The East Carolinian, October 28, 1980






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Officials Disclaim Responsibility For Center
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Bookstu
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Dormitory
Wcekcnd
Candidates Explain
Positions On Issues
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1 HI I M - KOI IM-N ��. loHl R 28, I4SD
Announcements
COMMITTEES
T ho Ott ' of the
Chancellor fw Stut I I ��
. � � '�" ftl
- �
� � � Plea
r oom 204 A' ' �
JOB SKILLS
WORKSHOP
A I
N.C.S.L.
! ii, North Crirulna SI
i egislati i � ' ' i
NigW at ' 00 m
� � �
All n � ���i'
.�� � � . � HO A,
PRC SOCIETY
ROSSE
first ini'i t,ng Of ROSSE
� . �. � students will be
� , i Wednesday October � W80
� � �� �� Room 3?8 wendenhall
. . . , � � � as
' . ' � '� � '
, . , . �,t tor tin'
I,rct time or ' fool
SYMPOSIUM
. . , n ; iw in � ' ' Med A Grow
hi Up of Wonii'i
lertaking I the ECU Com
ti, , an tl � ' �' ' �'� men
VACCINE
MOVIES

HILLEL FESTIVAL
EXCEPTIONAL
CHILDREN
'� �
lent


. '
g .
. ' ,r �
��. "i
� � . � irea � � �

� � '
. i, at � ��� and
it
. II
I thi speak
HANDBALL
Thosi- wishing to compete in
team handball this semester are
i, rwj, d �� � � ,i, adline tor
.�innng your team is Oct 28 The
�� im's captains meeting will be
held Oct 30 at 7 pm in room
B 10: Brevwtei Bldg R ik s are
available in the tW OM I
Memorial Gym or call 757 6387
PROCESSORS
RACE
Professors' The time to or ��
your worth hn conx Entet the
Lite Great St.it, Proti-ssor Race
It NCSI n Nov. 9 NCSU has
cfial � ,� � ind Du � '
benefit united
il Palsy thep�oi ess For
lormat all Ann T
n
. j
ACCOUNTING TUTORS
� . . � ety will pro
. .�. � � � ; services every
.� � iftei � from 4 to 5
n Ravi ' Acct 2401 and
25J1 s1 lent
cso
Oppor
CAREER SERVICES
i ��
the pul � ' � � �
, � . � � r here w i 11
lord " � peakei
� i � call
� . . �
' 6061
SOCIOLOGY ANTHRO
POLOGY
tot juai t e I tun � ��.�
in mattl : ' � ' chemistry
You must have an academic
record ot high performance in the
subject arti Wage based on
. . . � at on e u
� � iti i i luate Contact
i j r vvi hard Anne
� ' 17 OI 6075 tor an ,nter
v i-A
SCHOLARSHIP
D tur
future
PROUD
Kappa Delta Sorority ,s prouo to
have Teri Bonhoff Kim Casey,
Lucy Charles, Robin Craig, Jarma
Dove. Lynn Grasberger Kathy
Harper Lesh Jordan Anne
Ledbetter Adeii Summers, and
K.m Wilhs as 1980 fall pledges
DC WINTERIN
For the fifth consecutive year.
the Washington Center tor Learn
�g Alternatives will sponsor its
Washington Winterim program
The highlight ot this year's fhret
week symposium uan 1 7i) will
be the nrtuqurat.on of a President
and thi swearing m ot the 9 "
Congress Winterin . II provide
200 students w,th an opportunity to
analyze and disi uss the inaugural
ess as ' relates to larger na
tional pel . � erns
wc i a re c "i mends that
students submit applications as
. as possible so that special in
augural ,irr angm(-nts can
made Students are encourages to
apply by October 15th Apphra
tions will be accepted until
November 17th 1980
For further information a- Il
Director WASHINGTON
WINTERIM 81 1705 DeS.i � S
Stret " N � � � (ton D C
20036 ,T pi inc 102 � 659 8510
GEOLOGICAL
SURVEY
The Geological Survey is now
recruiting students who wish to
become involved in the �'� I �
fields of Geology Geophysics
Hydrology. Chemistry and Car
tography Qualifications inlorma
tion sheets and applications an
available n the Career Plann.ng
and Placemen' � ited m
thi- Bloxton Ho.
iiCP has annour
Cl �

SUMMER CAMP
ket, plea

' for the 1961 82
. . . � The
on s S' Ot
on piu- � � ition e
. ($5,ooo
SPECIAL LIBRARY
COLLECTIONS
SYMPOSIUM
ON HISTORY
ii
EPISCOPAL WORSHIP
� �� .

the computer
base tl � -
study
a ragt
Rev B
AID INTERNSHIPS
h Nan Ma
� � � . �.�.�� ����
- ��. . � .
WSI
, itet Itety Instructo-
� . . � �� Health Physical
i � �, on ana Sa
Department Wage start at
. n� � rai and h.qher Ap
ply this week I Ray S hart, Drec
lAquatici '�' nges Aquai
�i" 6490
SGA
�, rgai iat i ns �"� i ested in
I ring I n IS from the Student
I As! �' are asK
� � � ��. � budgets by
N .�"��� � W80
S.U. ARTIST
. . 111 oi � � � ���
taken for I nion
-����'�
: �' �

; : �������� � � � � �� � � i nti �
N . -14 1980
ROAD RACE� �� ire F
� � . .�. ii i Track
P,tl � �����. s nss ad
Assoc ol G � �1 tl , Depai tment otm � at -i ounting rural
so' no ,i I Mil- Bortil Race and aH'Slo . . - � . n
. v � - - ' be held27834
N
' � 'UNIVERSITY
'�COMMITTEES
SIGMA THETA TAU
READ CRISIS'�,� � f Nu1
� .
�. to 8 � ���� Opn n the I
I s
r
RURAL HEALTH
CARE

- 'iop spens red
�� �
� '
' �
Pu'l � � " � �'�
� '
r heaM
LIBRARY
SNOWSKI
A ' . ' I ' �
tor Ph,c 1105 oi . ncredit 1
� . .�. . � in 4
all pa . ' I pay ttn
room deposit of S10 00 on Oc tobi
. � -
lym room JO!
before Ocl '� :
REBEL
Vandoren Reeds by the box on
sale while supply last.
Bd Clarinet $6.50
Eb Soprano Clarinet $6.50
Bass Clarinet $8.50
Contra Bass Clarinet $16.00
Alto Sax $7.25
Tenor Sax $8.75
Bari Sax $14.50
Bd Soprano Sax $7.25
Prices include sales tax and shipping.
Send us your check or money order to
BOB KALET MUSIC, PO BOX 7223,
Jacksonville, NC 28540 PHONE 919
455-9800
AT BARRE
MONSTER MASKS
�HI
GAY COMMUNITY
� � . - '
� �. f �, meet t
ECU SURF CLUB
A meeting .��
���
. � �
Ii! . � a be tl � i.
��� i . � � � n
�'��'
tend
KAPPA DELTA PI
I la Chi Chaptei f Kappa
Delta Pi will hold it!
meeting on Thursda. . nber6
at 6 30 p m "i " � a. fen
Steak Res' i � ll '
Ou speaker be I
Kale Iron
Educaifon Her top a
Equ'i Everyone's Response:
t
For more information
call 757 6830 or stop by Speight ; M
Kadephians should send in " �
reservaitons by No.
SOULS.
There Will be a SOULS
meeting in Mendenhall room 221
at 6 p m ton.ght Please oe pro
REBEL WORK
REBf . �
iture must I ' � �
bie space �'� "
� and phone number musl
-��� nay bf
t the B
mailed I iHI REBEL
� . � �
RAFFLE
A -i S500 00 in records tapes of
your ' � " the Rl ' Bar
in Easter Seals Hoi.day ISX
Recoi - rickets eacl
$1 00 YOUl �' buy and or
� . rS sales pr ie S150 00 m
� � , let by mad to
da, Cal Eastei � � It E
��� ' 'it 3230
5
SCRUM
What s a SCRUM Part of a
rugby oh- I ' gan ling a
women's team No e�perience
necessary only enthusiam! Come
to Vemonal Gym Room 104
(basement! on October 30 Thurs
day. at 5 00 pm For more intor
maf'cn call 757 619.1 (day) Susan
HOf � it 1140 after 4 00 pm
Nan. n
� ' � �
� Oc
� � � �
gran
� 1 ���
Deai I thi Lei
Learning
. lei � Ii! uss
. . . � � '
rarii ��� : �
b D rector
Diversity's
Library Ws
Pelletn brarian of
. . ivaila
edi 1 n '� dit for
bie teachei
f thi s pro
. � , � A $5 00 tei
hargi lot ,r se persons
I redit 1 he Oi 'ober
��a be thi ast opporti .
, , fer for CEU redil
ntormation on "
� .� , � Lecture Series
ilhng the
tment I Library
CHESSBACKGAMMON
Whftht-r your garni ' �
�� � place to be for
som. friendl) ompetition s
. � . ludenl Center each
� .no at 7 00 p m I I �
� . Backg immon Club m � '
n the Coffeehouse Room
15 on the ground floo' '
II .
TABLE TENNISCLUB
Every Tuesday evening at 7 00
p m table ternns players who are
students faculty and staff get
toge � ' ' '�'� ' "hall for some
friendly competition Rates are
redui ed tor the club and all levels
of ability are represented So. if
you enioy play-no table tennis and
meeting new people fun
OP " �
AND
HALLOWEEN MAKE-UP
AND ACCESSORIES
422 ARLINGTON
BLVD.
756-6670
l
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
E.ch of rtt�. .���) Items �. rsqulr to b. r-dHy�H-b,�Joe ssl-t or
bskw ths sdvsrttesd pries In ssch A4P Stors, sicspt ss spscMlcslly noteo
In this ad
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU Nov AT A4P IN GREEN VILLE 0LESALERS
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OH v
(ANN PAGE
AA1LK
Staff Writers Wanted
757-6366
for news and features
CLIFFS
SPECIALS
E. 10th St. Extension
752-3172
MONDAY-THURSDAY
Oyster Plate3.95
Shrimp Plate3.95
Seafood Plate3.95
Ocean Perch2.50
Blue Fish2.50
Crab Cakes1.85
THURSDAY
Popcorn Shrimp2.95
i
LOW FAT
GALLON JUG
iODONLY IN GRI i NV
Beautiful, Fine Porcelain
THIS WEEKS
FEATURE ITEM
BREAD &
BUTTER
EACH
ONLY
WITH EACH
$5 PURCHASE
r
- - - � ��- �
� �
�A
SAVE 50c WHEN YOU PURCHASE
i
(
11! U i
Kllk
SUGAR BOWL WITH COVER
GOOD THRU SAT NOV I, AT ALL AAP S IN N CAR AND
S C EXCEPT AIKEN AND BEAUFORT SC 615
I
c
( wnriooo SsrAimr
$1 000 00 WINNER
$210,139
IN CASH PRIZES
103,437
CASH WINNERS
$100 00 WINNER
$100 00 WINNER
MARY B DICKENS
SCOTLAND NECK NC
FRANCIS SttlNTON
GEORGETOWN S C
BARBARA B WALL
SNOW CAMP N C
$100 00 WINNER
o
CA-
- . SBOROUGh N
Its easy to play
Pick up FREE Old Fsshlon�d Bingo concealed
ticket on svsry visit to A&P
Mstch straight row of 5 numbers vertically.
horizontally or diagonally on any one of the 4
games on master card.
No purchase necessary to participate
See game card for complete rules.
48 WAYS TO WIN!
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
WHOLE BONELESS
SHOULDER
ROAST
CUT FREE INTO
SHOULDER ROAST
SHOULDER STEAKS
STEW & GR BEEE
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A4P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
CHUCK STEAK
LB.
$58
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED FRESH V
FRESH FRYERS
BOX O-CHICKEN
LB.
�oc.
CAMPBELLS
TOMATO SOUP
5
10V4-OZ.
CANS
LX9 QU�uT1
L&
e��tf lb
"N
X-
ANN PAGE
POTATO CHIPS
REGULAR
8-OZ.
PKG.
69�
A&P COUPON
AP
PURE VEGETABLE SHORTENING
CRISCO 3
LIMIT ONE WITH THIS COUPON � . c -
GOOD THRU SAT. NOV 1 AT A&P IN GREENVILLE.N C
LB.
CAN
$169
612
46' COUPON
ANN PAGE
KMMWM
AP
SALAD DRESSING �"ART
JAR
LIMIT ONE WITH THIS COUPON
GOOD THRU SAT NOV 1 AT A4P IN GREENVILLE,NC
I
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FP 613
40c COUPON
AV
CONTAINS RICH BRAZILIAN COFFEES
EIGHT O'CLOCK 10 02
INSTANT COFFEE "
LIMIT ONE WITH THIS COUPON �necuvn i t
GOOD THRU SAT. NOV VAT A4P IN GREENVILLE.N C
lP .614
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CALIFORNIA
CRISP ICEBERG
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fOK f��SHNf SS �NO SAVINGS
EASTERN GROWN
ALL PURPOSE
LETTUCE
44
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HEAD
ROME APPLES
4
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� �
f
I





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Complaints Of Noise Resound Around Center
l �fl�llllH'

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ICW I' 'i, vl L'
p a i K
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Radio Contract Cancelled
untinucd Irom page 1

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Mem tor 11 i
, : II
�Id, iculK il : I

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1
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I
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Fosdicks
INCREDIBLE
$1.99 LUNCH!

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Wednesday:
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Frida
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AH Mothers EAT FREF
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boilt I he Issues Beaux Arts Belli
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Radio hack
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QUie iEaat (Earoltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
RK HXKDGRI 1 N
rERR Hi RNDON, . , i ,
Chris I i hok, � . - w.
Gl ORG1 Hi I I K H w
AM 1 N sil K. :�� i
1 ISA OKI VV.
liki Not w v
CH K1 ES CH Win I K, s
DAV 10 NoKRlV , ,
Octobei 28, is�M
Opinion
Page 4
Homecoming
Election Won Fair A nd Square
In last Thursday's edition of this
newspaper a letter to the editor was
printed from an anonymous student
accusing the Kappa Sigma fraternity
of rigging the election of this year's
homecoming queen, among other
thingv The letter made some strong
allegations and innuendos against
the Greek population and specifical-
ly the Kappa Sigma fraternity.
The East Carolinian investigated
those allegations and nc have found
them to be far from the truth and
without substance.
The Kappa Sigma fraternity was
not in charge of counting the votes
to determine the homecoming
queen. The votes were counted by
Dean Mallory's secretary, a
representative of the SGA, a black
work-study student, and a represen-
tative of SOULS, also black. The
votes were counted three different
times, on three separate days by the
same crew. There was no hanky-
panky at the ballot box as the
anonymous author stated.
The letter stated that "a block
vote by the fraternities assured us
that ECU would have a white greek
queen for homecoming Fraternity
men are only three prcenl of the
13,000 students who were eligible to
vote in the homecoming queen elec-
tion. There are twice as many blacks
at ECU than there are white frater-
nity men and the population of
Ay cock dorm is also greater than
that of white male greeks. It is dif-
ficult to imagine how this small
group could "assure" ECU of
anything.
The fraternities at ECU did not
"get away with anything They did
what any student group has the
right to do, sponsor a girl for
homecoming queen.
This year's queen won fair and
square. All the other girls had the
same opportunity. In any election,
the winner is determined by the
number of votes they get.
Somebod has to win and
somebody has to lose.
We commend the students on the
selection of a fine homecoming
queen, and special thanks should
aUo go to those who assisted in the
administration of the election.
It should be noted that the
homecoming ballots are on file in
Dean Mallory's office and are open
for public inspection.
Don't Bet On This One
Some have likened it to the final
minutes of a tied football game, but
the stakes for the American people
are much higher than a won-loss
record. We're talking about
tonight's debate between President
Jimmy Carter and Republican
nominee Ronald Reagan.
After all the hoopla about who
challenged who and who refused to
debate who, the blasted thing will
finally take place tonight in prime
time. Carterites are doubtful that
the event can benefit their man, but
Reaganites couldn't be happier.
Carter's brief but biting round of
attacks on Reagan have hurt one of
the strongest points Carter had �
the "decent man" image. And Ron-
nie countered calmly each time that
he wished Jimmv would stick to the
issues. The Democrats are hoping
the same thing tonight.
There is little either candidate can
be say tonight that hasn't been said,
but Reagan will obviously have the
upper hand. In truly professional
Hollywood form, Reagan has ac-
tually rehearsed the debate with a
Carter stand-in. Jimmy has his
work cut out for him.
Reagan has the perfect chance to
put a dent in the Democrats' claim
that he is a radical and unstable
man. By dealing smoothly with
Carter, Reagan can at least
appear" rational and stable. Both
candidates are running side-by-side
in the opinion polls on "the issues
but "the man" has become a major
issue.
"Jimmy the Creek" never had a
closer one to call.
THE SUICIDE
Campus Forum
A Foundation, A Beginning'
In a recent editorial in 1 he t
Carolinian, Stan Ridglev addressed a
"reprimand" io t qua! Rights Amend-
ment supporters lor their "uncivil
behavior and self-righteous indigna-
tion Mr. Ridgley failed to include ex
amples ol his charges, oilier than to state
that when he opposed I RA in the
presence ol feminist supporters, he had
to "covei up and wail foi the storm It
is understandable thai he may have in-
curred some hostility his conversa
tional objections to I k are as p.
nalistic and inaccurate as those cxpi
ed m print. Oppressed groups have
traditionally found offensive a member
ol the majoi ity group's assumpi
he knows what is besl for them, "here is
a subtle undercurrent in Rid :le
reminiscent of the racist rationalization
that "darkies are like children and o
know what's good foi them
Mr. Ridgley subscribes to the
Republican Party Platform's position
on the 1 K V which rejects RA as a
tedeial issue, proposing instead tl
women's rights be swept undei the
carpel and foi totten gain, women can
learn from the lessons of racial
minorities. If blacks had waited for
slates io take action to enfranchise them
or io integrate the schools, mam blacks
would not be voting this November and
schools would have remained separate
and unequal. Federal legislation has
been the ONI V V M for blacks to in-
sure then rights.
Ridgley suggests thai women's rights
are already guaranteed in the 1 ourteenth
Amendment, a ridiculous assumption
since thai amendment was passed by
Congress during the nineteenth century
before women even had the right to
VOTI '
It Mr. Ridglev is going to sei himsell
up as informant for the "uninitiated"
who "have noi read the amendment
this student would appreaciate his
quoting the amendment CORRK I 1 v
In contrast to Ridgley's equal rights
amendment, which was italicized and
printed in quotes, the actual Equal
Rights Amendment leads. "Equality ol
rights under the law shall not be denied
Of abridged by the United Stales or by
any State on account ol sex I lunk ol
it: Women are asking foi a place in the
constitution, the 1 aw ol the 1 and. that
says m effect that we can no longer be
denied equal rights as Americans
because we happen to be female.
Feminists are understandably appalled
by opposition to such a basic.
democratic, Wll RK W proposition.
: comse the amendmeni won't solve a
ol Km problems. But it is a foundation,
a beginning. Without it, we ate building
our house upon the sand
i ,11 )'l l
Graduate Student, Psycholi
Queen Selection Valid
()nce again someone iken a
"(ireeks 1 was sitting on tl
wall, reading I he Easi Carolinian, ad
e the girls with add-a beads in pink
� � ei Sudd � ly someone oui
field i- bl i :very fraternity on sain
- because a Kappa si little sistei was
elet imecoming queen. My
we i.o this�
lo the upset author, resl assured
every Greek didn't participate in a bloc
ecoming queen. I he youi
lady wa attractive and rv
ing. but so is Gilda Radn i I
guy, independeni oi Greek, goes less
iban two � s about who's crowned
homecoming queen. Why make a Greek
-v independent issue, with rashly
abusive racial overtones, out of a simple
homecoming formality !
nd please, don'l generalize when
referring to the "Greeks The only
thing fraternities ai I � I have in com-
mon is IFC, intramural competition,
dn Greek letters. I be fraternities at
l asiarolina, like oui student body. ol
let a wide social mix. It you've been ai
1i foi tout years, surely you must
have noticed the variety. It you till
ow' catch my drift, come to rush.
You'll probably find that some fraterni-
ty men have relatives that know black
people. Ami some "Greeks" may even
know people thai have been stoned.
(Yes, I was shocked to learn this too.)
Seriously, the wide variety found in both
Greek and non-Greek systems are iheir
mam assets. Please don't condemn all
Greeks to the "Gatoi" and " I opsider"
stereotype. I his is a frustrating
misconception that 1 hope this letter will
dispel. It you must consider all Greeks
alike, then compare ours to those from
other large campuses in the state. You
will find my statements on diversity
vent ted. Such diversity makes a univer-
sity unique.
s for the possiblity ol a fraternity
rigging tho homecoming election, that's
news to me. Obviously it the allegations
are 'rue. the Kappa Sigs can't be trusted.
1 ey, who trusts the h
anv vvav.
RK K HORNL-R
I ' B . -
11 I
s a
pop .
I would
I
1-81 H I -
r he
v.
heai tening fact bad
FAC1 l i
�red by the Intel I
� � issure Iiei
. � ng pop
ample ol block votii
ml' on - ince I he b
m ;
tor the 11 I
he II late, bui
represet
yeai queen a as e ;
vote ot the MR(
112)1 his year's
Pa Sigma Sweethi
iced in nomination b �

as a I
I UlCVI 111 I I ' 1 I � 1 I I 4.4 l i � I ' I
Inter-Fraternity Council.
1 V 1 J) Kappa S
box, once again undei 'n �
example ol this. 1 or those ol ;���
read this, hope it will possibly clear up
some misconceptions you ive. 1
would like to congratulate
queen and wish hei the besl ol luck
the remaindei ol her reign.
I x, , v. i. W I V 1
IXSU MM
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing ail points oj view. Mail or
drop them by our of fur in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner I ibrary,
I etters must include the name, major
and classification, address, photic
number and signature oj the author(s),
1 etters should be limned to three
typewritten pages, double-spaced, or
neatly pruned. All fetters are subject to
editing for brevity, obscenity and libel.
I etters by the same author are limited to
one each 30 davs.
Ball
litical
u
V
J
(
8
To The Right
V
BV
John Anderson: Watching For The Gleam Of Hope
B STAN RIDGLEY
"Old man, exhausted by ordeal,
detached from human deeds, feeling
the approach of eternal cold, but
always watching m the shadows for
the gleam oj hope. "
�Charles de Gaulle
On this, the day of the long-
awaited debate between Ronald
Reagan and Jimmy Carter, one
needs to pay final tribute to the man
that made such a game effort in his
third-party candidacy�the man
who has faded from the national
scene as surely and steadily as he
became a household word.
One has to admire John Ander-
son for his tenacity and for having
the courage of his convic-
tions�even to the point of taking
his unpopular stands into the teeth
of the opposition. But that, friends,
is the extent to which one should ad-
mire Anderson's independent
presidential candidacy. Anderson,
like de Gaulle's "old man is now
"watching in the shadows for the
gleam of hope
But he won't find his hope. For a
very fundamental reason, it was
never there in the first place.
Perhaps a scenario will be enlighten-
ing:
I ast week. 1 met an Anderson
supporter�a supporter apparently
eager for confrontation as he
brought up the subject of what 1 had
written in a previous column. He
was piqued because I had con-
gratulated East Carolina University
for not exhibiting the "current
mindless chic" of voting for Ander-
son in a mock election as mam col-
lege campuses have done. In that ar-
ticle 1 claimed that Anderson's
"campaign of ideas" consisted ol
one original idea: a $.50 per gallon
tax on gasoline.
This Anderson supporter pretend-
ed to snicker at me for about 15
seconds. Then, 1 asked him what
other original ideas Anderson has in
his National Unity Platform. He-
answered feebly, something to the
effect of: 'Well what original ideas
do Carter and Reagan have?"
Aside from the fact that the
Republican Platform is chock full
of innovations�among them the
Kemp-Roth 30 percent income tax
cut and the creation of "free enter-
prise zones" to alleviate urban
blight�this scenario illustrates very
clearly that all Anderson otters
voters this election is an alternative
personality. His platform is a mish-
mosh of traditional Republican and
Democratic stands on various issues
that, quite tramVK. doesn't appeal
to the majority (or even a substan-
tial minority) o voters.
Anderson thought his debate with
Reagan would boost his stock with
the American public. It didn't, and
one doesn't have to look far for the
answer though Anderson's people-
would be loathe to admit it. Most
people just don't like what he has to
say, and. unfortunately foi Ander-
son, that's how elections in this
country are decided. Neithei his
message nor its strident delivery is
palatable to the American public.
Of course, Anderson has a pet lect
right to continue his candidacy
firs! gamed its legitimacy. But no
matter what he does, Anderson will
remain a pleasant memory to his
supporters and undoubtedly retain
his image as the darling ol the col-
lege crowd.
Liberal mavericks like Anderson
can always find SUCCOt on die col-
lege campus, it nowhere else. Un-
fortunately for Anderson�-and the
Eugene McCarthys before
him�college students do grow up
because there are people supporting
him, people who believe very
strongly in what be stands for. But
these persons have to lace reality
when they call for a place on the
debate stage with Reagan and
C arter.
Anderson maintains he should be
in tonight's debate. He shouldn't.
simply because he doesn't meet the
league oi Women Volets' criteria
lot participation. Would Anderson,
a man of great integrity, have the
league violate its integrity bv
changing the rules of participation
just for him. Of com e not.
Anderson should submit to reality
(but ot course he won't, since he has Stan Ridglev is a senioi Political
campaign debts to pay) and let his Science major with a degree in jour-
campaign fade back to the mttism from the University of North
Doonesbury comic strip where it Carolina at Chapel Hill.
P
AI
by
1UI
or
be.






4

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HI t sl i KOI IMAN
Features
ot mm k 28 is�ho
Page 5
Halloween
Ancient Customs Live On
Camera Costume Wins Prize
Pho?o by GARY PATTERSON
I his costume, worn b Peter and Karen Podezwa,
won the (.rand Prize for costumes at the Beaux Arts
Ball last Friday night. I he prize was a S50 gift cer-
tificate from the I HI and a drawing b Kl School
of Art faculty member Bets Ross. I he ball, held at
the Willis Building, was attended b main Kl
students and faculty arrayed in almost every con-
ceivable type of costume.
Halloween, today one of the great
party times of the year, is one of the
oldest holidays that we celebrate.
However, it has undergone many
changes during the main centuries
that this holiday has been around.
In fact, it's really only in the last
century or so that Halloween started
to become that spooky night of fun
and parties that we are all familiar
with. And, it took some American
ideas on top of the ancient Celtic
Halloween rituals to give that holi-
day its final form.
Halloween was originally a Celtic
festival called Samhain. Because it
ushered in the darkest, coldest time
of year, it had evil influences
associated with it�things like
ghosts and witches thing around.
Various rituals arose, like tire
ceremonies and sacrifices, in order
to protect crops and herds trom evil.
In those times, the Celtic year
began on Nov. 1. making Hallo-
ween their New Year's Eve. 1 aws
and contracts were drawn up or
renewed then. 1 he Freig�the an-
cient Irish parliament �met once
every three sears at that time of
vear.
In Christian times. Nov. 1 became
All Saint's Da, or AH Hallow
Main ot the pagan customs ol the
Samhain festival continued on into
the Middle Ages and modern times.
Medieval people believed that elves,
witches (often in the form ol black
cats) and fairies flew around on All
Hallow's Eve and they would light
bonfires to ward them off.
All Hallow's Eve was also a time
for making predictions about the
coming year. One old cusl mi in-
volved putting apple- and a sixpence
in a tub of water. It someone could
pull out either an apple or the com,
with their teeth, they were supposed
to have a lucky year. Bobbing tor
apples is still known today,
although the original superstition
has been pretty much forgotten.
Immigrants from Ireland and
Scotland brought Halloween
customs with them to the United
States. The customs were somewhat
altered when thev reached America;
tor example, the Scots carved their
jack-olanterns out ol turnips, but
switched to the more suitable pum-
pkin when thev got to America.
The Irish believed that on Hallo-
ween, the "little people" dairies)
played pranks on humans. This
belief led children and young men to
also play prank- on people.
In America, pranks such as turn-
ing over outhouses became prettv
common; other, more serious
prank- resulting sometimes in great
damage also were done. luckily, the
custom of this rather dangerous
"mischief night" evolved into the
less harmful "tnck-or-treat" of our
own time.
Ol course, there are those who
like to stick to the old traditions, ig-
noring the harmless "trick-or-treat"
customs and going back to the more
serious and dangerous pranks.
These old Celtic custom- die hard.
Advice Aids Apartment Hunters

as .
� i first in a series oj articles
� . housing I
ECl students bv the SGA cabinet
is provided
K
w
foi can certainly be a Irustrating
. nembei thai the same hassles
encountered and conquered bv thousands
. vr � ?ep k kit , and eventual-
.��. . king foi. Housing
� . point of y our life in this area.
�me, othei aspectsol youi life,
id . can be difficult to cope with,
re en those classifieds or look on any
bulletin board oi ask people il the know oi any apart-
ments, you -hould ask yourself, "What do I want?"
You iiave to know (sort of) what you're looking for. It
you plan to live with others, all should more or less
agree on the sie ol and the amount o money to be
-pen; on your future home. Does everyone want her
own room? Do you prefer living in a house ot an apart-
ment? Doe- anyone have pet- (or weird habits)? Would
vou prefei living in a rooming house or in a private
home ?
y ou should try to assess vour need- and desires as ac-
:uratei
ossible be!ore vou start lookinj
Tin
number oi people in vour
can also al feet w h
household who will have cats
u hoe. Will vou be close enough
to a major supern � . or some bus line? Remember,
lout a car. one can get stranded in some area
e found a prospective apartment, the next
thing to do i- call the landlord (or agent) and try to set
up a suitable time to check out the premises. Any re-
quests tor more information should be now, in order
run to waste vour time seeing a place vou could have re-
jected outright. When vou go to see a prospective
landlord, remember that vou are dealing with a
businessman. Obviously, vou can't expect a landlord to
rent an apartment to someone whom he or she thinks
won't be able to pay rent on time oi may damage the
property.
When looking for an apartment, it is advisable to
have a checklist with vou. Often, in the haste to locate
housing, the prospective tenant forgets to check for
something or overlook- what he or she considers to be a
minor disadvantage ol the dwelling; such minor disad-
vantages may later become majoi annoyances.
Below is a list o things to notice, inquire about, and
o when being shown an apartment:
After finding out how much the rent is, .i-k whether
the amount quoted includes all utilities, heat and hot
water, and whether a security deposit will be requited
It may be helpful to use a checklist to assess the condi-
tion o vour dwelling before paying your security
deposit. Make sure the landlord and all tenants sign it.
date it. and have it notarized. 1 his is important when it
comes to moving out and having your deposit refunded.
It's a good idea to take pictures ot the premises oi
have a friend inspect them with vou to document its
condition before tenancy begins.
Ascertain as best you can whether there are plan- to
sell, renovate or rae the building. It so. be sure vour
lease contains a provision protecting vour tenancy.
It someone other than the owner shows you an apart-
ment, find out who the owner is. I alk to the owner to be
sure the apartment is really for rent and will be vacated
bv the time your term oi occupancy begins.
Speak with the present tenants, it possible, to get their
views o( the owner and or the agent, the rent they are
paying, the condition of the building, and estimates ol
utilities and other costs.
-k about the landlord's policy regarding picture-
hanging. Some will allow only stick-on type hangers;
others prefer small nails. It vou plan to paint or
wallpaper, get the landlord's permission in writing.
No matter what, get it in writing! This includes
changes in the lease, special permissionanything.
Check the location of the apartment with
neighborhood conveniences (e.g. stores, laundrymats,
bus lines, etc.)
I md out it pets are allowed.
It vou have a car, find out about parking ai
rangements.
If you will be paying your own heating bill, find out
trom the supplier and the last tenants the actual mon-
thly heating and utility bills. Oil or gas heat tend to be
the cheapest types o heating.
If the apartment is heated by radiators, check the
fit r around them; if it is discolored or warped, the
radiator leaks. Also, check for a functioning pressure
release valve, usually on the side o the radiator.
It you will be paying vour own heating bill, are there
storm windows and doors, insulation, etc.? Note: Find
out who controls the thermostat for vour apartment.
especially if the landlord pays the heating bill.
Cracks in walls or ceiling or warped floor- may in-
dicate leaky roof or plumbing in the adjoining apart-
ment.
Pull shades or Venetian blinds open and closed to
check tor rips and broken or missing blade
Window screens should not be bellowed or ripped.
I hev are a must for warm weather. Can vou install an
air conditioner
It there i- a fireplace, inquire it it is used as well as
whethei it can be used. Check the flue tor smooth
operation.
C heck tor closet space, noting height and depth ol
storage areas
C heck the kitchen cupboards and drawer- for easy
opening.
Check each room tor sufficient electrical outlets and
be sure they work. If vou plan on using any major ap-
pliances (air conditioners, etc.) inquire about special
permission and adequate wiring. It il is a furnished
apartment, determine if sufficient lighting fixtures and
bulb- are furnished.
( heck the range burners and oven to be sure they are
clean and working. Check the refrigerator tor operation
and size large enough for vour needs. Also, check the
rubber gasket lining around the refrigerator door for
cracks or tears. It is usually difficult to determine how
well appliances work until after vou have moved in,
unless vou are able to talk to the present tenant- in the
landlord's absence.
Check for vermin or signs o them (evidence ol gnaw-
ing, holes in woodwork or baseboard, unsanitary condi-
tions, grease and food -craps that have not been proper-
ly removed) bv looking inside cupboards, behind stoves
and refrigerators, in all corners, under the sink, and in
any other likely place. Open cupboard doors quickly
and quietly to catch insects before thev crawl back into
the woodwork.
Sext week: Leases and how to deal with them.
John Wayne And
Gary Cooper Films
Show At Hendrix
Pottticai
our-
� orth
"High Noon" is the landmark
western o the sheriff in a small
town who, on the dav of his mar-
riage and scheduled retirement,
learns that a criminal he convicted
will be returning to town for revenge
on the noon train. The film won
New York Film Critics Awards as
Be Picture and for Best Directing
(Fred Zinnemann). Garj Cooper
and Dmitri Iiomkm Classic score
won Oscar- in 1952.
Poetry Contest
Announced
I he College Poetry Review, spon-
sored bv the National Poetry Press,
is now accepting entree- submitted
bv any student attending either a
junior or senior college.
There is no limitation as to form
or theme; however, shorter works
are preferred bv the board o judges
because ol space limitations.
Each poem must be typed oi
printed on a separate sheet and must
bear the name, home address and
college address of the author. En-
trants should also submit the name
o one o their English instructors.
Manuscripts should be sent to the-
Office ol the Press, National Poetry
Press, Box 218, Agoura, CA 91301.
"High Noon" is just one of two
classic American westerns that will
be featured this Wednesday night,
October 29. in Mendenhall Student
Center's Hendrix Theatre. "High
Noon" begins at 7 p.m. and John
lord superb saga "She Wore a
Nellow Ribbon" begins at 9 p.m.
The double feature is sponsored by
the Student Union Films Commit-
I ee.
Preceding the double feature at
6:15 p.m there will be a short
discussion o the films and of the
genre of American Western in room
221 ol the student center. Dr.
William Bloodworth and Dr.
McKay Sundwall oi the Fnglish
Department will be present to make
remarks and answer questions. This
informal gathering is open to all
students, faculty and staff interested
in learning more about the films �
coffee and doughnuts will be served.
Discussion groups are sponsored by
the Films Committee and the ECU
Honors Program.
"High Noon" is one of those rare
achievements o talent and taste,
with a full appreciation of legend
and a strong trace of poetry in its
soul. It scoops up a handful of
cliches from the vast lore of Western
films and turns them into a thrilling
and inspiring work of art in this
genre.
The producers of the film have Crowds of students line up for more beer at a pre-game pep rally held last
turned out a Western drama that is Thursday at the Phi Kappa Tau fraternity house. The rally lasted from 4
See WAYNE, page 6, col. 3
Photo by GARY PATTERSON
Pep Rally Held Thursday
p.m. until about 8 p.m. At the rally were Ed Emory, the ECU
cheerleaders, the ECl Pep Band and another band. Talk of the Town.
�!�? �-
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Stock Dealings
Enrich Student
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ATTIC ATTIC
SOUTHS NO. 6
H(K
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ATTIC 9th ANN. PAR
TY with SKIP CASTRO
tanMi
Wayne, Cooper Films At Hendrix
( onlinued From page I bon' is a big
technicolored W estei n
' 1I IK klllil. u h i h
ai, Inn tai liom
vupci my
achieves .t
.1 aikl
inal, in ihe composite illustration
- s,or and ol all the legends ol the
ked b a jrontiei cavalryman.
' He has the bold and
'� Iius dashing courage, the
a brae and shMI, masculine senti-
sheritl in a ,1K,nl tne grandeui ol
full ol do
�, J cow atds
he bat rack-i oom
brawl
�ik best ol all, he
�v a has (he brilliant color
and vivid detail of
i eai guard heioism and
"ie biasli bravado of
we
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BOOKINGS
Hgft
ROCK & ROLL
8 H z
90 � s
3 S� VI H
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iclarv troops
iged through
( "Indian C�ao Cooper stars as Marshal Nil Kane in the classic western adventure
across Hiuh Noon. Cooper won his second Oscar as Best Vclor lor his perfor-
RESEARCH
PAPERS
10.278 on file � all subje
�llK! the magnificen
estei n plain
ol
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datnen-
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I i rd ha � emplov ed
his cast to what is
. i lei med the best
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and elect! ic. M -
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beaut it ul. No one could
ike a
mance in this 1 �52 film. High Noon and John U av ne's She ore N ellow
Kibhon are showing tomorrow nigh! at Mendenhall's Hendrix Iheatre in a
Western Double feature beginning at 7 p.m.

, I he Wesiem plains look
in ore excit i ng and
than this
;tot does. No
one could get more
i li u nder i n y cav;
oi a
I d i e r s
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Bulw arked
ihe sheril'l knows ihal and spirited music and
. ' t colors o1
She V.
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'She dillv ol u - alr p
SANTA'S HELPER

(V
McDonalds
I
W hat to earn Lxtra Money
Avaible between Thanksgiving and Xmas
McDonalds is looking for friendly, out going
person who likes children.
Santa needs an Elf.
C all Now for an interview.
756-81 1 1. 9am-5pm
AiOHTIONl 'r TO
irth wiik of
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ntorm�tion C�U tiJ Oils
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Mt�UH Or9�mi't�r
Pizza ixm
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Sports
(, loBI K 28 1980
Heels 'Defend' Ranking, Win 31-3
Bj CHR1 1 S( HM)1 IK
Sll. I (IIII
CHAPE1 Hill North
olina's seventh-ranked lat
Heels lolled to (heii seventh straight
win Saturday, dominating East
a ; i to set up a hie mat-
i weekend with Oklahoma.
e Heels controlled every facet
iv contest aftei overcoming
. early mistakes in downing the
. I v defense, which ranked
. in scoring defense
nth in total defense, not only
the Pirate wishbone attack to
ouchdowns but limited the club
64 ai ds ! ushing.
'That's the best defensive team
I've evet seen a North Carolina
ive sa 1I head coach
Id In illowing the contest,
and quick. I hey
letic ability
i I � i I eel ol tense was not that
� th tailbacks going
K) .� Senioi 1I-America
1 awrence iambled
while sophomore
a'K added 107.
: their si rent h
ball and marching
in ten plays foi a
first possession
d eight times foi
tl drive alone
in by the Norfolk, Va.
his dive from one-yard
i in
H.i kuk
I 1
4i. 1.441
IT.5-UH l
1 1 41 4� . �
II II I
i �:S 4'
1 zK.4
V IHI VI II (HI K
�tasking til I U�llB 14 t Mill �( JJ Hmici l-l�
I N( ivrn . � ui r in" lihnnn " 4X
I i , . - - II 1,1 I M
.
l .ilk. I 14 l�M
I st Ki.tufil-
out that, coupled Jeff Hayes con-
version, put UNC up 7-0 with less
than five minutes gone.
I lie lat Heel defense laid the law
down early after the Pirats had
recovered a fumble by UNC
returnee dreg Poole following a
Rodney Allen punt. ECU's Chuck
Bishop recovered the loose ball, giv-
ing the Pirates possession on their
own 42.
ECl could do little with this op-
portunity, though, and had to punt.
tumble by 1 aw rence later in the
opening quarter gave ECU the ball
on the UNC 2b. What transpired
was perhaps the turning point in the
game.
The Pirates were held to but three
aids on three plays by the stiff Heel
defense and had to settle for a 40
field goal from Bill I amm that nar-
rowed the score to 7-3 without 1:43
left in the first quarter.
I hough the field goal assured
I CU of scoring in its 105th straight
game, the fact that no touchdown
resulted from the break seemed to
take some wind out o the Pirate of-
fense.
I he Pirates suffered another big
setback in the second period as star-
ting quarterback Carlton Nelson
was sidelined just before the half.
1 he sophomore signal-caller fad-
ed back to pass and fell abruptly to
the ground m pain without being
touched. Pinched neck nerves, suf-
fered in an earlier hit, had acted up
as Nelson, was cocking his arm foi a
throw .
I he Pirates stalled alter the injury
arid turned the ball over to the
Heels, who quickly marched the ball
60 yards down field foi a score.
I ive mils for a total of 25 yards
by Bryant led to a 20-yard scoring
strike from I INC quarterback Rod
1 lkins to end Jon Ridhardson, put
ting the Heels up 14-3 at the half.
Carolina added seven more points
on their second drive o the third
quarter. With only Bryant and
I awrence carrying the pigskin, the
Heels marched 51 yards in seven
plays, I awrence getting the score
from two yards out to put his team
up 21-3.
1 he next Heel drive stalled ai the
ECU 30 as INC settled for a
47-yard field goal from .left Haves
to go up 24-3 with 2:2V left in the
'�
Cl
"fjwJgfiJ
tm �� . . t - ta
mh � - m

; M split end Jon Richardson hauls in a 20-yard II) pass
from ()B Rod I lkins in the closing moments of the first half
in the Tar Heels' 31-3 win over Kasl Carolina Saturday. The
score put I ahead 14-3 at intermission.
thud quarter.
The final UNC score ol the day
came following a Bryant-dominated
drive. I he larboro native covered
45 ol the 60 yards in the drive and
finished it ofl with a two-yard scot
ing plunge, to put his team ahead
H 3.
I he Pirates took the ensuing
kickoff and marched quickly
downfield, threatening to become
the first team all season to score a
11) on the Heels numbei one
de tense.
Passes from reserve �)M ti
Stewai t to Vet n l)av enpoi: and W ill
Saundei - totalled 34 yards and mov-
ed the ball to the C arolina 41.
Several runs moved the ball as
close to the i. N( eight before the
1 ai Heel defense dug in and
asserted itself, holding the Pirates
on tout dow n there.
I he three points scored by the
ties gave Heel opponents a meas
ly total ol 39 points in seven games.
I ha: a it to nisi over five
points ime, go ing I NC the
national lead in scorii nse
1I 's Emory was so impressed
with INC defensively he rated
the I or Heel defenders better than
those from Florida State, inked
sixth nationally and ea -
querors ol the Pirates.
1 think North Carolina has the
better defense he sa d. '1 he
definitely have I tihletes on
defense. Offensively, though. I'd
have to give 1 lorida State the edge.
rhey can attack you in more way s
Emory claimed that despite the
the Heels should
help ins squad.
"This ought to make us a much
bettei team he sa d "We've been
closer than ever as a team this w
in practice and I certainly this
will carry o er
1 he loss dropped the Pirates to
Moi he year as they look forward
ing W illiam and Mary this
Sat ui day i he Heels, 7-0, travel to
Norman, Oklahoma to face the
powerhouse Sooners next week
game ol major national importance
Big Test Looms Ahead
Heel Defense Awesome
Knoto 0 JON JORDON
I M tailback Amos Lawrence goes over the
top for his second touchdown of the day in
Following 1979 Classic
Saturday's 31-3 win. Lawrence was also the
game's leading rusher with 138 yards.
SPORTING NOTES:
Vr incredible.
1 hen are n i bettei words to
desct ibe t he Noi I harolina
defense. It is simply awesome.
1 he 1 ai Heel defenders lead the
nation in scoring defense, allowing a
mere 39 points through seven
games. Add ing to I he i m -
pressiveness of this is the fact thai
no touchdowns have been scored on
the team's number one defense.
I tie lest is coming. though.
C at olina it a els to Norman.
Oklahoma next Saturday tor
perhaps the biggest game in I ai
Heel football history.
I he club w ill lake on the
powerhouse Oklahoma Sooners.
perennial top ten club. Oklahoma
got ofl to a slow stan this year in
losing two early season games (a
Rl 1 rarity).
I he team has i allied back,
though, and beat a good Iowa Slate
team convincingly, 42-7, this past
weekend.
Charles
Chandler
win ovei the Sooners would
almost assurearolina ol a majoi
bowl bid, bailing any late season
disasters.
Some pec-pie question the quality
of the offenses the Heels have faced
thus far. No one will question the
quality ol the Oklahoma wishbone,
though
es. you might say we'll find out
nisi how good the la; Heel defense
is this coming Saturday. 1 xpeci the
best from it. rhe Carolina defense is
truly great.
I he Pirate defense wasn't all that
Rivals Went In Different Directions
By JIMM DuPRKK
tvuttanl Sport, ,tni.r
C H P1 I HIM It's been only
.t -ear smce the classic matchup bet-
ween the iar Heels of North
Carolina and the Pirates o East
Carolina last took place, but that
time frame has seen a marked
change in both football teams.
Saturday's 31-3 Pirate loss at the
hands o the nationally ranked Tar
Heels was one o the most lop-sided
in the series between the intrastate
rivaK, with last season's 24-24
deadlock the closest as UNC knot-
ted the score on a Jeff Hayes field
goal in the closing moments of the
game.
With only a 3-3 mark against
Atlantic Coast Conference op-
ponants in 1979, UNC supporters
agree that a loss to ECU would have
jeopardised a bowl bid and certainly
kept them out of the highly touted
Gator Bowl. The Heels went on to
defeat Michigan 17-15 before a
crowd of 70,407 in Jacksonville, but
new goals and priorities have been
set this season.
"Our first goal is to win the ACC
this year says All-American guard
Ron Wooten. "Beyond that, we
want to go undefeated and hopeful-
ly get a major bowl bid
With several scouts from bowl
selection committees present Satur-
day, the Heels proceeded to notch
their seventh win of the season
without a defeat. To further impress
the prestigious visitors, the UNC
defensive unit put on an awesome
display in shutting down the wound-
ed Pirate wishbone attack.
ECU quarterbacks Carlton
Nelson and Greg Stewart tallied
negative 39 yards rushing, as UNC
tackle Calvin Daniels, linebacker
� Lawrence Taylor and safety Bill
Jackson each contributed a sack.
The Pirates netted only 64 yards
on the ground and 61 in the air, as
Stewart connected on five of 13 pass
attempts on the day.
Anthony Collins led the Pirate
baekfield with 36 yards rushing.
followed by senior fullback
Theodore Sutton with 33 (which
moved him into second on the all-
time ECU rushing list behind
Carlester Grumpier) and freshman
Ernest Byner added 26 on just three
carries.
In 1979, Sutton netted 9? yards
rushing and Collins 91, as the
Pirates rolled up 259 yards.
But while ECU coach Ed Emory
has had to contend with graduation
and rash oi injuries which depleated
his offensive line, I NC Dick
Crum has a talented and experienc-
ed defensive corp. Tackle Donnell
Thompson led North Carolina with
nine unassisted stops, while seven
other Tar Heels contributed five or
more.
"This is the best defense I've ever
seen on a North Carolina team
said Emory. "They have great
athletes; they are so agile and quick.
"1 think their defense is better
than Florida State (who beat 1 C I
63-7 earlier in the season), and I
think Florida State has a great
defense.
"If Taylor's not an All-
American, then there's not one
Taylor tallied seven tackles in the
game, including four sacks totaling
losses o 24 yards for ECU. The
senior outside linebacker was also
credited with breaking up one Pirate
pass.
"I can't say enough about how
well our players prepared for this
game said Crum. "It would have
been easy to look past (ECU) to
Oklahoma, but they didn't.
"Had (we) not been prepared
coming into this game, East
Carolina was prepared to win. They
have a lot ot young talent out there
which takes time to mature
bad against the Heels, cither,
especially tinebackei Jeffrey War-
i en.
Mi Warren did was get credited
with 13 unassisted tackles duJ
assi- a tota 2 isles
against the Heels. Not a bad day's
woi k.
I heodore Sutton moved into the
numbei I wo p ng all-time
ite rushers following Saturday's
game.
Sutton totaled 33 yards against
the Heels, giving ham 372 for the
season and 2.Mb for his career This
moved him pasl Butch Colson
(2,512 yards) e number two
spot.
1 he Kinston native needs 373
yards in 1 (. I 's next tour games to
equal Carlestet Crumpler's school
record ol 2 ,8S
fuming to basketball, former
ECl stat Olivet Mack was recently
dropped by the NBA's Chicago
Bulls, rhe drop came as a result oi
the team's great 1980 a' winch
brought in two Ml-Americans.
Iowa's Ronnie Lestei and Mai
queue's Sam or then.
IWo formei Pirates have joined
together in the Women's Basketball
I eague.
Rosie rhompson, the all-time
Pirate cage scorer, signed with the
St. I ouis Streak last week. The
Streak is coached by none othei
than former ECU men's coach
Larry Gillman.
This weekend's ABC college foot-
ball telecast should be a dandy.
Featured will be the South Carolina-
Georgia contest.
The game will highlight two of the
most exciting running backs in the
country in SC's George Rogers and
Georgia's Herschel Walker.
Rogers is the nation's second
leading rusher and perhaps leading
Heisman T rophy candidate while
Walker is one of the most highly-
touted freshmen oi all-time.
If you like io see great backs in
action, don't dare miss this one.

i





8
mi I ST Kul ll w
iH loKl K l�8t)
Lady Pirates Fall In Consolation Final
B JIMM DuPREI
hum Sport tfiiiM
With "the best teams
from the eastern part ot
the I nitcd States"
entered in the
Maryland Invitational
Volleyball rournament
and the 1 ad Pirates
going in with iut a 9 20
oveiall mark, I v I
coach 1 ynn Davidson
is satisfied hei squad
came awav with second
place in a on
bracke
v ei a disappointing
; J peifoin a
pool competitioi
1 ad Pirates hi
ack ii
u nd s
irginia i v ! 1" ;
- V i r
Catholic I niversitv
7 15, 15 13, 15 s m the
finals.
"� 1 he teams that we
were supposed to beat.
with the exception ol
v atholic; we beat1
says Da idson. " 1 he
cams we were suppos
ed to lose to, we spin
with, except Penn
State. 1 hat ws good
because it shows we're
making progress
1I opened i he
tournev I i ida with a
15-11,9-15, 15 11 loss
to Rhode island and
Sropped antother
� ghh touted Penn
5-4. 15 11
S
ex
i w as ainst
admits
e !tis:
ofl the court.
1 hex are a very strong
serving team, and we
weren't passing well.
As a ic'sult. we weren't
returning main ol their
serves im the first game,
and when we were we
weren't getting
anything on it.
"In the second game
we hung in there and
slatted playing good
volleyball against a
team that will probably
go to the national toui
nament
Da idson credi t s
5-11 junioi huter Ellen
Crandall foi much of
the success of Penn
State this season.
"Crandall makes
things happen foi
them she says
�she made the Olym
team and would
have played in Moscow
(had the United States
participated)
I he Pirates com-
pleted pool competition
Saturday morning with
a 15-7, 15-7 triumph
over Navy, but follow-
ed with a 15-11, 9-15,
15-9 loss to
Georgetown to knock
them into the consola
tion bracket.
"Navy was big and
slow; we had no trouble
beating them David-
son slates. "We could
h a v e beat e n
Georgetown, too. They
were bigger than us,
but skill-wise we were
even.
"1 knew 11 would be
a ughi match. V e just
didn'i rise to the occa
sion
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By the time the
Pirates got around to
playing Virginia, West
Virginia and Catholic,
Davidson teels fatigue
came to be a factor.
But she is quick to
point out her team
should have been vic-
torious in the finals.
"Catholic is short
Davidson says. "They
have one or two good
hitters, but that's about
it.
"The second game-
was tied at six, eight, 1 1
a n d 13. W h e t e a
volleyball match usual-
ly lasts about an hour,
that one game lasted 40
minutes. It really took
a lot out of the players.
"(Catholic) got
momentum from winn-
ing the second game
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and we played verv,
very poorly David-
son ottered. "Our best
servers served into the
net and we had people
spiking into the net,
too.
"The third game was
just a disaster she
adds. "The players
were so worn out men-
tally and physically,
they just couldn't fight
back.
"When we needed to
reach down within
ourselves and pull the
game out, we just
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didn't do u mented David
UNC-Chapel Hill The 1 ady Pirates
claimed top honors in travel to Durham
the tourney with a win tonight to ban
over Pittsburgh in the A1AW Division
fianls.
"That really speaks
highly of volleyball in
the state ol North
Carolina for them to
win such a prestigious
tournament com-
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MAIL TO
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Greenville. M.C. "�J4
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 28, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 28, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.88
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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