The East Carolinian, October 21, 1980






She
Carnltntan
Serving the Last Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 55 No. 17
10 Pages
Tuesday, October 21, 1980
(.reenville. North Carolina
Circulation 10,000
Pat Benatar
Concert Plan
Falls Through
B IFRtn GRAN
Manstia i .in
I fforts lo bring Pat Benatai to
the ECU campus have apparently
ialien through as a resull oi schedul-
ing conflicts m Minges c oliseum,
c harles Sune said Monday
Sune, chairman ol the Student
I nion's Majoi Attractions Com
mittee, said that the prospect ol get-
ting Benatar to come to ECU looked
promising until he checked into the
availability tl Minges for the con
cert.
According to Sune, plan to bring
Benatar here foi a Dec. 1 concert
have been dropped because 1(1
basketball players are scheduled to
practice in Minges on thai date.
"The d.ic we were originally
shooting tor was Nov. 20 Sune
said "We were able to work out the
details on getting the facilities, bui
by the time we got everything settl-
ed, the Nov. 20 d.v.c was bought by
V ake Forest
After that, Sune said, the Ma mm
Attractions c ommittee learned that
Benatai Mad extended her tour by
. day to include Dec. I. rhe tout
' iginalh scheduled bet
A .1
Nov. 1
No. M).
"Because ol hei (Benatar's)
popularity, we decided to go ahead
and go foi the Dec. I date that
opened up Sune said. According
to Sune. a survey conducted with
ECU students three weeks ago in-
dicated that Benatar had a good
following on campus, "his week.
Benatai is number five on the
Billboard charts, and has recently
been featured on the cover ol Roll-
ing Stone magazine.
ccording to Sune. however.
E( I Athletic Directoi Dr. Ken Kan-
said the basketball teams both
the men's and the women's �
would not reschedule their Dec. 1
pi act ice.
According to Sune. l)i Kan and
others involved with scheduling in
Minges have been "cordial and
cooperative but did not want to
change the team's practice routine.
i he I ,id Pirates will play (Hd
Dominion I niversity in Minges on
Dec. 3, and the Pirates leave Green-
v ille Dec. 2 to tra el to the Univ ersi-
iv oi Maine foi a Dec. 3 game.
rhe teams are slated to practive
about two or three each in Minges
on Dec. I.
Sune said he spoke to Kan last
rhursday. When Kan turned down
the idea. Sune said he made an ap-
�ee CONCERT, Page 3
Cold Weather Draws
More Campus Strays
B Mlkl NOON AN
in
past ��� ee k .
"running at large" on
� pus in violation
ignt aogs
the ECl
City ol
Greenville leash law were impound-
ed at the requesi ol the ECl campus
police. The city wale leash law ex-
tends onto the campus
c
cor ui
No. 441.
Chaptei 5, Knw a . S. 5-1 1 tie
presence ol any stray animal, within
the corporate limits ol the City is
hereby declared to be a public
nuisance, such animals arc a threat
to the health oi the community and
v of persons and propel
ty alike In ordei to abate this pro-
blem tl
v created the divi-
sion of animal control ol the city
which shall be composed ol an
Animal Control Officer appointed
bv the City Manager to serve as
head ol the division, and such othei
employees as the c "ity Council shall
deem necessary
Among the duties outlined in the
ordinance for the Animal Control
Officer are seeing that all dogs in the
city are duly licensed and adequately
innoculated against rabies, supervis-
ing and being in charge ol the city's
animal sheltei and enforcing all the
provisions outlined in the or-
dinance
According to a spokesman for the
division oi animal control, the pro-
blent oi dogs on campus did not
become a problem until about two
weeks ago. With the onset oi coldei
weather, the problem increases as
dogs seek extra food from garbage
cans, dumpsters and any othei
possible sources.
"Running at huge and stray" art:
defined in the ordinance as "any
animal which, does not wear a tag or
other emblem, or which has not
been vaccinated, or which is not
cared for or harbored or maintained
according to applicable laws
1 he ordinance further states
"Every person owning or having
possession, charge, care, custody or
control ol any dog shall keep such
dog exclusively upon his own
premisis, provided however, that
such dog may be oii such premisis if
it be under the control oi a compe-
tent person and restrained bv a
chain or leash or other means oi
adequate physical control.
"It shall be unlawful for any dog
owner to keep or have within the ci-
ty a dog that habitually or repeated
Iv chases, snaps at, attacks, or barks
at pedestrians, bicyclists or vehicles,
or turns over garbage can pails, or
damages gardens, flowers, or
vegetables or conducts itself as to be
a public nuisance for permits a
female dog to run at large during the
erotic stage oi copulation
Any dog that is picked up by the
Animal Control Officer will be im-
pounded at the city animal shelter
located off W. Fifth St. behind
Greenwood Cemetery.
If a dog is impounded as a result
oi negligence on the part oi the
owner, the division "shall hold such
animal for a period oi three days
set DOG, Pane 3
Left-Handers Subject Of
Scientific Research Here
H (,KK(.I I I t llliinu K
M t Mdi. jl VSnier
Gammy, keggv, quif-
fy. bawky, watty.
wacky-handed, kay-
pawed.
The British have
coined the most names
for that significant
minority in the popula-
tion who possess one-
trait that has made
them the target of occa-
sional enmity and
suspicion throughout
history.
These are the five to
15 percent of the
population who are
left-handed - more
commonly known to
North Americans as
"southpaws
left-handers,
because they are the ex-
ception to the rule of
right-handedness, have
been accused oi being
mentally retarded,
stubborn, inclined to
lead lives of crime,
pooi in penmanship
and unlucky, to name a
tew oi the negative
labels placed upon
them.
But what causes lefi-
handedness? During re-
Homecoming 1980
Homecoming festivities went into full swing this weekend as EC I
defeated opponents 24-14. Sigma Nu fraternity won First Place in
the float competition with their "Free Spirit" theme pictured
above. Hrt runners-up in the competition was Alpha Phi sorority.
At right. Chancellor Thomas Brewer and SG A President Charlie
sherrod pose with Homecoming Pirate Ann eager and her escort.
Photon by JON JORDAN
Flaihl
1 C lstudi; n t sandthe
general publicareinvited to
aend a BeatCaroUnarally
that willbe 1ield iit thePhi
Kappa Iau house.locati:c at
409 Elizabeth Street, at 4p.m.
1 hursday
1 ortyfreekeesofyour
favoritebeverage will be mi
tap, anda livebandis selledul-
ed to piay.
Candidate's Debate To Replay
Anyone who did not see the na-
tionally televised debate between
John Anderson and Ronald Reagan
will be able to see a videotaped
replay oi the event Wednesday
night, according to Drake Mann,
one of the organizers oi the show
ing.
"It's not going to be a partisan
meeting said Mann, who is con
nected with the Independents for
Anderson group at ECU. "It's not
going to be pro-Anderson or pro-
Reagan. The showing is strictly for
educational purposes
Mann said there would be a
discussion alter the debates are
shown, "We'd like to talk about the
impact oi the debates he said.
"For instance, why didn't it have
the expected impact for Anderson'
The discussion is really the mam
thing � it's a chance for a group oi
people to discuss the event
The showing will be held in the
Joyner l.ibrarv auditorium. Mann
said. "We'll have several TV sere
set up around the auditorium, and
there will also be refreshments
soft drinks and doughnuts he ad
ded.
Mann said that the videotape was
made locally at the time oi the
original broadcast.
The debate replay will begin ai
7:30, Wed Oct. 22.
Rebel Staffers Dissatisfied
By MIKE NOON AN
�� .���'� News r dilnr
I he Rebel is here! has become the common ex-
clamation in literary and artistic circles on cam-
pus. However. Editor Kathy Crisp and the Rebel
staff are less than delighted with the quality oi
the magazine's second printing.
The magazine was returned to National Prin-
tiong c o. in Greenville in April because of incon-
sistency in the color reproduction. It was
reprinted on agreement by the printer, but some
oi the same problems still plague the literary and
fine arts magazine.
"Over all, it is vastly improved from the first
printing, but the print quality is still ques-
tionable said Crisp.
" The inside is especially improved. They have
worked harder at getting the color consistant.
But half the boxes we have opened have a green
tint running across the front cover she added.
"The back cover is scratched in some places,
and there are horizontal smudges and streaks visi-
ble on most copies. 1 don't know what caused it
except that it has something to do with the
printer's method oi color reproduction she said
There were 6,tXK) copies of the Rebel printed at
a cost oi $9,(XX). The second printing was done at
no additinal cost. So far, 4.000 copies oi the
magazine have been distributed across campus.
"The problem is that we paid for the work
back in April, and we kept getting put off by the
printer. This issue was supposed to hit campus
las! April she added.
"We really don't have time to pursue this. 1
have a magazine to get out for this year Crisp
said.
Submissions to the 1980-81 Rebel will be ac-
cepted Nov. 20. There wil be a contest to deter-
mine the best poetry, literature and artwork with
winners receiving cash prizes
In mid-January, there will be an art show in the
Greenville Art Center on Evans Street which will
feature all the artwork accepted by the publica-
tion. As much of the submitted artwork as possi-
ble will be hung also, according to Crisp
Judges are now being screened for the contest.
No members oi the Rebel staff will serve as
judges. There will be eight categories.
cent years, research on
the subject has
snowballed, and a
geneticist at the East
Carolina University
School oi Medicine is
one oi the many in-
vestigators who believe
that the preference for
the left hand is not
chosen by an individual
but determined by the
organization of the
brain.
"There is a segment
of the population
whose brain is built dif-
RFSFARCH, Page 3
Hypnosis Clinic Focuses
On Smoker's And Dieter's
Attitudes And Emotions
Photo by GARY PATTERSON
Smokey Joins Parade
Children delighted to the antics of Smokey the Bear in Saturday's parade.
If overeaten can change their at-
titudes toward food, they can lose
weight.
If smokers can change their at-
titudes toward cigarettes, they can
give up smoking.
Accomplishing these things is the
point of hypnosis clinics being of-
fered by the American Lung
Association of North Carolina,
Eastern Region, in Greenville on
Oct. 28 and in New Bern on Oct. 29.
Participants will relax during
three group hypnotic inductions
while Greer gives suggestions to
their subconscious minds. They will
each receive literature and a cassette
tape for reinforcement of the sug-
gestions at home.
Greer uses hypnosis to help peo-
ple change their emotional attitudes
that prevent them from ac-
complishing the changes they want.
"The constant conflict between a
smoker's intelligence and emotions
make 'will power' quitting dif-
ficult Greer says. "A person's in-
telligence wants to quit smoking,
but his emotions still need the
gratification smoking gives him.
Hypnosis helps a person convert to
a non-smoker, rather than give up
something he still wants to do
In the $30 stop smoking clinics.
Greer will regress smokers to the
time when they smoked their first
cigarettes, with the coughing and
terrible taste it caused. He will also
give suggestions to keep participants
from substituting food for cigaret-
tes.
See HYPNOSIS, Page 3
On The Inside
Announcements2
Editorials4
Classifieds10
Letters4
State Fair5
Victory8







I IU I s (. KOI ISI-W (K IOHI K 21, 1480
Announcements
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Ml y irs old
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For if1 fifth ��� live year.
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TOURNAMENT
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Febi
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PHI BETA LAMBDA
Ph Beta Lambda Aiii met I
Tuesday October 21 in rm 101 at
4 00 pm m Mendenhall Stu
Center Comm Itees will meet tor
planning purposes so all
members are urged to attend 1 t .
guest speaker will be Mr Joseph
High, who S with personnel in
union Carbide Lefs maKe Mr
High s efforts worthwhile by hav
mg all member! attending his
presentation
GEOLOGICAL
SURVEY
The Geologu al Survey is now
recruiting students who wish to
betotnr involved n the i an � i
fields of Geology Geophys
Hydrology Chemistry and i
tography Qualifications forma
tion sheets and api
,i lable in the c at eet ' a i
ind Placen ent Center lo iti
the B �' n House
CSO
The Center for Student Oppor
tunities .CSOi m the School of
�. has immediate openings
for qualified tutors j. II . i� rtisi
m math physics and chemistry
You must have an academic
record ot high performance in the
subiec t area Wage based on
academic classification e g
undergraduate, graduate Conta I
Dr Frye 217 Whichard Annex or
call 7S7 612? or 6075 for an inter
RAFFLE
Win $500 00 in r�S ' �:
youi ' � e Iron the Re or d Bar
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rds registei by mail to
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PHI BETA
LAMBDA
PPHA
Pi j
H
;i at 5
ft �
PPH
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ran Cultural
a ret ently charl
rganization �� I � i
minority student
eeding - i healtl
wl
PPH. ' .
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BILLIARDS
� � � w for the A( I I All
Worv 31 � Tour
� � � � � l Wi � � lay Ch
ble elin nation i I
rnamem letern
, epri
-� thi ��� men's I
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� . rtw �
lent � tudenl
an la will meel
lay lober ; I at 4 p.n
Raw ' '� � Novembei
member al
lendai � i � red � uuest
� � Joseph High
�' pet ' n Union
Cart, li - V �� ,i set
' Is �'� rtl while by having an
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AMA
niey Chaptei ol the
Amei � Marketing Ass ation
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���� 198
- i .�. i Ber
AN EVENING
WITH
MIKE
CROSS
SAAD'S SHOE
RKPAIR
I ILirandf Avc.
758-1228
Qualiu Kiiiaii
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KodaKhrofTM? o' Eii!�rhfom�
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PROCESSING
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I
TEST TAKING
is surviving � id cally and
enioymy i 0II 91 lift a rea
goal for college students? rtw
University Counseling Centei
st.iit j � 1 . . � ' so an I an iffi i ing
tandem mini series sessions on
time management and how to
list taking an. . I.
Students may participate in any
or all sessions The first sessions
on time management will bi
ducted Monday and Tuesday Oc
ti bei 7' and 28 from 3 4 p m in
Room 305 Wright Anne. The ss
sions on how to ridui 1 test tat
anxiety will be � ondui led Wi di
day and Thursday Octotn I . - II
30 from 3 4 p m m roon
.�.1 iht Annex
Sessions are a lal U 1
students free of harge Inten ��
students may 1 all thi- Umv
Counselinq Centei
turtr 11 � � il 1
is not rq
WOMEN &
JUSTICE
I he pul nvited 1 i irn thi
issues e � rn n1 tuation of
women in regards lo � 1 minal
� . it 1 .� � meeting � I �
� men Voters, fl p m ,
I rst Presbyterian Chui ' I4tl
II 1 �
a panel of ii. � rrection a
� 1 �� ritiei a pn ent
iding: Sheriff Ralpt
Irid Attorni , Nai �
Bar n ,1. env ille Poli e and
STaft Attorney ly Cai � . �
� � I . ' � � hi Halfwa
e for W � � �
ft ta ew with a formei
won it I both pi ind
e will be presi '
from se.
bservi
both thi entra
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DAVIS
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On Tm �.���;�
honor � . ty �
dinner at Pai kei Bar I
Drivi ! ' �
�� 1.
� .
licer wl ��-
print � . peal
. . 1
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PHI SIGMA PI
rauChapi � '�
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ts ��' ' .
I 00 1
leer rest
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NOV. 4. 1980
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JASON'S
UNDER NEW MANSGEMENT-WE ARE NOW
OPEN FOR BREAKFAST. WEEKDAYS FROM
11-10 WEEKENDS 11 -11 WE ALSO OFFER DAILY
LUNCH AND DINNER SPECIALS
MONDAY:Sourdough Cheeseburger (lunch)2.29
2 pc�. Fried Chicken Breast Fillet3.19
TUESDAY:Tuna Salad Sandwich (lunch)1.99
Ground Beef Steak (dinner)2.99
WEDNESDAY:Ham & Cheese Sandwich (lunch)1.49
Shimp Basket (dinner)3.99
THURSDAY:Ruben (lunch)2.39
Large Chefs Salad (dinner)1.99
FRIDAY:Fish Sandwich (lunch)1.89
Oyster Basket (dinner)3.49
EVERY SATURDAY
All the Spagetti you can eat with tossed salad $2.29
EVERY SUNDAY
All Lunch Specials come with FF.Pickle.and choice of one $4.49
vegtable.
All Dinner Specials come with FF.or Baked Potatoe and
choice of 2 vegtables
10 Discount for all ECU Student with I.D.
� Discount does not apply to Lunch & Dinner op
Weekend,or Beer Specials.
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I HI 1 ST KM IM AN
( u loHl K 21 I W
I
L
S I
�J
Researchers Link Left-Handedness To Brain Development
Continued Front Pag� 1
terently, and we're u v
ing lo find out whv
WtVS l)l
Charles 1
Boklage, assistant pro
lessor ot microbiolocv
Scientists and physi-
cians have attributed
handedness to struc
uuai asymmetries ol
human bods .
conditioning.
pathologica mdition
ol the and
hercditai mechanisms.
According to
Boklage, the nan for
left-handedness, which
is often hereditary, is
t elated to the basic
organization of the left
Ad right sides ol the
brain.
" Ml the basic sym-
metries and asym
metrics oi the human
bod are established in
cells in the first two
weeks ol gestation
s,iw Boklage "We
have some evidence
that the trait is laid
down extremely early in
the development of the
embryo, perhaps as
early as the first five or
si cell divisions ot the
newly fertilized human
egg
"In theii early
d e vel o p m en t, e g g s
know what to do �how
to make a person, a
pupp oi a cow 1 hey
also have information
lhal discern- 'left' from
'nght and that's why
vou don't see a person
with a left hand attach-
ed to a right arm says
Boklage, who admits it
is not known exactlv
how this left-right in-
formation is transmit-
ted.
What studies do
show is that most left-
handed children have
two right-handed
parents. More left-
handedness occurs
among artists than non-
artists and particularly
among architects. 1 eft-
handed people are
more flexible in their
hand preference and
have more unusual
fingerprints.
Furthermore, left-
handed people are
more likely to lose then
speech as a result ol a
brain injury, but the)
are also more likely
than a right-handed
pei son to recovei the
ability foi speech.
Boklage attributes this
fact to studies which
show that 5 pei cent of
right-handed people
have speech centei s on
the left side ot the
brain, while as main as
6() percent of left
handed people have
some speev h abilities in
the right hemisphere.
In a recently publish-
ed hook, Boklage
reveals the results of a
studv he conducted on
800 identical and
fraternal twins and
their families.
He found that it
eithei one oi both ol
the parents were let!
handed, they, were 50
Concert Plans Scrapped
Continued I ruin I'ane I
pointment with Chancelloi Brewei
to seek a solution, bu
upheld Kai r's decision.
" e had to move verv fast 1 I
know something by Friday al
Dec 1 '�- proba
ady been -old by now Sune
said
�1 cannot speak foi Di. Karr, or
c oa.i Odom, oi Coach Andruzzi
Sune saul "1 don't know I'm no!
a coach, and it's not tor me to sav
it we missed a tew hous prac-
tice, thai i! wouldn't do am damage
to oui basketball program. Maybe it
mieht, but personally, I don't think
so
lVntidkO
percent more hkelv to
have a let! handed
child. He also
documented that left
handed patents were
more hkelv to have
twins.
1 urthermoi e. t he
results showed that left
handedness occurs
almost twice as often in
twins as in single
children and thai
patents ot twins have
twice as much left-
handedness as then
ow n brothers and
sisters.
Boklage also un-
covered an unusual
relationship between
schizophrenia and hand
preference. He found
that schizophrenic
identical twins in which
eithei twin was left-
handed spent less tune
in the hospital and
usually were diagnosed
as hav ing a mildei foi m
of the disease
" 1 he correlation bet
ween twins and left
handedness may be a'
tributable to the unique
cell divisions thai
prepare the egg tot ter
t il i.i! i 'ii . ' ' said
Boklage, who recen
lead a session on the
biology ot twinning
and presented
research on handedness
A the International
Congress on IT win
Studies in Jerusalem.
"It is also during this
earlv stage of embryo
development that left
and right information
is transmitted, an I vve
believe 'ha! hand
preference is linked to
the differences in the
let! and right
hemispheres ot the
brain
In al! the universe,
Boklage savs. let'
mosl ii
tan! in the h
brain, .t left-
handers t he �.
tions to the rule are
prov iding clues h I
oi ganization
Pm�thiM a
Dog Owners Pay Fines
Before Reclaiming Pets

jiHii-n-
( ontinued from Page 1
ch lime the owner ol the
ill be notified and allowed
m the annual upon payrr
i �1
.1 on the
and the
. ng that the
- m the div ision's possession
be sold to she first
bei ot the public paving tor it it
the ow net within
period oi redemp
In case ot dogs is, the
. l redempiion is three days
� the animal is impounded. It
nal is noi redeemed oi sold,
nimal C
inue i mimal toi
the
animal in a
humane mannei
the division shall charge and col
leel the following tees from owners
heir animals. 1 here is
i s- fee charged foi
animal, and a SI a day tceding
It the animal to be redeemed,
is not licensed ot innoculated as re-
quired by law, the ownei must
secure a propel license and have the
animal innoculated at the cos! ot $3
before the animal may be redeemed.
acc, o the ordinance.
1 oi cacti animal fhal is impound-
ed mote than one hire within a
12 month period, the impounding
tee is increased by S2 50.
1 lie ordinance further states
civil penalties risked by dog owners
who dv not adhere to the ordinance.
"Any person who violates any
vision ot this chapter will be sub
- to a Si5 civil penalty foi "Lack
ot restrain! by chain ot leash" ot
charged $5 foi failure to obey any
othei provision outlined in the or-
nance.
V present, there are about 11
animals al the animal shelter waiting
to be claimed by their owner or pur-
chased as provided lor in the or-
dinance, according to a spokesman
the animal control.
1 kwfthfii
I tOMftMN
V 3 -
W
Disney Stamps
Countries of the British Commonwealth paid tribute
t Disney characters this summer with lhes slumps.
Hypnosis Can Help Dieters
Continued from Page 1
In the SZ. weighi control clinics,
Greei stresses overco hangups
that drive people to cat too much.
" 1 he kev to losing weight Is- mak-
ing a lite change, no! a temporary
body change Greei says. "Dieters
tisuallv get on the yo yo syndrome,
taking off weight and then putting ii
back on. That's because they
haven't reprogrammed then minds
to enjoy nutritious !ods and propel
eating habits
Greei gives suggt ns to
reprogram attitudes that make peo
pie feel they should eai every bite on
their plates and thai make them
look upon sweets as rewards
1 he stop smokmg clinics will be at
6:30 p.m. and the weight loss Junes
at 8:30 p.m. on ct. 28 in Sreenville
ai the Ramade Inn. 264 By-Pass,
and Oct. 2-) in New Ben at the
. raven Community College VI
ministration Building
It is time to get ready for the
Big Game.
PHI KAPPA
4:00 p.m. yy jhur.
Golden the 23rd.
Beverage D C A T
CAROLINA
PEP RALLY
Everyone come and Party ana
Cheer with the ECU Cheer
leaders and Talk Of The
Town. Everything is
happening at the
Phi Kappa Tau House
409 THANK YOU
Elizabeth st. SPONSORS
jiU liL&IiJU
FREE FRISBEE
THIS WEEK
AT THE
JUNCTION
JUST SHOW YOUR
ECU I.D.
COME BY AND
SEE US AT THE
JUNCTION
Dew it with
Mountain Dew
Mountain Devi'from Pepsi Cola, the totally
different soft drink with the lemony-fresh flavor
that's like nothing else you ever tasted
� ��
j

s'v
m
�am
Bottled by PEPSt COLA BOTTLif4G COot Greerw.lle Inc 1809 D.ckenson Ave GwenviHe.NC
unde� opp' from PEPSICO "NC

1





�lie iEaat (Earnltman
Set ving (he campus community since 1925.
Rl( H ki)(iKl I N, i
1 t KKN HERNDON, , i .
Chris 1 K HOK,
Cit (K .1 HETTICH. i w
Am i 1 N( si I k. , w. ,
1'
11 kkv Gray, ��, m
Lisa Dki w
Chari i s Chandi i K. s
1) W II) NoKKls. i
ounhct 21. 1980
Opinion
Page 4
Concert
Pat Benatar Called Off
Due To Basketball Practice
I he Major Attractions Commit-
tee had planned to schedule a con-
cert with female recording artist Pat
Benatar on Monday, Dec. 1, in
Minges Coliseum, hut the building
will be used foi basketball practice
that night. In other words, no con-
cert .
Do the coaches have a valid claim
in that the basketball teams, both
men's and women's, will need that
day for practice? The men's team
will leave for Maine on Dec. 2, and
the women's team will play ODU in
Minges on Dec. 3. Some students
might disagree.
Another important question is the
availability o' the coliseum for any
concert. The building is reserved far
in advance with definite priorities:
academics first, intercollegiate
sports second, intramurals third,
and finally other. Dr. Wayne Ed-
wards, director of intramurals, was
very cooperative in offering to
reschedule intramural activities in
Minges on the proposed concert
date. Dr. Ray Martinez, chairman
of the department, was also willing
to cancel classes that day. But inter-
collegiate sports presented the final
roadblock.
Because scheduling occurs so far
in advance, it is almost impossible
for Major Attractions to get an
open day in Minges. In other words,
the bands that students get to hear
are determined by the availability of
the coliseum. A concert with Boston
was cancelled in January 1979
because of intramural activties. And
now Pat Benatar, because of
basketball practice.
It seems that ECU students won't
be able to enjoy another major con-
cert until late spring, according to
Charles Sune, chairman of the con-
cert committee. But students have a
huge investment in Minges Col-
iseum, and something must be done
in the near future to ensure at least
one desired concert date each
semester.
Minority Seat Unnecessary
The ECU Media Board has pro-
posed several amendments to its
constitution that will have long-
lasting effects on the board and the
campus media.
Upon further consideration, the
board reversed its proposal to
reduce the Student Resident
Association (SRA, formerly WRC
and MRC) representation to one
vote. SRA will have two votes, and
the board should be commended for
the change. But we must continue to
take issue with the proposed seat for
SOULS under the facade oi minori-
ty representation.
The Media Board seems to be
forgetting some very important
facts: the SGa president represents
all 13,(XX) ECU students; the SRA
representatives speak for all dorm
students, black, white and other;
the Student Union president also
represents all students; and last and
not least, the day student represen-
tative must answer to the majority
and minorities.
And what about other board
members � the vice chancellor for
Student Life? And the dean oi Stu-
dent Affairs? Are they not represen-
tatives for all students? Of course
they are.
It is our very strong opinion that
all students are being represented
fairly on the present board. None of
the present members were elected or
appointed to serve "the majority
their jobs are to represent all
students, regardless of race. And
they do.
In the special Oct. 8 meeting of
the Media Board, SOULS President
Gracie Wells asked if there was a
minority board member when the
Ebony Herald (former minority
publication) folded, as if to imply
that a "majority" board was
responsible. Actually, the board
fought to maintain the Herald. The
reason that the Herald ceased to ex-
ist was due only to lack of minority
interest. No one applied for the
position of editor.
The very language used in the
meeting seemed to suggest that the
present board represents only white
students. The board members know
this is false, yet to back a minority
position would seem to be an admis-
sion that they are not representing
minorities. Nothing could be fur-
ther from the truth.
Again we call on the Media Board
to reject this proposal in the best in-
terests of ALL students and the
universitv.
MvJiO MWUs '
i�Campus Forum
'Biased, Incorrect Opinion'
In the October 16 edition o this
newspaper an opinion was printed which
was not only biased but incorrect as
well.
SOULS is a minority organization.
The Society of United I iberal Students
was first established to be a represen-
tative group tor minorities on campus.
It you consider all the minorities on
campus a tiny part of the student body
check the statistics
GRACIE WEI IS
President ol SOULS
Senior. Political Science
I am writing in reference to the
editorial "No Minority Scat Needed" in
the October 16 edition. 1 must say first
that all items covered in this paper are
not newsworthy in my opinion. I do not
believe that the features section of this
paper strictly covers newsworthy events.
S.O.U.L.S. is the representative body
for minority students. Each minority has
the opportunity to join this organization
if they choose to do so. This organiza-
tion is small in number, but if I am not
mistaken, minority does mean small in
number, otherwise it would not be term-
ed minority. This point that the editor
made about S.O.U.L.S. being a small
organization is irrelevant. The point is
that the media gets part of their money
from minorities as well as any other
facet o this University including the
University as a whole. 1 see nothing
wrong with creating a minority seat on
the Media Board. It could help this
University, not hurt it.
EULAMOORl
Senior, Political Science
Fall Break Justified
Editors' Note: The following is an
open letter to Dr. Floyd Mattheis, chair-
man of the Calendar Committee.
As SO A President, the chief represen-
tative o the students, 1 feel that the
SGA Fall Break Survey indicates that
ECU students want a two day fall break
in the month of October. The survev
presented to your committee also con-
clusively indicates that students arc will-
ing to make up the last class days by
beginning school earlier in August.
If the Calendar Committee desires to
research the issue further, then please do
so. My position should be clear. 1 want
the Calendar Committee to form the
19N3-84 school calendar that includes a
two day Fall Break in October.
CHARI 11 SHERROD
SGA President
'It Did Take Two'
"II " abortions are to be considered
murder and therefore illegal, then
legislation should be dratted making the
father equally responsible for the child.
In which case, if the mother is unable or
unwilling to accept custody, then it
would automatically fall to the lather oi
the child. This would also give the unw
ed father custodial rights should lie seek
them in court, and require that he con-
tribute to the support o the child until it
reached the age o majority.
At present, the abortion issue com-
pletely ignores the implied responsibilty
on the part o' the father. It men vere re
quired to either help support, or keep
and raise the illegitimate children they
fathered, there would be an abrupt drop
in illegitimate births.
Logically, it neither ot them wants the
responsibility o the child, and someone
has to go to jail for murder, then it
should be both of them; it did take two.
REBECCA IVANS
Senior, Communication Arts
Foreign Films: Poor Sound
We would like to express our ap-
preciation to the International films
Committee o MSCUFC for their ex-
cellent program ot films scheduled to be
shown this academic year � however,
the poor sound quality takes much awav
from what should be a pleasant learn-
ing cultural experience. It is quite
distressing for a senior level French ma-
jor to go to a French film and have to
resort to reading subtitles in order to
follow the story-line. You have no idea
how many formerly confident French
students walked out o the Oct. 8th
showing o' Iruffauts' "400 Blows" rid-
dled with self-doubt and inquiring about
the dates for change o major � it was
not until the next day that we discovered
native speakers in the audience could not
understand the dialogue either! While
this discovery may have restored some
shattered egos, it also brought to light
another problem. We would like to sug-
gest to the Films Committee, that
it when they preview future foreign
films, they consult a native speaker ot
the language in question and adjust the
sound according to their recommenda-
tions. Excelleni films should not be mar-
red bv less than excellent sound.
PAME1 A DIFFEE
President,
International I anguageOrg.
'Getting Moneys Worth'
On one Tuesday afternoon when I he
last Carolinian office was vacant, 1
dropped by to leave a message tor the
secretary. While 1 was there, the phone
rang, and when I answered it, a voung
lady began to "burn my ear" because
she had not received a paper in her dorm
room and all the papers delivered to the
lobby of the dorm were gom "We're
not getting our money's worth she
cried.
Whal this voung ladv tailed to realize
(or at least tailed to mention) was the
tact that there were plenty ot papers at
Mendenhall, the hbraiy. the Students
Supply Store and several Other places
around campus, (i know because 1 had
just walked across campus and had seen
them.) Not only does a great deal ot
work go into providing a newspaper thai
is verv inexpensive io the students, bul
also making it available ail over campus.
It there are no paper- available at one
particular place on campus, test assured
there are plentv in one of the attractive
racks only a short walk awav.
(Remember walking')
So before you think that you are not
"getting vour money's worth" from
your campus paper, remember that il
not only costs you verv little, but it i-
also readily available all over campus.
C. DAVIDK1KII
Dav Student RepChairman,
ECU Media Board
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points oj view. Mail or
drop them by our at lit c in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner I ibrary.
letters must include the name, major
and classification, address, phone
number and signature oj the author(s).
I etters should he limited to due
typewritten pages, double-spaced, or
neatly printed. All letters are subject to
editing lor brevity, obscenity and In
To The Right
ERA Proponents Ante Up With Ratification Extension
s
B STAN R1DGLEY
One of the surest ways to reduce a
friendly discussion to the level of
gut-wrenching combat is to hint to a
feminist that you oppose the Fqual
Rights Amendment. Then, cover up
and wait for the storm.
This is not to say that proponents
of ERA are any less rational than
opponents of ERA. There are some
very articulate, influential, and
principled persons who honestly
believe the answer to illegal sex
discrimination in this country is
passage of a constitutional amend-
ment. And it is astounding that
these otherwise rational persons can
be reduced to spluttering incoheren
cy by merely disagreeing with them
on the subject.
That is the crux o the problem:
Most, if not all, ERA proponents
feel that their cause is so just, so
necessary, so self-evidently correct
�hat there is no room for disagree-
ment. And there isn't�on the prin-
ciple of equal rights. But there is
plenty to disagree with in the effort
by some activist groups to ram
through ratification of an
undesirable amendment.
That is the distinction: there is a
difference between favoring equal
rights for women and favoring an
Equal Rights Amendment.
Just what does the proposed ERA
say? Many people on both sides of
the issue have never read the amend-
ment. Here it is for the uninitiated:
"Once ratified by 34 of the stale
legislatures, this amendment will
prohibit discrimination based on sex
bv any taw or action of any govern-
ment�federal, state, or local
Don't be fooled by the innocuous
language: the amendment is more
than enough of a pandora's box.
ERA proponents are mistaken in
their seemingly universal belief that
passage of the amendment will bring
an immediate panacea of blessings
on American society. Not so, says
prominent ERA backer and feminist
Clare Boothe Luce: "There are
some millions of women�especially
young women�who view the
passage of ERA with the same
mystic faith in its efficacy that
Negroes' had in the Emancipation
Proclamation.
the proponents of ERA great-
ly exaggerate the benefits that will
flow from its passage
Ironically, no more benefits will
flow from the passage of ERA than
if present statutes were adequately
and vigorously enforced. Equality
under the law is already guaranteed
by the 14th amendment which says
in part: No state shall make or en-
force any law which shall abridge
the privileges r immunities of
citizens of the United States: nor
shall any statedeny to any person
within its jurisdiction the equal pro-
tection of the law
Title XII and the Equal Pay Act
also treat the problem of sex
discrimination; the problem is en-
forcement, not legislation.
But more disturbing than the
ramifications of an as yet unpassed
constitutional amendment is the ap-
parent intolerance of ERA pro-
ponents to any difference of opi-
nion. Thomas Jefferson realized
that persons, though created equal,
might have variations in ideas and
opinions. Said he: "Differences ot
opinionlike differences of face,
are a law of our nature, and should
be viewed with the same toleranc
These honest differences of opi-
nion, in the case of ERA and any
other constitutional amendment,
are debated in both houses of con-
gress. After a two-thirds vote by
both houses, the amendment is sent
to the states for ratification by a
three-fourths majority. In the case
of ERA, 38 states must ratify.
ERA was sent to the states in 1972
for consideration. Many states
quickly ratified it; others did not.
The number of states now is stuck at
35 while as many as five have
rescinded ratification, a move that
has yet to be ruled legal by the
courts.
When it appeared that ERA
would not be ratified in the
customary seven years' time, pro-
ponents shouting "no time limit on
human rights" pushed for extension
of the time limit for ratification
while at the same time declaring
rescission b states illegal. Poker
players know what this is called.
How long must this endless
debate go on before the issue is put
to rest? How main times must anti-
ERA forces have to prove that ERA
is neither needed nor wanted by the
number of states needed to ratify it.
Will the next move bv ERA pro
ponenis be to force congress to
reduce the number of states needed
for ratification to 35?
This is not a condemnation of
ERA. merely a reprimand tor the
uncivil behavior and self-righteous
indignation ot main ot its sup-
porters. These ERA people have a
legitimate opinion. But they must
realize that no special significance
attaches itself to ERA simply
because 'hey feel si rough towards
it. It's just anothei amend-
ment�which main people oppose.
The Republican Party plattorm
for 1980 summarizes the issue sUe
cinctly: "We acknowledge the
legitimate ettorts of those who sup-
port or oppose ratification ot the
ERA. (The state legislatures) have a
constitutional right to accept or re-
lect it without federal interference
or pressure
Just so.
�,an N'dgley is a senior Political
Science major with a degree in jour-
nalism from the Universitv of Worth
Carolina at Chapel HtH
Fl
C
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1 HI 1 si c Ri XN
Features
i m k :i. i
ItLl 5
U
State Fair Involves 100 Counties
B MARC BARNES
"l�i VN Ml, :
Features ai this year's fail include:
� 1 he Village of Yesteryear. Located in a dome
It s nothing new. It's been going on since 1867 structure, this exhibit gives craftsmen from across N.(
1 lie Male Fair, which will run daily from 9:00 a place to show and sell then wares.
through 12 midnight through next Sunday, is the � I he North Carolina Department oi Fisheries I
cu' n ol an entire year's worth ot work. hibit. Here, fish from the N. . coast, as well as inland
water s are on display.
"We ve already set the dates tot the next ten years,
and the theme for next year said State Fair Director ol � I he Billion Dollai Discovery. Sponsored b the
Public At lairs F. Carlyle league. "We plan gradually, N Agriculture Extension Service, this exhibit has
I gears up " ideas on how to save money on food, clothing, sheltei
II Fair, a separate division within the North and energyOutside this exhibit are several operational
D partmenl ol Agriculture has added new solai energy systems, which were constructed In high
pavement, lighting and renovations to school students
Idines.
1 a i had i $.000 exhibits involving dp
inn .vk;k; n wm where children (and citv slickers) can eniei and pe
xtiinitois tiom al! 1(h) counties I"
arolina, according to league. I he fail employs
600 people, including food vendors, security
ds, ride operators and performers.
Children's Barnyard. I his is an open barnyard
city slii
and pig
nnual 1 oik Festival. Located next to
Dorton Arena, the 1 oik Festival features dogging.
stieej
smooth dancing, country and western music, blue grass
bands and ballandry in three shows daily ai 11:00 a.m
and 2:00 and 5:00 p.m.
� Musical entertainment. Every night at 7:00, a dif-
ferent act will take the stage at the Dorton Arena. I he
acts tot the rest o the week include I he Spinners (Oci
21); Dottie West (Oct. 22); Johnnie Dun.an (Oct. 23);
rammy Wynette (Oct. 24); and Charlie Rich (Oct. 25).
� I he midway. Operated by James 1 . Strates
Shows, has approximately 70 tides, from the daring to
the sedentary.
� 1 lie tood. You can get hot dogs, pizza, Greek and
Japanese foods like baklava and eggrolls, barbecue,
tried chicken and a host ot other gastronomical delights
at ovei $00 places on the fairgrounds. A recommenda-
tion is the long line ol sit-down cafeteria-style places
neat the grandstand. Usually run b churches, these
places have tood as good it not better than Mom's.
� rhe Grandstand Here, you will find all kinds ol
entertainment, form stunt driving to tractor fulls.
I lie best part of the 1 air is that you can get there from
here. lake 264 West until it ends on the other side ol
Wilson You will then be on N.C. 64. look foi the
I iwei Shoppingenter on your right on the outskirts
ol Raleigh. lake the First exit to the right (the one which
says "To 70"). Stay on this road until you see an �
marked Cartel Stadium State Fairgrounds lhen,
follow the directions ol the Highway Patrolmen who
will be directing traffic. 1: takes about two hours fn
the time ou lease Grt
youi cat.
reenville until the time you park
Even with all the planning and final organic
reague said the fair was depending on natun
help. "It will depend on the weathei as far as I Ads
are concerned he said. "Still, I think the fa ' is
one ol the best we've ever had
Artist George Brett
Exhibits Rare Works
One of the man Homecoming events that look place this ear was the (.erman October Festival, which was
held on Thursday. October 16 in the parking lot beside the International House. Dancing, drinking and
eating, and more dancing, drinking and eating were among ihe events that took place.
Foreign Language Department Holds
German October Festival Celebration
H N Y MOKRIs
� ���� I ihiiM
le, and
on I hui sday eveninj . �
began early this an Octobei festival look place in
the foreign language the pa; king lot beside the lnl
togethei and tional House. Open to the public ai
ihree dollars was , ol
on wishii
ible wavs to celebrate
8:00
event. After deciding, lected
ilge in hotdogs and bee band
played, and during intermissions the
I . I dancing club would get up to
h German dances, such as the
Poca I he Poca comes from cei
I urope. It is a dance with people
putting people on then shoulders
and going through various
movements in a line toimation.
B NAN(A MOKRIS
Cross Section, a show ol works b Greenville artist
George Brett, will be presented by the Student Union
Art Exhibition Committee from Oct. 20-31.
Brett combines knowledge and creativity to utilize his
talents m Constructive and I abric Design Brett's work
is unique in thai not many people are used to seeing
winks that d not lend themseh es to stylistic categoriza-
tion.
It is not surprising that Bretl was given the honor .it
being m the 1980 Outstanding Young Men ol Amei
organization. As an artist, he doc- � � fine himself
to one area ol concentration. His in econd areas
ol interesi are fibet an and mail art, respectively.
Brett's fibet art is understood by relatively few peo-
ple. "But he says, "1 don't mind explaining
Ihe tool Brett uses to create large fiber pieces is the
knotting machine, winch he feels has been too frequeni
! related to the production of home fashions. He sire!
ched the loosely-knitted elongated panels at various
angles across rooms and lawns to create and del
space.
"Ihe idea ol negative space he says, "has always
been one thai I have enjoyed playing with. I first e
piored this in my black and white photography.
later. I translated this interest while working with
knotted spider webs. Ihe webs brought attention to
two-dimensional spaces that had been previously taken
tor granted: the open space between two branches ol a
tree or between two buildings. I his feeling is perhaps
the primary emphasis ol m work: the utilization ol
'empty space in such a way thai it is not filled noi does
it remain empty
Brett's second interest is mail art. Equally uncom-
mon, it is basically a correspondence art with its roots in
surrealism. He creates work to be associated with ma
such as post card pictures and stamps. "The stamp he
says, "may be an objective correlative; thai is. the
depiction ol an object with which the person identifies
Some o my stamps commemorate eveni
people
Bretl is a correspondence artisl ol interi -
reputation He has exhibited works in places tl
the world. Italy, Holland. Argentina, Belgium and
Sweden, numerous museums and galleries throughi
the United States, including the Southeastern (enter I
Contemporary Artists and the . Museum ol Arts,
' w ol the areas fortunate enouj
d v ei si! led laid
Bret: does no! limit his abilities solely to pr I
objects. He furthei explains the processes, skills, and
the know-how necessary to produce such, works in
various books, essays, and magazines th
wotld. He has written "Mail Art: An Overview"on-
temporary An Southeast. 1980; "International Postal
V' Exhibit Artscope 2. no. 3, summer 1979. His
"Mail Art Populai Art" papei was accepted foi
1978 meeting ol the Popular C ulture V ation ol
South, in October ol 1978.
Brett received his B.F.A. in c obstructive Design from
Florida State University in 1973, and his MIX
Fabric Design from the I niversity ol Georgia in WH
During the tune between attending the two univei
he woiked as an illustrator tor the state ol Florida a
later supported himsell as an artist. He lias been a
dent ol Greenville for two years.
I his is the first opportunity Greenville has had to sec
a large, representative show ol Brett's work. On lues
day. October 21. a: 7:30 p.m. in Room 244 Mendenhall,
Brett will present slides and talk about his work. There
will be a reception and rubbei stamp party aftei ird
Pre-Columbian Incan Loom
Among New ECU Artifacts
By GEORGE A. THREEWI1 Is
1I l s.�. Barm
Anthropology
University.
at East Carolina
OKI i NVU 1 I
An
ancient
A
I aage auv Folles, Best Foreign Film winner of llK �ill be presented
(his Wednesday niyhi at 8:0(1 p.m. in Ihe Hendrix Ifuairr.
La Cage Aux Folles
French Comedy Coming
1 ach yeai in Germany an Octobei
Festival takes place. Music, danc-
ing, and entertainment, along with
dunking, and gaiety takes
Ihe language department loom, used by the Incas ol Peru
hoped to imitate this festival, and main centuries before the Spaniards
succeeded in doing so. Due to a arrived there in the 1500's is among
small budget, and the expense of a large collection ol well preserved
German beer, those partaking settl- Pre-Columbian artifacts acquired
ed for Budweiser, an American beer by the Archaeology laboratory of
with a German name. the Department of Sociology and
Homecoming
Banners, Booze, Alumni Return
Donated for permanent loan b
private collectors, the artifacts in-
clude: textiles, copper, silver, and
bone from Peru; ceramic vessels and
jade from Central America; and
pottery and othei artifacts such as
knives, hatchets and projectile
points from the Mayan area ol
I � Wed � night, (kMobci
i s p - Mei denhall Student
I 's Hendrix I heat re the Stu-
dent I nion I ilms C ommittee will
present the Best Foreign Film win-
ner ' 1979, the outrageous I rench
. "1 a C age aux folles (Birds
- I eai ei ?"
Vj i foi students is b I C I
ID ity card Faculty and
- may use theii Mendenhall Stu
dent C enter Membership C ard.
I ollowing ihe film at approx-
9 4 p.m there w ill be a
discussion ol "Laage" in
m 221 ol the student center. rhis
will be a totally informal gathering
lents, faculty and stall in-
d m discussing the Film with
others. Coffee and doughnuts will
be served. Discussion groups are
sponsored by the student Union
I ilms C ommittee and the I C I
Honors Program.
Before its Academy Award in
1979, "1 aage aux Folles" was a
little-heralded French-Italian farce
that has since become the sleepei
success ol the year � so much thai
"Grease" producei Allan Can has
scooped up the rights foi a bit-star
Hollywood remake. Ihe reason
isn't hard to find: m any language,
the film is laugh-out-loud funny,
like Ihe In-laws the
season's most amusing American
See COMEDY, paye 7. col. I
By DAVID NORRIS
t Ulllll i tlllMf
Homecoming weekend is be I 's
way of turning what could be nisi
another ordinary weekend into an
exciting, memorable annual festival.
It almost serves as Greenville's
answer to the March Gras. Full o
football, parties, celebrations and
isiting friends. Homecoming is an
obvious subject foi a humor article.
I n fortunately, I spent a
somewhat reclusive weekend,
eschewing most ol the football, par-
lies, etc. The peace and solitude was
vood tor my soul, but makes this ar-
ticle a little difficult to write without
rely ing on hearsay.
It I could have gotten them to
postpone Homecoming until next
weekend, I might have fell more like
getting into it.
Dining m freshman year, 1
helped make a historic contribution
to the Homecoming decorations.
About half a doen ol rn friends
and I painted one of those huge ban-
ners (made out ol unimportant
sheets) with derogatory statements
about the visiting team. I his par-
ticular sign said "WCU eats worn
bat droppings I; was featured in a
picture ol Jones Hall at Homecom-
ing that was printed in the Buc-
caneer later on.
There were several pretty good
Homecoming banners that year.
I hat is. they were good in a tacky
sort of way. One really funnv one
on Belk Dorm said something about
I inda I ovelace; 1 can't remember it
now, and couldn't print it even if I
did remember.
It might be fun for someone to
make a collection of these
Homecoming banners. I imagine
most of them are thrown away,
since tew detergents can get paint
out ol linen sheets. Over the years,
the collector could assemble a
gallery ol these curious relics o
school spirit and libelous insults.
An interesting sideline o such a
collection might be banners from
other schools when FCU plays at
their Homecoming. You know,
"Sink the Pirates" and cute slogans
like that.
Leaving the gentle art of m-
terscholastic character assasination,
we come tii the focal point ol
Homecoming: the former students
who are coming home for the game
and social activ ities.
I his year, m timing was off, and
the closest I got to finding anv old
graduated friends was a series o
notes on various doors saying
"Gone Downtown" or something
to that effect.
Down; own was m full swing
Saturday night. Finally tired of
peace and quiet, 1 went looking for
people I knew. Alas, all I found
were either people I see around
anyway, or people I didn't know.
Nonetheless, there were highlights
during the evening. Mv feet narrow-
ly escaped injury when a beer bottle
shattered near them. Rumors of a
32-keg party floated around, like
the legend o the Seven Cities ol
Gold the Conquistadores were
alwavs running after.
See ANNUM , page 6. ed. 1
Meso America. 1 hey are dated from
300 B.C. to the 16th Century.
" I he donors fell that the collec
tions would be more valuable to an
academic institution than being
maintained in private hands says
Dr. David Phelps, professor ol an-
thropology whose speciality is ai
chaeology. '1 he donors arc Mr. and
Mis I onnie C Rogers ol Marco
Island. Ha Mr .i)i. Mrs H
Greene of Marco Island. Fla Di
Donald H. lucker ol Greenville;
Mr. AC . I omkiiis. r. ol New
ork; and Dr. I aw 1
DeMann ol New York, among
others.
Phelps said the artifacts would be
used tor study ai I C I and foi
display as an interpretive exhibi
South American culture.
A very important part ol the col
lection, says Phelps. are the textiles
including cloth, an actual loom and
weavers' tools 1 hey were found
buried with the dead in drv caves on
the coast ol Peru and are unusually
well preserved
"They represent the type ot
preservation that we don't normally
get and are extremely important in
understanding that part ol the Inca
and Pre-lncan cultures that one
doesn't normally see in other
cultures because ot the lack of
preservation he said.
Most (if the ceramic vessels in-
cluded in the collections are ol the
type that are used foi ceremonial
purposes Of these, many contain
heiroglyphic bands as part of their
decoration.
Knives and other assorted
weaponry and tools are carved from
beautiful obsidian, a volcanic glass.
Numerous ornaments are made
from copper, silver and lade.
See ECU, page 7. col. 4

1





I HI I AM CAROL IN1AN
oc lOHl k 21, issu
?
Flip A Coin:
Indecisive Times Resolved Easily
B DAVID NOKRIN
1 ired ot watching the
news? ie you bored
with televised debates
between presidential
candidates? Are you
ci ushed under the
burden of campaign
leaflets, folders, and
bumper stickers? Now
there's an easier way to
pick the next president:
the President Picket
com.
1 his hands com, just
the right sie tor carry-
ing in pockets or
puises, can make youi
voting decisions tor
you in a fraction ot the
time it takes to arrive at
oui own decision
through the time-
consuming methods ot
leading about and
listening to the can-
didates.
(Note to politicians;
With a little imagina-
tion, these coins can be
adjusted to land on
u hat ever side ou
want.)
I he President Picker
is an ideal way to settle
intense political discus
Monv lor instance it
you need something
snapp to answei a
brilliant political
point, like "Reagan
made rotten movies
or "Carter's a jerk, so I
won't vote tor him
lust pull out the hand)
little coin and let it set
tie the argument.
It you are caught b
a campaign worker ask-
ing difficult questions,
like " ho ate you
voting tor, and why?
the President Picker
can help. Just flip it
and explain about the
appt opriatt rules ot
mass, force and inertia
that resulted in the
coin's landing on
whatevei side ii did.
(Don't forge! the wind
factoi; ii can influence
the election's out-
come.)
I Ins coin has poten-
tial foi an entire line ot
similai coins, covering
the senatorial, guber-
natorial, congressional,
mayoral, city council,
and clerk of superior
court races in every
state, county and town
in the country. It might
be the answer to what
to replace the complex
and outmoded electoral
college with.
Available in stores all
ovei town, the Presi-
dent Picker is an in-
teresting relic of our
apathetic and indecisive
times.
Annual Homecoming Events Return
Continued from page 5 . , . ac
looking eyeballs, it was
rhough not exactly a one ol those movies
Homecoming activity, with the night scenes
one ol the sable IV shot with some kind ol
ions had a good bad cheap filter, and giving
science tut urn movie the illusion that the
with Peter Graves aik moon is ten times as
some aliens with black bright as it normally is.
robes and plastic- Sunday dawned
Legendary Blues
Appearing At JJ's
Fhe Legendary Blues Band was formerly
known bv another name: The Muddy Waters
Blues Band. During then tenure with the world
famous organization, the members of The 1 egen-
dary Blues Band have played in almost every state
in the union as well as more than twenty-live
foreign countries on five continents. They have
appealed on the world's leading concert stages in-
cluding Carnegie Hall, 1 he Kennedy Center, and
Radio City Music Hall. In addition they have
played the world's most prestigious music
festivals including The Antibes Jazz 1974, I he
Newport Jazz Festival 1976, '78, 79; Grande
Parade du Jazz - Nice, 1 ranee 1977, 79; Pacific
Jazz Jamboree � Warsaw, Poland 1976; Mon
treaux .la Festival � Montreaux. Switzerland
1977; New Orl ans Jazz and Heritage Festival
9h. '78, '80; Capitol Radio Jazz Festival �
I ondon, England 1979.
In 1978, alongside Muddy Waters, they made a
special appearance at the White House perform-
ing tor President and Mrs. Carter and the entire
W line House staff.
Ciuest artists who have appeared onstage with
the members of The Legendary Blues Band in-
clude such diverse performers as Ciregg Allman,
Dan Avkrovd. John Belushi, C.eorge Benson.
Gatemouth Brown. 1 ric Clapton, I arry Coryell,
Boh Dvlan, Dizzy Gillespie, Albeit King. B.B.
Kme. Bonnie Rant. Johnny Winter, Stevie
Wonder, and all o the Rolling Stones.
I he 1 egendary Blues Band have appeared on
I shows around the world and are featured in
the Blues Brothers' movie starring Dan Aykroyd
and John Belushi.
Headed b the great Pinetop Perkins, 1 he
1 egendary Blues Band represents a combined ex-
perience ot well over a century in the blues tradi-
tion.
Die Legendary Blues Band will be appearing
Fhursday Oct. 23 at J.Js Music Hall. The doors
will open at 8:30. and admission is S2.50.
1 he 1 egendary Blues Band is: Pinetop Perkins
� piano; Jerrv Portnov � harmonica; Calvin
Jones � bass; and Willie Smith � drums; with
special guest I ouis Mvers on guitar.
SPORTSWOKLD
COLLEGE NIGHT
Tuesday Night
quietly; it must have,
since 1 didn't wake up
until noon and 1 usually
wake up during a noisy
sunrise. Most ol
Homecoming W eekend
was over, except for
ret in n iourneys,
hangovers and assorted
loose ends.
One assorted loose
end was the littei from
Friday's nighttime Mall
concert, which was still
there Sunday after
noon. 1 shuddered at
the thought of people
attending the Sunday
concert, which would
be for main a mixture
ot good music and
broken glass
1 caving broken bot-
tles King around where
people are likely to sit
or he around is one ot
the meanest things
anyone can do. Io
quo led Ian pet
it's "Lov a
snake be � ' a
1 11ei is
unsightly and
dan gerous to our
ecology B( �id( � that.
it's wasteful to throw
away bottles ihat can
be recycled. Foi in-
stance, I hose hot I c s
1 iebfra with the
colorful little medieval
castels and towns on
the labels make good
candle-holdci s.
Bv the way. in an in
formal survey ot
Homecoming litter. I
found that white wine
�,s pt et i icd bv nci bugs
two-to-one over red
and iose wines com-
bines
F r a g m e n i
telephone reports from
some ot my friends in-
dicate that 1 missed
some pretty good par-
ties and miscellaneous
mischief. Highlights of
the evening included
staving up until 5:(X)
a.m. and playing an
number of unsettling
pranks on various peo-
ple
So. the first of this
autumn's great college
festivals is now over.
ttei a tew days of
classes to provide some
rest and relaxation, it
will be Halloween,
another one of this
season's great holidays.
One doesn't usually
think o October as the
holiday season, but it is
here at ECU. What
othei month offers
Homecoming, Hallo-
ween and even Colum-
bus Dav. all in a tew
shoit weeks
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I
r





I HI I ASIAK(1 IM
(k k Mil k :i ivko
f
i
I
I
I
I
J
Leoaiib About Collcgc. rut Who Mh
6i Dvjip Atows
'll grrvou iAjeet
GLTDsr Youe. ousf
l0�LL Ajetpep 7Z GO"
Morrit curwes
Comedy La Cage Aux Folles
Coming To Hendrix Theatre
Continued from page 5
like "The In
1 aws the season's
most amusing
nici lean farce, "la
c age aux 1 olles" gets
its laughs from the c 1
lision of iuo mismatch
ed families forced upon
each othei h a wed-
ding engagement. 1 he
fathei ol the bride
(Michael Galabru) is
the French secretary
leral ol the Union
foi Moral Order, a
moralistic prig who
hopes to offset scandals
in the government b
marrying his daughter
ofl to a distinguished
famil).
I ittle does he know
. Renato, the fathei
ol the groom, is not, as
he lias been told, a
notable diplomat, but
an unc loset ed
homosexual (Ugo
I ognazzi) ho has
been living toi twent)
years with AI bi n
(Michael Serrauit), the
drag-queen siai ol his
transvestite revue.
Fearing the worst,
the young groom pet
suades his fathei to
straighten up foi the
occasion � no easy
triek for a man who
wears make-up, collects
phallic objects d'art,
employs a barefoot
black manservant in
hotpants and sleeps
with an outrageously
bitch) drag queen who
would rather tight than
su itch
It's the setup foi a
classic boulevard farce
m which eveithinu sou
could think to go
wrong does and
worse. 11 s heroes,
Renato and Albin. ma
be merrily unconven
tional, but "La t 'age
aux 1 olles w Inch w.is
a long i unning stage hit
in Pai is before dit ectoi
1 doua id Moli na ro
transfei red it to 1 ilm, is
convention itsclt, a
I eydeau farce in drag
that follows the time
honored rule that
whatever is hiding in
the closet must come
out.
I he clockwork foi
mulas and the image
ol homosexuals as
swishy queens are
old fashioned, but
1 ognazzi am! Serrauit
manage to invest then
parts with gieat comic
zesl and delicate
pathos. When Albin,
who is accustomed to
trotting around St.
I ropez in floppy hats,
v i cam coloi ed i csoi i
outfits and loads ol
jewelry, emerges from
his bedi oom in a severe
three piece suit, his at
tempud butch mas
querade is a hilarious
failure, but one is mo
ed as well: it is the one
role this acclaimed
c h a m el eo n ca n n ot
mastei.
In one brilliant se-
quence, lognazi dies
to teach the hysterical
Serrauit to butter his
toast "like a man
and it safe to say that
Serrauit gets as much
mileage out ol that
piece ot toast as
( haplin got out ot the
shoe he ate in " 1 he
Gold Hush s in
c haplin's tilm, the
comedy woiks on two
levels as g r ca I
slapstick and as sly
comment on out une
amined assumptions
about masculinity ami
femininity.
Molinaro's comedy
approaches it's boiling
point at a prenuptial
dinnei party in which
every last pretense at
decorum is thoroughly
and deliciousiy shat-
tered.
Ihis Friday and
Saturday night the
1 ilnis Committee will
present the visually
stunning "Apocalypse
Now" at 5, 7:30, and
10 p in. m the Hendrix
I heat re.
ECU Acquires
In can Textiles
Dr. David Phelps, an ECU archaeologist, displays a loom and cloth
woven many centuries ago bv the Ineas of Peru.
Continued from page 5
Phelps saul that the
artifacts will be used
primarily foi study by
1(1 faculty a nd
students in histoi y, art,
anthropology and ar
chaeology. He noted
that the Central
Amer ican collect ion
which is from Hon
dm as,osta Rica and
Nicaragua will be ol
particulat interesl to
students em oiled in
II 'sosta Rica pro
gram. I he progt am
regularly takes students
to (. osta Rica foi fut
ther study in 1 aim
American history,
cult me and language.
"With a quai tei ol a
million dollars worth ol
collections from the
high civilization areas
ol the Americas plus
the extensive collec-
tions that we have from
our own research in
Northarolina and the
Southeast, we have the
potential foi a mean
ingful interpretation ol
the prehistoric cultures
ot all ol the American
subcontinents
Phelps said.
Paits ol the collec-
tion will be on public
display beginning in
late October in the
Gray Gallery ol the
East Carolina I Iniversi-
t School of Art.
Willie Smith Louis Mvers Jerrv Portnov Culvin Jones Pinetop Perkins
The LEGENDARY Blues Band
THURSDAY OCT.23 ONE SHOW ONLY!
FORMLY KNOWN AS MUDDY WATERS BLUES BAND
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Call
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Open till 12 mid
CalI or Take Out 758 2712
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(Presenting our Designer Diamond Collection.)
This week only, ArtCarved presents its
V A dramatic nm college ring concept for women
in 10K and 14K gold. On display only while
the ArtCarved representative is on campus.
The new Designer Diamond Collection,
reflecting the importance, value, and rare
beauty of genuine diamonds, is an
ArtCarved innovation.
This collection is also available with a new
diamond substitute, Cubic Zirconia, which
creates the same dazzling elegance for less.
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� 1980 ArtCwvedGiflege Rings

I
��:�������.��'��
? � �
v
T





I HI t S (. ROl
Sports
CX l)HI K 21. 1980 P
Pirates Down Western Carolina, 24-14
i
r

NlPH
�� ��.
Photo n. JON JORDON
Sutton Crosses The Tape
ECU fullback rheodore Sutton forges his waj victor) over Western Carolina. Sutton, a
into iki end one for the Pirates first senior from Kinston, netted 115 yards in the
touchdown en route to a 24-14 Homecoming contest which evened the Pirates record at 3-3.
By CHARLES CHANDLER
spnm I dmir
It was homecoming at Easi
C arolina Saturday and despite the
fad thai much of the game was
played in pouring ram. ovei 20,000
tans leit Ficklen Stadium happ)
alter watching their Pirates roll up
an impressive 24-14 win over
Western C arolina.
Among the activities oi the day
was the induction of three former
E( U sports stats. Cecil Heath.
Carlester Crumpler and Danny
Kepley, into the school's Sports
Hall ot Fame. With the Pirate past
meeting fan approval, the football
team made the present and future
seem promising attei winning its se-
cond straight game to even its
record at 3-3.
I he Pirate offense rolled up 376
yards, 325 of them on the ground,
while the defense tor the most part
shut down Western's vaunted pass-
ing attack.
c atamount spin end Gerald
Harp, who entered the game as the
nation's leading receiver, caught on-
ly two passes on the day tor a total
ot 22 yards. Prior to the contest he
had averaged over KM) yards in
receptions per game.
"1 didn't kimu coming into this
one that we could control their pass
ing game thai well Pirate head
coach Id Emory said following the
game. "We were trying to play them
with seven or eight defenders and
make them run. We wanted to make
them beat us with their running
game and thev don't like that
1 lie Pirates were the first on the
scoreboard when fullback rheodore
Sutton went over from five yards
out to complete a 53-yard drive at
the 1:26 mark of the opening
quarter Bill Lamm's extra pom
made it 7-0.
I hat lead lasted less than a
minute, though, as the Caramounts
struck back quickly. Pinned at their
own eight-yard line following
I C U's kickot the C at amounts got
an 89-yard touchdown run from
tailback Ant horn lames on then S�
cond play from scrimmage follow-
ing the Pit.He score to even things at
seven apiece.
ECU halfback Anthony t ollins
appeared to have matched .lames'
teat when he romped 62 yards into
the endzone early in the third
period. An inadvertent whistle by an
official blew the play dead three
yards into the run. (hough
1 morv later said that the missed
call was a blow to his team "I'm an
official's man said the first-year
mentor, �"but that call and a couple
of others I couldn't believe 1 hev
made t.ght a baligame thai wouldn't
have been that close otherwise.
i (i
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1-851 �( I M
W ha: can you say, though ' 1 he
official came over to me and
apologized foi messing up
1l went ahead jusl before
halftime when C ollins went over
from one yard out to move Ins
ahead 14-7 at intermission.
()n then fil si dr ive ot ' nd
half, the Pirate marched deep
into C atamount territory bul
settle foi a 4 yard field goa
1 amm to move ahead I 7
Westeiii. now 2 4. struct
when I I s W illic Holley fumbled
the ball aw i.
ing the atam
the Pirate 20 five plays I
tailback 1 eonai d W illiams
from one yard
I lead to 17-14
II slammed 11
Western's chances ol a cornel
taking the ensuing � kofl and
ching 70 y aril � foi a scoi
Pirates threw one
12-play drive and
when t reshman halfback tri
Bynei scored from iwo yai I
with 6 4 remainin
24 14.
Following his first win ai hoi
Emory was jubilant. "Tl great
personal win foi me and a great
for 1 as! Carolina University II
crucial for ib to w u-
I he tn st sear mentoi claimed
performance was his club's best ol
the season. "Our guys played tour
quarters today betiei than al any
time this veai Ex I i lame
yard run in the firsi half, we had
tually no breakdow ns
rhc Piial. t irsi two
100-yard performance the
season as both quarterba I
Nelson dnd fullback I heodore I
ton �.tasked the century mark
ton rolled up 115 yai ds w hile Nelson
tallied :
Progress Of Secondary Credited
Defense Stiffles Cats' Harp
B JI1M DuPRI !
-m � i .mi sp.i
Vide tiom the
iac
Satui
day's 24 14 victory over Western
Carolina was new Pirate head coach
Ed Emory's tits; vicotry in Ficklen
Stadium as 1' mentor, it was a
a landmark day for anothei partici
pani ol the 1980 Homecoming con
test.
For Western Carolina wide
receiver Gerald Harp, the game was
his most unimpressive outing of the
season, largely because ol I .
coverage by the Eastarolina
secondary.
"When 1 was crossing the field
alter the game says E I assistant
coach Rickv Bustle, "1 happened to
run into Harp and I just told him
what a fine receiver we knew he is.
He looked at me and said 'You guys
played great; ! just couldn't gel
open '
lo limit the receiver who led the
nation in receptions and yardage .
ing into the game to just two recep
tions and 22 yards was a tea; noi ac
complished overnight.
Sophomore Tackle
Smith Reinstated
After Suspension
last Carolina defensive tackle
Doug Smith has been reinstated to
the Pirate team after a two week
suspension, head coach Ed Emory
announced Monday
Emory had announced Smith's
suspension on Octobei 8, citing
academic and personal reason I n
the action.
The first-year Pirate head coach
said then that some regulations were
laid down to the 6-5, 265-pound
Smith that lie would have to meet
before being reinstated.
Emory said Monday that Smith
had satisfactorily met the regula-
tions.
"We talked to Doug and lo his
teachers and came up with nothing
negative Emory said. "We just
hope now that he'll get back into the
thick ol things and pla as good as
he is capable of playing
The Pirate coach said that Smith
would be available for this Satur-
day's game with nationally-ranked
North Carolina but did not know in
what capacity.
"We won't know until alter this
week's practices whether Doug will
start or how much he'll play. We
just hope he'll get back in the
groove because he's one of the best
athletes that has ever been recruited
at East Carolina
Busile met with the Pirate secon-
dary aftei the 24 22 win over Rich-
mond, and continued the extra duty
throughoul the week.
"We met early before practice
and stayed aftei practice lo watch
films said Bustle. "Al night we
met with the players in the dorm and
watched mine film and did thai all
week long
fhe extra duty paid of! early into
the game, with junior strong safety
Smokey Norris picking off a David
Mashbum pass with 5:58 left in the
tirsi qurtei to set up I heodore Sin
ton's five-yard touchdown jaunt.
Norris began practice at free safe-
ty, but Bustle shitted him to strong
safety when injuries depleted that
k.
'Nobody really took the bull by
the horns and impressed us said
Bustle "So we moved Norris and he
made the adjustment well. He's the-
kind of guy thai doesn't make the
mental mistakes.
"He's not as last as others, so he
can'l depend on speed it he gets
behind his man. He knows where he
has to be
W c I coach Bob W atei s
countered with sophomore signal-
caller Ronnie Mixon to direct the
c atamount attack. But the results
wete the same, as ECU cornerback
C lint Harris snared his pass to end
the second quarter and another as
the Cats atempted to score at the
end of the game.
"We've moved (Harris) around a
lot, too sas Bustle. "He's play-
ing with a lot more knowledge of
that position now. He's getting the
feel of his cot cage area
The only veterans of the Pirate
secondary are seniors Willie Holies
and .lames freer, with Holley the
only starter returning from a year
ago. freer was unseccessful in his
attempt to run down halfback An-
thony .lames en route to his 89-yard
touchdown sprint in the first halt,
but Bustle was pleased with his
veteran duo.
"I think Willie and Freer both
had their best games oi the yaer this
week said Bustle. "The last two
weeks (Hollev) has worked harder
than he has since I've seen here.
11 reer) just started off a little flat
and took a bad angle to try and
catch the guv.
"This is the first time since the
Duke game that we've played four
full quartets of solid defense
I he Pirates travel Saturday to do
battle with the nationally ranked
1 c.i Heels ol North Carolina, and
Bustle will have to have his secon-
dary at the peak of condition for
I NC quarterback Rod F-1 kins an-
dhis talented receiveing corps.
" I hey've got talent everywhere
Bustle slates. "They line up in so
many ditterent formations, you
never know what to expect.
"(llkins) can throw the heck out
of the football and they have plenty
of people who can catch it. You
don't win foot races with (Amos)
1 awrence and when he's out they
have Kelvin Bryant in there. Bryant
is just as good and probably a little
better considering his speed
Pnov ' . N JORDON
Anthony C ollins Cuts Against The drain
Lady Pirates Second
In ECU Invitational
Freer Makes The Tackle
Pirate cornerback James Freer makes the tackle on the I ata-
mounts' Anthon James, who earlier marched 89 yards for a
II).
By JIMM Dul'KKK
st Sport t dour
l ady Pirate volleyball received a
shot in the arm over the weekend, as
Fast Carolina improved their record
to 11-19 with a 6-1 performance in
the East Carolina Invitational Tour-
nament.
The fatigued 1 ady Pirates drop-
ped a heart-breaking match to
I NC -Charlotte in the finals, 15-4,
15-0, to claim second place honors.
1 arlier in the dav the Pirates had
ousted Virginia Tech 15-10, 15-10
and High Point s�-l5, 15-8, 15-12 to
advance to the finals with UNC-C.
"Charlotte had one girl who real-
ly hit well throughoul the match
(Rita Barrett) said ECU assistant
coach Lynn Davidson. "We tried
everything. This girl was hitting
over the block, around the block,
under the block, through the block.
"We did not play that badly.
"They couldn't do anything
wrong; everything we tried didn't
work
Last Carolina cruised through the
pool competition Friday without a
loss to claim the top seed going into
the championship bracket Saturday
The lady Pirates opened the
tournament with a hard-fought
15-11. 15-13 victory which saw ECl
struggle from an eight point deficit
in the first game to sweep the match.
"They were controlling the tempo
of the game said Davidson. "You
have to stop their offense before
you can really get yours going and
maybe turn the game around
The University ol Virginia pro-
vided the hosts with then second
victory, 15-2, 15-13, as ECU
established a sound ot tensive at-
tack.
Tourney Favorite Winthrop Col-
lege fell victim to the spirited Pirates
in the third match, with LCI claim-
ing a 6-15. 15-11. 15-8 rally.
ECU closed out the pool competi-
ion with a 15-10. 15-4 trouncing oi
v ake I orest.
Davidson praised the entire unit
lor responding to adjustments in
various situations, adding, "It's
really satisfying when you ask vour
players to go to the floor and they
do it
Senior hitter Sharon Perry was
awarded Mb I ournameni honors
for ettorts. but Davidson was d
pointed serv.or Loretta Holden was
omitted from the select group
"1 oretta had a supei ;
merit; she was psyched to the max
Davidson stated. "She was a strong
leader tor us all weekend "
Sophomores Stacy Weitel and
Miti Davis again drew piaise foi
their performance in the tourney.
"Stacy is probabl) the best hiiier
n the team lauds Davidson.
"1 here are times when she is really a
power hitter, but she knows how to
read the defense and where to hit
"liti had her usual steadv per
formance. She's become a solid
volleyball player
T verybodv was ready lo plav
she concludes. "Alter we played
Appalachian (Friday) morning
realK alter the Carolina match
(earlier in the week). vnC leit like we
could plav as a team
The Lady Pirates now have the
week off in p.eparanon lor ihe
Maryland Invitational Tournamem
next weekend.
I
?






14

i
I HI I s i Kll
(K FOBI I
Green Blends Winning Unit
B MIM V
I y si Wn ,
a 4-3 victory ovei the Game 3, said he doesn't rrillo made a sparkling
Kansas Cit) Royals and toe! extra pressure. relay to catch Darrell
a 2 lead in games in "The game's jusi not Portei at the plate.
the World Seues. on m back he said il ol this came as
KANSAS CIT
N'1 Dallas Greei
worked all yeai on pro "We're going home "I've got 24 othei guys nisi a prelude to a waste one.
ducing the perfect K' we have Steve to help out there, too. dramatic ninth in which said
id Now, because it � arlton and Duk rhere's no question Unset came through
worked per fee tU at an Ruthven going foi us I'm going to be and winning relievei
McGraw in the seventh, stake. Royals' managet eback ol the Series h
struck out again elected to lei lose singling off the glove ol
1 thought he Cardenal bat. Brett, who had been
thought I was going to Hut McGraw wound ordered h Fre to
McGraw up striking Cardenal move in five steps lies
out to end the game. was concerned with
Bui McCiraw's "The Brett strikeouts Schmidt, who had
troubles had just vere highlights but bunted in Games 3 and
opport une
Green continued. "But pumped up, but it I fug McGraw survived begun He walked Y il Cardenal's sttikc out 4. mighl n a similar
hiladelphia ma soon we've been taking it lose the sun still wil
r drinking the most in one game al a tune come up on Wednes
ol baseball since Sept. 1 and it day
would be silly tochange It Green's blend con
tmues to work.
o
more perils than a
barefoot rattlesnake
ir ainei.
It k( uaw telt relax
l Aikens then served a was the big one trick.
pilch that Hal McRat McGraw said. "In m
drove fai down the hue mind lie's one ol the Schmidt came all the
to just miss a dramatic, best pinch hitters with way around to score on
lie ed
W v WOI I DOW
day, Nevertheless, the Phillies max party long have been the only one
Phillies manage! Phils surely know thai enough to see it. Mike around who did. lt
said Sunday after when Carbon faces Schmidt provided the ing to protect die lead.
defense, Rich Gale luesday power with a two run he started shakily by
p tching, and night in Veterans' hornet in the fourth, walking Frank White
strength plus a Stadium, they can win Marty Bystrom with the middle ol the
- two run rallx the tiist world title in represented the rookies ordei ready to hit
then history. by pitching gamely into George Brett, who
ga I Gale, who pitched in the sixth; and Manny struck out against
i the ninth, he may game ending home run. runners in scoring posi I user's show past first
McRae then h
sharply into the
stop hole but I ai
lion " baseman Aiken
Kansas (. iiy I nsei moved to thit
leadinu 1 2 on Bretl's on Keith Moreland1
Bowa back handed the KMI grounder, Otis' sacrifice and scored on
ball and forced pinch home: and rhllo's two out rip ofl
runnei Oni.x C'oncep VYa ' I m's sai fly, the glove ol Dan
tnos Otis walk Schmidt began Quisenberry, who has
ed and with the b.i PI adelphia's thud now blown two leads
loaded and th winning c n tor Kansas (. ilv.
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front ol 96,748 pounded Ainu 3D 3
s at soldout Neyland No. 6 Georgia routct
� um let"I mote Vanderbill 41 0; No
hat the Beat shaking I lorida S
In- head Boston t ollege 41
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' ; 1. 4 41 and detealed Nortl
24 yards from Korean Carolina State 2H H
born Petei Kim and No. 9 Nebraska crt
11) runs from ed Oklahoma Stat
. .erve quarterback 48-7; and No. 10 Ol
In other games in the Sugai Bowl
Bt m ham oun
ference title and go to Mate upset No. ISJ
Miami ol I loi
U No 15 rkansas
passi ng mac h inc. was idle
junioi quarierback lim
i x con si a i n s
wo weeks later
4
12
EXPOSUI
ROLL Ol
Klahon, shredded to
I tah State lot sis ID 1948, has i
whipped passes and two ID tun-
in a 70 46 route.
McMahon threw foi
$42 yards in the first
tl me, breaking the
NCAA mark In ins
last two lies,
k Mahon I . a.
now Ml, is Pacilu in onteienee �
t uolma. best start in 2" game tha' pa: the 5f?
yeai and figures to be Huskies in the driver's
it hosis seal foi a Rose Bowl
Xikaus.is on Nov N. berth with a 2 I a'li j�
ts tils' lean ise in I he Bears play fexas ference record.
Ba!
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taxing in
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Vols 59
back Majoi Ogilvie 2" 17. No. 3 rexas and m tota
fot all its points. No. 4 I c 1 were idle
I : victory, Saturday's action record
tl 27tl a was highlighted by a In othei lop 20
a paii ol bi lliant tines. No. 1 I Pin
i he dividual performan West
.� because Freshman running x � 14 No 12
anked US back Herschel Walker Pei Sta 1 heal
to a 7 tie fully recox ered from an s � 1 a. ise 24-7; No. 13
v Oregoi a iwo ankle sprain. raeed I01 Bayloi vsl rexas
��� � mderdog. 2S yards, including M 46-7; No 14
rroja 11 ning Kk I ID: uns ol 60, 53 and S t'a Iin a
Mat.us Mien gamed 48 yards, in leading defeated Cincinnati
s ird but lie was Georgia to its sixth con 49 ; N 1 I a State
ped I no gain on secutive win hi was ; Kai
and I al the Oregon Bulldogs, who do not 28 17; No. 17 Missouri
32 late in the game. I he play Alabama, ait. overwhelmed t olorado
Ducks tied ihe game in favored to tie the Crim 45 7; No. is Oklahoma
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d run b ferrance Southeastern Con 35 21 and Mis- ppi
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t





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 21, 1980
Hrabosky Disgruntled At Atlanta
The I Last Carolina campus had a
rather unique isitor last Thursday.
"The Mad Hungarian" was in town
and had some very interesting things
to say.
Al Hrabosky, a relief pitcher for
the Atlanta Braves, dropped by
ECU'S Harrington Baseball Field in
one of his several stops through
eastern North Carolina.
Hrabosky had just completed
perhaps his most disappointing year
in the major leagues, seeing little ac-
tion for the Braves. This was a big
drop for a man who was considered
the top reliever in the game just a
tew years ago when he was playing
in St. I ouis.
While with the Cardinals,
Hrabosk) developed the reputation
ol being a "crazy man Sporting a
fu manchu mustache, Hraboskv
would psyche himself up for every
pitch by stepping behind the mound
and doing all sorts of cra things
before addressing the batter at the
plate.
What the "Mad Hungarian" was
doing was nol only psyching himself
up for the pitch but trying to in-
timidate the batter at hand as well.
"1 wanted those batters to think I
was a maniac he said. "I wanted
them to think 1 was six-foot-nine
and mean as the devil
In actuallity Hrabosky is shorter
than the average pitcher and more
amiable than most people with
much less prestige.
Of his nickname. Hrabosky said
it was something that he felt he had
to do "When you have a name like
Hrabosky he said, "very few peo-
ple can pronounce it and most of
those that can think it's some kind
ol disease.
"Besides he continued, "1 was
not achieving when I first came up
to the majors. 1 had to do something
to raise mv level of concentration,
so 1 gave myself thai nickname and
began to psyche myself up behind
the mound before each pitch
Hrabosky became a nationally-
known star with the Cards, at least
Charles
Chandler
until a managerial change was
made, St. Louis bringing Vern Rapp
in and ousting Red Schoendinst.
Rapp laid a law down with the
Cardinal players, telling them that
haircuts had to be short and
mustaches and beards had to be
shaved.
Exit Hraboskv fu manchu and
with it much of his image. This did
not go over well with the man that
his close friends call simply
"Hongo"
From St. Louis Hrabosky was
shipped to Kansas City, where he
met with limited success.
His old teammates are now in the
World Series against the
Philadelphia Phillies and Hrabosky
said he was behind the Royals 100
percent.
"I'm with them all the way he
said. "There are some great guys on
that team who deserve to win
Of Kansas City superstar George
Brett, Hrabosky uttered high
praises. "George is one of the
greatest persons in baseball he
said. "Not only is he a phenomenol
player, he's a really nice guy also.
He's got it all together
Hrabosky left the Royals after
last season via the free agent market
due to what he called "poor pay"
by the team's front office.
"As great a team as they have
Hrabosky said, "their payroll is on-
ly the 16th highest in the majors.
Their players win despite of some
front office difficulties. That's why
1 respect that team so
Though he cited a few problems
with the Royals' front office,
Hraboskv said that there are multi-
ple difficulties in Atlanta.
"They're just beginning to learn
in Atlanta what they have to do to
win he said. "It's a lot more to it
than just going out of the field say-
ing, 'Hey, let's go win this one
Hrabosky cited problems with
front office and public relations for
the team's lack of success in the past
decade. "1 think they do a very poor
job of marketing the Braves he
said. "1 know Ted's (Turner, owner
of the team) cable network keeps a
lot of them at home, but they just
don't push attendance like they
should.
"1 don't blame Ted, though he
continued. "All he wants is what's
best for the Braves. He'd like to find
some good front office people so he
could stay out of things and just be
a big fan
Hrabosky could not be expected
to be altogether happy with the
Braves, considering he saw very lit-
tle action this past season and the
fact that Atlanta manager Bobby
Cox forced him to cut out his antics
behind the mound.
"Bobby thought it hindered my
pitching Hrabosky said. "He just
doesn't understand that that's the
way 1 get myself ready for each
pitch
Hrabosky will soon be ofl to the
Dominican Republic, where he will
participate in the winter league
there. He says there is much work to
be done.
"During the last year and a halt
I've only pitched in H5 innings he
said. "I prefer pitching three or four
times a week to slay in shape. I've
got to regain my arm sttenth now
Hraboskv also announced some
surprising plans for his time out ol
the U.S. "I'm going to be starting
down there he said. "I wasn't
happy with the way Atlanta used me
tins year so I going to work hard this
winter and hope to win a starting
job next spring with the Braves
No doubt . "I he Mad
Hungarian" has been through a lot
oi ups and downs m Ins majoi
league career. It appear- now,
though, that lie is at a m.
crossroads.
Classifieds
PERSONAL
CUSTOM CRAFTING and repair
of gold and silver Buying and
selling of gold and silver by Les
Jewelers 170 E 5th St 758 21;?
SUNSHINE STUDIOS offering
classes m Ballet. Jan. Yoga, and
Exercise Special student rates
Within walking distance of cam
pus '56 7335
OVERSEAS JOBS Summer year
round Europe. South America.
Australia. Asia. All Fields
1500 $1700 monthly Expenses
paid Sightseeing Free Into
Write: IJC Box 53 NC4 Corona
Del Mar, CA 92625
PERFECT CHRISTMAS GIFTS
High quality, low cost portraits,
caricatures. T-shirts, people, pets,
you name it John Weyler
753 5775
HELP WANTED: Several posi
tions open Hours are flexible to
fit your schedule S S Cafeteria,
Carolina East Mall
TYPING Term papers, short
stories, resumes, letters, bills, etc
753 $407 after 6 00 p m
ANYTHING YOU CAN WRITE:
We can write better Typing, pro
ofreadmg, editing Write Right
75 ��4
WANTED Faculty or staff wife
with small boy who would like to
keep 3' j year old boy in her home
74 4793 after00 p m
TYPING DONE Term papers
resumes, Thesis, Etc
Reasonable Call Jane Pollock
757 9719.
HELC WANTED Part time
some retail experience needed
Classified Ad Form
Apply in person at T shirts Plus
Carolina East Mall
NEED COLLEGE STUDENTS
For part time work See Tommy
Jamieson at Southmet Recycling
Corp located at 135 N Greene St
in Greenville Only those who
don t mind physical & dirty work
need apply
HELP WANTED Occassional
babysitter for nights and
weekends Own transportation
75 3133 or 75 543 after 4:30
WILL BABYSIT Children ol
students Call 7S8 7795 tor more in
formation I'm located near
Meade and First Street
CAMPUS REPRESENTATIVE
POSITION! Part time position
promoting high quality Spring
Break beach trips on campus for
commission plus free travel Call
or write for application Summit
Travel. Inc, Parkade Plaza, Col
umb.a Mo , 45701 (800) 335 0439
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE NEEDED lm
mediately. Three bedroom house
off Memorial Drive 5100 rent plus
one third utilities Call 756 4790
ROOMMATE WANTED Five
blocks from campus s'00 in
eludes rent, utilities, heat
Available Nov l 753 �970
FEMALE ROOMMATE To share
three bedroom house 75 1551 or
757 453 or 757 � Ask tor Ellen
or Lynn
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED
Two bedroom house One block
Irom campus For more mtorma
tion call 751 0371
FOR SALE
FOR SALE PEARL Snare drum
5 x 14 in S335 new Best Offer
Call 758 307
FOR SALE Technics SA 500 40
watts SL 730 fully automatic
turntable with Empire 3000 EHI
Phase Linear speakers
Aluminum antennae Paid JllOO,
best offer Call 753 8840. ask for
Graham
SEWING MACHINE With case
580 or best offer Will trade for
typewriter Call 793 3998 after 5 00
p m
FOR SALE Acoustic, Jumbo
Folk Yamaha FG 340 Beautiful in
looks and sound Excellent condi
tion Call Cris 757 4090 5795 Case
included
FOR SALE Want a good leather
lacket Sue 38 40 Original Lamb
skin Coat valued a' 5175. only 5100
Call 757 4815
HAIRCUTS
FOR YOUI CONVENIENCE
CLASSIFIED ADS CAN BE PUR
CHASED AT THREE LOCA
TIONS
Student Supply Store Lobby MWF
!0 00 11 00 TTH 11 00 17 00
East Carolinian Office. MTTH
4 00 5 00 WF 3 00 3 00
Student Organization Booth
(Mendenhall), MWF 13 00 1 00
TTH 11 00 17 00
Kiffin Looks To Bounce Back
PRICE 51 00 tor 15 words.
� each additional word
05 for
I
Reg.8
No Appointment
OPEN 8-8
RAl 1 IGH (UPI) -
North Carolina State
will approach this
weekend's game with
emson as a challenge,
coach Monte Kiffin
said Monday.
"The game will be a
challenge to each team
to see if the can
bounce back from last
weekend's loss said
Kiffin, referring to the
Wolfpack's 28-8 loss to
eighth-ranked North
Carolina and Clem-
soiv's 34-17 upset by
Duke.
"It's an important
game for both teams
kiffin also announc-
ed senior fullback
Dwight Sullivan will be
out for the rest of the
season with an ankle in-
jury. Sullivan, N.C.
State's second leading
rusher last year, has
been out since suffering
the injury Sept. 20
against Virginia and
will seek an extra year
of eligibility to play
next vear.
� wake checks payable to The Easi
! Carolinian
m Abbreviations count as one word
as do phone numbers and
� hyphenations
I MAIL TO
The East Carolinian
Classified Ads
Old South Building
Greenville. N C 77834
HAIR PflSHlOnS
ICAROLIN EAST CENTER
Intramural Corner
Students who would
like to play intramural
team handball are
reminded that the
deadline for signing up
is Oct. 28.
There will also be a
clinic for anyone in-
terested in officiating
the intramural team
handball games. Pay
ranges between $3.10
and $3.50 per hour for
those who successfully
complete the clinic.
To sign up for the
clinic or for par-
ticipating in team play,
call 757-6387, or go by
the Intramurals Office
in room 104 Memorial
Gym.
One of the most
popular sports in the
world is volleyball, and
ECU students are no
exception when it
comes to love tor the
game. Intramural co-
recreational volleyball
competition will begin
in November, and
anyone desiring to play
can sign up in
Memorial Gym before
No 14. Teams will
consist o' three men
and three wo m e n
players.
Congratulations to
Alpha Delta Pi and to
Streak of Lightning for
their championship
wins in the flag football
competition held last
week. Co-rec flag foot-
bal play begins soon,
and captains are
reminded that the cap-
tain's meeting is
tonight at 7 p.m. in
Brewster B-102.
Watch every Tuesday
for Intramural Corner.
miiiiiii ill ii
ARMY NAVY STORE
Backpacks. B 15. Bomber.
j Field. Deck. FIi9ht Snorkel �
Jackets, Peacoats. Parkas.
Shoes Combat Boots. Plus.
� 1501 S E vans Street
CLIFFS
SPECIALS
E. 10th St. Extension
752-3172
MONDAY-THURSDAY
Oyster Plate3.95
Shrimp Plate3.95
Seafood Plate3.95
Ocean Perch2.50
Blue Fish2.50
Crab Cakes1.85
THURSDAY
Popcorn Shrimp2.95
NOW DELIVERING
DAILY
SPECIAL
MILL OUTLET CLOTHING
OPEN MON-SAT 9:30-6:00
W.GREENVILLE BLVD.
LADIES OXFORD BLOUSES
PINK, BLUE, WHITE
LADIES CHEENO CORDS
ASSORTED COLORS
MEN'S POLY-FILL VESTS
MEN'S PLUSH VELOUR SHIRTS
RUST, NAVY, DARK BROWN, MULTI
KING SANDWICH
AND
DELI
DELIVERY SERVICE NOW AVAILABLE FOR ECU CAMPUS
HRS. 12am-2pm
5pm-9pm
$5.00 MUMMUM ORDER,AND A .50 DELIVERY SERVICE CHARGE.
(FOR ANY SIZE ORDER)
DAILY
SPECIAI
752-4297
oc
11.99
17.99
22.98
19.98
W
LAY AWAY PLAN AVAILABLE
E CARRY A COMPLETRE LINE OF WRANGLER APPARAL
AUNEW
KINGSIZED
BREAKFAST
STARTING OCTOBER 27th COME IN AND HAVE A COUNTRY STYLED
BREAKFAST WITH YOUR FRIENDS.
HRS. 7am-11am
MONSAT.
CALL AHEAD AND YOUR BREAKFAST WILL BE HOT!
t
I
f





Title
The East Carolinian, October 21, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 21, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.86
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Permalink
https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/57294
Preferred Citation
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