-
ty of Georgia in addition to his
library science degrees.
Collins has assembled a stagger-
ing array of brochers, posters, pms
and medals, matchbook covers,
banners, old prints and even rare
candidates' "giveaways" � an
eyeshade, a hat, a paper fan, some
tie clasps, a mug, emory boards,
coins and even a thimble. His collec-
tion includes not only political
memorabilia, but also tokens ol
various social and reform
movements since the late 1800V
Some of his things are quite
valuable on the collectibles market;
he owns several historic lithographs
and posters, including two rare pro-
paganda posters used by Vichy
France during World War II and a
dollar certificate given long ago to
contributors to the Jeff Davis
Memorial.
He did own a woman's suffrage
banner found in a student's attic,
but traded it for a detailed depiction
of the Battle of the Crater from
"Leslie's" magazine. A Collins
ancestor died in that Civil War bat-
tle.
Other items are common and easj
to come by now, like the large
"Iran: Let Our People do" button,
but may someday be eagerly sought
as a curiosity of 1980.
He has a few special favorites: an
Lhabeth Ray button, a 1904 Teddy
Roosevelt watch fob, a
"Governments Make War" button
personally given to him by feminist-
pacifist Jeannetie Rankm and a
bronze button used for Progressive
presidential candidate Robert
I aFollette in 1 s24.
"I don't really have enough of
these things to be considered a
serious collector Collins says.
"Serious collectors will buv buttons
to vompletc a series: I stopped buv-
ing buttons a long time ago
Scarcity, rather than age, dictates
a button's value; some the the 1976
Jimmy Carter campaign buttons are
more valuable than a cloth button
trom the 1888 Benjamin Harrison
campaign. Many "pressings" of
different Carter buttons, and
relativelv few ot each, were made
tor distribution by independent
manrfactureres. To collect them all
would be quite a task.
Collins' bronze LaFollette button
is less valuable than a cheaper tin
one, because the tin button is
scarcer.
Fake buttons are a major pitfall
for new collectors. While recent
fakes are required to have
"Reproduction" stamped on them,
counterfeits do turn up to plague the
unwary hobbyist.
Buttons are a method of
"advertising" one's political
beliefs, and they invite discussion
with the wearer, Collins believes.
"Some collectors dislike bumper
stickers, but 1 think of a bumper
sticker as just a political button
worn on a car he said. His earlist
bumper sticker is a fragile piece
dating from a FDR campaign.
Collins is a liberal Democrat, but
in the true spirit of collecting, he
Joes not discriminate in his acquisi-
tion of mass-produced propaganda
pieces. Besides nuraberous
Democratic and Republican items,
doens ot lesser-known political and
social groups are represented in his
campaign.
Among them are the Ku Klux
Klan, the Young Americans
Freedom, the John Birch Society,
the American Independent Part,
the American Nai Partv, Zero
Population Growth, the Theocratic
Partv, the Socialist Workers Partv,
the Young Socialisi Workers, and
for fun, the "Pat Paulsen for Presi-
dent" campaign and the Sen. Sam
Ervin Fan Club.
Presidential candidates ot the
past � some nearlv forgotten � are
recalled among his button displays;
Landon and Willkie share equal
space with Coolidge, Taft and
Hoover.
Of prime interest to a collet
Collins' series of buttons hurriedly
pressed in 1976 before President
Carter picked Mondale for his runn-
ing mate: "Carter-Jacl
' ' C a r t e r - M u s k i e ; ' '
"Carter-Church
"Carter-Stevenson and
"Carter-Glenn Collins also has
pro-Carter buttons in 15 languages.
Another fascinating part of his
collection are pamphlets from the
"dirty politics" campaign of Frank
Merriam who opposed Upton
Sinclair in a long-ago California
gubernatorial race. "This wasn't
just dirty politics; it was filthy
said Collins.
Photo by GARY PATTERSON
Long Line Last Friday Night
This scene shows that even Halloween night is not exempt from ECL's long lines.






1 Ml I AM l Kil INI () I 1HI K4. 1980
bbll� X �v x�n�L
1
Photos by GARY PATTERSON
The Blues Brothers Meet Jaws
1 hese costumes based on popular contemporary films were among manv worn b ECl students celebralinn Halloween
VWrOT btt W f)T
4Y Student Wins Scholarship
IrJfMT As
TOr iNivibieci' j
Sandra Monteith of
Brevard, senior interior
design student in the
asl Carolina Universi-
ty School of Art. is the
recipient of the first an-
nual $1,000 scholarship
a u a i d e d b y t h e
Carolinas C haptei ol
the American Society
of Interior Designers.
1 o be applied toward
expenses for
Monteith's senior yeai
at I c I . the scholi
ship is the fii
in
Fossil-Hunting Fun
outstandi n
design tu
North
c arolina.
design 01 architectural
firm.
Her special interest is
e n l r o n mental
design� making use o
natural means and
matei ials, such as
.in sunlighl and
' ipography, rather
than artificial or
South mechanical means, to
� e a t e desirable
buildings.
An exhibition of her
( ontinued from page 5 be;
m- a lai l'c sha: k s
tooth on the collecting
market may bring ,b
much as 150 dollai -
Bui
. i � � �
il these relics
from oui biological
past. Some o! these
tossiIs such as the 1 ur-
rttella, are surpassingly
ireaieu
u ondei t ul mobiles
fi om sharks' teeth and
bellamites that ap
, A-ever,
erve as
a � ork
Is
contemplate e
Senior
Show
Held
Donald .1. Mackey ol
inston-Salem, N. C,
a senior student in the
ECU School of Art. is
now having a show oi
prints and drawings in
the Kate Lewis Caller
in the W h ic ha rd
Building. The show will
continue until No. 7.
Mackey exhibition
includes drawings and
prints (intaglios and
lithographs.)
A candidate foi a
B.F.A. degree in print-
making with a minor in
drawing, Mackey plans
to attend graduate
school for an M.F.A.
degree in print making
or medical illustration,
or an M.S. degree in
physical education.
Mackey is the son oi
Mr. and Mrs. Ro I
Mackey of Winston
Salem, N.C.
pieces. Foi years I car-
: ied a fax oied piece oi
whale bone in my
pocket that assured me
many times that life is
only a transient tiling
that must be made the
most ol he i � e we
ourselves become
fossils.
Search out these
areas and look for these
fossils. If you are in-
terested, the Geology
Building has a perma
nent display ol any
fossil that ou will find
in this area. And it you
do find a specimen that
they do not have, well,
they will be very in-
terested to see what you
find. Who knows, you
may find something
that has nevei been
found before, and then
your name will live on,
attached to a fossil.
Happy hunting.
A candidate foi the
Bachelor oi Fine rts
degree in interior interior design projects,
design. Monteith ex including layouts, floor
pects to graduate from plans and perspectives.
ECU at the end oi tall along with a painting
semester. ! . on and several prints, is
graduation she plans to scheduled tor
pursue a careei with a Mendenhall Student
southeastern interior Center Nov. 2-9.
ATTIC
LeRoux
Capitol recording artists I.eKoux will be
performing at the Altie I uesdax. Nov. 4.
ELECTION DAY
5 WED. . . IFC CONCERT wBILL DEAL
AND THE RHONDELS
6 THURSUGAR
SIGMA PHI EPSILON
AND
CHAPTER X
TUE. NOV.4 AT 9:00
END OF THE WORLD
ELECTION DAY PARTY
$1.00 ADMISSION FOR GIRLS & GUYS
.05 DRAFT FOR EVERYONE
ELECTION RESULTS WILL BE POSTED EVERY
HALF HOUR & IF YOUR CANIDATE IS AHEAD
YOU DRINK FREE FOR FIVE MINUTES ON THE
HALF HOUR.
Fosdick's
INCREDIBLE
$1.99 LUNCH!
Monday:
Fish Fry all you can eat $1.99
Tuesday:
Salad Bar. ayou can eat 1.99
Wednesday:
Shrimp Creole ayou can em 1.99
Thursday:
Chowder and Salad
all you can eat. 1.99
Friday:
Fish Fry allyoucaneat 1.99
Sunday Lunch Special:
MOM'S DAY
All Mothers EAT FREE
(when accompanied by family
of 2 or more)
ALL YOU CANEA TSPECIAL
to all students and faculty Monday � Inun-
day 5:0flpfli I'il closing you may purchase our
f-ried Fish Sfe fat for only
$2.50
18M)$6liM
"A Great
Seafood
ISSGJH Restaurant"
2311 S Evans St � Greenville
ADVERTISED
ITEM POUCV
Each of these advertised Hems it required to be reedily available to sale a! o
below the advertised price in each AAP Store except at specifically noted
in thit ad .
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT NOV 8 AT A4P IN ,�4i ene
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOt ESALERS
Highway 264 By-pass
Greenville Square Shopping Ce
Greenville N.C.
nter I
���HUM Mil III
Beautiful, Fine porcelain
Diane China
THIS WEEK S FEATURE ITEM
DINNER PLAT
WITH tACH
55 PURCHASE

SAVE 50c WHEN YOU PUI
Y)!k � u. � i
CREAMER
t2
GOOD THRU SAT NOV 8 AT ALL A&P S IN I ND
S C EXCEPT AIKEN AND BEAUFORT S C
$1,000 (X) WINNER
$100 00 WINNER
MART B DICKENS
SCOTLAND NECK N C
$I95,044
IN CASH PRIZES
98,774
CASH WINNERS
100 00 WINNER $100 00 WINNt
FRANCIS SWINTON
GEORGETOWN S C
BARBARA CHAVEZ
ROXBORO N C
n
C ART
Its easy to play
Pick up FREE Old Fashioned Bingo concealed
ticket on every visit to AAP
Match straight row of 5 numbers vertically.
horizontally or diagonally on any one of the 4
Bimes on master card
o purchase necessary to participate.
See game card for complete rules
U8 WAYS TO WIN
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN-FED BEEF
WHOLE BONELESS
SIRLOIN
TIPS
9 TO 12-LBS. AVG
CUT FREE INTO SIRLOIN
TIP ROASTS. SIRLOIN TIP
STEAKS AND TRIMMINGS
A4P QUALITY CORN-FED
PORK LOINS
$38
10-LB
PKG OR MORE
A4P GRADE A YOUNG
TURKEYS
BUTTER BASTED
SELF BASTING
WITH REAL BUTTER'
10 TO 14-LB
AVG.
LB
98�
J HORMEL3-LB OR A&P4-LB.
CANNED HAMS

YOUR CHOICE
ONLY
$888
ARMOUR STAR
HOT DOGS
12-OZ
PKG
99
28 COUPON
LIQUID BLEACH
Q CLOROX
LIMIT ONE WITH THIS COUPON
good thru Sat. nov 8. at a&p in Greenville N.C.
AP
TBB BBS BBS BBS BBB BBS 3B9 K3 PBB SB
e
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1
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680 I
BB BBS BBS SBB BBB Bll
39�
o
37 COUPON
AP
ANN PAGE REFRIGERATED
ORANGE JUICE
Vj GAL. CARTON
LIMIT ONE WITH THIS COUPON �
good thru Sat. nov 8. at A&p in Greenville N.C.
88�
�al s 'bIbbs -cai
I
I
I
I
I
681
J
CHICKEN OF THE SEA
SSrT TUNA
All VARIETIES
PILLSBURY
A
�SJ 6-OZ
88c CAN
I
79c
ANN PAGE LOOK FIT
ICE MILK
MR. PsPIZZA
79c
PKG
GOLDEN DOLE
READY TO EAT�RIPE
f m W Vj-GAL
99$
RED DELICIOUS
WASHINGTON STATE
BANANAS
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APPLES
39
?
r
' � � r





r
I HI t S1 (. AROl I MAN
Sports
NOVI MHt K4. 1980 Pa:e "
Pirates Blitz William And Mary,31-23
B CHARLES CHANDLER
Spurt r itilnr
1 he hast Carolina defense came
up with the big plays when it had to
m a wild third quarter as the Pirates
snuggled to a 31-23 victory over
stubborn William and Mary Satur-
da night.
Following a field goal by Indian
kicker Laszto Mike-Mayer�the
youngest of three Mike-Mayer kick-
ing brothers�the Pirates led by on-
ly 14-10 with 8:28 remaining in the
thud period.
� tumble by Pirate halfback

w ilium�Ml Mart II " 1 3 U
tl 1M IS 31
It 1Ntevkflrl ,J ran ll mm kuk
�1Wright) 7 p� Irum (arri( iMike Miner Mchl
H isniittn li run . 1 amm kukt
VMMik. M��1 W IteM u.ial
M 1s�frlv tumble mil nt endnne
M 11 nllin 1 run il amm kicml
KMXnilriHN pass trnm l.umlt i Mike-Maer kuki
H 1Hmri fA run il amm kuk
W Mv hut Ibein 40 iia Irum .arni� tl'u lailrdi
VVXM H 1
firsl rtmm 13 In
Kn.ln �r,i. 35-MH M UJ
Passing v arl I �
I'assfs2 ls-0 I 1 1
I'linl.5-4: i. 5-31.4
1 umh 4: vi
IS MM 4 4: 10 �2
1 "i j'� , 25M �
IMIIMIM VI 1 r IIK
Mike Hawkins on the ensuing
possession was recovered by the In-
dians on the EC I 22.
William and Mary got as close as
the Pirate eight before Indian
quarterback Chris Ciarrity fumbled.
ECU rookie defensive end Jeff
Pegues recovered the loose ball to
thwart the drive in the first of two
big defensive plays o the quarter.
ECU punter Rodney Allen pinned
the Indians deep in their own ter-
ritorv on then next possession as he
drove one to the William and Mary
two-yard line.
lhe ECU defensive line followed
up on Allen's boot; end Hal
Stephens slamming Ganity to the
ground in the end one as the ball
rolled out of bounds for a safety,
making it 16-10 Pirates.
ECU kick returner Chuck Bishop
then took the ensuing free kick and
returned it 46 yards to the Indian 19.
putting the Pit ate offense in ex-
cellent scoring position.
Kuvhini; Ml i nllim 21 �un.n 121 B�m-r S-72.
steart lt-54. HakM� 5-15 M Hr.i :n-V. (,�mi.
i: v Mihk : in
PaHM Ml Me��M B-l-M �M l.arnl�
! I (i I5S. Mitrph� ion (I
nr Ml Itaxmwrt l- �M SchwWtata
rig)) i ! - I ran 2 II
Stewart lets Loose
And score the Pirates did,
halfback Anthony Collins taking a
pitch from quarterback Greg
Steward from one yard out into the
endone, putting his club up 24-10
with 12:59 remaining in the game.
The Indians would not give up,
though, and took the ball 80 yards
in ten plays to paydirt. A 33-yard
keeper by Ciarrity was the key play
in the drive and set up his five-yard
pass to Corky Andrews that cut
ECU'S lead to 24-17.
The Pirates showed they could
fight back also on the possession
following Andrews' TD. A 13-yard
run by Mike Hawkins moved the
ball to the ECU 37.
Freshman halfback Ernest Byner
took over from there, rambling 63
yards for the game's deciding
touchdown. Bili Lamm's kick made
il 31-17 and seemingly to lock the
game up. The Indians, again, saw it
differently.
A 40-yard TD pass from Ciarrity
to end Ed Schiefelbein shocked the
Pirate secondary and narrowed
ECU'S lead to 31-23.
An onside kick by the Indians
failed and the Pirates had their
fourth win o the season against as
main losses. William and Mary fell
to 2-7.
"We sure don't make 'em easv
remarked ECU head coach Ed
Emory following the contest. "We
kept thinking they would not score
on us and then they'd turn around
and get a big pass piav. You have to
give William and Mary Coach
(Jimmye) I aycock lots of credit tor
fighting back
Emor) was impressed with the
play o quarterback Greg Stewart,
who was starting his first game tor
Pirates Record Safety
Last C arolina defensive back James Freer
jars the ball loose from William and Mary
quarterback Chris Ciarrity in his own end
zone late in the
31-23 victory by
third quarter of Saturdays
the Pirates.
the Pirates after regular Carlton
Nelson was pronounced out for the
season this pas! week.
"dreg showed lots ol poise
tonight Emory said. "He's still
got a problem with his foot but he
go! the job done
Stewart finished the game with 54
yards rushing on ten carries and a
first-quarter touchdown.
Stewart look a back seat, though,
to an impressive performance by
fullback 1 heodore Sutton. The bur-
ly Kinston native rushed for 121
yards in 26 sanies and strengthened
his position as the school's second
leading rushei t all time.
Sutton moved to within 252 vards
of Carlestei Crumpler's record total
o 2.SS9 yards. He needs to average
84 yards per contest in the team's
final three games to match that
mark.
Garriiy was the star for the In-
dians, completing 15 of 23 passes
for 158 yards and three TDs.
The Pirates enjoyed their top
rushing game of the season, rambl-
ing for 344 yards en route to a total
offensive output of 353 vards.
Stewart Questionable For ECU-Miami
-���� � iv�t I irtiK ttMltimort"oils, and
Photo by JON JORDON
Stewart Drives For Six
ECU freshman quarterback Greg Stewart powers his way in-
to the end zone for the first Pirate touchdown of the night
Saturdav.
Swimmers
When it was announced late last
week that ECU starting quarterback
Carlton Nelson would miss the re-
mainder o the season Pirate fans
most sureiv said to themselves.
"Not again
Still, the Pirate faithful could
take solace in the tact that Nelson
was backed up by the capable Greg
Stewart. Even though Nelson
became the 29th Pirate to be termed
" c 111
out for the season, Stewart had the
confidence o Coach Ed Emory and
his staff.
Indeed, Stewart performed well
for the Pirates m their 31-23 win
over William and Marv this past
Saturdav.
But. lo and behold, it is now
Stewart that may miss a game, due
to an injury to his ankle. The
freshman signal-caller has had pro-
blems with lhe ankle all season and
was supped up in Saturday's game
and reinsured it.
"We'll just have to wait and see
about Greg Emor) said late Mon-
day. "It's a very serious problem
and we're very concerned about it
I lory said that Stew ait was
receiving four to five icepack
treatments dailv from Sports
Medicine and that something
detinue on his availability this
weekend against powerful Miami.
1 la. should be known by Wednes-
day .
"lhe doctors X-rayed him and
found no breaks Emory said.
"Thev told hun to stay off o his
tee! as much as possible until
Wednesday, when they will
reevalute this situation. Greg has
lots o pride and will give it all he's
got to play Saturdav, I'm sure
lhe Pirates' opponents this
weekend, Miami, Ma are coached
by former Baltimore Colt head man
Howard Schnellenberger. Perhaps
Schnellenberger is more famous,
though, for his work as offensive
coordinator of the powerful Miami
Dolphins of the early 1970's.
Before going to the Dolphins,
Schnellenberger served on George
Allen's staff with the Los Angeles
Rams. Before that he served as a
Charles
Chandler
it
college assistant to the legendary
Beat Bryant at Alabama and was
credited with the successful recruit-
ment of All-America quarterbacks
Joe Namath and Ken Stabler to the
Crimson Tide.
On Schnellenberger's Miami staff
is one o his former players. Earl
M or rail. Mori all replaced starter
Bob Gnese as quarterback o the
Dolphins following the latter's in-
jury early m the 1972 season.
the Dolphins were unbeaten
when Griese went down and con-
tinued to roll under Morrall.
finishing the season as Super Bowl
champs with a perfect 17-0 record.
Morail was also a star QB for the
With Monarchs
B JIMMY DuPRFF
wi�lanl sport rdilor
When the Pirates of East
C arolina open their 1980-81 swimm-
ing slates November 14 against Old
Dominion, both the men and
women will be looking to fill holes
in their aquatic armour.
The men's squad must replace
star performers Bill Fehling and Ted
Niernan and the women must over-
come injuries and illness to several
key performers. Along with Niernan
and Fehling. senior standout Kelly
Hopkins is no longer with the Pirate
natators after having qualified for
the Olympic trials a year ago.
"He just quit said veteran ECU
coach Rav Scharf. "I guess he just
got tired of swimming, but he really
let his teammates down
Aside from those losses, the
Pirate men return experience at
most of their top positions. Senior
Jack Clowar leads the team in the
sprint events, while junior Doug
Niernan returns as the top per-
former in the individual medley.
Junior Scott Ross and freshman
Jan Wikland of Sweden will anchor
the distance events, with sophomore
Matt McDonald tops in the
breaststroke and Perrv Newman
strong in the butterfly.
"We've got some good per-
fomrers in each event " said Scharf.
-It's going to depend on what he
other people behind them m the
events do. The men will be kind of
in a building year.
"They could surprise us he ad-
ded. "We'll go as far as they want
to.
The Lady Pirate swimmers are
lead by sophomore Ail-American
Tami Putnam, whose specialty is
listed as the individual medley. The
versatile performer also turned in
standout efforts in the breaststroke
during the 1979-80 season.
Other top prospects for the Lady
Pirates include freshmsan Jenniffer
Jayes in the backstroke and
sophomore Susan Hanks in the
freestyle events.
Top sprinters for the Lady Pirates
are sophomore All-American Carol
Shacklett in the IM, and freshmen
freestylers Mona McHugh and Lori
McQueston. Junior Julie Malcolm
and freshman Sally Collins head
East CArolina's list of distance ex-
perts.
"We just don't know who's going
to swim the butterfly for the girls
said Scharf. "Each year (the girls)
have gotten a little better
In each of the various dual meets
the Pirates participate in, they will
be behind in points before they ever
hit the water. With no diving coach
on staff, Scharf decided it would
not be in the best interest of the
athletes to recruit a skilled diver.
"We can't honestly recruit unless
we can offer them a program ex-
plains Scharf. "We have several top
high school divers who want to
come here, but it's just not prac-
tical. We've got great facilities here.
We'll put somebody up on the
board, though
Former ECU assistant John
Sultan now coaches at Old Domi-
nion, and Scharf is wary of his
former pupils' squad.
"I'm sure John will have them
ready for us he said. "1 wouldn't
be a bit surprised if they shave for
the meet
Both squads have meets with
UNC-Chapel Hill, North Carolina
State, South Carolina and Ten-
nessee during the season, all of
which Scharf considers to be top
teams in the country.
"I'm always optimistic he
adds. "We'll do well. They do have
some of the top programs in the
country.
"We've always swum against the
toughest competition. How can they
be ready when we get to the
regionals if they haven't been up
against that kind of competition all
year.
"My top priority is that the kids
reach their potential. We've never
worked this hard at the first of the
season before
Curly Neal Gets A Lift From Bob Blutinger
Detroit Lions, Baltimore Colts, and
a host of other teams. The 192
AFC Player of the Year coaches the
quarterbacks under
Schnellenberger.
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
Tickets to the ECU-N.C. State
football on Nov. 22 in Raleigh are
still available at the Minges ticket
office. They can be purchased from
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily and are
priced at $4.50 for the first ticket
and $9 for the second (student 11)
required).
The Pirate javvee football squad
will host Fort Bragg this Sunday at
Ficklen Stadium. Garnetime is 1:30
p.m.
Single and season tickets to Pirate
home basketball games are now on
sale to the ECU faculty and staff at
the Minges ticket office. They can
be pruchased during regular
business hours.
Globetrotters
To Visit
East Carolina
Everybody's favorite basketball
team, the Harlem Globetrotters,
will be in Greenville for one game
Friday, Nov. 28, at Minges Col-
iseum.
No team in history has attracted
bigger audiences than the Globetrot-
ters. Now in their second half-
century, the Globetrotters have
played nearly 15,000 games in 9"
countries before more than 98
million people.
In their 55-year history, the
Globetrotters have played games
before every imaginable audience,
and have entertained 'veryone from
Popes to Presidents to the average
Joe.
This game is one stop on the 1981
World Tour which will carry the
Globetrotters to 46 states and nine
Canadian provines. In addition, the
Globetrotters will play a mere 200
games outside of North America.
One reason why the Globetrotters
have become a genuine American
institution is that everyone enjoys
them and their remarkable brand of
basketball magic.
Three delightful variety acts with
a touch of whimsy and a dash of ex-
citement will dazzle Globetrotter
fans during the all-new variety show
at halftime.
T
t





ill L'ASI Ki I IM
Four Named All-Deep South
Lady Pirates Fall

MAW
-
I
1 ad �
I
mm
m
I (,oalie Jam- Radford
ad Pii

Pirate Booters Shoot
For Record This Week
i
win
� �!
KCl 's Brad Winehell
A�MYMAVYSTO�t�
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For More information Call:
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Mai
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1 HI t SI C AKOl INIAN
NOW MBI K4, 1980
y
Ae
B
let
lar
2
Maryland Blanks State, 24-0
Sooners Hand First Loss To UNC
RA1 E1GH (UPI) -
Sixth-ranked North
Carolina traveled to
Norman, Okla seek-
ing respectability for
the Atlantic Coast Con-
ference and a top bowl
bid, but came away
with a 41-7 loss to 16th-
ranked Oklahoma.
Before sufferings its
first lost of the season
to the Sooners, North
c arolina had racked up
seven straight victories
and its defense had not
s u i i e n d c i e d a
touchdown all season.
But under the scrutiny
oi a flock of bowl
mts. the defense's
mtation was tarnish-
ed as Oklahoma ran at
will f 01 si
touchdowns, foui of
them in the second
half, and picked up 495
.Is i ushing.
While North
c arolina, the ACC
leader, was suffering in
the Oklahoma sun,
Maryland solidified its
hold on second place in
the league with a 24-0
win over North
Carolina State and
Clemson held on for a
35-33 win over Wake
forest to jump into a
tie for third place.
Virginia upset Ten-
nessee on Wayne Mor-
rison's third field goal
of the day, a 43-vaider
with 11 minutes to
play, while Duke's
defense turned back a
second half comeback
bv Georgia Tech foi a
17-12 win.
1 ai Heel coach Dick
Crum said it was
Sooner quarterback
J.C. Watts who did the
worst damage to his
team.
"He can do so main
things with that of-
fense Crum said
about Watts, who ran
foi three touchdowns.
"He can go inside or
outside, and when he
fires those pitchouts �
well, there aren't main
guys who can get it out
there that quickly.
"Watts is the key to
their whole offense
Sooner halfback
David Overstreet added
two touchdowns for
Oklahoma, now 5-2.
North Carolina's on-
ly score came on a first-
quarter touchdown run
by tailback Amos
Lawrence, who ran for
106 yards in 20 carries.
In College Park, it
was once again Charlie
W vsocki who paced
Maryland's attack.
W vsocki ran for 132
yards to lead the Ter-
rapins to a 24-0 win
over North Carolina
Slate � the first time in
113 g a m e s t h e
Wolfpack had been
shut out.
The Terps, now 6-3
and 3-1 m the ACC.
took a 10-0 halftime
lead on W vsocki's one-
yard run and Dale
Castro's field goal in
the second quarter.
After the half, the
Wolfpack moved to the
Maryland 11, but lost
m omen t u m when
Lloyd Burrus blocked a
21-yard field goal at-
tempt.
"The defense played
a superb football
game said Maryland
coach Jerry Claiborne.
"When Lloyd blocked
that field goal, it got us
momentum again, as
they had put together a
good drive
Claiborne also cited
an interception by
defensive end Mark
Wilson, who picked o
a screen pass in the end
one in the thir d
quarter to give
Maryland a 17-0 lead.
The Wolfpack drop-
ped to 4-4 and 2-3 with
the loss.
Clemson quarter-
back Homer Jordan
ran for one touchdown
and Obed Ariri kicked
four field goals to tie an
NCAA career record as
the Tigers took a com-
manding 35-7 lead mid-
way through the fourth
quarter against Wake
forest.
But Deacon quarter-
back Jay Venuto threw
three touchdown passes
and Wayne McMillan
ran for a fourth with
lust over a minute left
as Wake forest closed
the gap to 35-33.
Wake forest
recovered its second
straight onside kick
alter McMillan's score,
but Clemson's 1 err y
Kinard intercepted a
pass with 44 second left
to seal the win.
"We'd have been in
good shape it we had
stopped the game at the
end of the third
quarter said Clemson
coach Danny ford. "I
went to the bench a lit-
tle too early and that
was almost a fatal
mistake, but thank
goodness they bailed
me out
The win boosted
Clemson to a 5-3
season record and a 2-2
ACC mark, good for a
tie with Virginia foi
third place. W a k e
forest tell to 3-5 and
last place in the ACC
with a 1-4 mark.
Virginia, playing in
Knowille, raised its
record to 4-4 with the
upset ovei rennesee,
now 3-5.
The Cavaliers held a
13-6 lead going into the
fourth quarter, when
Tennessee flanker An-
thony Hancock tied the
game on a 44-yard
reverse with 12:45 lett.
But 1:37 later, Mor-
rison connected from
43 yards out to put
Virginia ahead to stay
and defensive ba.k
Cor win Word in-
tercepted a pass to kill a
Volunteer drive.
Duke, 2-6 foi the
season, took a 17-0
first-half lead against
Georgia ledi. but the
Yello w I ackets
dominated the second
halt betore the Blue
Devil defense sacked
quarterback Stu Kgeis
for an I 1 -yard loss with
15 seconds left.
Georgia lech drop-
ped to 1-7.
�$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$�
KODACOLOR
Developed and Printed
Classifieds
&
12
EXPOSURE
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$3.23
N Foreig
20
EXPOSURE
ROLL ONLY'
Steinbrenner Undecided
On Howser 'Situation'
l W ()Rk (I PI)
George Steinbrenner
s.is he hasn't made up
his mind one wav oi
another regarding the
Dick Howser
"situation" and
anybody who claims
?'s about io fire his
agei is . :el
� peculating1
I he possibility
Howser might be
dismissed momentarily
as manage! of the
ankees became a mat-
ter of increased conjec-
ture, at least in New
York's newspapers,
when he was summon-
ed from Ins home in
fallahassee, Ha to
St
einbrenne: s
I am pa,
evening.
Gene
Y a n k ee
manager
Fla.
home in
Sundav
Michael, the
general
also attended
the session alter arriv-
ing in Tampa from the
major league general
managers1 meeting in
Viih Miami.
"The three of us met
tor an hour and we
talked about a number
oi things but nothing
was decided one wav or
another Steinbrenner
said after the meeting
broke up. "We'll talk
again in the near future
and 1 may have
something to saj in
another few davs. But
nothing has been done
yet. A ny one w ho
claims to know I'm go-
ing to do this or that is
simplv guessing
As matters stand, lit-
tle Don Zimmer, fired
as manager bv the
Boston Red Sox shortly
betote the end of the
season, could turn out
to be the pivotal figure
in whatever decision
Steinbrenner finally
reaches with regard to
Howser. At the mo-
rn ent, 1mmer is
waiting for general
manager Eddie Robin-
son of the Texas
Rangers to let him
know one wav or
anothei whether he will
or won't be t he
Rangers' manager next
season.
Even betore Robin-
son told Zimmei he was
being comideied for
the job during the
World Series. Stem
brenner called Zimmer
and ottered turn the
x ankees1 third base
coaching job at an ex-
cellent salaiv. Zimmer
would've grabbed it on
the spot, but he told
Steinbrennei he was be-
ing considered tor the
Rangers' managerial
post and the Yankee
owner agreed to wait
until Robinson made
up his mind. So far,
Robinson hasn't, and
Zimmer is still waiting.
Robinson and Stein-
brenner also met in
I a in pa during t he
weekend and that cir-
cumstance gave rise to
the belief the two talk-
ed about Howser going
to Arlington, Texas, to
manage the Rangers,
Michael succeeding him
as manager of the
Yankees and Zimmer
becoming the Yankees'
third base coaching
job.
Zimmer, who lives in
St. Petersburg, natural-
ly would prefer manag-
ing over coaching, but
whichever wav that
winds up. he'll be hap-
py because his primary
desire is to be in
uniform again next
season. Meanwhile,
he's staying close to the
telephone waiting to
hear yes or no from
Robinson so he can tell
Steinbrenner yes or no.
"Here's what hap-
pened he says.
"Eddie (Robinson)
called me from the
general managers'
meeting in Miami the
other night and told me
it would take him about
a week before he would
name his manager.
He's trying to make the
right decision. 1 don't
know who he's got in
mind. 1 don't ask anv
questions. I just answer
them
Steinbrenner and
Robinson both like
Zimmer, who coached
at Montreal and
managed the San Diego
Padres foi nearly two
years before coming to
Boston where he was a
coach for the Red Sox
for two years and then
managed them for four
years.
Howser, meanwhile,
has said he wishes to
continue managing the
Yankees but he hasn't
said he would not agree
to manage the Rangers
in the event Steinbren-
ner and Robinson work
out such an arrange-
ment between them.
Originally, the two
chiel candidates for the
Rangers' managership
were Zimmer and Bob
Lemon, but if Stein-
brenner feels he'd like-
to bring in Michael
from the front office to
manane the Yankees,
then Robinson would
go for Howser as his
manager and Zimmer
would wind up coach-
ing third base for the
Yankees.
Michael isn't so-
meone Steinbrenner
I bought about 10
minutes ago in terms of
managing the Yankees.
The Yankee owner had
him in mind for the job
as far back as four
years ago and that was
one of the reasons he
arranged for him to
manage the Yankees1
Triple A club at Col-
umbus in 1979.
And what happens it
Michael gets the
Yankees' managership
and then doesn't work
out Never fear. George
Steinbrenner always
plain ahead and makes
sure he has a good
backup man. He has
ore now. too, behind
Michael in former
Giants1 manager Joe
Altobelh, who did an
outstanding job in
leading Columbus to
the American Associa-
tion championship this
past season.
PERSONAL
CUSTOM CRAFTING and repair
of gold and silver Buyinq and
sellinq ol qold and silver by Les
Jewelers 120 E 5th St 758 2127
SUNSHINE STUDIOS ottennq
classes in Ballet, JaJ Yoqa and
Exercise Special student rates
Within walkinq distance ot cam
pu 756 7235
PERFECT CHRISTMAS GIFTS
Hiqh quality low cost portraits
caricatures T shuts people, pets,
you name it John Weylii
752 5775
ANYTHING YOU CAN WRITE
We can write better Typing, pro
ofreadinq. editmq Write Riqht
756 9946
HELP WANTED RN s and
LPN s Punqo District Hospital
needs you Openmq on all three
shifts with shift differential for
3 00 11 00 and 11 00 7 00 Contact
Director of Nurses Punqo Disti ict
Hospital, 943 2111
To Mis Clark and Debbie the
I � Carolinian thank
FAST, EFFECTIVE
INEXPENSIVE
CLASSIFIEDS
So Specially
Hers!
Initial 'Heart
'Petldant
.&�
30-day accounts
extended terms
major credit cards
iiustration enlarged
You'll Win
Her Heart With
This Highly
Personal Gift
Idea
MILL OUTLET open
CLOTHING MON SAT 930 6
W. Greenville Blvd. PRICE
LADIES WESTERN SHIRTS �J4.98
SOLI DS,PLADS,CHECKS,SIZES 30-40
LADSIES FANCY JEANS 19 98
BY WRANGLER SIZES8-20
MEN'S WESTERN SHIRTS 12.98 14.98
SIZES-SMALL, MEDIUM, LARGE, EXTRA LARGE
MEN'S WRANGLER JEANS14 98
STRAIGHT LEGS& BOOT FLAIR
LAYAWAY PLAN AVAILIABLE
WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF WRANGLER APPARAL
FOR SALE
FOR SALE PEARL Snare drum
6') 14 in S235 new Best Offer
Call 758 3076
FOR SALE Technics SA 500 60
watts SL 230 fully automatic
turntable with Emp.re 7000 E III
Phase Linear speakers
Aluminum antennae Paid SU00
best offer Call 752 8860 ask for
Gr aham
FOR SALE New Electric Ranqe
and 14 cu It Refnqerator at fan
tastic price Call Mike Turner at
7S8 7332
FOR SALE Fuubuster II multi
band Best offer 752 8860 ask for
Kevin
FOR SALE 1972 Fridqidaire
Washer Dryer Stack Unit.
2�2 ;�5 ft 5 lb loads uses 220
volts Good condition JtOO leave
name and number at 756 5323
FOR SALE Dual 1214 Automatic
Turntable Excellent Condition
$50 Call 75? 8125
FOR SALE 1972 CB 100 Honda
Many in parts .� i , good shape
85 MPG 4300 Firm Call 758 8124
FOR RENT
APARTMENT FOR RENT K '
chin bath bedroom den Prat-
parkinq Call 752 3070 after 6 00
p m
MALE ROOMMATE S
WANTED To share two bedroom
apartment at Cypress Garcl.
One mile from campus SJ'f
split evenly utility bin ranges
from S3S i50 Call Don at 75.
or from 10 00 p m to I 00 a m at
753 4123
ROOMMATE To share two
bedroom house one block from
campus J78 p'us oni thud
utilities 758 0275
FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE
CLASSIFIED ADS CAN BE PUR
CHASED AT THREE LOCA
TIONS
Student Suppi Store Lobb. VWF
10 00 11 00. TTH 11 00 12 00
East Carolinian Of
4 00 5 00 WF 2 00 3.00
5 t u d i � n � O'qanwation Booth
Memtentiall �" F
TTH il 00 12 00
$4.81
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I Classified Ad l-orm
I
PRICE SI 00 tor IS words 05 for
each additionas word
I Make checks payable to The East
Carolinian
� Abbreviations count as one word
as do phone numbers and,
� hyphenat on�
I MAIL TO
ITh. Easl rar,)lin.�n
Ciassifiid Ads
IG'd Sou'h Buildniq
GrenHi N C 27834
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IS
36 EXPOSURE
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AND EKTACHROMF
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LOW, LOW PRICES ON
Movie
PROCESSING
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AND EKTACHROME
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SUPER 8 AND STANUaAQ VOVlES
LIMITED OFFER
ts$$$ss$
Dew it with
Mountain Dew
Mountain Dew from Pepsi-Cola, the totally
different soft drink with the lemony-fresh flavor
that's like nothing else you ever tasted.
"i
Ki
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j
s

M
'
Bottled by PEPSI COL A R V ' ' G (
Greenville Inc 1809 Dickeson Ave
under oppt from PEPSICO INC
xi'cHose New York
.
Greenv'He NC
f
1
ft
I





I Ml EAS1 CAROl INIAN
SOU MM K4, ts�S�)
Textbooks,photo finishing,and selected cameras are not on sale, but
Everything else in our store is
20 off
Wednesday, Nov. 5 through Friday, Nov. 7
PAINTING SUPPLIES
Brushes,oil
paints,acrylic
paints,tempora, magic
torch mediums,
canvases.
Vtt
LETRASET
Dry transfers,letrafilm
zippatone,markers, pan-
tone papers,letra line
tape.


DRAWING
PAPERS& BOARDS
Mat board,printing
papers,backing
boards,charcoal &
drawing supplies,
watercolor paper,
drafting papers.
i "
�4
PHOTO SUPPLIES
Film,photopaper,enl-
argers,chemicals.
KODAK
CAMERAS&
PROJECTORS
Movie cameras,movie
projectors,slide pro-
jectors.
FRAMES &
FRAMING SUPPLIES
Matte boards,matte
knifes& blades,
masking tape,acetate.
SELECTED 35mm
CAMERAS &
LENSES
Nikon,Canon,Fujica,
Olympus.
i
-�e
ALL SALES FINAL
CASH ONLY
NO CHARGES OR
CHARGE CARDS
and
mcra Sh
Ap
II y
SPORTSWEAR
All sportswear,
T-shirts,hooded pull-
overs, sweatshirts,
jackets,raincoats, hats,
sportshirts,infant &
childrens wear,tennis
shorts,gym shorts.
STUDY AIDS
Cliff Notes,Monarch
Notes,Schaum's
Outline
Series,Arco,etc.
TEACHING AIDS
Construction
paper,crepe
paper,Hayes
b o o k s , K i d
Stuff, cut-outs, plan
books,E-Z rule,etc.
SCHOOL SUPPLIES
Note books,
composition books,
pencils,pens, typing
paper,filler paper,
index cards,etc.
U.B.E
528 S. COTANCHE
GREENVILLE, N.C.






Title
The East Carolinian, November 4, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 04, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.90
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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