The East Carolinian, October 14, 1980






�lje I;a0t (Earnltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 55 No. 15
10 Pages
ThnwUy, October 14, 1980
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 10,000
Brewer Responds To Questions From SGA Reps
Chancelloi Thomas Brewer, ap-
pearing before the SGA 1 egislature
Monday afternoon, indicated that
he had no particular objections to a
fall break tot ECU students, but
said that the reasons tor adopting
the break could be better.
"1 don't care if there's a fall
break or not Brewei said, "But I
would like to see a bettei reason for
it than 'Chapel Hill has it That's
like saying whatever Chapel Hill
does, we have to do
SGA President Charlie Sherrod
broughl the idea of an annual Oc-
break before the Calendai
C ommittee of he Faculty Senate
last Wednesday. Sherrod quoted
figures from an SOA survey that in-
,icd that over 90 percent ol the
students responding to the poll
wanted a fall recess from classes.
However, members of the com-
mittee doubted the survey's ac-
curacy � saying it was not a true
random sample � and asked Sher-
rod for more complete information.
They also said that students might
not realie all the implications such
a break would have.
"1 don't mind it (the proposed
break) Brewer said, "as long as
everybody understands that the
semester doesn't get cut. I don't
think the faculty will buy any
shortening of the semsster
At present, ECU semesters are
scheduled for 71 total days of in-
struction � a figure called "a
minimum" by at least two faculty
members associated with the Calen-
dar Committee.
Brewer said that if students get
the break, they would have to decide
whether to begin the school year
earlier in the summer or extend the
fall semester closer to Christmas.
Responding to a question about
increased freshman parking
facilities for ECU, Brewer also said
that the university had tried to buy
the old Pitt County Hospital,
located on Johnson Street a few
blocks from campus, for parking
space.
"We tried to get the old hospital,
but the state appraisal was less that
what the county could get if it sold
the building to a private buyer he
said. The chancellor added that if
new dorms are built on campus, the
parking situation could get worse.
"Right now, I don't see any im-
Red Cross Draws 797 Pints,
Best Record Ever For County
B M1KENOONAN
sM.iant Nc� Y dil�r
Seven hundred and ninety seven pints o blood were
collected d the FROTC-sponsored blood drive
campus last week on Oct. 8-9. This is the highest
ever collected in Pitt County over a two-day
-dine to Pitt County Blood Drive Chairman
accoi
!1
hrilling experience for me to see the students
ie to such a worthwhile endeavor Alford
the total amount
.�;
blood col
campus
i h ty percent ot me
� in Pitt County comes from the I Cl
led.
" 1 he lifeblood of out drives is on the Tel campus
he added. Alford, who is also the superintendent of Pitt
County Schools, is himself a six gallon donor.
ccording to Nicola 'Nicky' Cowell, the AFROTC
. adei in charge ol this year's drive, the drive was a suc-
"Everyone in the ROTC was suppos
hour but most ot us put more
�d to work at
Man one hour
in she said.
"The Red Cross really depends on us (ROTC) for the
blood drives, and we enjoy helping she said. The
AFROTC has sponsored blood drives on campus every
year since 1951.
last yeasr the ROTC collected 766 pints of blood.
The goal last year was 750 pints-
The Red Cross will sponsor two more blood drives on
campus this year. The ROTC will organietheir second
drive on Feb. 4-5. All past blood drives on campus have
been in Wright Auditorium, but renovations to that
building are scheduled to begin before February.
The Inter-Fraternity Council will sponsor a blood
drive on April 7-8, 1981, said Alford.
According to Alford, the Pitt County blood drives
have not fallen short of their goal for well over four
years. Last year's countrywide total of 4,400 pints was
met and surpassed and this year the total of 5.000 units
is expected to be passed also.
A blood donor may donate every 58 davs, according
to a spokesman for the Red Cross.
mediate increase in freshman park-
ing Brewer noted.
According to Brewer, a proposal
to get a new $18.5 million general
classroom building for ECU would
have an impact on parking if it is
passed by the UNC Board of Gover-
nors and approved by the N.C.
Legislature. Brewer said two loca-
tions are being considered for the
building.
The first location, said Brewer,
would be behind Joyner Library, on
the "little white house sitting at the
end" of Ninth Street. The second
location would be where the Old
Main Cafeteria and the Jenkins
Alumni Building are now situated,
near the Jenkins Art Building.
Brewer said locating the
classroom building on this end of
the campus would boost the use of
Mendenhall Student Center, which
he said was an undcr-utilied facili-
ty.
The ECU chancellor also sought
to dispel rumors that the new struc-
ture might be built on the campus
mall. "There are no plans to disturb
the mall he said.
If it is approved, the proposed
building would be under planning
and construction for four ears.
Brewer said.
Chancellor Speaks
Ph( �( by TERRY GRAY
ECU Chancellor Thomas K. Brewer, pictured here in a meeting of the ECU
Planning Commission Monda. later appeared before the SGA Legislature
to respond to questions covering tall break, parking, and classrooms.
Gay Fights Not Over
� ulleiir Pro- Vfmr
After a tough fight with the SGA
in 1978, the East Carolina Gay
Community won official recogni-
tion for their group. The controver-
sy over the ECGC has largely died
away, but other campuses around
the nation are still struggling with
the question of gay rights.
Music Projects Get Grant From Raleigh Group
A.J. Fletcher
1 ducational and Opera
tundation Inc. ot
Raleigh, whose founder
was a 1 o n g t
nefactor ol the East
Carolina University
Scl ol Ol Musi has
ded an increased
: ual financial grant
ol $20,000 to aid tour
specific E( U music
projects.
I he grant provides:
� $9,000 tor con-
tinuation and expan-
sion of the AI. Ilet-
chei Scholarship pro-
gram, which now pro-
vides for 35 scholar-
ships in the School of
Mu
� $5,000 tor con-
tinuation o' joint per-
formances ol the Last
Carolina University
Symphony Orchestra
and the National Opera
Com pany (one perfor-
mance in Greenville
and two performances
in Raleigh each year
� $2,000 to partial-
ly support a youth or-
chestra program which
has been re-organized
with a community
board of directors as
the Eastern Carolina
Orchestra and
Chamber Music
Association, and which
will support one and
possibly two youth or-
chestras
� $4,000 to support
the East Carolina
University Opera
Theater, providing
scenery, costuming and
accompaniment for an
opera program which
presents scenes from
several operas and at
least one full pro-
duciton each year.
The late A.J. Flet-
cher of Raleigh,
businessman, broad-
caster and phi lan-
thropist, founded and
subsidized the National
O pe r a C o m pan) .
formerly known as the
Grass Roots Opera, in
a personal effort to br-
ing opera to as main
North Carolina school
children as possible.
Reflecting a lifelong
interest in music and
music appreciation, he
began to support the
ECU School of Music
substantially with a gift
of $50,000 in 1973 and
made annual contribu-
tions to programs of
the school until his
daeth in 1979. He
specified in his will that
A.J. FLetcher Educa-
tional and Opera Foun-
dation Inc and Culter,
Inc continue to sup-
port music and music
education through
philanthropies.
Richard H. Steinbacher
Phil ciuresv Ol NASA
Peering Into The Planetary Giants
B MIKENOONAN
Two unmanned spacecraft,
Voyagers 1 and 2, are now on their
way to study our giant outer
planets, Jupiter and Saturn and 11
of their satellites. Voyager 2 was
launched from Florida on Aug. 20,
1977. Voyager 1, which flies a faster
trajectory to reach the planets
first, was launched on Sept. 5,
1977.
Richard H. Steinbacher of the
Jet Propulsion Labratory in
Pasadena, Calif, spoke to Green-
ville media in the auditorium of
Willis Building Monday in advance
of a talk he was scheduled to give
to the Eastern North Carolina Sec-
tion of the American Chemical
Society.
Voyager I flew by Jupiter on
March 5, 1979. Voyager 2 will fly
by Jupiter on July 9, 1979. Both
spacecrafts are carrying in-
struments capable of conducting 11
types of experiments.
"The rings of Saturn will be in-
vestigated with all 11 instruments so
we can tell what the material of the
rings is. what the groupings are
and what the density of the rings
is oy radiation measurments as
we fly by them. How and why the
rings were formed is also a major
question he said.
"We used to believe that Saturn
was the only planet that had rings
but scientists have recently
discovered that there are rings
around Jupiter too. This was
discovered by the Voyager
spacecraft Steinbacher said.
"Through astronomical obser-
vations, we know that there are
rings around Uranus also. It might
be that rings are a characteristic of
most planets and we'll have to
decide why the Earth is without
rings rather than why the other
planets have rings" he added.
"Voyager 1 is on a trajectory
that, once it goes past Saturn, will
not approach any of the other
planets. It will go past the orbits
of Uranus, Neptune and Pluto, but
unfortunately,those planets will
not be close by at the time Stein-
bacher said.
Voyager 2 was put on a trajec-
tory which will carry it out towards
See NASA, Page 3
In the last few years, gay students
at the University of Maryland have
endured physical beatings, frequent
verbal assaults, and even the
establishment of a formal organiza-
tion opposing their presence on
campus.
But the hostility hasn't been
limited to students. In each of the
last three years, the Gay Communi-
ty � the campus voice for gays �
has fought to add a provision to the
campus Human Relations C ode thai
would ban discrimination against
homosexuals. University President
John Toll has rejected it each time.
Toll turned down the gays'
demands once again last month,
labeling them "meaningless" and
suggestive of an endorsement of
homosexual acts which are forbid-
den by state laws
The provision outlawed
discrimination on the basis of
"expression of sexual preference
As expected, the Gay Community
was outraged by the president's
decision.
Toll's decision is so
retrogressive said Tom Clauss,
the group's former president and
treasurer. "I would expect that kind
of decision from a fundamentalist
campus crusader
Though Toll's rejection lias no
noticeable practical effects on gav
programs or funding, the Gay Com-
munity views it as another sign of
the administration's insensitivity to
gay rights. Lor a group constantly
on guard against wise-cracking
heterosexual students, such support
is av idly courted.
"We feel like it would have given
us a lot of support, that they do in-
tend to make sure we are not
discriminated against Clauss
adds, "that they wouldn't tolerate
any more attacks by other students
on us
Those attacks have evolved into a
regular routine on campus for gays
here. Clauss says he is often called
nasty names bv other students, and
that his roommate had two of his
ribs broken two years ago in a fight
with others in his dorm. Recently.
he adds several) "straight" students
were placed on academic probation
after assaulting another member of
the Gav Community.
That kind of hostility is common
on college campuses. Administra-
tions often don't shy away from
making anti-gay sentiments into
policy. Brigham Young University,
for example, regularly spied on
students, looking for signs of
homosexual behavior. Less ag-
gressively, Cornell rushed out a
�"clarification" of its equal oppor-
tunity policy when it was found that
See GAYS, Page 3
Both Sides Rest In
Ku Klux Klan Trial,
Case In 18th Week
GREENSBORO (UP1) - Both
the prosecution and defense have
rested in the trial of six Klansmen
and Nazis accused of killing five
communists, but that does not mean
the case is close to going to the jurv
The prosecution is expected to
present rebuttal witnesses for the re-
mainder of this week � the trial's
18th. Closing arguments are ex-
pected to take a couple weeks.
Coleman Blair Pridmore,
Lawrence Gene Morgan, Jerry Paul
Smith, David Wayne Matthews,
Roland Wayne Wood and Jack
Wilson Fowler are charged with
first-degree murder and could be ex-
ecuted if convicted.
The five members of the Com-
munist Workers Party were killed in
a clash shortly before a Nov. 3, 1979
"Death to the Klan" march was
scheduled to begin.
The last defense witness to testify
Monday was Rex W. Stephenson, a
two-tour Vietnam veteran who
worked with Dr. James Waller, one
of the slain communists. He said
Waller once told him the com-
munists needed a martyr and were
prepared for violence.
"They only thing he said was that
they were prepared for violence
said Stephenson, who worked with
Waller at a Greensboro waste treat-
ment plant. "He said they needed a
martyr. The activities they were in-
volved in were not getting enough
attention and he said they needed
some national TV exposure
Under cross-examination,
Stephenson described Waller as a
"good worker, a friend" who did
not try to impose his political views
on him. But he also said he felt
Waller could be dangerous.
"If he was standing there with a
gun in his hand, I'd say yes
Stephenson testified when asked if
he considered Waller dangerous.
Stephenson testified he warned
Waller, a medical doctor, that the
communists were headed for trouble
if they continued to hold
demonstrations against the Klan.
On The Inside
Announcements2
Editorials4
Classifieds10
Letters4
Concert5
t
f





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 14, 1980
t
Announcements
ATTENTION
The East Carolinian
welcomes all campus
organizations to submit items
to the Announcements sec-
tion. Hue to our space limita-
tions, however, all future
submissions should be no
longer than 50 words. Hand-
written submissions will also
no longer be accepted. Items
must be submitted no later
than 1 p.m. on Mondays or
Wednesday.
LEARNING
A new program for Increasing
Learning Efficiency will be of
rered by Dr George Weiganci
nning Ociobei 20. W80 There
win be vn groups one will mee'
. n M, ncfay ami Wednesday a' 1 00
� er gi i up will mee'
. n Tuesday and Tr-ursflay a' t 00
pm in Room 305 Wrigh- Annex
� � , i ,t.s is available tc an
sTudenis A i ta i l I ' ary
no I � ilion is re
quired
REBEL WORK
REBEL ECUS h-erary and
��agazine is m� accepting
subn- iss . � s -1 pi e'r y fit lie n
.ssa, i 91 hw rll and ptM vqrapfv
S : . v pod. dou
i . . . A � - s name, ad
dress and prune number must be
each work Submissions may be
: . the REBEL office (r
�c THE REBEL
� Center
PROFESSORS
RACE
lessors! I he lime i pre ve
a �" has �" � the
Lit Greal State Pri'lessir RcK-
l NCSU on Nov 9 NCSU has
i-nged us, UNC. and DuKe l
benefi1 unred
ihe ore cess
call A
. - - � b v Oc . j
P08sll00t6p06sl070t5sm08u6 will be
. . ng on Oct 14 a- 7 30
� agan 307 Speak -
Ravai s Dei ai i
� � , ECU SC �
All members are urged
PHYSICS TUTORS
The ECU Depar'men' ol
Physics is s'MI seeking appln ams
tor a tutor 'raining program Ap
plicants should have ccmple'ed
PHYS 2350 with a grade otBu
better Attendance of 'he 'rammg
sessions tor two hours weekly will
put the tutor's name im a publish
ed list Of certified 'u'trs Fir tur
ther information, contact Dr
Mc Enally a' 757 6894
PSI CHI
The Psi Chi honor society foi
psychology will held an Initiation
banquet for new members Oct 23
at the Villa Rims inductees and
members mus' sign up by Of 13
in Psych Office and pay COS1 Ot
S3 25
The OC 22 mee'mg is cancelled
PLAYHOUSE
The Eas' Cari Ima Playhouse
will hild audi'uns fir
Streamers, a military drama
Dv David Rabe on October 13'h
and 14 a' 7 30 p m in 'he Drama
Department's S'udu Thea're
The cas' for 'his drama c nsists
11 11 men Ri les in Ihe i I,i.
. per, l( students, facul'y and sttt
members it 'he universi'y and
citizens of Greenville and the su'
rcundmg area
Cedr.i WincheM a taiul'y
member if the Department it
Drama and Speet h, will direc
priiduc'iin The performance will
run fri m Ni vembet 17 ihru 25
SNOWSKI
Prereuis'er w ft! povf advisor
for PH,f 1105 . ' g I . mi
Snowshoe w v a Jan 4 jai !
all par'icipan's mus' pay ' � I
room deposit it $10 00 on Octobei
30 a-4 00 pm room 108 Menu nal
gym rum 205 r call 757 5000
before Oi'i ber 30 to be included in
'he group
HONORS
1 11 e r e d
REBEL

icatio
lablc Vo
e RI Hi I
Mei
EPISCOPAL
An episc
5th
� ����
14 in e
� S uden-
� a I' be
Honors sem m
freshmen and sopl res with a
3 5q p averag� andnewfn
ai received invitai
Honors Seminars K beoffi
ing semester 1981
imeres'ed students may attend
an Hon rs n ee'
: � � � �
� see Dr David Sanders. C
dma'i r of Honors �'� � � - � �
further � 1� �
P r . � . r -
HSEV ;oio Paralli . �
nese am: ����
� - a res Drs Ai and
Wa w Wednesdays " - 1
� � - . and Si 1 10
D r Carlos C O b I (
W � � sdays, 6 30 8 . .
HSEM 2050 Hum I
Response '� the Tragedy it
Human Cond Dr Dt 1
V Vt 111 a n and D'
Bassman Tuesday 7 9 pn
HSEM 2060 Naturi
Landscape era
ting in America Pro!
and other. W �. �
GAY COMMUNITY
The Eas- Carolina Gay Com
muni'y will hold rs weekly
mee'mg Tuesday Oc 14 a' 5 p m
The ECGC mee's a' 953 E 10th
S'ree' a' the b. "1 m ;f College
Mill Tins week 'here will be an m
t, 1 ma'ive presentation by a health
specialis' with 1 ppc runries for
discussion and questions afer
waros New members are urged t(
attend
HANDBALL
Those wishing n compete in team
handball 'tis semester are
reminded 'ha' 'he deadline for
en'enng your 'earn is Oc 28 The
'earn captain's meeting nn be
held Oc 30 ai 1 p m in 1 m
B 102, Brewstei Bldg Rules are
available in the IM Otfue in
rial Gyn I 1 all 757 6387
ALLIEDHEALTH
The Allied Health Professions
Admissions Tes' will be i ftered a'
East Carolina Universi'y 1 n Sa'ur
day, November 15 1980 Applua
'ion blanks are t be completed
and mailed 'i ihe Psychological
Corp 304 Eas' 45th Street, New
York, NY 10017 K arrive by Oc
lObet 18 1980 Applica'nn blanks
are alsi available a' 'he Tes'mg
Center, Speight Building,
Ri I m 105, Eas' Car Ima Universi
'V
AEDPLEDGE
The firs' pledgi1 -ig will be
1 n Oc 14, 7 p m Flanagan
307 aii pre profess nal students
a �. are interested in bei 1 meing .1
mbei 1 aed in the 1980 81
ai aoi , a e urged i atend
I is meeiing Basi reouiremi
lor rm bershiOi ire sopl n r
SCIENCE ED
The Science Education Club will
OC 15 a' 4 p m in F 303 Dr
Di ugh and Ms Lisa Mangier, will
uss ' student 5 attitudes at
to, t theii 1 ' es 11 physical
s . , . � � ,s � mi 11 vaie them
�am aii prospective elemei
�� , p - . - 1 scienci phyt
� � � . try �,��
BAKE SALE
in rei 1 g� � I North ���
� 1 i , � �
13 18, r. Club it
: �� � tie and adai .� � . .
display Wed Oct ISmfi � �
-
PICNIC
erested lewisi s'uden is
� H i- ;
Sunit.i. 19 at Elm Par!
1 j M pi I 1 'id 1 all Jerry
'52 594: � Di Resn � '5? ' i
p eas 1 us for loft � �
MAC
Wed 15, at 4 15
� � . I - I Ml
. , � , mi : -
It
VACCINE
The influence vaccine is
available for students at the Stu
dent Health Center Students bet
ween ages 13 27 should get 'he vac
cine in 'wo doses given one month
apar' S'uden's over 28 years old
need only one dose The cos' Of the
vaccine is SI 50 per dose I "is par
'icularly important tor students
with chronic respira'ory disorders
such as as'hma and emphysema
or any other chronic illnesses 10
receive 'he vaccine (both doses if
under 28 years Old) before
Chns'mas
PHIALPHATHETA
Ph. Aipta rheta the His'iry
Honorary Siiie'y will hi Id its
bird meeting of 'he semester on
O- 14, 1980 a' 7 30 pm in the
R11 hard C Tidd Room, D Wing
Brews'or i lems f discussion will
11 ncern the Dep' of His'or y picnic
11 be held on the following day ah
members and prospec'ive
members are encouraged H a'
tend
PICNIC
T he Dep' I i Histoi y will hold its
Fall semestei picnii undei ihe
rship 1 I the members cif Phi
Alpha Theta The picnic will be
held Oi' 15 from 4 p m un'il 6
p m at 'he picnic grounds adia
. eni l Memi I ial Gym. All His'i 1 ,
man rs and ni.n, r s i ,�( , y fai ul
� y "iaiors,
inv.ed to a'end
�1 1 picnic will be
si 75 if pun' as � be re 0 1 15
and S2 if purchased .i' 'ho picnic
r i kets may oo port 1 ased ihn ugl
�1 .� Dept i t His I , rfiCi
ly prospe
and guess
Admissii n
ECU LAW SOCIETY
The E( ��-� ciety w.ll be
I a lular meeting
Thursday mq' ' Ocl 16 in "�
Mu I ' i Pur pi so r i iin f
v tenl ill � m t ave a si �
bus.i � ng beginning a' 6
pm w �� speakers following
Spea � lor this n ng ai � Ai
torneys Cl irles v ncent and Stan
San 5Of Hi ward. vm eni and Duf
fus aGree - � firm a,llstudents
ind � law
� � �
1 � , pieast
757 6611, exl 218
SCEC MEETING
e Student Cou lor E �.oc
� �' v. met Wei
s I 4 0" Room 129
land embers
� � � �
n'ss will be cond
ACCOUNTING TUTORS
� . O'
g . � . , . � � ,
ly aftei � � to 5
Raw ' 7401 aicl
. - . ' ��n'S
MUSIC
General educa'ion music,
students preregistenng next week
may enroll for Fine Ar's General
Education credit in: Music Ap
precia'ion (2208), Contemporary
Music 12238), Orches'ral Music
(2218), History of Jan Music
(2258) Performance groups ac
ceptmg many non music majors
are Concec Band, Symphonic
Band. University Chorale. Men's
Glee Club, Women's Chorus,
Women's Glee Club Limred
spaces may exist for pnva'e and
group lessens
MOBILITY
H you have a mobility impair
ment. you should contact the Of
fice of Handicapped Services at
757 6799, 211 Whichard, during the
preregis'ra'ion per.od, October
13 17 We have a service whereby
your classes can be assured to be
located m accessible classrooms
BINGO
Ge1 ready for bingo and ice
cream' on Tuesday. October U at
7 00 p m m the Mendenhaii Multi
Purpose Room Prizes will be
given to bmgi winners and ice
cream will be given 'i all a'
Mendenhall's Mon'hly BingoIce
Cream Par'y l"s tree to everyone
so come join 'he fun - you ius'
can lose!
OKTOBERFEST
The International Language
Orgamra'iin is hi idng its annual
Oktoberfes Thurs . Of 16 a' '
p rri in 'he mterna'ional House
parking k � Come and enioy the
bra'wurs' beer. 11 mpah band and
dancing Tiikes are S3 and are
available a' the � i r r from any
ILO memh.r
AUDITIONS
'�' Eas' Carolina Universi'y
Playhouse Will hi Id auditions for
S'reamers a military drama
by David Rabe Oc 13 14 a' 7 30
p m m 'he ECU S'udu Thea're
The cas' consists of 11 male ac
rs Ri les m 'he play are open 'i
s'uden-s, ECU facul'y and s'aft
members, and citizens of 'he
Greenville area
Cednt Winchell of the Dep' it
and Speed faiul'y, will
the production Pern r
are scheduled fir Nov
17 25
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Pi i Be'a Lambda will mee' I n
Tuesday O. 'ber 21, in rm 103 a'
4 00 pm in Mendenhaii S'uden'
Center Committees will mee' lor
planning purpses. St all
members arc urged H a'tend
FILMS
� � . rns �� m I tee will rrtt �
� � 16 a' 6 30 p m m
243 it Mendenrall S'uden'
� mi members are urged 'i
$100 Prize Offered
To Best Essayists
East Carolina
University and the
Honor Society of Phi
Kappa Phi are prepar-
ing for the Sixth An-
nual ECU-Phi Kappa
Phi Symposium
scheduled for the latter
part of February, 1981.
The theme is
"Higher Education:
Trends and Issues for
the 80's" � a timely
theme which lends itself
to creative treatment by
students from all
academic and profes-
sional disciplines. The
committee has iden-
tified many topics
which can be treated
under this theme. A
fevs suggestive ones are
listed below:
Coping with Rising
Educational Costs; The
Declining Status of the
Diploma; The Effects
of Grade Inflation; Job
Education vs. I iberal
Education; Selecting a
Major for the 80's; Stu-
dent Financial Aid for
the 80's; The Abuse of
Women's Rights in the
Classroom; The
Changing Role of the
Female Student; Ef-
fects of the New
Morality on Campus;
Equal Educational Op-
portunity in the 80's;
Student Evaluation of
Faculty Performance;
The Student's Role in
University Governance.
We are sure there are
many more.
As in the past years
awards of $100 each
will go to the two
students whose papers
are judged best on the
basis of (1) creative ap-
proach, (2) constructive
ideas offered and (3)
overall quality. The top
student paper will be
presented by the writer
at the symposium.
The Mmposium pro-
gram will also include
ECU faculty and pro-
minent external
speakers. Proceedings
will be published for
distribution to leading
libraries and interested
parties.
To get into the com-
petition, all that is
needed is a two to three
page abstract of your
idea.
Please send the
abstract o your pro-
posed presentation to
Dr. Fred Broadhurst,
Chairperson ECU-Phi
Kappa Phi Symposium
Committee School of
Technologv � Campus
Mail.
The deadline for
abstract submittal is
Nov. 17, 1980.
Campus Interviews - October, 1980
Career Planning and Placement
Ihe following companies and institutions
will be interviewing interested ECU
students and alumni on the dates in-
dicated. All those wishing an appointment
should contact Career Planning and
Placement. 757-6050.
Oct. 14 Burlington Industries
J.C. Pennev Co.
Blue Bell Inc.
Roses Stores, Inc.
Oct. 15 U.S. Navy Officers Programs
Ernest & Whinney
Oct. 16 K Mart
Oct. 17 W.S. Peebles Department Stores
Oct. 21 Southern National Bank
Arthur Andersen & Co.
Oct. 22 Del Monte Sales Co.
Oct. 23 Integon
Electronic Data System
Fieldcrest Mills
Oct. 27 Burroughs Wellcome Co.
First Union National Bank
Oct. 28 Fife of Virginia
Oct. 29 Liberty Mutual Ins. Co.
F.W. Woolworth Co.
Oct. 30 Sonoco Products Co.
Oct. 31 Univ. of Richmond School of Law
J.P. Stevens Co.
Unisex Salon
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NASA Envoy Explains Mission
I HI I AM kOI MAN (K I OBI K 14. 19X0
Continued From Pane l d
ajii
Uranus when it finishes
the Saturn fly-by. It
Ihe option to journe) to
I ranus is exercised,
Voyagei 2 will sail
within range ol I ranus
in Jan. 1986, more than
tout eais aftei leaving
Saturn, according to
NASA releases
"Knowledge gamed
a I each planet oi
satellite can be related
to others and con
bute to the
understanding ol the
1 arth as well Stein
bachei said
"We ha e always
t n quite sensil i c to
tel thai w
nding the taxnavt
dollai- Bui we have Bj comparing what is
Years alter the mands from theii
put ver gome on in these dif- launch, when the crafts Earth-bound masters,
waj ol precious ferenl environments, are 30 times farthei according to NASA
we can get a much bel from the sun than the releases. Communica
tei feeling as to what Earth is, the two tions wi" ,aiJe and
has happened in our Voyagers will be unable disappear as they drift
pas Steinbacher to respond to attitude into the outer limits of
said corrections and com- space.
materials into the
spacecrafts. Mo
what has been spent on
the spat ecrafts oi i he
mission goes back into
the ei i
eludes
techno!
been
spendi
dollars
been I
a n o n
"We
info
11 on
ogie
de
n g
l
ai
e
1 hi - in
skills and
that have
Grades Get 135- Year Delay
ped
t hese
i . yield has
more than
h ad evei
addi
Ivin
l'R( mi NCI . R.I. (C PS)
Students complammg about pro-
fessors who procrastinate before
posting grades have met their
match: it took Brown University
freshman Edmund Baldwin 135
years to get his grades delivered in
the mail.
Brown's public information of-
reports that Baldwin's report
originally mailed from Pro-
vide Baldwin in Stratford,
H. in December, 1N4 only
hei
recently turned up at the Man-
chester. N.H. post office. Baldwin's
great niece received the letter, and
forwarded news of it to Brown of-
ficials.
Baldwin's grades, the university
adds, were excellent. However, he
did not return to the school, opting
instead to become a lawyer in his
home state, and then to become a
prospector in California. He died on
his wav west in IN48.
WESTERN SIZZLIN
STEAK HOUSE
THE FAMILY STEAKHOUSE
Opportunities For Americans Abroad
Op pot
set
IC
Semin;
Speight Bi
129.
d
JO
broad m the organization with head- for expanding their
ation and con- quartets in Greenwich, educational horizons
,i, Connecticut and Ion- through foreign studv.
ns. don, England. This Opportunities will be
for this program is one of over discussed for ai, age
e mencan 50 such seminars con- groups from the junior-
I oreten ducted nationwide dur-
illsi. the na- ing the month of ()c
i's oldt
Gays Still Fighting
For Campus Rights
high level and up for an
international aspect to
tober b MIS m
i ,An�.�;ft� ,vi, i a their education. I here
tel voopeiation with local .
,i, i . 11 vvil! be an oppoi tumtv
schools anu colleges. ' '
tor questions to be
Ihe purpose of this answered regarding
seminar is to raise the specific areas of in-
awareness level ol teresl expressed by
Americans to the many those attending the
poitunities available seminar.
( ontinued 1 rum Page 1�
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1





GlXie iEaat (Earflltntan
Serving the campus community since 1925.
Richard Green, ,��� u
fl RRV Hi KNIM, , , ung TERRY GRAY, Mamgu,g Mm
CHRIS LK HOK, Bmmta u� l lsA DEW, , op, Ech.o,
George Hettich, , � Charles Chandler, v"� .��
Ami I we sn r, , m David Norris. fm�����
Octobei 14. 180
Opinion
Page 4
Defense
'Russian Roulette' In Voting Booth
I ho recent attacks and parries
between Republicans and
Democrats over the "true" defense
posture of the United States have
most Americans worried about na-
tional security, and rightfully so.
But the point is that no one really
knows exactly how we fare against
the Russians in military might �
and no one will admit it.
In the July August issue of Col-
umbia Journalism Review. Roger
Morris painfully pointed out that
"between Vietnam and
Afghanistan, the press forgot a
lesson: beware of Pentagon sources.
Recent national seeuritv coverage
reveals a militant press � and few
conscientious objectors Morris
contends, and it has been
acknowledged, that "bloated Rus-
sian numbers have been treated as
sacrosanct, their economic
legitimacy, strategic relevance, and
bureaucratic provenance largely
unexamined" by most security
reporters. The result: a misinformed
and unnecessarily paranoid public.
And the feelings of that public
have been seized by the politicians
and used to propel campaigns,
Reagan contending that Carter has
allowed our nation's military to lag
behind the Russians, and the Carter
Administration claiming it has done
the necessary strengthening. Who's
telling the truth'7
The military budget of the Soviet
Union is a state secret. According to
Morris, most CIA and Pentagon
estimates are based on the arbitrary
assumption "that military salaries
and weapons-production costs in
the forced-draft Soviet economy
were the same as they are in the U.S.
Even government analysts privately
admit that the margin for error in
such guesswork is potentially enor-
mous
Neither Republicans nor
Democrats know exactly how much
we need to spend to "keep up with
the Russians but there is a major
difference in approaches to the pro-
blem. The Republicans advocate an
increase in defense spending that
would hopefully outdistance the
most generous estimates of Soviet
strength. The Democrats are so
busy trying to balance the budget
that they are being more cautious
with large military spending in-
creases.
The November election will
decide which path the United States
will take, and voters will be judging
by facts that are hardly supported.
It's hard to believe the press, harder
to believe the Pentagon (where two-
thirds of the military budget "has
nothing to do with weapons"), and
hardest of all to believe the politi-
cians. When it comes to defense,
Americans will truly play "Russian
roulette" in the voting booth this
year.
Thanks For Blood
Once again ECU students came
through for the Red Cross and Pitt
County residents by rolling up their
sleeves and giving that precious
fluid of life � blood. All of those
who gave and volunteered their ef-
forts � AFROTC, fraternities and
sororities, campus organizations,
students and faculty � deserve a re-
sounding "Thank You But know-
ing how many lives will be saved has
to be the most rewarding thanks you
can get. Keep up the good work,
ECU, in the years to come.
�'6t i9eo Pi
7)) we just wifHTTW'Thallucinating
i�Campus Forum
Professors 'Give The Grades9
1 am writing this letter in response to
the article "Opinion Disagrees With
Professor's" in the October 9 issue of
The Hast Carolinian. Stan Ridgley
brought out a very interesting point
which 1 have found to be very true of
this university. The fact that to educate
would be for teachers to "expose
students to all points of view adequately
and impartially" has obviously not
crossed the minds of many professors on
this campus.
To cite an example of the liberal point
of v iew given withoul balancing it with
other ideas 1 look into the curriculum
material for what is known as
"Marriage and the Family" classes. I sat
for four months in a "Marriage and the
Family" class onl to hear of how com-
munes, living together, homosexuals.
divorce and "fair fighting" are alternate
lifestyles and they work well as en-
vironments foi raising children. 1 ain't
recall once ever hearing anything on how
to have a good relationship between a
man and a woman. Never did the pro-
fessor mention how God would struc-
ture and direct families to live. 1 realize
this would be a very conservative view
and other points would probably be
discussed. The views 1 heard were far
from being impartial.
Furthermore, in my three years at this
university 1 have not once heard a
teacher speak of God's divine creation
of earth and life, but if you want to hear
something about evolution and how men
came from monkevs, this is the place to
be.
When it comes to grades, it can never
be fully proven that a lower grade was
given because of a differing opinion, but
when it comes to writing papers express-
ing opinions, be careful to keep in mind
the professor's point of view. 1 was
assigned to write an introspective paper
about an event that made an impact on
my life. 1 wrote very clearly how Cod
touched my life and caused me to believe
and follow Him. 1 received the grade of
"C and the comment was that the pro-
fessor did not understand my faith. Of
course not � he won't understand until
he believes as 1 do. Is this any reason to
give me a "C"?
1 could go on with this liberal view-
point in the classes, but we all know that
a professor is right no matter what he
says, because he gives the grades.
DANAB1NGHAM
Senior, Social Work
Bikers Need Consideration
In response to the articles on bicycles
(Oct. 2) concerning rule enforcement, 1
see nothing wrong with the rules the
university police have to enforce
However, in restricting cyclists to the
streets of the campus, (as well as Green-
ville in general), they are now endanger-
ing the cyclists' lives instead ol the
pedestrians. 1 tor one have had more
than one close call on the streets o this
town while riding my bike.
It's time to give cyclists a fair chance,
too. After all the talk on conserving
energv. I for one feel like I'm dome m
share to conserve by riding a bike. I here
may be negligent bike riders thai dodge
pedestrians, but there are jusl as many
negligent motorisi on the road who
think thev have the right-of-way not
ter what'
There are ways to solve these pro-
blems. 1 have seen the problem nicely
resolved on other campuses (re. Univ. ol
Arizona, Univ. o Cal at Santa Barbai
where some sidewalks are marked like
the streets with lines to indicate it being a
bike, skateboard, scooter path only.
Where there are wide sidewalks, one side
is marked for cyclists, the other for
pedestrians.
At let there aren't enough streets to
get to all buildings bv bike without going
way out ot the vsav, hut there are plenty
ol walkways to provide ample room for
both people and bikes. So instead of just
enforcing the rules, win not resolve the
problems in a way that will not
discourage cyclists. In the future, more
bikes will be around campus, not less.
One other comment 1 have is. it you
don't want people parking their bikes on
stairwells, sidewalks and in buildings.
then provide more bike racks so we can
properly park.
1 OlSW GENSEH
Senior, Art
Anti-Abortionists Brow-Beat
'In The Name Of God'
The recent letters on the subject of
abortion call our attention to a new
wave of ultra-conservative dogma. Some
people today wish to make a particular
view or act "wrong" just by declaring it
so. If that doesn't suffice, some are like-
ly to brow-beat another with their
political views, "in the name of God
Whether there has been more social
good achieved in God's name than social
evil, under the same banner, is
debatable.
To me, it is totally reprehensible for
individuals to assume that any one of us
has the right to inflict his particular
religious value upon all others by depriv-
ing individuals of their freedom to make
personal choices, though many of those
choices may be less than ideal.
The Pitt County Board ol Health
courageously defended its programs ol
family planning and sex education last
spring, despite being accused of pro-
moling sexual promiscuity and abortion.
Alas, many counties have been deprived
o numerous health services, in their
schools and in their health departments,
because of intimidation at the hands ot
local, dogmatic right-wing political a.
tiv is! 5,
Amazingly, the "pro-hie" people's
compassion for life seems largely limited
io life within the uterus. They tail to
ep at the tragedy ot tv.elve. thirtee
fourteen or fifteen-yeai old children giv-
ing birth to babies. Nor have they
lamented on behalf of the poor, sought
to seek child care, food stamps, im-
munization, etc. Rather, only two
three weeks ago a Beaufort County
group caused the eviction ot health
workers from their schools who tried to
help prevent unwanted pregnancies, pro-
vided students with transportation to
doctors and dentists, etc.
Nevssseek (9 1580, p. Ml provide-
an expose of the so-called Mora! Majori-
ty, whose very conception was political
not �"rehgious But under the religious
guise ol Rev. Jerry Falwell, it is
mistaken for a religious movement by
many.
Shall 1 be damned and accursed and
jailed for being a Jew? Or a liberal? Or a
Catholic? Or a person who practices
contraception'? Or who believes each of
us has an obligation to the Constitution
Is it inevitable that America create its
own version ot "Holocaust
Unless we do more thinking and less
shouting, more caring and less haling.
more worshipping and less posturing "in
the name oi God surely our own
Holocaust will come, for we will have
labeled the victims and will have fired
the furnaces.
11 LIAM C BYRD
Professor,
Dept. of Community Health
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
Letters must include the name, major
and classification, address, phone
number and signature of the author(s).
Letters should be limited to three
typewritten pages, double-spaced, or
neatly printed. All letters are subject to
editing for brevity, obscenity and libel.
Letters by the same author are limited to
one each 30 das
To The Right
Iraq-Iran War: Get Used To Walk From Belk To Elbo
By STAN RIDGLEY
Students at ECU and elsewhere may be
forced to rediscover the pleasures of walk-
ing their dates downtown should the war
between Iran and Iraq continue.
For now, the danger of soaring gasoline
prices in the United States is minimal, as
Saudi Arabia has boosted its ojl produc-
tion by one million barrels a day to help
soften the blow of the loss of so much Iraqi
and Iranian oil to the world market.
But if the Strait of Hormu, through
which 60 percent of the Western world's
oil passes each year, is blockaded, then
many experts assert that the world would
be plunged into deep recession. Any long
war could result in a $40 dollar-a-barrel oil
price and, in at least one worst-case
analysis, a price of $200 a barrel � a
seven-fold increase, say, $9-$10 a gallon at
the pump.
Faced with this so-called "horror
scenario which includes a reduction of
U.S. economic output by $300 billion, the
United States would have a limited number
of options. One ECU instructor even sug-
gested that a U.S. invasion of oil-rich Mex-
ico could not be ruled out, so crippling
would the oil pinch be.
But all this is worst-case supposition,
and there is a silver lining � though a ma-
jority of Americans might not look at it
that way.
Americans have been notoriously slow
to change their lifestyles, even in the face
of the world energy crunch and world star-
vation. Changes in the basic way of doing
things in the U.S. are needed, and it would
be better to start making these changes
rapidly now rather than wait for some in-
ternational oil drought to cause a domestic
upheaval.
Most countries in Europe have already
learned their leson and begun widespread
conservation measures � and not the
picayune voluntary effort that the United
States has been engaged in the past couple
of years.
Three major differences in European
and American lifestyles made more than a
significant difference in the relative im-
pacts of the 1973-74 Arab oil embargo on
Europe and the United States. They were:
the widespread use of the bicycle, the high
price of gasoline, and the almost universal
use of small cars.
For the United States to survive in the
1980s (and 'survive' is not too strong a
word), a drastic shift away from indepen-
dent transit to mass transit is necessary.
And if Americans now are not willing to
forego having two cars in the family (one
of those usually a large gas-guzzler), then
we might not have the choice in a few
year.
High school students won't have the lux-
ury of being able to cruise the local
Hardee's parking lot at night nor the seem-
ingly traditional right to fill up their high
school parking lot, one person to a car.
Any massive shift away from the
automobile certainly would mean rapid
development of what are called 'phase III'
bicycles. These are three-wheeled vehicles
(of which several designs are already on the
market) which sit close to the ground, have
fiberglass bodies, and can easily attain and
sustain speeds of up to 60 miles per hour �
soley by leg power.
So there are alternatives to America's
profligate national lifestye. The alter-
natives may have the flavor of coming
from somewhere in left-field, but they may
seem all to viable in a few years.
A complete or near-complete cutoff of
Arab oil supplies could plunge the world
into depression, but its result in the U.S.
could be to finally turn this country from
the path of energy wastrel. Alternative
sources of energy would have to be
developed; perhaps something revolu-
tionary would come of it.
In any case, one could get used to that
long walk from Belk Dorm to the Elbo on
a Thursday night. One might have to.
Stan Ridgley is a senior Political Science
major with a degree in Journalism from
the Universitv of North Carolina at Chapel
Hill.
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Hit I AM C'AROI l
Features
Ot lOBhK 14, 1980
Page 5
Cooking Tidbits Make
Good Nutrition Easy
B LISA DREW
l P lllll.T
ECU students spent seven million
dollars last year eating in
restaurants. Since this figure in-
cludes "fast-food" establishments,
can it be a true indication of
students' eating preferences? It may
merel) be an indication of a general
ot either knowledge of or
facilities for cooking.
Most students come to college
fresh out oi high school and home.
Prior to this, their cooking ex-
perience has probabl) been limited
at best. For these students, especial-
ly for those in the dorms, learning to
cook and eat properly can be an un-
nerving experience.
Students who want to, or must,
cook for themselves have special
problems that are not considered by
standard, conventual cookbooks
naturally enough, since these
cookbooks are written for persons
with well equipped kitchens or
families to teed or both. 1 ypically, a
student in a dorm room is cooking
with a minimum of equipment, and
then for only one or two persons, as
Hypnosis Can Help
Nicotine Addicts
i on love to eat, but sou don't
like being overweight. You diet for
weeks, come close to your ideal
weight, or maybe even reach your
goal on!) to go back to your old
eating habits.
You know smoking is not good
foi you. But you try to quit onlv to
feel deprived when vou sit down
with your morning cot tee.
John Greer, clinical hypnotist
i Sell Psych, Inc in Southfield,
Michigan explains that if overeaters
and smokers can change their at-
titudes toward food and cigarettes,
the) can lose weight and become
non smokers. I he Self Psych clinics
have ben conducted successfully in
Greensboro, Southern Pines,
Wi nston Salem , Asheville,
Charlotte, Hickory, and Monroe, as
well as in several other states.
1 he American lung Association
ot North Carolina. Eastern Region,
will sponsor Greer's hypnosis clinics
Octobei 28 in Greenville at the
Ranuida Inn, 2(4 By-Pass, and Oc-
tober 29 in New Bern at Craven
Community College in the Ad-
ministration Building. I he smoking
clinics will be at 6:30 p.m. and the
weight loss clinics at 8:30 p.m.
Greei uses hypnosis to help peo-
ple change their emotional attitudes
that prevent them from ac-
he changes they want.
'The int conflict between a
smoker's intelligence and emotions
make 'will power' quitting dif-
ficult Cireer savs ot those who
have tried unsuccessful!) to kick the
bit. "A person's intelligence
v. ants to quit smoking, but his emo-
tions still need the gratification
g gives him. Hypnosis helps
a person convert to a non-smoker,
rather than give up something he
still wants to do

The same holds tor the
overweight. Dieters usuallv net on
cheaply as possible.
Following is a list of the basic
types of cooking equipment that is
available to facilitate cooking in a
dorm room; some are obvious,
others are not so obvious.
The Toaster Oven
I his is probably the most versatile
appliance of all. It vou have one
that broils and bakes, the
possibilities are virtually endless.
You can heat up froen foods, bake
cookies, or broil a steak. If you ex-
periment and use your toaster oven
to its optimum advantage, it's just
like a small oven.
The Hot Plate
.lust plug in your hot plate and vou
have an instant stove. Some hot
plates have different temperature
settings, lj you like to fry foods, be
sure to get onu that has a "high"
setting.
See COOKING, Page 7, Col. 1
� , iARY CA1 TERSON
Nantucket Plays A t Minges Coliseum
Minges Coliseum resounded last night to the rock and roll of Epic recording artists Nantucket in the first concert
of the 1980-81 school year. Also appearing were the Dalton Bos and Doc Holidav.
the yo-yo syndrome, taking off
weight and then putting it back on
ireei savs. "That's because they
haven't reprogrammed their minds
to enjoy nutrituous foods and pro-
per eating habits, "he key to losing
weight is making a life change, not a
temporary body change he says.
During both clinics, participants
telax during three hypnotic induc-
tions while Cireer gives suggestions
to their subconscious minds.
Literature and cassette tapes will be
provided in order to reinforce these
suggestions al home.
The tee for the stop smoking
clinic is $30. Cireer will regiess
smokers to the time when they
smoked their first cigarettes, witht
(he coughing and terrible taste it
caued. He will also give suggestions
to keep participants from substitu-
tion food for cigarettes.
Ihe weight control clinic is $25.
Suggestions to reprogram attitudes
that make people feel they should
eat every bite on their plates and
that make them look upon sweets as
rewards will be given during the
hypnotic inductions. Cireer helps
clients reprogram emotional at-
titudes that keep them captive in the
kitchen.
lo register for clinics at both
locations, call the American lung
Association oi North Carolina,
Eastern Region, at 752 5093. To be
guaranteed a seat, one must
preregister.
Wine's History Traced From
Phoenicians To Californians
Bj DAVID NORMS
1 niim i i�ior
Some things never change, but
wine is not one ol them. Wine has
been around for perhaps as long as
twelve thousand years, but has
undergone many chagnes in that
it me. One might go so far as to say
that they don't make it like the) us-
ed to.
Wine was known among virtually
all ot the earl) civilizatkmsol the
Middle last, such as the Babylo-
nians, the Hebrews, the Phoenicians
and the Assyrians. Ihe Phoenicians
and the Greeks, both seafaring
peoples, spread a taste lor wine and
vineyards all over the Mediterra-
nean.
The wme ot the ancient Creeks
would taste strange (to sav the least)
to a modern palate. I his ancient
wine was strong stuff, and was
always drunk diluted with water.
Spices, herbs, flowers and perfume
were added to classical wines. The
storage vessels were lined with resin,
adding further to the wine's taste.
By the way, wine storage among
the Creeks, as well as the Romans,
was also different from what we are
used to today. Wine was kept in
casks, goatskins or earthenware
jugs, called amphorae (Millions of
amphorae lie in archaeological sites
and ancient shipwrecks all over
much ot Europe toady.) Cork stop-
pers were unknown; wine containers
were sealed by oil or a greasy rag.
(Thank goodness for corks!)
Ihe Romans introduced
vineyards to Caul to provide wine
for the legions oi soldiers stationed
there. The famous vineyards ot the
Moselle Valley and the Rhineland,
todav producing much of the
world's wine, have been under
cultivation since then.
Alter the fall oi the Roman Em-
pire, the quality of wine (like
everything else) declined. Transpor-
taion over crumbling, bandit-
infested roads was difficult and
dangerous, so most wine was pro-
duced for local consumption.
Because wine was used in commu-
nion services, monks established
vineyards with their monasteries.
Through their efforts, the quality of
wine improved gradually during the
medieval period. Many monasteries
established vineyards in areas now
con- 'ered too far north for grow-
ing good grapes, such as Wales.
During the 12th century, great
areas of vineyards began in the
Rhine. Carrone and Loire valleys.
(They had to be along rivers then �
remember those crumbling, bandit-
infested roads.) Trade began to
recover and wine was sold at fairs all
over Europe.
In the late 17th century, wine was
kept in bottles with corks for the
first time. Cork comes from the
bark of cork trees, which are a type
of live oak. Although cork trees can
live as much as 500 years, thev
usually don't reach heights ot oven
thrity feet. Most cork comes from
Portugal, but some comes from
Spain and Algeria. The corked bot-
tle was a great invention in the
development of wine, replacing the
ancient containers capped bv greas)
rags in everything except a drink
called a Molotov cocktail.
As Europe began to colonize
other countries, the colonists took
grapevines with them. The first
European grapes in North America
were planted by the British in 1617;
the Spanish had planted some in
Central and South America long
before. Wild grapes already grew all
over what is now the eastern coast
of the United States and Canada;
when the Vikings landed in America
about 1000 A.D grapes v, -re grow-
ing in such quantity that they named
the new continent Viniand.
An insect pest from America,
called the phylloxera, a type ol
aphid, was accidentally imported in-
to Europe during the 186()'s. This
little bug almost destroyed the wine
industry in Europe. Grapevines
from California that were resistant
to the insect were crossbred with
some oi the older vines, today's
European wines are made with such
hybrid vines.
Later, America's wine industry
was destroyed not bv insects, bu
Prohibition. American vineyards,
which were gaining respect even in
Europe, were uprooted or permitted
to turn into wilderness. Wine pro-
duction didn't recover until after
World War II. since it takes years to
establish new vineyards.
Today, California leads the
United States in wine production,
with 9) percent oi this country's
total output.
Worldwide, the United States
ranks eighth in wine production.
France leads in the quantiu of wine,
making one fourth oi the world's
annual total of 4.500.000.0(H)
gallons. Following are Italy. Spain.
Algeria. Portugal, Argentina and
Greece. Obviously, some oi these
countries' wines are more popular in
America than others; for instance,
when was the last time vou have
some nice Algerian wine?
; The Tube:
Perfection Merits Respect
Phcosby JON JORDAN
Clockwise from upper left are Linda Chestnut, Kelvin Parks, Carol Briggs, Julian Parks, Gina Diehl and Antonio
Barnes. These students offered suggestions for improving contemporary television programming.
B NANCY MORRIS
4MbtMN Fr�lurr Idilnr
Television has been around since
long before most of us can
remember. Most of us ennot even
remember the tirst time we sat down
in front of a television to be
enlightened by whatever happened
to be showing on the set at the time.
Today, television is so widespread
that virtually every few households
ate without a television set. In fact,
most families have two or three, and
sometimes even four or five. And
yes, believe it or not, some
households have as many as six or
seven sets, one in every room, some
color and some black and white.
"There is always room for im-
provement" is an age-old cliche that
originiaied from the perfectionist
whose work was never done, and
filtered down to the rest of society
as an example to go by. Even
something that has been around as
long as television broadcasting has
room for changes that will probably
never lead to perfection.
Before improvements can be
made, it is necessary to determine
what faults need to be improved
upon. What can be done to improve
television viewing? The best source
to ask is the viewers. Many students
at ECU admit to watching television
often. Some slipped and admitted to
watching it up until the last verse ol
the national anthem plays. Then,
they said, they often fall asleep in
front of the set, or leave the room
for the night with the set still on. Ail
students interviewed had something
they would like to see improved in
the present viewing system.
Gail Dupress, a senior English
major, stated that she would like to
see "one educational station, and
fewer game shows
Julian Parks, senior philosophy
and psychology major suggests,
"one channel with all news. One
media station would enable one to
be informed by different viewpoints
at all hours of the day instead of just
at 6:00 and 11:00. There are many
inside viewpoints that cannot be in-
cluded in just the half hour that is
allotted on the news time slot
Jon Jordan, a sophomore
chemistry major, states,
"something I've always wished
would happen on T.V. is for each of
the networks to take a 60 minute
slot once a month and fill it with the
best episodes of some of the old
shows they used to have on, like
Time Tunnel, and see what kind of
response the networks got with it.
There are so many good shows that
have gone off the air
"Commericals come in at the
wrong times during the programs,
and other than that 1 don't watch
enough T.V savs Antonio
Barnes, a freshman general college
major.
Gina Diehl, senior art major,
says. "What I don't like 1 don't
have to watch, so therefore I
haven't really put that much
thought to it. 1 don't like commer-
cials cut in between a movie; it's
like reading a book when the phone
rings, and you have to stop. Other-
wise 1 usually like commercials �
they're like looking at any other
piece of art. I don't like so much
violence either
Kay Sanders, sophomore nusing
major, observes, "There aren't
enough educational shows. There
isn't enough variety either. Vou turn
on the TV. in the afternoons and
you get soap operas. You turn the
T.V. on at 6:00 at night and you
watch the news. You don't have any
choice. It's whatever they put on.
It's not necessarily what you want to
watch at that specific time. I also
think cartoons are too violent.
They're so unrealistic
"A lot of times they (T.V.) will
have unrealistic pictures. They will
See STUDENTS, Page 7, Col. 1
'
�'
t





6 rHE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 14,1980
I ti�J�& CfSUO MUCH fOK.
FooOUM TV VliN��b I
1 foony LiKtT
07 (M)IQ AJpti3
r
Aten Course
Announced
i
Somewhere In Time
Fine Film For Incurable Romantics
K JOHN W 1 IHN
Mali � i .
Chi istophei Kee e is
b quite a pro-
iis new movie,
ere in I ime,
;ven Supei
d nol solve. In
film, Reeve por-
: a s a successful
playwright, c ol
I in in love with
.� iman. ! his
a not seem
some, but this
.n died some
and
pi me in the
this
Her name
I h
Hannan Etkins,
. e Sc mot e) and she
�t the greatest
genei a-
� c ollins spots
it ful face in an
aph for the
rtr
ien
Is hei - hen so-
. like Collins falls
he time dif-
f 68 5 ears does
uch. He
upon
f tim travel,
from one
professoi s
jossil
se o! self
Collins
w a
d Men he finally
� :s it back to her
nds himself
awkward in manners
and dress for tins Vic
torian culture He is
also confronted b
anothei problem.
namely Hannah's pro
tective manager W.F.
Robinson (Christopher
Plummet). He proves
to be mote difficult to
get past than the time
barriei. However, true
love prevails in the end
in this picture; in spite
of Robinson's jealous
motives, the two are
eventually brought
togethei at last.
c ritics have not been
kind to this movie. Yet,
one is curious whv
anyone would have it in
for this warm romantic
put ure. It does not
seem to desrve the total
condemnation that it
has received bv main
Sui1 there are things in
this movie thai can
justify the criticism.
Director Stephen
Deutsch has certainly
tried to give his film the
feeling ol 1912. His set
ting does not lack any
realism. In looks and
manners, the people are
definitely ol that era.
He can also be credited
tor sparing his audience
oi silly special effects
which would not have
helped this movie at all.
Writer Richard
Matneson's plot is not
to be blamed either, for
this picture's failure to
please. 1 he story is a
good one. It combines
romance and a pinch oi
science fiction to pro-
duce an interesting
blend. It definitely had
some possibilities.
It one could find any
wrong with this movie,
it would have to be the
amount of time that it
took for Collins to go
back in to the past.
Deutsch spends so
much time trying to
convince his audience
ol time travel that he
begins to lose them.
1 he acting in this
movie has its ups and
dow ns, too.
Christopher Reeve does
not put in a verv good
performance as the
lead. His character Col-
lins is well meaning.
but not verv complex.
In tact, it is almost
paper thin at times. e
was much bettei as
Superman.
It is Jan Sevmore's
acting as the lovely lady
ol the old stage who
pulls this movie
through. With the
mysticism of Maude
Adams and the beauty
of I illie Langtry,
Seymore has a certain
inner quality that
makes one see whv Col-
lins was willing to go
back that far to reach
her. She has what many
other actresses today
sorely lack: class. Yet,
as good as her acting is,
her character is not
given much of a chance
to breathe in this
movie.
P 1 u m m e r ' s
character, too, never
has time to prove what
an effective villian he is
with this small script.
Perhaps the makers of
this movie should have
spent a little more time
with the dialogue. You
come away from the
theatre wanting extra
time with these two
lovers. If they had con
cent rated on this point,
they might have had a
box office hit on then
hands instead of this
mediocre llick.
However, foi you in-
curable romantics, this
is still a fine film.
FREE
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1 he newest and
perhaps one of the
most exciting elective
courses in the expan-
ding curriculum of the
genet al college require-
ment in the Department
of Health, Physical
I ducat ion. Recreation
& Safety at East
Carolina University is
lm luction lo Sail-
ing. 1 ftrough the ef-
forts of the new depart-
ment chairman, l)r
Raymond Martinez,
this sailing course has
broadened in scope and
expanded m course
content. During this
fall semester, twenty-
six students are atten-
ding a series of five,
two-hour dry-land ses
sions on rigging, types
of boats, nautical
terms, knots and lines,
supplemented by visual
aids ol salmg films and
slides. To strengthen
specitic important sail-
ing skills, outside lec-
turers help teach the
class. These speakers
otter special expertise
in such things as water
safety, knots and
weathei.
1 ectuter for last
I hursdasy's class ses-
sion was Dr. Richard
Stephenson, Division
Captain in the U.S.
Coast Guard Auxiliary
and a professor in the
East Carolina Universi
tv Geography Depart
ment. Dr. Stephenson
was a meterologist tor
the Navy during the
wars and is now using
his special knowledge
to help the students
understand weather
and its related pro-
blems to all boaters.
Certain cloud forma
turns, whether over
land or open water,
have significance to
sailors. Dr. Stephenson
remarks that HO percent
of all local Coast
Guard rescues concern
ed sail boats.
Alter completion ot
the dry land sesions,
the class moved to
Camp Don-lee, near
Oriental. N.C on the
Neuse River, for three
davs, they spent ap-
proximated 20 hours
sailing racing, and
working on related
nauiieal problems.
Each participant had
the opportunity to sail
as a skipper alone and
with a crew. School
vans provided the
transportation to Camp
Don-Lee and the
students took their own
bedrolls or sleeping
bags and several
changes ol warm
clothing. All meals
were provided b the
camp.
Sooth's No. 6 1 Rock Nightclub
In
Concert
Senior Show
Announced
Rose Hender- B.I .A. degree in pain-
of Greensboro, ting with a minor in
C a enioi studeni drawing. Henderson
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.V
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. School ol
iw ha
I ewis
Callers
e K
in the
r 4
Building
exhibi-
�. figurative
oils an d
ylics and drawings
a! as well as
ntings in watercolor
media.
� candidate 3r a
plans to entet the Ml
Program in painting at
either ECU or UNC-G.
she later plans to teach
on either the college or
high school level in ad-
dition to doing por-
traiture work.
She also plans to
become a member ol
the Greensboro Artists
League.
Henderson is the
daughter of Mr. Mrs.
Worth D. Henderson
ol Greensboro, N.C .
SPORTSWOKLD
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Students Give Opinions
Continued from Page 5
make everything look real pretty. In
a one hour show, they will show a
lite-time crisis, and it will all turn
out good in the end, and life isn't
like that. Sometimes problems go on
foi years, and like they solve
divorces in one show states Kelvin
P.irks, sophomore general college
major.
1 aurie Brown, freshman general
college major, feels that "there
shouldn't be the same thing showing
at the same time on all three sta-
tions, like the conventions. That
drove me crazy. And 1 think the)
put too marn commercials on.
You've got to have some, but
sometime it goes too tar
Mike Morris, freshman business
major, states that, "T.V. should
broaden its horion to include
X-rated movies
"One thing is they're getting real-
ly simple, and they're always about
the same things. They're either
policemen stories they're just sil-
ly Carol Briggs, freshman nursing
major states. "They all seem alike.
Maybe the commercials are the best
pan
I inda Chestnut, senior SLAP
major, says "there are commercials
that 1 complain about when I see
them; they are rather bland. 1 don't
like seeing all the commericals of
politicians running for government,
and the local commercials of
salesmen trying to sell cars
Cooking At Home
Can Be Cheaper
Continued From Page 5
The C offee Pot
A cot tee pot is er versatile when it
comes to cooking in your dorm
room. It can be used to heat water
tor instant foods, or tor boiling
eggs, making soup, or cooking
frozen vegetables. You can even use
it to reheat leftovers that you have
from home.
The Popcorn Popper
Depending on the type you have,
and the extent of your imagination,
a popcorn popper can be used in
much the same a as a coffee pot
O! a hot pot. Some can even be used
verv efficiently for frying eggs.
1 here ate a tew additional wavs
that you can cook in vour dorm
room, but these are not as practical
as the others. 1 oi example, a grilled
cheese sandwich can be made easily
using an iron .Hist butter the bread,
add the cl md wrap the whole
thing in aluminum foil. With the
iron on a tairlv high temperature,
iron the sandwich tor a few minutes
or until the cheese is melted.
I've also heard of girls using then
steam hair setters to steam
etables, but I'm not exactly sure
�. You'll have to experiment with
that one on vour own
lor those of you who are totally
at sea when it comes to eating pio-
perly, following is anothei list �
this one of five types of foods. Try
eat at I le item from each
up every day to help provide
I HI EASl CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 14, 1980
your body with the vitamins,
minerals, and fats it needs.
- Whole gram bread or cereal oi
some type.
- Fats: butter, olive oil, etc.
- Proteins: meat, fish, eggs,
cheese
- Citrus fruit, tomatoes (fresh,
canned, or froen)
- 1 eatv green or yellow (and
othei) vegetables.
Following this hsi does not
necessarily mean that you will gain
weight. On the contrary, you will
find that if you are eating b -tier.
you will feel better. Hence, you will
probably be more active and,
because your blood sugar will not be
subjected to drastic fluctuations,
lose your craving for sweets. It you
are overweight to begin with, this
should, at first, tend to make you
lose vour extra fat.
Irv, also, to stay away from
refined carbohydrates. You receive
more nutrients from whole grain
products than you would from the
same amount of refined ones.
"Enriched" flour, for example, is
not as good as it sounds; when flour
is bleached, to make it white, the
nutrients are removed in the pro-
cess. Enriching merely replaces
some of them.
By usmg these suggestions and a
little common sense, you wil find
that you are not only eating better,
but also saving money. After all,
seven million dollars is alot of
monev.
de Antonio's Film
Satirizes Nixon
Millhouse:
Theatre W
This Wednesday night, October
15, at 8 p.m. in Mendenhall Student
Center's Hendrix Theatre the Stu-
dent Union Films Committee will
present the scathing political satire
of the Nixon administration,
"Millhouse: A White Comedy
Cast: Richard Millhouse Nixon.
Students are admitted free with
ID and activity card and faculty or
staff members may use their
Mendenhall Student Center
Membership Card.
Following the film at approx-
imately 9:45 p.m. there will be a
short, informal discussion of
"Millhouse" in room 221 of the stu-
dent center. Present at the gathering
to answer questions and make
remarks about the film will be Dr.
L.E. Hough of the Political Science
Department. Coffee and doughnuts
wil be served and any and all in-
terested persons are cordially invited
to attend. Wednesday night discus-
A White Comedy will be showing at Mendenhall's Hendrix sions are sponsored by the Student
ednesday night, Oct. 15 at 8 p.m. Above is Nixon with his family. Union Films Committee and the
Fnglish Department Honors Pro-
gram.
This 1971 film directed by Emile
de Antonio doesn't pretend to be
objective; it is about Richard Nixon.
De Antonio's skillful, axe-wielding
polemic is directed at the engulf-
ment of politics by the media, the
evolution of government by televi-
sion. What more perfect object-
lesson for all this than our first all-
visual, no-substance politician �
Richard Nixon.
It's all here: the "last" pres con-
ference, the Hiss case, the Caracas
"crisis the Krushchev kitchen
debate, and, of course, that all-time
spectacle, the "Checkers" speech
(see photo at left). Juxtaposing
documentary footage with the
authority of a rabbit punch, de An-
tonio presents his material not con-
ventionally or chronologically, but
strategically, and the results are
both very, very funny and very, very
frightening.
CLIFFS
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"a swell musical comedy"
present
"WAVES OF SINGING
AND TAP DANCING"
8:1 5 PM Oct.9-1 5 A.J. Fletcher Hall
For Reservation Call 757-6390
ECU Students $2.50 General Public $4,001
WIN WITH MILLER
92
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Enter the Miller Pick 'Em lp Contest
TODAY! For full details, collection
schedules, and free pick-up bags, contact
your Miller Campus Representative.
In the event that a certain prize is
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our control, you will be offered a suitable
replacement of equal or greater value.
Personnel from reclamation centers,
employees of Miller Brewing Company,
its bottle and can suppliers, its distributors,
any permittees or licensees, and their
immediate families are ineligible.
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?
I





I Hi EASTCAROl 1N1AN
Sports
Dill HI K 14 I4KU
ECU Comeback Snaps Spiders' Web
B CHARLES CHANDLER
sports l-ditor
RICHMOND, Va. - East
Carolina rallied for 17 fourth
quarter points, most o them com-
ing despite a driving rain, to gain a
24-22 comeback win over Richmond
Saturday.
The Pirates fell behind early and
trailed 15-7 at halftime following a
slopp) first half of play that saw the
club fumble five times, losing two of
those in key situations.
ECU did move the ball in the first
half, though, piling up 232 yards
rushing. The Pirates twice moved
the ball to within the Richmond 20
in the opening half but failed to
come away with any points on either
drive due to penalties and a missed
field goal by Bill Lamm.
The Richmond lead was 22-7 after
three periods of play after Spider
quarterback Steve Krainock threw
his second TO pass o the day, this
one to tight end Tim Spriggs that
covered three yards, with 2:23 re-
maining in the third quarter.
1 he Pirates, now 2-3, took the en-
suing kickoff and began what was to
be an amazing comeback. Two
passes from quarterback Carlton
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Nelson to split end Vern Davenport
went for a total of 18 yards a began
what turned out to be an 80-yard
scoring drive.
The drive culminated on the first
play o' the fourth period when
fullback Theodore Sutton found a
gap up the middle and romped 27
yards for the Pirates' second
touchdown of the day.
ECU went for a two-point con-
version and got it as Nelson ran
wide right and was never touched,
making the score 22-15.
The Pirate defense came to life
following the score, holding the
Spiders and forcing a Kevin Wolfe
punt.
The Pirates sent an all-out rush
and succeeded when defensive
tackle Nate Wigfall blocked Wolfe's
punt. Glenn Morris grabbed the ball
as it was falling to the ground and
returned it to the Richmond 16.
The Pirates were held to but one
yard on three plays by the Spider
defense, which brought on kicker
Bill Lamm for a field goal try.
Just as Lamm was connecting on
his 35-yard try that narrowed the
Richmond lead to 22-18, rain began
to fall over City Stadium.
A severe thunderstorm that car-
ried with it a pouring rain was soon
causing havoc for both teams as
they tried to maintain footing on the
stadium's now slick astroturf.
On their next possession, the
Pirates moved the ball to the Rich-
mond 28 before Nelson slipped on
the wet turf in a fourth-and-eight
situation, giving the Spiders posses-
sion on their own 35 with 4:44 left in
the contest and the rain coming
down harder than ever.
ECU's defense stopped the
Spiders cold as Wolfe was forced to
punt, giving the Pirate offense 'he
ball on its own 22 with 3:15 remain-
ing and the rain still a major factor.
The second play of the drive was a
big one as Nelson scrambled for IS
yards to ECU's 38. On the same
play the Spiders were penalized 15
yards for piling on, moving the
pigskin all the wav to the Richmond
47.
Perhaps the game's key play, came
with under a minute and a half re-
maining and the ball resting on the
taflfci
ft
r
A
� �
�HM&
I
The Spiders Are Washed Out
Saturday's ECU-Richmond fo
a driinn rain that hampered
2 and the Pit icing a crucial
third-and-16 situation.
QB Nelson threw to halt hack n-
thony Collins, who fell before the
ball reached turn. An official's flag
followed the star halfback to the
turf as pas interference was ruled,
giving ECU a big first down on the
Spider six.
Two plays latei Collins went ovei
from the eight (following a two-yard
otball jiiimc was finished in
both teams play. The rain
loss b Hawkins) to give ECU its
clinching ID. making it 24-22. A
two-point conversion try failed.
Following the contest Ricmond
coach Dal Shealey, whose team fell
to 2-4 with the loss, questioned the
inter lerence call.
"The hall was overthrown about
ten yards �.aid the first-year Spider
mentor. "There was a rule change
passed that it the ball was clearly
did not slop the Pirates from earning a come-from-behind
24-22 win, though.
overthrown and the contact was
unintentional, no penalty would be
called. But I'm seeing it from my
side and they're (officials) seeing it
from their side
Collins saw the call in a somewhat
different light. "I thought it w
good call he said. "It was pro-
bably an accident due to the
weather, but then it was probably
the best thing he could have done
because i
In
head 1 d I jubilat
cluh

"We �
iy bad he said. "J'm proud ot the
way w e hei e. We
faith and that's a turnaround tor us
It's a nev -v
Says ECU QB Nelson
'We Came Together Today'
PhC( by PETE PODESZWA
ECU HB Mike Hawkins Runs Through The Rain
By CHAR1 IX HANDIIK
Sport r diinr
RICHMOND, V "I think we
came together as a team today
East Carolina quarterback
Carlton Nelson seemed excited as he
talked to reporters in the Pirate
dressing room following his team's
come-from-behind 24 22 win over
Richmond Saturday
"Our offense was backing our
defense and our defense was back
ing our offense he said. "I don't
really know why thai has just hap-
pened now (the team had lost three
in a row before the win). Our
defense has been playing well all
year and our of tense has not. But
today we did
That the ECU offense did, runn-
ing up its biggest day o the year
with 4(X) yards total offense. Still,
the club had "fumbleitis" in the
first half and trailed 22-7 after three
periods of play. Only a fourth
quarter rally saved the Pirates.
"We've been moving the ball all
vear and started out moving it to-
day Nelson said. "We almost
gave it away with fumbles and that
kept holding us back early. We
should have scored three times in
the first quarter
The Pirates overcame five first-
half fumbles (two were lost) with a
17-point final period to down the
Spiders. ECU head coach I d 1 n
was most proud o his club after-
wards.
"We needed this one awfully
bad he said. "I'm proud ot the
wav we hung in there. We had the
faith and that's a turnaround for us.
It's a new season now
Nelson agreed with the first-yeai
head coach. "We felt we had to win
this game claimed the sophomore
signal-caller. "The confidence o
our team was beginning to drop
The three losses in a row were tough
and we felt we should have won two
of those
The comeback was certainly not
an easy one. With the team down
Three Named To ECU Hall Of Fame
!I Sport In'
I hree former outstanding athletes
at East Carolina University have
been voted into the school's Sports
Hall o Fame.
Cecil A. Heath, a baseball and
basketball standout in the mid
1950's; Carlester Crumpler, star
football running back; and Danny
Kepley, also a football standout;
will be inducted into the Hall of
Fame on Homecoming, Oct. 18,
during a special luncheon and at
halftime of the Pirates' game with
Western Carolina.
With the induction of these three,
the Fast Carolina Sports Hall of
Fame reaches a membership of 30.
The Hall of Fame was intitiated in
1974.
Heath, now an educator at Rose
High in Greenville, was a two-sport
star at Fast Carolina College from
1951-1955. Participating in both
basketball and baseball, Heath won
seven letters. He was named all-state
in both sports in 1954-55, was all-
conference in baseball as a junior
and senior, was all-conference in
basketball as a junior, was captain
of the baseball and basketball teams
in 1954 and 1955 and was named to
Who's Who in American Colleges
and Universities in 1955.
As a a baseball star, Heath played
second base, starting all four years
of his career, finishing with an im-
pressive .320 batting average.
As a eager, Heath was a three-
year starter at guard. During those
three years in basketball, East
Carolina attained its best stretch of
winning seasons ever.
The Pirates were 18-5 in 1952-53,
23-2 in 1953-54 and 16-8 in 1954-55,
for a culmaltive 57-15 mark.
The 1953-54 team won 16 con-
secutive games, the North State
Conference regular season tourna-
ment championship and the District
26 NAIA tournament The Pirates
also played in the national NAIA
tournament.
The 1952-53 team won a district
title and advanced to natinal tourna-
ment play, marking the first time an
East Carolina basketball team had
earned a national tournment berth.
Crumpler is considered the finest
running back ever at East Carolina,
still holding school records in eight
categories. The Wilson native came
to East Carolina in 1970, deciding to
play as a Pirate after being highly
sought by schools throughout the
country.
Honors awarded Crumpler in-
cluded: honorable mention All-
America by Associated Press, 1972,
1973; Southern Conference Athlete
of the Year, 1972; Sothern Con-
ference football Player of the Year,
1972; all-Southern Conference,
1972, 1973; all-state 1972, 1973;
Outstanding Fast Carolina Player
award, 1972, 19"3; being selected to
play in the Blue-Gray c lassie, 1973.
School records set by Crumpler
that still stand for a single season in-
clude: most rushing yardage, 1309
yards in 1972; most carries, 340 in
1972; most touchdowns, 17 in 1972;
and most points, 102 in 1972.
Career records set by Crumpler
that still stand are: most rushing
yardage, 2889 yards; most carries
658; most touchdowns. 37; and
most points, 222.
In the same era with Crumpler
came a player that main consider
the finest defensive player ever at
East Carolina, Damn Kepley. The
Goldsboro native has continued his
defensive excellence with the Ed-
monton Eskimos of the Canadian
Football League, having starred
there since leaving East Carolina in
1974.
Kepley earned the name "Captain
Crunch" in leadin the Pirates'
famous "Wild Dogs" defensive
unit. His play earned him third team
All-America honors by the
Associated Press in 1974, making
him the first Fast Carolina player to
receive such status since the school
began NCAA Division I play in
1964.
Kepley also earned honorable
mention All-America in 1972 and
1973.
Included among the many other
honors bestowed upon Kepley was
his selection as national defensive
player of the week by the Associated
Press for his performance versus
Richmond on Nov. 10, 1973.
The East Carolina Sports Hall of
Fame was initiated in 1974 as an
organization to honor those in-
dividuals who have, by their direct
participation in East Carolina
University intercollegiate athletics,
brougt outstanding recognition to
themselves and to the University.
Ten members were inducted in
1974, but no more that four
members may now be inducted in
any one year. To be eligible for
selection, a person must not have
been connected with the University
in the capacity to which the nominee
is being elected for a minimum of
five academic vears.
Former ECU halfback
Carlester Crumpler is pictured
in 1972 action. Crumpler will
be inducted into the Pirate
Sports Hall Of Fame this
Saturday.
22-18 and f; ight
n the Richi i vith
minute- remaining,
Nelson slip; d as he
' back :
steady d ��� " : had
made the 'it Stadium astroi
shek. causing Nelson fall. The
ik ovei . point w
4:44 left to be played.
Nelson sa te worried
"I go! kind ot
fial we
might not come back he said. "1
thought it wa;
Ovei it Wi r: EC1
defense held the Spiders, giving the
Pirates the ball on then own 22 with
3:15 left.
The club thei - i a
score 1 � play in the drive
a pass interference call
the Pirates faced a third-and-16
situation on the Spider 2"
I Ik als on hand ruled that
Anthony- I ns, Nelson's intended
receive was tripped by Richmond
safety Mike Irvin on the play, giving
EC I possession on the i 6.
I wo plays later Collins scored the
winning touchdown, Afterwards,
" (. as he is called b his
coaches and teammates, described
the plav.
"1 saw thai Snake (Nelson's
nickname) needed help he said. "I
slipped out ot the back Field. I
thought the interference call was a
good one It was the best thing he
(Irvm) could do because 1 had the
football otherwise
Nelson explained that Collins was
not his interned target tor the pas-
when the play was called.
"AC was not the primary receiver
on that plav but they shifted their
defense he noted. "Larrv
O'Roarke was the primary receiver
but I had to look for whoever was
open. That turned out to be AC
In the end players like Nelson and
Collins came through for the
Pirates, but Emory said his attitude
had been positive throughout the
game and the losing streak.
"I'm the most optimistic person
in the world he said. "1 never
gave up on this team. We're back on
the right track
football
commc i
comeback !
Richmond Sa
A simple
stati
reali
that comeba
midst
thundei
ot Richi
have �
clul
old
"Wl
g
Pirati
.
d.
defe
que '
N
RA
riva
feel
not �
The b
3-2 team hi
it I
und;
em
w h .
whei
team �
tiot.
��'
el e, iai
came to Nd
this yeai
L.
Bi
3
Bot
1

T , �-





I I I I I : , I � VII Ml NI A N
II) 11 till I' I I
7
eb
t
V

Pirates Fight Back
I he I .�i .nolm.i he only way lo
loot ball team should be ivcrcomc such pro
commended foi its tlems Is by hard work Charles
comeback win ovei md desire rhal won
Richmond Saturday ul a ity Stadium
simple enough Saturday afternoon
latement, right? Not he Pirates moved
( ll.llnll

i� vwu give il� olFcnsc inomctii were lo
a chance at such a feat? Follow in ii- PR yard,
Vc, in both ijues viim winninv ln
(ions I U's defense
played like a stone wall, Nelson scrambled,
yi. iiiy the offense ran and passed with
anothei i ham c i"i � and � � nc �� I.
leally, the club made the ball well in the first Ihundci and lightning I he offense loot found confidence in
lhal comeback in the half but, as has been roared and flashed ovei on its 22 with thai diiv With Ihe
midsl of a terrible the case l ol Ihe violently as high winds about Ihree minutes rain definitely a bothei,
thunderstorm When year, beat Ihcmselvcs and heavy rains lefl hor a young, inc� Ihe sophomore ignored
the storm hit the town with fumbles and blanketed ity perienced offensive line it and led his learn to
ol Richmond, it would penalties lhal nullified Stadium and a sophmon �
have been easy foi the chance at coring Still. Ihe Pirates iptarlcrback, the las!
club to have given up All these mistakes mounted a drive to the musi have crmci
I Ik- old saying ,ays came when the .ky was Richmond 28 lhal mighty large
When the going gel blue and Ihe field was driv, ended, tlgh, Ihe ophomore about many thmii thus
the lough gel dry When the club fell when 1.(1 rjH Car lion (piartcrback, Nelson, t No doubt they will
Such wa the behind 22 things Nelson slipped and fell came through get more uitictsm dm
Saturday Ihe looked dreary while attempting lo beautifully. �'� ,1"1 � "��
Pirati I played i will torm wa evideni pass on fourth down line
in lhal wa ly on vay a the I I Spidci who Nelson had nol ha(
trongei than many field irea be ante played well offensively the best of days prior I
I Im T'HO I'll �l
jiv� been riiicied
ih
.i , in
i i
thoiik'h'
iarkened � � heavy all day, look ovei al the drive, cs
(MKj thai point with only during the first hall In
2 j M1ii by 4:44 remaining in the decision on several op
j , in, ,�, the game lion play � and '�rnr
()j ihe fourth I lung . looked a wlul pom handoffs II
II . � hegan Ihe big Iy bad for IX U, if nol auscd the cluh lo stall
� � ncbacl I his occui because of the previous on occassion
minds of red, tl J"1 ' � � thc" ' Im' i ' �"it h
� � i- ivers and begai lhal because ol (he heavy native had had his gwid
Pi; momcnl prcv ion .
I he cluh ha ipute �
i.ill , I' ��� veal ne .e ini ,1
o thern ;iir.nl b the
ma � 'I iniurm.
I . � t i � Saturday's
game one of i li � .�
vral m � appeal
be a ill find d '�" c
Scral thai from � he
in no '� 'bnigh
lu;tf� I ,n thf ill . Bf�vf I b� I bun nl . In Mm limoiid
ABORTION
the tub bad I � .though, ur lurhng a I hr '
-
i j � � � � -
pui :� iog( bet bcatiful pit' Ii to Mil
. ,i rotui I Hawkins for (be '� in
: lo it again? firs! louchdowi
� vill Find rlesiri
Sal ii I i
thai
� �� ! gam '� Moi
y ' , i'i
NCSU Prepares For Heels
Th�- Frntiii0Jmitrr tout lwn fiwn f'fl � ii'M
jf,vi'liiifi; i-ri 7u.t. u r�fl writ ah11 r� hcwJMi nc
U, yi � 'f u.ll UgAH i). n nmiii).i '
Ha toflay abortion htmrm
Wf �H� prr ngriArmy UmcIa
Mm y naly pmtgriArury lmUt
Kvmilng birth oonlrol hOON
Tf,�- Fliill;& � wi'tn � Mrhmi ' ri��rl m
Gall 701 BUBO fan Umlmi mnytimm
THE FLEMING CENTER
t
K '
Emory, Pirates To
Attend Pep Rally
'
MILL OUTLET
Clothing
Ladies Name Brand
Wool Skirts i"i J50.00
Ladies Nome Brand
Wool Blazers "�� im.oo
Guys & Gals Joqging
Suits
Men's Ski Sweaters
� '
A 'i A A A (
f elf j � if it I'inyUr �i
Phone:
752-5025
Grade" A"
Whole Fryers
lb. .49c
ttHome of Greenville's Best Meats
Great for Before
or After the Game
4 ' r � �
Ac '
ScotTowels
Paper f ow-h
58t
fiij�n! Fli
fjrad A Fryef P�rt�
Leg w,th Thigh lb. .69C
Brest with Wins iu 7QiC
Super Buck
Pepsi Cola - 1 r Carton of H
$ 1.00 -
i,yr A X WltlOUt COUpOf
� 1 11 �� "r�aM
Golden
Bananas
4 lb $1.00

L
Morrell Smoked
Hams
Half w Wh.o
! 99 c
J Liter
BottJ M
Taylor 'Table Wines
Lak e Coon trv w h j t�
Lake Cowitry Pink
Lake Country Red
5 yy
Miller Beer
I2pcfc vf 2 o-z. Bottles
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S-p�xk ol 12 oa Bottles
SI.99
Tropicana Pure
Orange Juice
a 1J on
98t
Northern or Charmin
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98�
i f si
Coca-Cola
w
1 Uter Plsstk Bottk
99t
��





10
mi i si �. KU1 ii w
(K'lOlll K 14. 1980
ECU Pounded In Tourney
B JIMM DuPREE
xsl S(Hirl I dHiir
"When East
Carolina gets oppoi
tunites, we uist don't
take advantage of
them
lasi Carolina
volleyball assistant
coach 1 mi Da idson
mark this weekend poorly
at the Francis Marion
Invitational t diop
1 he 1 ady Pirates
opened the tout ney Fri-
hen seasonal record to da morning with a
4 IS.
15
15 11 loss tO
"There were some I M Greensboro, but
retaliated in the second
game ol theit pool
good teams there,
Davidson explains
"But there were some competition with a
that we could hve 15-10, 16-14 win over
adplent) K.alen i( we had been Pernbroke State.
playing up to oui Hard luck and me
potential. perience continued to
"We played ven plague the Pirates
be upset with her
squad, as the I ad
Pirates posted a weak
Saturday, though, as
they dropped matches
to Baptist College
15 13, 15-13 and to
College of Charleston
15-2, 15-12 before
del eating Baptist 15 4
in a playoff game to
break a three-way tie
tor third place in the
pool.
East Carolina again
squared off to face
Pembroke State, but
this time it was the
I ady Pirates who drop
ped a hard-fought 15-7
match. East Carolina
lost a 15-12, 15 It)
heait breaker to Win-
throp College in the
consolation game.
"We went in to the
tournament hoping it
would be the turning
point ol our season1
savs I)a idson. "We
are verv young and the
girls just don't have the
mental discipline
necessary to win in col
legiate volleyball.
"We had trouble
playing as a team
Davidson adds. "We
got into a little more ol
an indiv idual game and
that's ust not the way
to win in college
volleyball
Davidson ex-
perimented in the se-
Duke Places First
In Rugby Tourney
1 he populai English horn Winstoi Salem "The tournament
igb came to claimed boil; third was a big success said
lie in grand place slots, with the city spokesman Alan
fashion this weekend, team and Wake lores! Poindexter. "The sup-
i ihc lasiarolina University being port of the students is
y club hosting a eliminated in the greatly apreciated.
am tournament of semifinals
the North Carolina 1 ast Carolina's team
Rugl opened the tournament "E I really played
fea across with a sou; '�'� 6 well, winning two of
the state wee trouncing ol I N three games against
int
� d . ity Ciieensboi
h Duke round, b
lefeating then
� North 21
he ins! tough opponents. Our
Iropped only loss was at the
contest hands of the eventual
; cham- w innei ol the tourna-
Hill pion Duke ment, Duke, so that's
Ue cham- ECT bounced back not bad. We hope we
i a can use this chance to
lecision gam acceptance and
tie popularity tor the
pionship and Old
harlotte besting Fort narrow 7 :
Bragg foi the si;v title, ovei Appala
A
itries Unive
pori.
Classifieds
PERSONAL
i
CUSTOV CD
d a no
SUNSHINE STUDIOS
� � SE AS JOBS
r ouna F 0. S
.
I
paid S-qrr � �. nq � ' '
,s � ite 1JC Bo� s: NC4 Corona
Dei Mar CA
'1P1NG Theses. Term Papers
U
REWARD etorn
� �. ino a t �' i s
ba'ir
v
bvon LAB L 9
. . s Paul Cus'om
' . M24
STEWED BSR 'iO Automatic
turntable Panosonic AM FM with
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i.OX HOME PINBALL
MACHINE s'and up almos'
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assembly ' kivh ed Grt-a h�i
Fra'ui Sorority Gouie Suqqos'i d
S ISC Will sell lor S200 drm
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FOR RENT
Resumes
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FOR SALE
FOR SALE PEARL Snare drum
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S2 i
HELP WANTED Several pos
pen Hours are llexabte rC
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7s: 5JC2 afti
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48S or best offer

qood
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FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED
ED Two bedroom duplex Fur
nished Quiet sun oundrngs Biq
ra'd t' i ; SC plus halt utilities
FOR WENT Private room wt
bath, refriq utilities included
near campus S125 per month
�56 :S85
FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE
CLASSIFIED ADS CAN BE PUR
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TIONS
Student Supply Store Lobby MWF
10 00 11 00 TTH 11 00 12 00
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Mane Cnecoa pa
Carolinian
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PPICE ' 00 for is .
� each additionas word
I
I a s do phone numbers and,
� hyphenations
I MAIL TO
The East Carolinian
I
Abbrev.ations coi
Classified Ads
Old South Building
Greenv.He. N C 378JJ
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
JASON'S
UNDER NEW MANSGEMENT-WE ARE NOW
OPEN FOR BREAKFAST. WEEKDAYS FROM
8-11 .WEEKENDS 10-1. WE ALSO OFFER DAILY
LUNCH AND DINNER SPECIALS
MONDAY:Sourdough Cheeseburger (lunch) 2 pcs. Fried Chicken Breast Fillet2.29 3.19
TUESDAY:Tuna Salad Sandwich (lunch) Ground Beef Steak (dinner)1.99 2.99
WEDNESDAY:Ham & Cheese Sandwich (lunch) Shimp Basket (dinner)1.49 3.99
THURSDAY:Ruben ilunchi Large Chefs Salad (dinner)2.39 1.99
FRIDAY:Fish Sandwich (lunch) Oyster Basket (dinner)1.89 3.49
EVERY SATURDAY
All the Spagetti you can eat with tossed salad
EVERY SUNDAY
Shishkabob Platter,served on the skewer
BUDWEISER 30� Mug with any meal from 1-6 on Fri-
day,Saturday,and Sunday40� mug with any meal Monday
Thursday from 1:00-4:00
All Lunch Specials come with FF.Cole Slaw and Pickle.
All Dinner Specials come with FF.or Baked Potatoe and Toss-
ed Salad.
10 Discount for all ECU Students with I.D.
Discount does not apply to Lunch & Dinner on
Weekend,or Beer Specials.
cond game ol i ho
match against (. ollege
of Charleston by inser-
ting freshmenl I exanne
keeler and Stout, and
the rookie coach feels
the move was suc-
cessful.
"They played really
well she states.
"They played some real
scrapp defense
The 1 ad Pirates
host UNC-Chapel Hill
tonight at 7 p.m. in
Minges Coliseum in a
showdown ol the two
NCA1AW l)i mm on
rivals.
K I also hosts Ap-
palachian S I ate Friday
at 10 a.m with the
1 ast Carolina I imersi-
t y Invitational
Volleyball 1 ournament
beginning later in the
dav.
Miti Davis Spikes Against NC SI
MEET YOUR FRIENDS
for good times and fun at
NEWBYSSUBSHOP
Downtown Greenville Features
Subs,Steak Sandwich and
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Dollar Day
Every Weds.
x2 Sub with purchase
of tea
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 14, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 14, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.84
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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