The East Carolinian, October 23, 1980






She iEaat Carolinian
ol. 55 No. 18
10 Pages
Serving the Fast Carolina campus community since 1925
lhurxday, October 23. 1980
.n t iiillt . Northarolina
( in ulalion 10.000
Committees Eye Utilities Costs
Heating Plant On 14th M. Prepares For Cold.
The cost o utilities in the 15
residence halls is skyrocketing.
The total cost of utilities tor the
dorms during the past academic
year was $965,12X, a figure covering
the cost of heat, electricity and hot
water.
The amount of money budgeted
for tlie payment of the utilities was
$600,000. This was surpassed by
over $365,(XX) which was paid
through additional income housing
had received but was not apportion-
ed for use in paying utilities. Ihe
money had been apportioned foi
use in repairing and renovating
some ol the dorms and purch;
materials needed foi the general
upkeep of the doi ms.
The problems associated with ris-
ing utilities and housin
are not going undetected, however,
and two separate commottees have
been formed to cope with the pro-
blem �e
Ihe student residence associatin
commit lee has beer, organized to ad
vise the Student rewsidence v
lion on problems associated with
utilities usagge in the lence
halls.
Ihe committee has b � i ned
a list ol problems winch are affected
bv utility usage. Among these
inadequate wiring in the older-
residence halls, leaking faucets and
showers, steam heat which can not
be efficiently regulated, and the
number of electrical appliances in
the residence halls used tor cooking
According to the division's food
service task force report, 93 percent
ol the students who responded in
the survey said they prepared meals
in their dorm rooms. The survey
estimated the numbet ol cooking
appliances in the dorms at over
20,000
ccording to Ion Rogers, coor-
dinatoi tor central campus who
heads the committee on utilities. 'lt
he function of this committee
strict students form cooking in
hat may become an
: ity he said.
" 1 � - . . ippen until the
uni ffer the student an
act epi ' tion he added.
�� I tie � on ol the committee is
make recommendations to the
SKA to solve some ol the problems
in idence halls caused bv
Fundamentalists
Church Group Gives Support
KM i
� I It;
'
Receiv
Den
:
.
! i'h I ne t i ienus
! ibert a North
� nentalist
i cross section
R publicans and
endorsement from the
; k '
K ea.an .
teneral
I . E d n
: ' G
o i
D-Johnson, or and
listed ca
rral Asset a c i
inty basis,
I he Rev Daniel D. Can i t
i ouisburg, executive directoi m the
non-partisan political action com-
mi'tee i s the std .
the letter had been sent to "a
disproportionate mini her
Southern Baptists1 bui
Pre
es
He said roup sp
"bundled- turs"
researching ea ididate's -�
issues including the 1 qual R
Amendment, n, regulation
u -by-the-drink,
right is and
div oi ce la a
an said vv ednesday 11 at can-
didates receiving endorsements were
those considered "able, iable can-
hold the best overall v icw
on vital family and moral issues
f lid noi endorse can-
S. 1 louse and Senate
race te insurance commis-
luse "we did not have
at on on I hose
; aces I at r said.
Ht �aid the three page mailing
i Till-in-the-blank"
mode! lettei
pastors w ho w I
the fundamental
and circulate then
Pastors til' :?, ih ime ol
proved legislative eandidates tor
then county and mimeograph
lettei which includes the gro
stand on "moi al" issues.
"If they change the v
the letter or change the Candida
they do not have pc n io use
our material C ai r sa
The letter desi i hes I K as
legislating "forced
women and legal
homosexuals
United Way
Campaign
Under Way
'
�lina University
I mica Way Campaign kicked ofl
breakfast meeting
the Mendenhall Multi-purpose
Room yesterday. "The goal for Pitt
County this year is 5390,000.
"b looks like the campaign is well
said Dr. Rosalie Ann
Hai lirman, "and it
I 80 will be a good year
The ' � � i hosted by
llor 1 homas Brewer, and
guest speakers included 1980 Cam-
'� ne I aylor and
i man V llliam I aupus.
Lee Folger, 1 nited Way executive
. showed a film about the
ipaign that was made on the
f C I .ampus.
Di Haritun said that 90 percent
of the representatives turned out tor
the breal I thai they helped
tdd pre the campaign. "It
i e us a lot ol clout she said.
i gear's campaign will be
ais. and focused accor-
From The Inside Out
Most ECU students have had ample opportunity to
observe the construction being done to McGinnts
Auditorium, hut few. if an. have had a chance to
peer into the building's interior. Here, a lone con-
struction worker keeps his balance as he adds stone
finishing touehes to the east wall of the building.
dim
D'
Haritun. I he length of
the campaign will be somewhat
shorter than last year in order to
maximize campus efforts.
Scholarship By English-Speaking Union
utilities usage Ihe mam probl
it we put thim in to .
ies would be cost,
sanitationRodgers -aid
The problem ol safety is especial-
ly critical ut the older bu
where the electrical wirin g is in
quate for the number of appliai
being used. "In c otton and I .
ing there are fused fuses
being blown almost every even
Safety isdefinaiely in que
he added.
In extending the tune;
committee beyond tl
cooking in thge dorms. Rdgei
"We hope to make
tions in a package torn; I
program ol energy -
We may recommend a c
effort to see which dorn
serve the most ene
"We are dealing w acl
awareness he added.
See COMMI1 I H page 3
ECU Campus Police
Investigating Thefts
B MIKE NOOWN
s.�. I i
. is eat gh ofl the
1I campus police
Id like to know
e d investigating a
and � - i1 'tie Cia 11 c
n dining facility which has
resul the loss ol over 60
pounds ol meat, i estimated
; S161 89
ccording to police reports,
d intruders entered a win-
dow a est Mdc . Galley
serving area located underneath
Jones Dorm. footprints were
red by investigating officers
i able below the window and
also e serving counter which
ne over to gei
ere was also
an u . ' tttempi to break in-
to the lake box .nd pinball machine
in area
.� suspects broke into several
meal lot - n the serving area ol
the Ga where they ap-
parently removed the food bv prv-
ing open the doors. I hey then ap-
jntly took the items to the dieti-
cians office and parsed them
lugh a hole they I ad cut in a
een w indow.
some items ol tood were
discovered outside the galley room
under the stairwell leading into the
south side ol Jones Dorm.
Greenville Police arrived at the
scene and took pictures of the
damages and took fingerprints.
Ihe meat stolen included IN
pounds ol turkey valued at $42. 15
pounds ol chicken valued at $21.
and two canned hams valuled al
$22 hot plate valued al x was
also included among the items
stole according to the report.
In an unrelated incident Friday,
1 c I campus police arrested and
charged a 16-year-old non-student
with two counts of breaking and
entering .md larceny aftei
prehended the youth a
ireyele trom the ui
ty.
According to police report
Oct 15, Dr. Alfred King rep
iv"4 Suzuki 125 cc n
been taken trom the storage ;
pound under the noi
Ficklin Stadium.
The motorcycle had beei
to the school ol drivers edu
and used for instructio
cle safety. Or. King is the a man
of the department of driver- educa
tion.
On the following Friday, cat
police observed two s
motorcycle larceny riding a I25cc
Suzuki west on 14th streei
1 he suspects parked the
cle in the lot located between
and Berkely Streets and
foot towards the stadium.
The investigating ol I
ed the parked motorcycle and d
mined that it had been hot wired,
according to the report. V
same time an anonymous ca -
formed the ECUPD that some
was attempting to enter the sto
area under the north stands ol
stadium.
The officers arrived at the see
in time to apprehend the two
suspects attempting to steal a second
motorcycle from the motor
storage area.
A; the scene, the suspects ad
ted they had stolen the first bike
Oct. 15 and that tney had en
the secured area where the bike
stored bv breaking the padlock
with a pick axe they had taken from
the tool storage shed at the stadi
The 16-year-old and a 14-year
accomplice were released under
custody of their fathers. Court i
for the 16-year-old has bee;
Nov. 15. 1980 in Pitt Cc
District Court.
Congress Says U.S. Oil
Production Is Slipping
On The Inside
Announcements
Art
Conceri �
ECU Goes lo INC
Editorials
Letters
Movies
5
5
8
4
4
5
GREENX II 1 I A $1,500
scholarship tor studv in I ngland
will be ottered this year to an
eastern North Carolinian bv the
Greenville Branch of the English-
Speaking Union.
Applicants may be from any
academic or professional discipline
who wish to pursue for formal
credit an authorized course o for-
mal study in England.
Applicants should reside within
the environs of the Greenville I -SI
branch, specifically Pitt. Greene,
SGA Minutes3
Two Sports Axed8 Lenoir. Wayne, Craven, Beautort
Martin. I dgecombe. Wilson and
adjacent counties. Preferably, ap-
plicants should plan to continue
residing in the area.
Among, study programs available
to scholarship applicants are those
at the University of London, the
I diversity of Kent at Canterbury,
Oxford University, the University of
Birmingham and the University of
Edinburgh.
An international organization
whose purpose is to promote
understanding and good will among
the English-speaking peoples ol the
world, the English-Speaking Union
has seven branches in North
Carolina.
Scholarship applicants should
send letters of application, along
with detailed curriculum vitae and
letters of character and academic
reference to the committee, in care
of Elizabeth Webb, 204 North Oak
St Apartment 4, Greenville. N.C
27834.
Application deadline is January
8, 1981.
ASH 1 N v. 1 ON
tl pi) � A gloomy
siudv says IS oil pro-
duction could sink as
low as 4 million barrels
a day bv the turn ol the
century, meaning the
I nited States would
have to look elsewhere
foi the energy to fuel
industrial growth.
Congress' Office o!
rechnology ssess
ment. in a studv titled
'�World Petroleum
Availability :
1980-2000 said cur-
rent U.S. production of
10.2 million barrels a
da may sink to bet-
ween 7.2 million and
H.f- million barrels bv
1985 and decline to 4
million to 7 million bat
rels bv the year 2000.
�if OlA's projec
tions prove correct, the
I nited States as well as
the rest of the world
will have to fuel its
ec ono m i c and in-
dustrial growth without
the seemingly limitless
supply of oil we have
had in the past said
John Gibbons, the of-
fice's director.
The studv found it
might be possible to
boost world production
bv one-third in the
l9V0s. But it said in-
creases are unlikely
because Arab oil expor-
ting countries and Mex-
ico, the countries with
the best prospects for
higher product! o n,
have little financial or
political incentive to
boost output.
The report, released
Sunday, agreed with a
CIA studv that con-
cluded non-communist
oil output � 52 million
bat rels a day in 19"
could start dropping in
this decade, and reach a
range of 40 million to
60 million barrels in 20
years.
The office sai d
declining production
could cut exports from
the Soviet Union, the
world's largest pro
ducer, forcing I astern
Europe and perhaps
Russia itself to compete
as buyers in the world
market.
Production by
OPEC nations in the
next 20 years should
continue at its current
level o about 31
million barrels a day,
with the bulk 01
reserves controlled bv
Arab countries.






1111 I M t Kt �l ll
K 1 t H! K I i�
Announcements
BtAttX ARTS BALL

V
EPISCOPAL WORSHIP TABll WNNISCIUH


A I D INTLRNSHII'S
ROSSE
WOMt N S Bll I I AROS
r O U R N A M f NT
A
POSlUM
SKIMAIMHAIAH
UAt Ki-AMMON
TOURNAMINl
ALPHA Dl t 1 A PI
CORRt C T IONS SOt IAI
WORK
SOCIOLOGY ANTHRO
POLOGY
WOMI N S Bll I I AROS
BK A
CI'HA
� HA
&afr& ,2f'&&fr.2P &&fr
ft
ft
ft
ft
Announcing
. catalogue of
Traditional ladies Clot!
and Rccessones from
FAMOUS PIZZA
FAST, FREE DELIVERY TO
YOUR DORM
call 758-5982
PIZZA
DESSERTS
1 i.tt I 4K j
SPAGHETTI
i 3 'c.
1-7S
? ec
o
r
I
I
I
I
L.
i JLrls .
f. . If .
� � SUBS, ,1 1 St; ! 1 �
�.1.oo 2
�Xao -i feo
� i -1 ��o,Z-i.
i.OO 2.1C
OV -L.Cd
Iiar-iasj
. .la.2fl-a.irj 2lga.4a
� ' �2- .Z
SALADS � � - -
- .
J -3SA BEVERAGES
�po -J
-
V -1 1 1 1 �! . J

COUPON
10 OFF YOUR NEXTDINEINMEAL
At FAMOUS PIZZA. OFFER EXPIRES
NOV. 4. 1980
SNOWSK I
HANOBAt I
Uf t 1H
I'KOUlt
St,A
PROII SSORS
R At I
BASK I I BAl I
OFFICIALS
ECU SURI t I lili
WSI
t St)
I I S I I AK INI.
BAt K GAMMON
TOURNAMINI
RAI f I I
r
ABORTION
The Fleming Center has been here for you since 1974
providing private, understanding htwdUi care
women ol til ages at a reasonable cost
Saturday abortion hours
Free pregnancy testa
Very early pregnancy testa
Evening birth control hours
The Fleming Center we're here when you need us
Call 781 -8880 in Raleigh anytime
ITER
10 Ndi th Greene St
Gi i i'iiviIK N C
5 Minutes I rom im�i
JL4st A i tss I li' Rivei l-ii idge
10 Off on any Meal !
With This Coupon !
and ECU ID.
rakeOul Spet ial F ri � i1
SNACK PACK
3 f 1i isl i �i i� i �,
WE CATER ALL EVENTS
� 11 m
��� thM� �)����
n�ma It required t. t.a fadll
� � lot ���� �� h i" ny� s� �
�i) apt �� �(? lf� � 1 tHfimC In lh�� �: II ��� '
. �n ��� �! "�- fou foul '����' � �
arable �'��' ��'��� ������� �' � ' "fl "?'� ��� ���1"u �
� ���'�.� ' ��� � ad��r1l��d '� �� �
� il��: ���� ��" !���
llama and ��
( Hax tive Thura Oc1 23
opyi j
Before, During &
After the Game
Kroger Savon
has everything
you need!
c
FRESHLY MADE
Sausage
Biscuits
Qf STROH S LIGHT OR
m Stroh's Beer
FOR �
6
12-Oz
Cans
99
FOX SAUSAGE OR
Pepperoni
Pizza
KROGER SLICED
Dll I Pr PSI, Ml Dl W OR
8
16-0
Ret
Btls
Pepsi-Cola
49
SAVE
50
PI US Dl POSIT
CHAHUS. RHIN1 . ROSf OH
I
I
I
I
,1
I 'A
NONE SOLD
TO
DEALERS
OPEN 7 AM TO MIDNIGHT
nsjwra
600 Greenvie Blvd. - Greenvie
Phon 756-7031
I






i
City's Recreation Department
Plays Matchmaker
U IXANDRIA arc sorry, Dei N
Va il 1M) ula Mgns allowed
tip Denis site evei
� place Dia i a
a sij � u mai: hei'
di ia intei e�. lion asking ca 11 low you I
his km mei gii Itriend i sign. A
. him, so the city Reciea �i i
depanmeni K:
s . �ped in pia
v pid dii �'� d N
1 h e d e pai da ii � a
dev ided to put up
i ii sign foi illiams. lie ha
aftei he was told he with w llianu,
could . ii himsj lea e il
1 � r� ads " 1 heai from I

i air K Back iu! I lu rt spU-ndiil linu tor Ml
I
ommittee Seeking Input
iiinui
. -
v
Let ullje last (Earolinian
write home for you every
Tues. and Thurs.
One Year �

� -or
t


e
SGA Minutes
October 13, 1980
NOTICES AND
ANNOUNCEMENTS

I)
I
OLDKJSINESS
ARMY NAVY STOftC
Backpacks. ����,
fl rtQlWt WWCW (PIIW JpWwWWt yf,
jackvH. Pwcwta, ���rte�v
�MM, MM.
iWil
SAAD'SSHOfc
RtPAIR
w.
I 228
Repair
S
ami HffHur
7o
Original hundtrafutl Jewelry
in Sth r and (old
(,rtmi ill, . i rt,(
g
I and Silver andoin�
758 2127
IO�IONI P TO
in �� op
HIONtNC
I 'ft 00 ���H Inclvtlv
pregnancy l��t birfg con
iroi �n3 probi� (K�srnr,
t ou"�ime For rvf'rw
� n(or�n'tori c�n �1J 0J1
(IqII fr�� nuiril-tr
M�� b'w��n
A M 5 P M w�Od�r�
���'� Wn��i't
M�MH Orfanila'tOr
I" Will Morffsn �'
Fosdicks
INCREDIBLE
$1.99 LUNCH!
Monday:
Fish Fry
Tuesday:
Salad Bar
Wednesday:
Shrimp Creole
Thursday:
Chowder and Salad
Friday:
Fish Fry
.
i can eat
Sunday Lunch Special
MOM'S DAY
AH Mothers EAT FREE
(wh ompanied by family
'if 1 (r m re)
THE SHOE ROOM
402 S. EVANS STREET
ON THE DOWNTOWN MALL
752-1268
ALL BRAND NAME SHOES
15 OFF
ALL CLOGS (BRAND NAME)
10 OFF (8.95 reR. price!
NEW Shipment of Handbags
now in stock 10 Off
SHOES FOR rHE ENTIRE FAMILY
MASTER CHARGI mURSDA SA1 .
ISA
.AYAWAY PLAN AVAlLABLt Hou"
At . )()( CANEA'I SPECIAL
� fat tilt '
I .� . our
I fit
$2.50
FOSDICKS
189G$cafood
2311 S F vans St � Greenville
Proudly Presents
Thurs. Oct. 23
The Larry Franklin Band
From Dallas, Texas
"A Great
Seafood
Restaurant"
RELAX
IN THESE GREAT
GO-TOGETHERS
FROM D.A. KELLY'S
COWL-NECK
SWEATERS
.ACRYLIC INTERLOCK
HEMMED CUFF &
BOTTOM
� SIZES SMALL.MED&
LARGE
. WHITE.BLACK.NAVY.
CREAM, RED.BROWN
& MORE
THIS WEEK ONLY $5.90
(REG.S11.9SI
WORK PANTS
� TWILL
� BUTTON-BACK
POCKET
� WAIST SIZES 25-31
. KHAKI.NAVY.BERRY.
HUNTER GREEN.TEAL
BLUE
THIS WEEK ONLY $11.90
(REG.S14.98). .
TkAMfs
UOWNTOWN.EVANS ST. V
pSV7S2L8965 CAROUNA-EAST MALL
nuiNL.52-8965 PHOISIL:756-8242
Tonight Ladies $1.00
Special Guest (






�ije �aat (Eawltmatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Richard Green, cm tar
It rri Herndon, d�c�o 4,v.Tn, Lisa Drew, i�.
Chris I.it HOK, ���� !��, Mikt Noonan. m em
George Hi i i u n ����� mm Charles Chandler, wa thn�
Anita Lancaster, product mom David Norris. rmm &��
Octobci 23, WHIl
Opinion
Page 4
WZMB
Station Might Be Dead For 80-81
By the time you read this,
ZMB-FM might be declared dead
for the 1980-81 school year, for all
practical purposes. The ECU Media
Board was scheduled to hold an
"emergency" meeting at 8:30 this
morning to discuss the possibility of
cancelling the equipment contract
for the as yet unheard radio station,
according to the station's General
Manager Glenda Killingsworth.
Most students are either so con-
fused about the radio station con-
troversy that they've stopped trying
to understand, or still totally ig-
norant o' the FM station we almost
have. Liven if you know little or
nothing now, you should know
what could have happened this mor-
ning.
Until September, former station
manager John Jeter was in charge
of buying and installing the broad-
casting system, which was described
by Gale Hawks, a state engineer, as
the "Cadillac" of transmitting
systems. The only way Jeter could
afford to get the equipment that
would have made WZMB the
highest-fidelity station in eastern
North Carolina was to agree with
the representative that Jeter himself
would install it.
Now that Jeter has resigned, the
equipment representative wants out
oi the contract because his deal with
Jeter left with Jeter. In a meeting
yesterday, attorneys determined
that there was nothing illegal about
the contract, but the Media Board
will undoubtedly put all the blame
on Jeter's head.
WZMB petitioners claim that the
only reason the board wants to
cancel the contract is to make the
petition a moot issue. That it would
certainly do: The petition calls for
the board to reinstate Jeter to get
the station on the air as agreed to by
the board last summer.
Jeter has little chance of being
reinstated because he is no longer a
student. In fact, Media Board
Chairman David Creech told Jeter
about a week prior to Jeter's
resignation that he should give up,
not even bother to come back to
school in the fall. No wonder Jeter
tendered his resignation.
We at The East Carolinian want
to know why we weren't contacted
about the meeting. (Fortunately, a
concerned friend informed us and
Killingsworth confirmed it. We
planned to tape the meeting.) We
would also like to know what the
"emergency" was. With such short
notice, there was no chance for any
concerned students to attend.
There's always the slight chance
that Jeter convinced the board to let
him put the station on the air, but
don't count it.
Carter Ensures Privacy
On October 14, President Carter
signed into law "the nation's first
comprehensive privacy policy'
which he initiated last year in the
aftermath of the U.S. Supreme
Court ruling of Zureher v. Stanford
Daily.
The Privacy Protection Act of
1980 includes safeguards for
employee records, reductions in the
number of government files on in-
dividuals, stricter guidelines on
government computer "matching"
programs, and greater First Amend-
ment protection for the press.
For any American interested in
preserving hisher privacy, this act
just might preclude two sweeping
bills backed by Sen. Edward Ken-
nedy and Sen. Strom Thur-
mond�S. 1722 and H.R. 6915.
These bills, holdovers from the Nix-
on era, would require landlords and
telephone companies to cooperate
"forthwith" and "unobtrusively"
with government wiretappers�and
pay them for doing so; and facilitate
the prosecution of journalists who
refuse to reveal confidential news
sources.
Carter initiated the Foreign In-
telligence Surveillance Act of 1978
which limits the use of "national
security" wiretaps. This act could
hinder Kennedy and Thurmond, but
a more comprehensive act has been
deferred until 1981.
The new privacy law, however,
will be more effective in protecting
journalists and their sources by for-
biding "searches by federal, state,
and local officials against those
engaged in First Amendment (press)
activities, including reporters,
writers, scholars, etc
Of course the Supreme Court can
always rule against these acts, but
it's comforting to know that the
president is attempting to prohibit
invasion of privacy instead of ad-
vocating it, unlike some former
presidents and present senators.
VtArl, Llltr SC0FOOP
SO THERE'S A ROACH IN THE HALL. SO UHAT ?
Campus Forum
Former Coach Praises Wrestling
Editors' Note: The following letter
was received on Tuesday, Oct. 21,
before yesterday's announcement of the
cancellation of the ECU Wrestling Pro-
gram.
This letter may seem unusual. Most
coaches and instructors that depart do
not write letters to the school's
newspaper. My leaving East Carolina
was not a reflection on the university. 1
feel my current position at West Point is
one of the best teaching and coaching
positions in the country.
I enjoyed my year at ECU. Teaching
in ECU's Department of Health,
Physical Education, and Recreation was
an honor. The department is top notch
and certainly moving on to even bigger
and better things.
1 was also very proud of the progress
of last year's wrestling team. We were
receiving very good campus and com-
munity support. We were receiving
regional and national recognition. The
team was definitely coming up, especial-
ly with the outstanding group of
freshman recruits. I believe the team can
eventually become one of the best in the
East.
I want to wish everyone at ECU the
best of luck in the pursuit of their goalv
ED STEERS
Head Wrestling Coach
U.S.M.A.
nities assured us that ECU would have a
white (Caucasian) "greek" queen for
homecoming.
For those of you who voted tor so-
meone you actually knew, or voted tor a
girl you thought was pretty, 1 am sorry.
Since the MRC (Men's Residence Coun-
cil) split up this year to give more girls a
chance to be on the court, the IK had
no competition. 1 he MRC won last year
with I isa Zack.
For those girls who made the court
this year, without having the power-
hungry 11 C votes. 1 and many, main
others would like to congratulate you.
You ladies are the real winners. Your
friends and admirers put von on the
court, not a bunch o voting men who
were pressured to vote for someone thev
may not have liked or even known. It
the fraternities had the guts, they could
each nominate a separate girl to run tor
homecoming queen, bin this is a slight
possibility because the greeks can only
persevere in their masses.
For this year's homecoming queen. 1
am not saving you don't deserve this
honor. I only hoped you could have won
it fairly, with the same chances all the
other contestants had.
Name Withheld b Request
Questionable Queen Selection
The fraternities of ECU have once
again proven that they can get away with
anything they want to at this university
and escape punishment or persecution
by our intimidated faculty. I am a senior
at East Carolina and have been in a posi-
tion for three of my four years here
where 1 can clearly see the discrimina-
tion that this university makes between
the non-greek population, the black
fraternities, and the favored white
fraternities.
The most recent injustice done to the
non-greek population and black popula-
tion at ECU deals with the election of
this year's homecoming queen and her
road to this honor. Here are some
disheartening facts that many students
and faculty mav not be aware of:
Factl) This' year's 1980-81 ECU
homecoming queen was sponsored by
the IFC (Inter-fraternity Council) of
ECU. This assures this young lady of the
votes of all the white fraternity members
on campus.
Fact 2) This year's new queen is a
Kappa Sig "sweetheart The Kappa
Sigs were in charge of counting the votes
to determine our new queen this year.
They also ran the ballot box.
Fact 3) A "block vote" by the frater-
Editors ' Note: We were unable to on-
firm all oj the allegations in the above
teller ai press time.
Fine Arts Festival Cancelled;
Could Be Rescheduled
The SGA Fall line Arts Festival
scheduled for Oct. 22-2? has been
cancelled due to the unusually heavy
schedules o both the Art and Music
schools this week. However, the dance
films originally scheduled will be shown
at a later date in another location, and
Myron Carter, the mime, will be perfor-
ming at various locations around cam-
pus on Thursday, Oct. 23. The group
Good Wood will also play both Wednes-
day and Thursday on the Mall.
This does not affect the possibility o
trying again in the Spring to have a
festival, possibly coinciding with the Art
School's major student show o( the
year. 1 hope also that more people will
audition in the spring, thus providing
more entertainment without having to
rely solely on the departments
themselves.
CATHERINE VOL1 Ml R
Junior, Drama
'Biased, Incorrect Opinion?'
I would like to ask Grace Wells, presi-
dent o the SOU1 s organization, a v ery
simple question. How can anyone be
biased and incorrect in his opinion?
MARK kl Ml'
Junior, English
'Life Of Brian Newspaper
Expanded The Issue
Responding to a recent article and
editorial in the l.ast Carolinian referring
to "Life of Brian 1 quote a comment
in the editorial: "In this country, we are
guaranteed certain freedoms, and two
these are freedom oi expression and
freedom of religion With these
guaranteed freedoms, some members
the community along with a few
students from ECU expressed in a
meeting that was held by courtesy of the
Student Union Films Committee reasons
from a Biblical view not to show the
movie "Life of Brian
One reason that wasn't mentioned by
the Fast Carolinian but was given by an
individual who had seen the movie prior
to the meeting was the mocking ol
Jewish people and tradition. From a
Biblical viewpoint, what is done to His
chosen is also done to He who has pro-
vided guidelines for all to live by and to
be held accountable for. All the reasons
expressed during the meeting were in
defense of a religion and not disrespect-
ful to the rights of other beliefs. The
East Carolinian is responsible for any
extra attention that mav have been given
to the movie because the newspaper is
the one who publicized on the tront
page, not the concerned individuals at
the closed meeting.
KEV1NGROSSG1 SS
Sophomore. General College
Forum Rules
The fasi Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office m the Out South
Building, across from Joyner 1 ihra
Letters must include the name, major
and classification, address, phone
number and signature of (he authorfs)
Letters should be limited to three
typewritten pages, double-spaced, or
neallv printed. Ml letters arc subject to
editing tor brevity, obscenity and libel.
I etters by the same author arc limited to
one each 30 days.
Keeping Warm On Campus Won't Be Easy This Year
B RALPH NADER
Ivory towers are not remote from
energy price surges. As the cost of
energy drives ever higher, colleges,
like industrial and private con-
sumers, are finding that the failure
to conserve means rapidly escalating
bills. For students, this inevitably
translates into higher tuition or
special surcharges.
Such a surcharge was recently in-
stituted by George Washington
University, a well-known private
college in Washington, D.C. Begin-
ning this fall students will tack
about $75 onto their yearly tuition
bill to cover increased energy costs.
university's director of plann-
ing and budgeting says the universi-
energy is available says George
Beckmann, provost of the
34,000-student University of
Washington, "it's the cost that is
getting to us. We've had to take the
money from the hide of the
budget
All schools can do the obvious:
turn off unused lights, keep
classrooms, offices and libraries at
moderate temperatures. Some have
even altered their academic calen-
dars to keep students off the campus
longer during the coldest winter
months. Larger campuses can sup-
plement these measures with more
sophisticated projects such as co-
generation plants that produce both
heat and power and the use of com-
puters to regulate energy consump-
tion across campus.
As the ones ultimately left paying
the bill, students have a large stake
in promoting energy conservation
on campus. Some student organiza-
tions have already become involved
in campus energy planning. In
Washington state, Washington
Friends of Higher Education are
coordinating the student body
presidents and college ad-
ministrators of private schools to
hold an energy reduction competi-
tion. A prize will be awarded to the
school that saves the most energy
over a one-year period. Similarly,
Harvard University is holding a
competitive drive among its dor-
mitories.
Such competition is a good idea.
Students can also conduct an energy
"wastehunt" as outlined in the
book For The People by Joanne
Manning Anderson.
In the wastehunt, students con-
duct a "walk-thru" survey to find
how a building's heating, cooling
and ventilation systems work, how
thermostats are regulated and where
lighting can be curtailed or
eliminated. Students then interview
officials in charge of energy opera-
tions to find out what energy con-
servation procedures have been im-
plemented and what fuel costs are.
At the survey's end, students offer
ty has tried to save energy. But GW .
like many other institutions, he
claims, is limited by the lack of the
flexibility of its existing physical
plant. Two ol GWS largest
buildings, he savs, use oil � and
their construction prevents them
from being converted to use coal Of
gas.
GW is far from the only school
with energy problems. At Harvard
University in Massachusetts, tuition
is scheduled to increase 12 percent
next year � an increase, according
to physical plant officials, directly
attributable to energy costs. Some
institutions have been forced to cut
back on academic or service areas to
keep everybody warm. Others just
have to live closet to the wire: "The
recommendations tot conservation.
The individual student can save
energv by not fiddling with
classroom thermostats and by not
using otherwise empty classrooms
for studying purposes. University
administrators and physical plant
officials could use the prodding and
students' pocketbooks could use the
break.
For The People is available for
$5.95 at the Center for Studv of
Responsive I aw, P.O. Box 19367,
Washington, D.C, 20036.

r





l
o
UJ
Uj
3
KT
,lty
piant
and
the
l tit t S I C AKOl INIAN
Features
o( i mi k 23. rM' Page
??
Concert And Recital
Highlight Music Events
Fast Carolina University bassoonists Matthew Morri of Delco and Cynthia Cooley of Jericho. Vermont, are
featured soloists with the ECU Wind ensemble at its fall concert Sunday, Oct. 26. at 8:15 pm in EC1 s
I (etcher Music (enter Recital Hall.
fr t News Huriat!
GREENVH 1 E - A varied pro
gram of original and transcribed
music for band will be performed by
the Fast Carolina University Sym-
phonic Wind Ensemble at its fall
concert Sunday, Oct. 26, at 8:15 pm
in the Fletcher Music (enter Recital
Hall here.
Ensemble conductor is Herbert
Carter. ECU music students Mat-
thew Morris o Delco and Cynthia
( ooley o Jericho, Vermont, will be
featured bassoon soloists in Michael
Campbell's "Variations on 'Silver
Threads among the Gold
Other works on the program are
ProkofiefPs "Athletic Festival
March a Grainger arrangement o
the J.S. Bach "O Man, Weep for
Thy Great Sin Rossini's Overture
to "The Barber i) Seville Morion
Gould's Symphony for Band. Paul
Creston's "Square Dance '76 and
Grainger's "Scotch Strathspey and
Reel
The concert is free and open to
the public.
The Symphonic Wind Ensemble
is taking this program on tour from
Nov. 3 � 5. Concerts will be given
on Nov. 3 at (ape Fear High School
in lavetteville and in
Fliabethtown; on Nov. 4 in
Southport at South Brunswick High
School and at F!N( -Wilmington;
and on Nov. 5 at White Oak High
School in Jacksonville
Faculty Recital
Brad Foley, faculty membei ol
the School o Music, will present an
evening o saxophone music on
Monday, Oct. 27. 1980, at 8:15 p.m.
in the AT Fletcher Recital Hall.
Appearing with Foley in the
varied program will be faculty per
formers Donna Coleman and
Patricia Foltz, piano, Antonia
Dalapas, soprano, and local flute
instructor and performer Anne
Searl.
The program will open with
works bv .IS. Bach. Sonata No. 2
will be performed by Foley andol
eman, and three soprano arias from
( antatas 89, 98, and 9 will be per-
formed bv Dalapas, Foley, and
Foltz.
Originally from Indianapolis,
Foley earned Ins B.A. degree from
Ball State I niversity. A? the l niver-
sity of Michigan, he studied �
Donald Suit a, internationally
known saxophone arlisi and A
Mariotti, formei principal oboist
with the Detroit and Pittsbu
Symphonies, while earning his
M.M. degree in woodwind instru-
ment performance. Foley b
doctoral studies in saxophone per
formance at the University
Michigan during the summei ol
1979.
I ormerly principal oboist in the
Longview fexas Symphony
chestra for two yeai . i oley has pei
formed in other organizations Mich
as the Indianapolis Syn
Band.
Students Following Soap Operas
(CPS) � Vivian Relta, a graduate student at Cornell,
starts with "Ryan's Hope Then she switches channels
between ABC's "All My Children" andBS s "The
Young and the Restless Afterwards comes T dec of
Night "One 1 ife To Five and "General Hospital
And Relta's viewing habits, once assumed to be ex
clusively those of idle housewives or aged shut-ins, are
oming more common among college students. Soap
operas, in other words, have come to campus.
Estimates of just how main students have taken to
the soaps are almost always unscientific. But one
scholarh study, bv Northern Illinois University pro
lessors Myles Breen and Jon Powell, projected that 40
percent of the female and 10 percent ot the male
n campus regularly tuned in.
"1 would estimate about 30 percent of the students
here watch them" speculates a Vale senior who prefei
red that her name be withheld. 1 he senior, whos iays
she suspended most t viewing in deference to hei sut-
dies, likes "General Hospital" because "it's s
plicated. I started watching and got hook
A male senior at Harvard's C urriei House "used to
watch them, but I don't anymore sinct ol started.
He notes that "quite a tew people seer; to know
nething about them, so I would say most ot them
e watched them
pparently a number ot students haven't been able to
give up the soaps for the duration ot Ore school year.
Celia Roddy, a dorm head at Cornell, knows "quite a
few" women who daily gather in the t rooms of sorori-
ty houses and dormitories, particularly to watch
"General Hospital
But she claims Cornell women don't watch as much
television as women at other colleges. And no one in
college, she asserts, cares a- much about the soaps as
high school students.
Roddy supervised a group of high school seniors in a
special summer program at the university. The students,
she recalls with some awe. "planned their whole davs
around the soaps
1 orraine Zenka Smith, editor ot the soap tan
magazine "Rona Barrett's Daytimers" savs the campus
-oap opera boom is part of a more general spread ot
popularity tor the shows.
She cites a budding interest in the programs lor then
production values and for sociological observations.
She wouldn't mind cultivating that interest, either. She
has been discussing the possibility ot teaching classes on
soap operas with administrators at I t 1 and other
( alitornia schools.
"Soaps are more sophisticated than they evei were
Smith savs. "They're shooting on location now in
places hke Ireland, Greece, France, the Bahamas
Moreover, "they can treat an issue with more in-
depth coverage and perspective than night-time pro-
gramming she adds. "They cover issues like wife
beating, cancer, abortion, infidelity
Smith guesses that the subject matter has helped
soaps reach new, male audiences "We get a lot ot let-
ters from men. Foi everv three men who write, you can
bet there ate several behinu then, . write.
ABC's line-up ot "General Hospital "Ail My
Children and "One I ife to I ive" seems to be most
popular among students, she observes.
1 lie reason may be that the competition � soaps like
"As the World rums" and "The Guiding Light" are
older and more conservative in tone.
"The ABC stones integrate their oldest and their
youngest storv lines Smith points out. She, like many
ot the students contacted Tor this article bv College
Press Service, thought "General Hospital" was the
most successful integrator.
Student interest tends to center on the tale ot Luke
and I aura, just two of the tormented crew at "General
Hospital 1 uke is a down-and-out-kid from the wrong
side o town who got mixed up with mafioso. 1 aura's
past is a bit checkered, too � notably the business
about killing her mother's lover. But then she married
Scottv, and became respectable.
1 uke rapes I aura, paradoxically because he thinks
the Mafia is going to kill him for not carrying out a hit.
Scottv finds out about it, tra.ks I uke to a boat, and at-
tacks him. They struggle. 1 uke pitches overboard. Sc
iv has killed Luke, as well as the viewing habits
millions ot college students.
But wait. 1 uke not only survived, he left town with
I aura V hen last seen, they were both on the run fn
E hit man.
Figuring out why such material appeals to the
educated elite o American youth can be a problem.
" 1 he programs have obvious appeals savs sociolog
Rodney Jacobs o the University of Delaware "THey
iiffer romance and escape and relatively-harmless titilla-
tion. But as to why college students watch them instead
of higher-quality programs that otter the same things, 1
don't know
In the Northern Illinois study conducted last tail. 40
percent o the soap watchers said they viewed s
because they were interested in the involved plots. 30
percent said they watched because the characters were
"so dumb and almost 14 percent noted the beneficial
effect ol watching televised programs that made their
own troubles seem trivial.
lacobs figures "it's the same reason people of all
watch 'Three's Company AH o us who have studied
television viewing know why people watch mindless
shows. But no one honestly understands it
New Show Opening
Highlights Art News
collection ol prints bv FC I
alumni along with works from the
Graduate 1 raveling Exhibition and
a Pre-( olumbian Art museum ex-
hibition will open at the Fast
lina Museum o Art in the
B Gray Gallery on Oct. 26.
I he reception for this show Will
ne
held Sunday, Oct.
6, 7 9
will
p.m and the exhibit will run
through Nov. 11. Operating hours
the gallery are 10 - 5 Monday
through Friday, and I � 4 Sundays.
,pus visitors should ask at
Art Office for admittance if the
gallery is locked during these times.
he prints are from selected
senior folios produced in the Print-
making Department from 196Y
through 1976. The Graduate 1 ravel
Exhibition contains a variety ol
work bv ECU graduate students
which were exhibited throughout
the state bv the North Carolina
Museum of Art's Traveling Exhibi-
tion Service during this past spring
and summer. The Pre-Columbian
ceramics, fabrics, and small stone
catvmgs in the museum portion ot
the gallery are from the collection of
the ECU Anthropology Depart-
ment. Duke University, and private
collections. An exhibit o these
works will continue throughout the
tall semester.
I he Gallery Committee wishes to
thank two campus organizations tor
donating their time for supervising
the dray Gallery on Sundays, per-
miting it to be open on that day. The
c l 4 11 Club helped during the
Beaux Arts Ball
Tickets A vailable
able tor
'udv o'
19367.
K I S(� Bureau
hough Halloween will still be a
week away, many adults here will be
wearing imaginative costumes Fri-
day, Oct. 24 when the ECU School
of Art hosts its sixth annual Beaux
Arts Ball.
The masquerade ball, a fund
raising event for special projects
planned by the art school, will
feature music by the ECU Jazz
Ensemble, an exhibition by dancers
from the ECU Department ot
Drama and Speech, and
refreshments and prizes for the best
costumes.
The Beaux Arts Ball will run from
8 p.m. until 1 a.m. in the Williis
Building at the corner oi First and
Reade Streets in Greenville.
Public tickets at S3 each may be
purchased at the door. Advance
tickets. $2.50 each, are available
from ECU art students or from the
School of Art offices in the Leo
Jenkins Fine Arts Center.
This year's ball was planned by a
student committee, including Gina
Diehl of Rocky Mount. Nam Ki
Kim of Greenville. Janet Micks and
Adrienne Lot! of Raleigh, Kathy
Sholar of Providence, Rhone
lshald, Fori Hicks of Greencastle,
Pa Michael Hitchcock of
Charlotte, and Cynthia Efird of
New Bern.
Southeastern C on tempo r a r y
Metalsmiths Show; Gamma Sigma
Sigma is helping during the current
exhibits.
A wareness Day
Over 250students from 14 eastern
North Carolina high schools will
visit the Jenkins Fine Arts Center
Friday Oct. 24 for Awareness Day.
The purpose ot Awareness Day is
to introduce interested high school
students to the School o Art at
ECU and the types oi work being
done in the different departments.
The day's events will begin at
10:30 a.m. in Jenkins auditorium
with a lecture bv Dean Richard l.a-
ing, of the School o Art, and will
continue until 3 p.m.
I ollowing is a list o the presenta-
tions to be given:
ART EDUCATION The Art
F ducat ion Department will present
information on the current job
market, training required for cer-
tification, salaries, related job op-
portunities, and prospects for the
future.
ART HISTORY � A short
presentation will be given on the
discipline of art history, its methods
of research and its interrelationship
with other areas o study in the
visual arts.
See ART, page 6, col. I
Apocalypse Now To Play At Hendrix
poealvpse Now will pla at the Hendrix Theatre in Mendenhall Student tenter this Friday and Saturday at
SOO 7-30 and 10:00 pm. The film, directed by Francis Coppola, stars Marlon Brando, Martin sheen and
Robert Duvall. Admission is free with student II) and activity cards or a Mendenhall Studententer
Membership Card for faculty and staff.
Students Scream Away Frustrations
We Mere Wrong
In reference to the Tuesday, Oct.
21 article about the George Brett
show, a quote from the March,
1980 issue o the Arts lournai
was used without proper attribu-
tion. We sincerely regret this er-
ror and apologize for any
misunderstanding it may have-
caused.
ITHACA, NY (CPS) � Until
now, frustrated freshmen had just a
few choices: Quit school, kill
themselves, or somehow manage to
hang on.
But now there's an alternative.
It's simple, inexpensive, and it takes
only a few minutes. It's called
screaming.
Though not nearly a fad yet, as
streaking was a few years back,
screaming has caught on at Cornell
University. Facing academic
pressures they had never an-
ticipated, a group of seven freshmen
students began one night last month
to scream out of their windows to
relieve their anxieties.
What began, though, as a simple
release o tension has evolved into a
Cornell ritual that has stirred a cam-
pus controversy. Angry and bitter
calls from a number of students,
complaining of the nightly screams,
has prompted dorm officials to
charge the screamers with harrass-
ment. If the screams don't stop
soon, these officials warn, the
freshmen could face severe judicial
penalties.
The practice is officially a therapy
called Primal Scream, which was
developed by Dr. Arthur Janov. It
enjoyed a rief vogue in pop
psychology circles in the early seven-
ties when rock star John l.ennon
mentioned he used it.
It was revived innocentlv one
evening in September Neil O'Shea,
a freshman, wandered into the ad-
joining suite, complaining about the
usual tlow oi homework and
pressures. He said he fell hke
screaming because the tension was
getting so high. Another student
agreed, and decided to see how it
would feel. Within a few minutes,
seven freshmen were screaming out
of their windows as loud as they
could.
"It fell good savs David
Bremner, one of the original seven,
"so we decided to keep doing it
every night. After a while, we tried
to organize it. We saw how ii really
See STUDENTS, page 6, col. 1
r





!U t M i KOl IN1AN K loltt K 23, l80
A'
4ft - 4fVvT C 0u � t
' �'�' - - A. pfctP (
rn ! mic " o
Students Scream Away Frustrations
, , c m nopularit came rhe Primal Scream weren't expecting it to
( onl.nued from page 5 rf c ub are ca�. become an occasion fOI
. made us
soni
unexpccic
d. seem hiitci that the crazies to yell out
changes. Instead oi usi et
non-verbal screams their friendly screaming anything they want.
sure which the seven claim is has turned into an op Parti) because o!
Within a few days, all lhc evel intended, portunitv foi nuts to that development, as
;p went from there have been scream out obscenities sell as the persistent
�a few dozen, to stutJents screaming and racial remarks. pressure from dorm
500 who yell racja and dirt) slurs. "It's gotten out ol and school officials,
minutes at 10 phese verbal messages hand now Bremnet the original screamers
tsaweek. have angered students confesses, "because
witl crease rh. mnti anything goes. We
the mosi
Art Awareness Day;
Students Visit Campus
have already moved the
screaming time from 11
to H' p.m and are
considering ways to end
the newest school tradi
tion.
"We've been think-
ing about it . and
believe there may be a
more constructive way
things started on most
nights, much oi the in-
itiative for the scream-
ing lias gone out oi
then control.
"I think we could
make it die down on
most nights, but on
days when there are a
lot ol exams, we
ouidn'l have a chance
to contain it he sa s,
"Foi example, the next
nighi aftei a chemistry
prelim, tins place will
pi obably go w ild
( me va i iman who is
already wild and
angi about the
screaming is university
-
The
fair
North Carolina State Fair Continues
North Carolina State Fair is open daily from 9:00 a.m. until 12 midnight through Sunday. I he
offers crafts exhibits, music, amusement rides and over MH) places to buy food.
t ontinued from page 5
t R M1CS isitors will see
ry made on the
� �: mal discussion bet
students and visitoi -
MMl NIC M IONS RT
( ommunications art
wed by a slide show
work and a demonstra-
media equipment. Following
demonstration there will be a
of possible careers in
a ns art.
I BR1( DI SIGN - Slides ol
and professional work will
Demonstrations of b
fabric printing pro-
v i WIN A slide presenta-
formal discussion will be
contemporary trends
� Howing the slides, a
tudios will be given
nts will be wea ing
ap loom and floor
V easl one loom will be
allow visiting students the
�� to weave on a floor
INT1 RIOK DESIGN � The In-
Department will pre-
a ion on the practice of
basic forms, dnd
at ions. The
kill be made bv a panel
� :urrent design students
:ei . ' aduates.
11 V l 1 R Metal students will
be domstrating various forming and
fabricating techniques used in mak-
ing jewelry. n informal discussion
and explanation ol the processes
demons!rated will be part ol the
program.
PA1N1 ING AND DRAW INC,
Members of the painting and draw
ing faculty and then students will
display and discuss their work.
short demonstration of a color
phenomena will also be presented.
PRINTMAKING Various
print processes will be demonstated
bv two faculty and two graduate
students Four print studios will be
utilized foi the demonstrations V
exhibition ol prints will be provided
in each studio.
SCI LPTl Ri DI P K I 11 Nl
1 irst demo: In the 1 oundry area:
I he department will demonstarate
the melting and pouring of bronze
into losi wax molds for the purpose
of casting sculpture. Second demo:
In the court yard area: Students will
demonstrate the carving ol stone
sculpture using both hand tools and
pneumatic power tools.
WOOD DESIGN tour ol the
wood design studio will be followed
b a demonstration ol the making
ot a small "handsaw box a con-
tainer made from a small .hunk of
wood. In-progress and finished
wood design products bv faculty
and siudents will be shown and ex-
plained.
to handle our anxiety librarian Yoram Szeke-
Bremnei adds. s she savs the
"perhaps we may have students have been ac-
a weekly frisbee toss in ring ve;v irresponsibly.
the gym or a nightly "Who the hell do
game ot touch toot- jhe think they are to
ball disturb the peace and
Stopping the game quiel ol others who
may not be as simple as mav want to study, or
starting it. Bremnet ad- sleep, oi listen to music
nuts that though it or whatever on an even
takes the seven to gel inj
ATTIC ATTIC
SOUTHS NO. 6
ROCK
NIGHTCLUB
hSrBRICE street
24 fri ARROGANCE
bsAiSTILLWATER
JcobE BOL
28 TUES
ATTIC 9th ANN.
PARTY with
SKIP CASTRO
ATBARRE
MONSTER MASKS
AND
HALLOWEEN MAKE-UP
AND ACCESSORIES
� C7n 422 ARLINGTON
756-6670 BLVD.
cfk Tii(a
(3kSc�
204 E. 5th St.
Across From
Newby's Sub Shop
Open Til 9:30 Nightly
THIS WEEK'S SALE ALBUMS
ALL CURRENT RERLEASES
S8.98 List for 5.99
Jackson Browne
Rolling Stone
Billy Joel
Doobie Brother
Roiington-Collmi Band
The Jackton
Queen
Molly Hatchet
Van Halen
B. Streuand
$5 98 Liat 3.99
Nantuchet
Long Way To The Top
$13.98 List 9.99
Supertramp
Pan
$17 98 List 11.99
No Nuke
Bruce Springtten
The River
We Buy Used Albums
SALE
SALE
LEVI'S!
Picture yourself in a pair of
snappy Levis ieansina
variety of sizes, colors and
textures Choose from
corduroys or denim
in Straight
Leg. Boot Cut
and Flair models
You II be sure to find
ust what you've been
looking for1 Be com
fortable and look
good. too. in eans
with Levi's'
famous fit
10.88
Choose from Men s Sizes
28-38 Student Sizes 25 30
Junior Boys 8-14 Some ir-
regular
Levis
SHOP AT BELK TYLEP
THE BEST SELECTION
LEVI S IN THE AREA'
FOR
OF
Shop Monday Through Saturday 10 a m Until 9pm
Phone 756 9 E I K (756 23551
Walking Lady,
the GlobeTrotters
by
trotters
"WE MAKE SHOES FOR WALKING
M
THE BOOTERy
Huh I hompson
301 S. Evans Mall 752-8778
Greenville, N.C. 27834
Across town, or around the world, get there i
Maine Trotters' famous Walking Lady, the
comfortable walking shoe ever maoe I
perfect-fit shoe that supports and cushions-
Handsome, too, in antique finished tot
Just tie it on. and go globe trotting
walking Lady Price $3 100
Colors n 'ine, 'av. ('a
Siz0s-4A 's to I s to '
! "�
.
THE
GREAT
RING
EXCHANGE.
(Or How To Get Your College Ring For Less.)
Trade up. Trade in. And save. Because
ArtCarved offers you the unique opportun-
ity to trade in your 10K gold high school ring.
You can save up to $90 on the c llege ring i f
your choice. And ArtCarved offers twenty
different styles from which tachoose.
Get ready for The Great King Exchange.
You can't afford to pass it up.
i
IRTC7IRVED
COLLEGE RINGS
Symbolizingyow ability to achu r.
Oct. 23-24
Date
10am-4pm
The Official ECU
Class Rings
. ttion
Student Supply
Store Lobby
Wright Building
$10
Deposit required Master Chaqp oi Visa accepted
-





I HI I SIAROl INIAN
(H mm k iMKo
L
q
Happenings
Campus Events:

Thursday 23
� 4:00 P.M. Beat Carolina Pep Rallv, 409
Huabeth St. at the Phi Kappa Tau House. L ive
tand starts at 4:00 P M
7:30 P.M. Sigma Alpha Iota Musicale,
� S:00 P.M. Minority Arts Film Series: "I Will
Fight No More Forever Ledonia S. Wright
Atro American Cultural Center,
"Apocalypse
Friday 24
� 5:00, 7.00, 9:00 P.M. Movie-
Now" Hendrix Theatre.
7 30 P.M. Senior recital, Bari Webster,
� W omens Volleyball: Univ. of Maryland, Col-
lege Park Maryland.
Saturday 25
Womens Volleyball, Univ. of
College Park, Maryland,
Football: UNC � Chapel Hill,
Hill. N.C
� 5:00, 7:00, 9:00 P.M. Movie: "Apocalypse
Now" Hendrix Theatre,
� All day,
Maryland,
� 130 P.M.
Chapel
Sunday 26
� 2:(K) P.M. Soccer: William and Mary, Home,
� 8:15 P.M. Wind Ensemble Concert, Wright
Auditorium.
Monday 27
� 6:00 P.M. MSC All-Campus Backgammon
rournament for ACU-1, Student Center Aud.
244.
� 8:15 P.M. Faculty Recital, Brad Folev, sax-
ophone.
Tuesday 28
� 6:00 P.M. MSC All-Campus Backgammon
Tournament for ACU-1, Student Center Multi-
purpose room.
7:00 P.M. Womens Volleyball: Duke
University, Durham, N.C
� 7:15 P.M. MSC Dinner Theater Dessert per-
formance, Student Center Aud. 244.
Wednesday 29
� Soccer: Campbell University, Home,
� 7:15 P.M. MSC Dinner Theatre Dessert per-
formance. Student Center Aud. 244,
� 7:00 & 9:00 P.M. Western Double Feature:
"High Noon" and "She Wore A Yellow Rib-
bon Hendrix Theater,
� 7:30 P.M. Senior Recital, John Jones, Tuba,
� 9:00 P.M. Graduate Recital: Ellen Kaner,
Flute.
Thursday 30
� Womens Field Hockey: NCA1AW State
Championship, Durham N.C
� 6:30 P.M. MSC Dinner Theater Dessert Per-
formance Student Center Aud. 244,
October 26 - November 16
School of Art
� Pre-Columbian Art, Gray Art Gallery,
� Print Retrospective, Gray Art Gallery,
� Traveling Graduate show, Gray Art Gallery.
Movies
Buccaneer:
� "Times Square" shows at 1:10, 3:10 5-10
7:10& 9:10 P.M
� "Somewhere in Time" starring Christopher
Reeve, shows at 1:00, 3:00, 5:00, 7:00 & 9:00
P.M
� "Fame" shows at 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, & 9-30
P.M.
Plaza:
� "Oh God! Book Two" starring George
Burns, shows at 3:15, 5:10, 7:05, & 9:00 P.M
� "Prom Night" shows at 3:30. 5:25. 7:20. &
9:15 P.M
� "Urban Cowboy" shows at 2:00, 4:30, 7:00,
& 9:30 P.M.
� STARTING FRIDAY "Motel Hell" &
"Loving Couples
Park:
� "Snake Fist vs The Dragon" shows at 7:00 &
9:00 P.M.
Nightlife
Carolina Opry House:
� Thursday LARRY FRANKLIN BAND and
SNUFF
� Friday LARRY FRANKLIN BAND
� Saturday LARRY FRANKLIN BAND
� Sunday MIKE CROSS
Attic:
� Thursday BRICE STREET
� Friday ARROGANCE
� Saturday STILLWATLR
� Sunday JESSE BOLT
� Tuesday Attic's 9th Anniversary Parts with
SKIP CASTRO
� Wednesday THE EAI
� Thursday THE EAZE
� Thursday THE LEGENDARY Bl UES "t' Mlk� Cross will perform at the Carolina Opry House on Sundaj
BAND Oct. 26 at 9:00 pm. He plays blues. Irish jiKs and reels, mountain fiddle
� Friday HAV - A - HAPPY WITH TOMMY ,um's ant' somt' original compositions.
Ci. and CO. doors open at 5:00
� Saturday TOMMY G. and CO.
� Sunday Greenville's Own Nationally Famous
GREEN GRASS CLOGGERS Road Team and
Square Dance
Mike Cross To Perform
If you have anything that you would like to put
in HAPPENINGS, send them to T. Ashe
Lockhart Jr The East Carolinian, East Carolina
University, Greenville, N.C. 27834.
AN EVENING
WITH
Mountains' Fall Colors Draw Tourists
SHEV1LLE (AP)
Western North
Carolina is bracing for
hundreds of thousands
ol tourists who are ex-
pected to crowd the
area this weekend as
the blaze of autumn
colors peaks.
Reds, oranges,
yellows, pinks and
purples are bursting out
m all areas, intensified
b) the dr summer and
recent clear, crisp air.
The fall color will
probably combine with
two other attractions �
the Alabama-Tennessee
football game in Knov
s. ilie. Term and a
mammoth textile show
in Greensville, S.C. �
to till everj available
motel room within the
region.
Dick I rammell of
the Asheville Area
C lumber of Commerce
said reservations are
running heavy in
Asheville hotels and
that fans attending the
football game in Knox-
ville already have filled
hotels in Cherokee and
Maggie Valley and in
Gatlinburg and Pigeon
Forge in Tennessee.
Trammell said that
the chamber is making
arrangements with the
American Red Cross to
set up emergency hous-
ing in the gymnasium at
Asheville High School.
The chamber will be
open until 9 p.m.
Saturday to assist
visitors in finding a
place to stay. Trammel
said. When all the
motel rooms fill up. the
emergency facilities will
open and radio spots
will inform visitors.
Blue Ridge Parkway
dispatcher Gary Barnes
said the color is now
greater than 65 percent
in the lower elevations
and 90 percent in the
Great Balsam moun-
tains southwest of
Asheville and in the
Bluffs section near the
Virginia line.
The color will peak
over the weekend in
those two areas and
peak color is expected
in midweek in the lower
areas, Barnes said.
At the Boone
MIKE
Chamber of Com-
merce, Teri Van Dyke
said the color is almost
at its peak in Boone
and should peak this
weekend and hold
through the next
weekend.
She said that many
of the hotels in the
Boone area are filled,
but there are still many
cottages con-
dominiums and private
rooms that visitors may
rent.
The Boone chamber
is open seven days a
week, she said.
The color has already
peaked in an area stret-
ching along U.S. 64 in
southwestern North
Carolina. The area
stretches from Lake
Toxawav in T r a n -
s y 1 v a n i a County
through Cashiers and
Highlands to Franklin
and into Clay County.
The color is
"beyound descrip-
tion C.C. Mertes of
the Franklin Chamber
of Commerce, said. "It
is at its peak and
beautiful
Mertes said motel
and hotel reservations
in the area are extreme-
ly high for the
weekend.
CROS
I
Womens' Symposium
Offered On Monday
He Here Wrong
I he Last Carolinian would like to
apologize to the International Language
Organization for our coverage of the
Oktoberfesl in the Tuesday, Oct. 21 issue.
T he article contained a number of factual er-
rors. I lie Oktoberfesl was held by the Inter-
national 1 anguage Organization, not the
foreign Language Department as stated in
the article. The ILO began planning the
event in May, 1980. Bratwurst, not hot dogs,
were served. The band that played at the
Oktoberfesl was The Schmu'zigs, a group
put together from the school of music bv
Barry Shank. I he ECU Country and Folk
Dancing club performed and taught German
dances throughout the evening. The polka,
which was misspelled as the "poca was not
one of ihem.
I he ILO had a rather large budget for the
celebration, contrary to what was stated in
the article, and chose Budweiser by
preference, not because of the expense of
buying German beer.
About 4(X) people attended last Thurs-
day's Oktoberfesl held by the ILO.
We sincerely apologize for any inconve-
nience that these errors may have caused.
K I r�s Burrati
"A Growing Up of Women a
symposium on the challenges facing
contemporary women, will be of-
fered at ECU Monday, Nov. 3.
Sponsored by the ECU Commit-
tee on the Status of Women, the
Program features a presentation by
Dr. Patricia Gurin, professor of
psychology and faculty associate at
the University of Michigan Institute
of Social Research. Gurin is co-
author of the book, "Black Con-
sciousness, Identity and Achieve-
ment
Gurin's presentation is scheduled
for the symposium's opening ses-
sion in the Fletcher Music Center
recital hall, 1 � 2 p.m. Following
will be afternoon small group
discussions and workshops on
various issues of interest to women,
including career development and
management skills.
The evening session, to be held at
Freddie's restaurant on Fifth St
6:30 � 9:30 p.m will be a dinner
program with a panel of speakers.
The symposium day sessions are
open to the public, wiht a fee of S7
for the evening program (dinner and
panel discussion) or $3 (panel
discussion only).
According to Mary Ann Rose,
chairperson of the campus Commit-
tee on the Status of Women, the
symposium will "address the
changes necessary for mature
decision-making and problem-
solving" among American women
today.
"Specifically, women will speak
about how their areas of expertise
can help others with real problems,
the essential needs of a women
'growing up' to meet challenges of
life, career and family she said.
Further information about the
symposium is available from Ms.
Rose or Peggy Balcome at 757-6061
14k (old bcadi IKt
�: .
5mm M c
r �
Of
mate
SALE
II �
1. �
�6 '
-
ft.t3 J s tt Ife - ,i jcMf
-e pj- ap- fd t s �p
�J0
cn-dit
f&
ORftNVILlt
CAROLINA OPRY
HOUSE
SUN. OCT.26,1980
ONE SHOW ONLY
SHOW STARTS AT 9:00PM
ADMISSION $5.00 PER PERSON
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT
THE DOOR
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CAfcL
758-3943
VIRGINIA
fta&tee
MOONLIGHT SALE
chapters;
AA7T End Of The Week
Party From 4-8pm Friday
FREE ADMISSION4:00 5:30
ADMISSION 25C After 5:30
50C After 6:30
75 After 8:30
$1.00 8:30 Until
FRiday Admission Can
Be Used Friday Night
Beverages are 40 From
4:00-5:00
Go Up IOC Every Hour
Sponsored ByAATT's
And
CHAPTERXEvery
Friday Afternoon
FRIDAY 6:00-11
20
OFF
POCKETBOOKS
COVERS
AND
HANDLES
Off
20
Off
Entire
Stock of
Oxford
Shirts
20
SWEATERS
LARGE
SELECTION
DOES NOT INCLUDE
E.S. DEAN SWEATERS
COAT SALE
GREAT BUYS
LIKE DOWN LOOK-POLY
FILLED VEST AND JACKET
WITH ZIP OUT SLEEVES
VEST
$18,40
PHONE
756-9955
w
LAYAWAYS
AND CHARGE
CARD WELCOME
.







. -V "
THl EAS1 t -K()l IN1AN
Sports
(K mill R23, 1VK0
Pag�
ECU Axes Wrestling, Field Hockey
NCAA wrestling and A1AW field
hockey are being dropped from the
Last Carolina athletic program, ef-
fective at the end of each sport's
respective season, it was announced
Wednesday by ECU Director of
Athletics Ken Karr.
"Today's economic situation is
extremely tough for athletic pro-
grams, especially those like ours
that are attempting to grow Karr
said. "It's felt at the present time
that in the best interest of the ECU
total athletic program, we must
drop field hockei and wrestling
Karr said that the Pirate program
focused on growth and that such
ECU AD Ken Karr
growth is not possible without cuts.
"We must divert resources and
energies in the areas most suited to
our needs he said.
The first-year ECU AD said the
situation here was not unusual.
"We regret that this move must be
made he said, "but we find
ourselves having the same problems
here that other schools are having
cross the country. In order to make
the major sports go, we must draw
the purse strings tighter in other
areas
Wrestling has also been cut at
Georgia, Alabama, Florida, UCLA
and LSU recently. Of the 256 Divi-
sion I schools, 52 have made cuts
recently in their athletic program.
Field hockev has long suffered at
ECU because only 18 North
Carolina high schools have teams.
"As we project to the future and
possible conference alignment
Karr added, "we must realie what
sports are likely to be sanctioned by
a conference
Karr said that the two sports
dropped were the most logical
choices in comparison to other
minor sports.
"Wrestling and field hockey are
not very likely to be sanctioned he
said, "whereas MAW and NCAA
cross country and AiAW golf are
more likely choices. This is due to
dollars involved in fielding such
teams and the availability o
recruiting talent in one's own
backyard
With the cuts, the question arises
of what the involved atheletcs will
do following the current season.
Assistant AD and Sports Informa-
tion Director Ken Smith addressed
the problem by saving. "We will
follow NCAA and AIAW rules
regarding scholarships Smith
said. "We will go strictly by the
book. We will make sure that
everything turns gut in the best in-
terests of the athletes involved
NCAA regulations concerning
athletes participating in a sport that
has been axed or considered leniant.
Anv athlete involved in such a case,
as the Pirate wrestlers are, can
transfer to any other school and
become eligible immediately, rather
than having to sil out a year.
NCAA scholarships are signed
foi only one yeai al a rune so each
I wrestler will be Ireed to
negotiate with other schools and will
no longer be undci scholar Tup
June 30, 1981.
AIAW regulations state that any
girl participating in a sport that has
been cut ma be given an academic
scholarship for on: additional year
following the move.
Pirates Look To Upset
Seventh-Ranked Heels
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sport Kdilur
"1 can't see where they have any
weaknesses
East Carolina head football coach
Ed Emory was simple in his asser-
tion of the seventh-ranked North
Carolina Tarheels, a team that his
Pirates have the unenviable task ot
tacmg this Saturday in Chapel Hill.
"On defense Emory said,
"they've been awesome. Their of-
fense also is something with great
backs like Famous Amos
(1 awrenee) and (Kelvin) Bryant
Indeed, the Tarheels have been
awesome in winning their first six
games o the 1980 season. The UNC
defense has allowed but 36 points m
those six games with only 15 points
coming before the fourth quarter.
"We have to move the football on
the ground to win said the first-
Year Pirate coach. "Everybody goes
up there trying to pass on them.
We've got to establish our running
name
Emory said if the Pirates are able
to get a ground attack established,
patience will be a factor. "We need
to move the ball north and south
he claimed. "We've got to fight for
field position. And we can't try to
do anything too fast. We must be
careful and take our time in doing
what we do best
Concerning the Tarheel offense.
Emory said the leader o the UNC
attack was not who everybody
thinks it is.
"People always look at their great
running backs Emory said. "But
Elkins (Rod, quarterback) is their
key.
"He's done a super job and is the
guy that keeps the ball alive in then
attack
The ball usually stays "alive"
when the Heels have it too. I he
tailback duo o' Bryant and
Lawrence has produced nearly 1 ,(KK
vards by itself. Lawrence has rambl-
ed for 524 yards and Bryant 462
through the team's first six contests.
The Heels, 6-0, ranked seventh in
both wire service polls this week and
are the highest ranked team an last
Carolina squad has ever faced.
Florida State, which downed ECU
63-7 earlier this season, was ranked
ninth before its matchup with the
Pirates.
"Here we are looking forward to
a challenge o' playing a team ranked
higher than Ohio State, Oklahoma.
Arkansas and Penn State Emory
said. "This is an opportunity that
we at East Carolina have been
waiting tor for main years
The Pirate head man said that he
felt good about his club's chances
due to some improvements made in
recent weeks.
"To date, we are capable of play-
ing very good or very bad. We're
not real solid yet. But we have made
some big improvements after star-
ting off 1-3
The Pirates have taken con-
secutive victories over Richmond
and Western Carolina to even their
record at 3-3. Still. 1 mory, savs there
is no doubt that ECU is the under-
dog Saturday(with I Nc being
tavored by local bookies bv 25
points).
"On paper 1 mory noted.
" 1 hey are better than we arc. Bui
you don't plav on paper, you play
on turf. And on turt is where it
counts
r
ECU defensive back Manin Elliott (32) brings down
I NC "s Amos Lawrence in last season's 24-24 tie.
Wooten Says ECU
Rivalry Not Same
ECU's Vern Davenport
He Has One Last Chance
By JIMMY DaPREE
xstsiant sports l-dilor
Over the past few years, the
rivalry between the University of
North Carolina and East Carolina
University has become one of the
best in the state. Last season's 24-24
tie on a late Tar Heel field goal
stands as testimony to that tact.
With the coming o' a new coach
at 1 C1 and the coming of age of the
1 ar Heel veterans, senior All-
American Ron Wooten of UNC
feels that that rivalry has been erod-
ed.
"The main way I'm taking
(Saturday's game) says Wooten,
an offensive guard from Kinston,
"is that it will be our seventh win.
"1 don't feel as much of a rivalry
as 1 have in the past. It's not that
East Carolina doesn't have a good
team, it's just the fact that we have
to win it we are going to achieve our
goals for the season.
"Our first goal is that we want to
win the AC C and (the East Carolina
game) is not a part of it. We have to
win this game to achieve another
goal, which is to go undefeated
To accomplish the latter goal the
Heels must beat the powerful
Sooners ot Oklahoma, but Wooten
insists he and his teammates have
their minds solely on the Pirates at
this time.
"Don't get me wrong he adds.
"We've never really beaten East
North Carolina AH-America
offensive guard Ron Wooten
heads an awesome Tar Heel
ground attack
Carolina badly since I've been here
and 1 don't think we will this Satur-
day either. If ECU was another
team from out of state or
something, Ed say we could make it
a blow-out. But they play well
against us every year
Runningbacks 'Famous' Amos
Lawrence and Kelvin Bryant head
the UNC ground attack, with
Woolen and center Rick Donnelley
opening holes and providing protec-
tion for sophomore quarterback
Rod Elkins. Wooten's observation
of the Pirates on films leads him to
believe ECU will be one of their best
challenges o' the season.
"From what I've seen, they do
more stunting than any other team
we've played Wooten states.
"Lheir line coverage has been better
the last few games.
"The main thing that gives us
confidence, though, is our defensive
line he adds. "They've been able
to get to the quarterback a lot, and
that has made a difference in a cou-
ple o games. East Carolina doesn't
throw as much, so that may not be
that much of a factor
The Tar Heels have been ranked
in the top twenty of both major wire
service polls throughout the season,
but according to Wooten, only head
coach Dick Crum carefully watches
those figures.
"Coach Crum has gotten to
where he pays attention to the
polls says Wooten. "But we
(players) haven't let it go to our
heads or anything like that.
"We're aware of them, of course.
But we haven't let it put additional
pressure on us.
"No Carolina team in recent
history has won five in a row; we
pay more attention to something
like that
The ultimate goal of the Tar
Heels is to earn a berth in a major
bowl, but personal goals are also a
factor for Wooten.
"Sure I'd like to take a shot at
pro ball if the offer's there
Wooten says. "If the money is
there, 1 don't think 1 could turn it
down. But aside from that, I would
probably go on to graduate school
in business
An ACC crown; an undefeated
season; a major bowl bid: all these
are realistic goals for the Tar Heels
of North Carolina with Ail-
American Ron Wooten leading the
way.
By CHARLES CHANDLER
sporN t diinr
For East Carolina senior
split end Vern Davenport this
Saturday marks the last time
that he can get what he most
wants out o' his college toot-
ball career: a win over North
Carolina's Tarheels.
In his and the Pirates
previous three tries, UNC has
won 12-10 in 1976, 14-10 in
'77, and the two clubs tied,
24-24, last season. lor Daven-
port. 1980 represents a "now
or never" situation.
"I'm trying to look al h as
anv othei game he said.
"But that's hard to do. I've
been there three years and
we've played well each time.
We've done everything you
need to do to win and we've
never won
Though the Pirates have
never been favorites going to
Chapel Hill, the team has
Davenport Kicks Off
never been an as big o an
underdog as it is this year,
winch finds L NC ranked
seventh in the nation.
"The odds have never been
against us like this Daven-
port said. "It will take a lot of
breaks for us to win. But I'm
not going up there planning to
lose
Past performance, says the
Grifton native, is enough to
give ECU fans hope. "We
always seem to play good
against them. You can throw
the record books out the win-
dow when these two teams
play
I he one danger the young
Pirates might face, said
Davenport, was respecting the
Tarheels too much.
"1 just hope the young guys
on the team don't get awed by
Carolina he said. "All of us
should just line up and treat
our man as anv other guy.
That's all they are
lo Davenport, and to main
o the Pirate faithful, the an-
nual game with the Heels is the
game o the season. There are
specific reasons for this, said
the senior end.
"It's like Carolina is in an
upper echelon Davenport
said. "There is this aristocratic
atmosphere
The way today's Pirates feel
about Saturday's game goes
back to the way former ECl
head coach Pay Dye approac-
ed the annual rivalry. Daven-
port said.
"He used to say in the
papers that we were a bunch of
skinny-legged guys from
eastern North Carolina. And
that wasn't all that wrong. Not
many of the guys on this team
were recruited by Carolina.
It's like we've all got
something to prove
With Dye gone to Wyoming
and Ed Emory now at the
Pirate helm, Davenport con-
trasted how the two men
prepared their teams for the
big game.
"Coach Dye brought out
this intensity in us he said.
"He would tell us that we
weren't as good as they were,
that we didn't stack up. That
would really fire us up
era
Davenport
lmory takes a different ap-
proach, said the German-born
Pirate. "Coach Pmory looks
at it from the aspect that we're
not supposed to like them. He
tells us that we should hate
them and instills this hatred
and madness in us
In reminiscing ovei his
career Davenport does not
have to look far to find his
most disappointing moment.
"If there's vine play in the
world I'd like to go over he
said, "it would be that kick
last year
In addition to his duties as
split end. Davenport often
kicks off for the Pirates and is
called on for long-range field
attempts.
With the score tied 24-24
last year at Carolina and less
than a minute remaining.
Davenport was called on to try
a 59-yard field goal. The kick
fell about three yards short,
spelling "defeat" for the
Pirates.
"It was just like a loss for
us Davenport said,
"because we had had the game
won
As for the missed kick,
Davenport says the only thing
that will atone for it is a win
Saturday.
"1 wish I had stretched
more before I tried it he
said. "I definitely should have
made it. I can go out here to
Ficklen Stadium right now and
make 10 out of 12 of those
After Saturday's game is
over, Davenport would surely
settle for one out of four;
games that is.
,��
Kv II
It
two
B
Na






tevery





(L I"1
C -�'�'�� � . MMk �
t
I





I HI t AS IAROI INIAN
(K OBI R 23. I9K0
'
n


?
Women Cagers
Begin Practice
B JIMMY DvPREE
rhrough her first
two years as the head
women's basketball
coach at Last Carolina,
Cathy Andrui had
the luer of depending
heavil) on veteran
strong forward Rosie
rhompson to provide
an offensive or defen-
sive lift for the I ad
Pirates in times of trou-
ble.
But as the squad
p; epares tor its
November 23 opener
against Virginia Tech,
Andruzzi has the
ominous task of fin-
ding a replacement tor
1 hompson, who has
joined the Iowa Cor-
onets of the Women's
Professional 1 eague.
"1 or two seasons,
Rosie carried the
ballclub savs An-
druzzi. "Hut last year
other people helped
carry the load. Nome
games in which Rosie
scored only four points
or so, we won. We'll
miss her more on
defense
vital element in the
I ady Pirates 20-11 per-
formance of a year ago
was forward Kathy
Riley, who averaged
17.3 points and si re-
bounds per contest.
Riley, an All-American
candidate from
Nashville, renn
returns with the added
honor of surviving until
il cut at the trials
o! the 1980 Olympic
team.
"kattn will be very
important tot he team
again this year An-
druzzi says. "She will
have to know all the
positions. With the ex-
ception (of center), she
will prohahly be used
everywhere
s has been the pro-
blem with the ECU
football squad, the
I ad Pirates have had
to contend with a
number of serious in-
juries to kev players,
including senior guards
I ydia Rountree and
Laurie Sikes.
Rountree, who rank
ed third on the team
last year with 13.0
points per contest, suf-
fered a severe groin
muscle pull last week
and will be out o' ac-
tion for several more
weeks.
Sikes, meanwhile,
continues limited
workouts while suffer-
ing with recurrent knee
ailments. The Marietta,
Cia. native established a
new school record a
vear ago with 225
assists while averaging
8.5 points per outing.
Also included on the
list o' casualties is
freshman point guard
I isa Fcnnell who is ex-
pected to see con-
siderable action in the
I ady Pirate backcourt.
"Fennell has a stress
fracture, which is
something she had
before she came here
savs Andruzzi. "Sikes
has what is called
'jumpers knee That
leaves us with two
starters from last
season
long with Riley
senior center Marcia
Ciirven returns on the
1 ady Pirate front line.
Ciirven is the leading re-
bounder returning,
with an average of 7.6
per outing along with
6.4 points per game.
Sophomore Mary
Denkler and senior
Heidi Owen served as
top reserves a year ago
and expected to provide
height and experience
again this season.
Denkler averaged 4
points and 5.2 re-
bounds per game on the
front line, while Owen
excelled defensively ex-
cept for a late season
surge in the offensive
catagories.
Transfers Sam Jones
and Caren Truske add
depth up front and in
the backcourt, with
Jones a potential
starter at forward.
Jones ear n e d A11 -
American honors twice
in her two seasons at
I ouisburg College,
while Truske comes
from the nationally
ranked N.C. State pro-
gram.
"Caren worked at
one of our camps this
summer says An-
druzzi, "and 1 guess
that's when she decided
to come to Hast
Carolina. She had
already left State and
was going to Virginia
Tech. We're certainly
happy to have her here.
"1 think Caren and
Sam have done an ex-
cellant job adjusting to
our program
Also returning from
the 1979-80 edition are
guards Lillion Barnes
and Fran Hooks and
forward Donna
Moody. Barnes, a
junior, returns as the
quickest of the guards,
with Hooks adding
scrappy detense and
Moody sorely needed
height on the front line.
"We're going to
have to work extremely
hard because we are so
small Andruzzi ad-
mits. "We don't have
the 6-2 or 6-3 players
other teams have, so we
have to make up tor it
with intensity
Part-time Delivery Job
Must Have Transportation
Good Pay And Flexible
Hours
Call
Biscuit Towne USA
756-7828
And A�k For Ivy Knight
ECU'S Heidi Owen
. . . defensive standout
Classifieds
PERSONAL
CUSTOM CRAFTING and repair
ot gold and silver Buvincj and
selling of gold and silver by Les
Jewelers 120 E 5th St 7S8 2127.
SUNSHINE STUDIOS ottering
classes in Ballet. Jazi. Yoga and
Exercise Special student rates
Within walking distance ot cam
pus 7S4 7235.
OVERSEAS JOBS Summer year
round Europe. South America
Australia Asia All Field1-
SS00 $1300 monthly Expenses
paid Sightseeing Free Into
Write IJC Box 52 NC-1 Coron
Del Mar CA 92625
PERFECT CHRISTMAS GIFTS
High quality, low cost portraits
caricatures, T shirts people, pets
you name it John Weyler
752 5775.
HELP WANTED Several posi
tions open Hours are flexible to
tit your schedule S & S Cafeteria
Carolina East Mall
ANYTHING YOU CAN WRITE
We can write better Typing pro
ofreadmg, editing Write Right
7 5� 196
WANTED Faculty or statt wife
with small boy who would like to
keep 7' i year old boy in her home
746 47?3 after 5 00 p m
NEED COLLEGE STUDENTS
For part time work See Tommy
Jamieson at Southmet Recycling
Corp located at 1625 N Greene St.
m Greenville Only those who
don t mmd physical & dirty work
need apply
CAMPUS REPRESENTATIVE
POSITION! Part time position
promoting high quality Spring
Break beach trips on campus for
commission plus free travel Call
or write tor application Summit
Travel inc Park.ide Plaja Col
umbia Mo 65.0; (800' 325 0-iJv
CARTE The ultimate n
cosmetics has final!v arrived in
Greenville For your complemen
tary facial call Loretta at '58 6228
found Male orange t,ihi) cat
appiox 6 months weannq Hea
collar Foundries Rii'stw Call
757 6000 day M� -202 after 4 00
FOR SALE
FOR SAl E PEARL Snare d-um
61, X 14 i
Call �'56 3
FOR SALE Technics SA 500 60
atts SL 230 tuliy automatic
turntable with Empire 2000 El 11
Phase Linear speakers
Aluminum antennae Paid suoo
best offer Call 753 8860 ask tor
Graham
FOR SALE Acoustic Jumbo
Folk Yamaha FG 340 Beautiful in
looks and sound Excellent cond.
tion Call i. :C�C S?55 Case
included
FOR SAL� Kenwood ST 2120
AM FM Reciever Will accept
Pre Amp 15 watts I7S will talk.
756 442 I 00 6 00 Robert
Waldrop
FOR SALE New Electric Ranq(
and U cu ft Refrigerator at tan
tastic price Call Mike Turner at
758 7332
FOR SALE Beggmner set
Golfpro Princess' lefty golf clubs
with bag Rarely used. Call Peg
758 6186 before 10 31 80
FOR SALE Filibuster U multi
band Best otter 752 8860 ask for
Kevin
TURN TABLE Tape ft speakers
S100 Twin beds(maple) box spr
mgs & mattresses
so ?957
565
Call
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE WANTED Five
blocks from campus 5100 m
eludes rent utilities, heat
Available Nov 1 752 6970
FEMALE ROOMMATE Tosher,
throe bedroom house 756 1558 or
7S7 4652 or 757 6161 Ask for Ellen
or Lynn
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED
F D To ;han fwe bdt wm
� i u� !isr Joiet
so and halt utilities 7S6 2995
ROOMMATF Need roommate to
share beautiful three bedroom
Windy Ridge Condo with my
dauqhter A I Fireplace pool, ten
ms courls and washer 5125 or
S100 and babysit Mondays and
Wednesdays 3 45 730 and half
utilities Single parent wanting to
trade babvsi'tinq would be ideal
Call Becky 756 8637
ROOMMATE WANTE D lor large
house Private room with house
privelges 305 E 14th St 580
month Call 752 3444
FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE
CLASSIFIED ADS CAN BE PUR
CHASED AT THREE LOCA
TIONS
Student Supply Store Lobby, MWF
10:00 11 00, TTH 11 00 12 00
East Carolinian Office, MTTH
4 00 5 00 WF 2 00 3 CO
Student Organization Booth
(Mendenhalll, MWF 12.00 100
TTH 11 00 12 00
Venuto, Wysocki
Lead ACC Stats
I Classified Ad Form
I
I PPICE H W tor IS wards, 05 tor
� each addition word.
I
m Abbreviations count �s one word
at '� phone numbers and,
I
Make cherts payable to The Bast
Carolinian
hyphenations
GREENSBORO
(L'Pl) � Wake forest
quarterback .lav
Venuto, who had 224
yards passing and
rushing against
Maryland Saturday.
lead the Atlantic Coast
Conference in total of-
fense this week, averag-
ing P6.S yards per
game.
Maryland tailbacK
ran for yards in
Maryland's 11-10 vic-
tory over Wake forest,
is the league's leading
rusher with 11)8 yards
per game. He is follow-
ed by Virginia's Tom-
my Vigorito with 88
yards, North
Carolina's Amos
Lawrence with 87.3
yards, and the Tar
Heels' Kelvin Brvant
I MAIL TO:
The East Carolinian
Classilted Ads
CM South ftwiMinf
Greenville. NC. 2713
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Charlie Wysocki, who with 77 yards per game.
ELECTROLYSIS!
K Permanent Removal Ot I nwanted Hair 3
� . I'l.KMAl.i n Jfl
W I Iri.yi
I, J
tf The Electrolysis Center
103 Oakmont DrOffice G
756-3780
TueWedFri. 9:30-5:30
Thursday 9:30am7:00pm. t
Presents In Concert
RESEARCH
PAPERS
10.278 on file � all subjects
Send $1 00 (refundable) 'or your up-to-date
340 page, mail order catalog
We also provide research - all fields
Thesis and dissertation assistance available
RESEARCH ASSISTANCE
11322 Idaho Ave.206F
Los Angeles. Calif 90025
(213) 477-8226 or 477-8227
Doors Open c �!S Vloon Show Starts
At 8:00pm. un- Uct- Zb iy5U At 9:00pm.
One Show Only
Admission $5.00 Per Person
Tickets Available At The Door
For Further Information Call 758-3943
EXPERT STYLING
FOR BOTH MEN
AND WOMEN
BY APPOINTMENT
ONLY
SHIRLEY'S
KUT & STYLE
,301 EVANS ST. MALL
jMINCKs Bi.jj -U;i
Turner's Sleep Center, Inc
Big 2 for 1 Sale
Buy Mattress At Regular Price
And Get The Boxspring Free
312 Coil lnterspring 5 yr. Warranty
Sealy Posturepedic Bedding
On Sale At Reduced Prices
628 S. Pitt St.
758-7332
Open
8:30am6:00pm
Mon-Sat
THE $74.95
DIPLOMA.
Aft'
Siladium rings are made from a fine jewelers
stainless alloy that produces a brilliant white
lustre. It is unusually strong and is resistant
to deterioration from corrosion or skin
reactions.
In short, it's quality and durability at an
affordable price.
Both men's and women's Siladium ring
styles are on sale this week only through
your ArtCarved representative. Trade in
your 10K gold high school ring and save
even more.
It's a great way of saying you've earned it.
IRTC7IRVED
COLLEGE RINGS
Symbolizing your ability to achieve.
Oct. 23-24
The Official
ECU Class Rings
Date
Location
10am-4pm
$10
IVposit required Master Charge or Visa accepted.
Student Supply
Store Lobby
Wright Building
�1W ArtCarved College RW�
ft
T





10
HI I-ASK K( l IM N
(Hit MI K
The Fearless Football Forecast
U I ai I l
VIRC.INI al V Kl I ORI SI
C l I MSON a M.( ST ATI
M Mn ! WP ill L)I Kl
Kl I'Cil RS ai MKU SI
l HI RN ai MISSISSIPPI sl
UCl A ai C Al II ORl
1U HIGAN s ai PI KIl 1
s mi CO SI ai V YOMINt i
RK Ws N ai H l STON
PI rSBURCi al II NN1 SSI I
st H I HI K MISS tl l P-M
II KK HERNDON
Advertising Manager
(60-24)
I 24 10
ake I oresi
i Stale
Maryland
Rutgers
Mississippi Si.
UCLA
Purdue
oming
i Kansas
Pittsburg
Mabama
Yellow Jackets
To Host Tulane
nin moi i n
TI w i d Pi)
anu this thai average
season quite si
pa-
ll a e
ishine
touchdowns. Hail a
� is himseli
Currs said rulane,
which has won f ol
16 ii las ' . � i ' c- in
so eluding .eek's 2s
hilt a nei ol impro tball team
�i ,�,), n.nnino and wei whai u showed
�� i
d) i
-
I
� ��
4 m Sa
Y. a v e
-
1 sards runnin
has 1,818 sards total eai l in the year.
nse average rhey've had sonic ups
me : downs, bul the)
Hia than are sen meed in
t v attack
I he Yellow and will i for-
lacl
irds wh
.
"Tula a i
mi than people
edit
tst tew
, � v C
GOLD & SILVER
PRICES ARE UP!
11 y3u need money tor fall clothes or football tickets now is a
good time to sell your gold and silver valuables. And here s a
good way to get EXTRA CASH!
SELL YOUR
CLASS RINGS
TO COIN & RING MAN!
Almost everyone has a high school or college class ring
they don't wear anymore. Check your dresser drawers
and bring your class ring Into Coin & Ring Man. We're
your protessional buying service and we guarantee you
tatr prices and good service
Wl PAY CASH ON THE-f POT
FOR JEWELRY, VALUABLESANYTHING
MARKED 10K- UK - 18K.
S GOLD S
filNCS � HKKUCIS � WATCHIS � DIA�0�DS
CLASS SINGS � WIOOIKC l�0S � DIKTAl
COLD � BBACUITS � MOOCHIS � 10CKITS
CHAINS � UGMTIBS . CU� UWKS - EMRWCS
rO
Vl
r
JIMMY DuPREE
Assl. Sporls Editor
(59-25)
UNC 35 7
Wake Foresi
N.C. State
Maryland
Rutgers
Mississippi St.
UCLA
Purdue
San Diego St.
�i kansas
Pittsburg
�Mabama
KEN SMI III
EC! SID
5J-25
ECl 17 14
Wake Foresi
( lemson
Maryland
Rutgers
Mississippi Si
UCLA
I'm due
yoming
Arkansas
Pittsburg
Alabama
HKI ESCHANDLER
Spurts Editor
(58-26)
I NC 2 10
S .ike Foresi
V( State
Duke
S racuse
Mississippi Si
UCLA
Purdue
yoming
Al kansas
Pittsburg
Mabama
(,l s �( Kl U
WOOD) Dl RH M
I M sporls Network
s� i
Wak I
(
Mai
Mi
I
I
H .
I'
THURS:
The Legendary BLUES BAND
ADM. $3.50 Doors Open 8:30
FRIDAY
AFTERNOON
HAV-A-HAPPY With
Tommy G. & Co.
Doors Ooen At 5:00om
FRI & SAT NITE
TOMMY G. & CO.
SUNDAY!
GreenvillesOwn Nationly Famous
Road Team And
Square Dance
GreengrassCloggers
PAYING ONTNI1ROT
CASH FOR ITIAtl MAftKID
STERLING SILVER
REGARDLESS OF CONDITION
� COFFEE SERVICES � GOBLETS
. RINGS � SPOONS � TRAYS � KNIVES
NECKLACES-BRACELETS
C?f HEY SALES CO Wc" �
401 S.EVANS ST.
HARMONV HOUSE SOUTH)
OPEN 9 30 i 30 MON -SA I
PHONE 752-3866





Title
The East Carolinian, October 23, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 23, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.87
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy