The East Carolinian, October 9, 1980






�hc iEaot Carolinian
Serving the Las! Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 55 No. 14
10 Pages
Thursday, October 9, 1980
Greenville, North C arolina
Circulation 10.000
Policy Change Adds
Minority Representative
To ECU Media Board
Bx 1FRRN (,K Mail.iKu 1 .liii
N .ommittee ol the Mod ed Wednesday to consida
aminority representative t0

mmittee's proposalIs
to be v oted on w hen tl1C
!Si Board mets next Wednes-
proposal is expected0
he boardmembers wl10
il co nm ttee almcsi
majority on the full
t; .ck
ions on campus were piE
tnd said they
1 ula Moote,
ol SOll S, would be 1�
Society t! !ed
a i.vHis, a predomi
in :v' tei mpus sinv e 1969.
nked
� Media B tnd 1m
.�
MsMcxil
1. a as � ;� poliom
.s on.
tout policy changes required
changes in the board's constitution.
Othei proposed changes included
raising the vote ol the Inter-
1 laterally Council reprscntative and
the Panhellinic representative from
one-halt vote each to a lull vote
each.
rhe committee also passed a mo
lion that would require all paid stafl
memebers of campus media to have
and maintain a 2.0 grade point
average in order to work foi the
media. 1 he two votes thai used to
ng to the Men's Residence
Council and the Women's
Residence c ouncil were also reduc-
ed to one vote tor the Student
Residence Association (SRA) repr-
sentative, since the SRA merged the
two formei residence organizations.
t ommenting on the proposal to
aM a minority representative from
s1 s to the board, board
membei Rudy Alexander said,
��SOI 1 S might come closest to be-
ing an umbrella organization foi
minorities on campus. 1 know every
minority student does not belong,
bui there is no reason why every
minority student couldn't belong
i he proposal names the president
ol S 'I 1 S. Oi the president's
designee, to be the minority member
of the Media Board.
"Minority students may have
strong feelings about certain things.
Those views should be heard, and
this board should make sine that all
students have a chance to have their
views heard lexander said.
Before the board voted on the ad-
dition. Grade Wells, president oi
SOU! S. asked if there was a
minority board member when
publication of the Ebony Herald
ceased in 1978.
The 1 bony Herald was a minority
publication at ECU.
Alexander replied that This
board has nevei put any publication
out of business. 1 he Ebony Herald
has been funded whenevei an editor
has applied to run it. My understan-
ding is thai the Ebon) Herald stop-
ped printing because the stafl at thai
time just didn't gel il out
After the meeting, Ms Moore
said thai she had specific ideas
about campus media that she would
bung before the board it she
becomes a membei
"1 oi one thing, you hardly ever
see pictures ol minorities on campus
unless they're in sports Moore
said.
Worth A Thousand Words
Bud Rackley, one of the foremen on the McGinnis
construction job, took this photograph as the second
tier of outer wall assembly began. "It's easier to send
a picture than try and explain to m boss ho far
along we are Rackley said.
wall should be finished today
should be up by Friday. Oct.
is the contractor.
Rackley said
. and all four
17. Kxposaic
the west
walls
Industries
Carter Campaign Swings Through Piedmont
W INSTON s 1 1 M (UP1)
President Carter makes his first and
only campaign trip to No; it;
?lina Thursday - generate �
ciiement for bis campaign in the
populous Piedmont section
Not th (. arolina.
I he presideni is scheduled to ar-
rive in Winston-Salem late Fhurs-
day afternoon for a political rally at
the Dixie Fairgrounds and a $500
per couple fund raising reception at
anglewood Park in nearby C'lem-
mons.
The visit will be a repeat of a 1976
trip thai gave C arter a 700-vote win
m Winston-Salem and Forsyth
C'ount - the first by a Democratic
nominee in recent history, said John
M 'I'vnuin. C .irfcr Mondale lis-M
coordinator tor the 5th District.
"We're com meed we can lo bet
ter this sear, and one ol the ways is
to get the presideni in here and
generate the excitement that only he
can generate Holleman said.
Carter is considered to be leading
Republican nominee Ronald
Reagan in North Carolina and
Reagan campaign aides admit they
are trailing with less than a month
left in the campaign.
Service 'doing a tine job

University Employee
Defends Jones Cafeteria
By MlkF NOON N
� � i diiiH
� � a I eiena as much
else, rhey have
my opinion
v. Bal an ECU
s in i of
sung and
( afetei ia.
; l he 1 a
tides have ap-
� ng facilities

'� . ; had in the papei
n oi' doing a
flem is not Ser-
1 don't think the
� rvomation and
ees is fail. 1 work with
very day and 1 know they are
good employees. Mi.Simon is one
ol the smartest men I've met. He
sees that the cafeteria gets one ol the
Highest sanitation grades you can
eet. I've talked with several
students and other people and their
opinion is the same as mine he ad-
ded.
Simon is in charge ol Servoma-
tion in Jones' three eating facilities.
Baker feels that some of the
blame for the "filthy" surroundings
is misfounded.
"You should see the food thrown
on the air conditioners, down air-
ways and all over the roof. The root
is covered with food, beer cans and
wine bottles Baker said.
"We've had trouble with the air
conditioners because bricks and
concrete blocks have been thrown
down into the fans causing several
problems. We did some work on the
compressor lasl week and on several
occasions we had to sweep maggotts
oft the top of the unit that had got-
ten into the food that had collected
on top of it. We had to have a guy
clean off the unit so we could work
on it Baker said
" 1 he equipment in the building is
as old as some ol the people who
live in it he added. Jones Dorm
and cafeteria were completed in
1958. 1 he problem oi food being
thrown on top ol the root and
around the building is not a new
one.
"They cleaned off the roof right
before school started back and got
almost a pickup truck load off that
SeeJONFS,Page3
The Reagan campaign has
targeted the Piedmont, the central
section oi the state with the bulk ot
us popi ' ttion in the closing days o!
the campaign and will continue to
i tack Cartel's record on the
economy. inflati m a; national
defense.
Bob turner.arter's deputy stale
coordinator, acknowledged the im-
portance ot the Piedmont in the
cam pa:
"It ou look at the '76 'suits, we
lost 11 or 12 counties and those were
Piedmont counties, except tor some
Republican areas in the moun-
Book Sale
A book sale will be sponsored
by the Friends oi last Carolina
University Library on Saturday.
Oct. 1 1 from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m.
The book sale will be held at
Carolina last Mall, in front oi
the Belk-1 yler store.
Hardback books will be $1.50,
paperbacks .50. miscellaneous
.10. The proceeds will go to the
development oi the university
librarv.
tains Turner said. "It's an area
thai is important to us and an area
where we are concentrating some ef-
"
Hie president's schedule includes
a 5 p.m. Democratic Party unity rai-
ls with other Democratic cai
didates. including Gov. lame- B.
Hunt Jr. and U.S. Sen Robert
M o i g a n .
At a similai event tour year- ago.
television cameras caught Carter,
then the unknown who had cap-
tured the Democratic nomination,
standing meekly and holding
Agriculture Commissionei Inn
Graham's coal as Graham mutated
the braying ot a donkey, the symbol
ot the partv.
inc picsideiii will make buet
remark- a the rallv before leaving
to travel to 1 anglewood Park.
it 12 miles away, to meet with
supporters a' a private reception.
Holleman reported -ales ot tickets
were brisk, even at the $500 pet cou-
ple prise
C artei will leave W inst tlem
around 7:30 p.m. tor a trip to
1 allahassee, 1 ia.
Campus Thefts
Keep Police Busy
Nudging The Goal
Photo by JON JORDAN
A student waits in Wright Auditorium until the pint
of blood he is donating to the Red Cross is drawn
off. At 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, the goal of 800 pints
was short by about 125 units. However, close to 100
students were still waiting to donate. The AFROTC
helped the Red Cross with the blood drive. An award
will be given to the student organization who makes
the highest percentage of donations.
Fall Break
Explored In
Student Poll
Calendar Committee
Questions Accuracy
The first step toward a tall break
tor ECU was taken Wednesday
when SGA President Charlie Sher-
rod presented the results of a recent
student survey to the Calendar
Committee.
A subcommittee of the Faculty
Senate, the Calandar Committee
met an in open hearing to discuss
proposals for the 1983-84 calendar.
The calendar for the present year
has already been decided, so the
proposed fall break would come in-
to effect only after this year.
Committee Chairman Dr. Floyd
Mattheis and others questioned the
accuracy of the survey, saying that it
was not a random sampling of
students, and implying that it may
not represent the actual opinion of
ECU students.
Committee members also ques-
tioned whether or not the students
who filled out the survey were aware
See FAFF BREAK. Page 3
By MlkF NOON W
September was a busy month at
ECU, especially foi the campus
police
More than SO crimes were in-
vestigated by the ECl Police during
the month of September alone,
resulting in $5,991 worth of proper-
ty loss and damages. Approximately
halt oi the crimes reported were
breaking and entenngs and
larcenies' according to a monthly
summary ot all crimes on campus
released by the campus police
Wednesday.
About S3.(HH) ot the total loss was
attributed to bicycle larcenies, the
campus' most prevalent crime.
Eighteen bicycles were reported
stolen in the month of Sept.
resulting in an estimated loss ot
S2.765
One-third of these bicycles have
been recovered, according to a
spokesman for the campus police.
Bicycle larceny icpresents 52 percent
oi all on-campus larceny, according
to the report.
"If the students would get behind
us and support us and call us when
they see groups of people or any in-
dividual who doesn't look like a stu-
dent around the bicycle racks, we'd
probably recover two-thirds or more
of the bicycles, according to Capt.
Wiggins 'oi the ECU Campus
Police.
"There are so many students who
see things but don't want to get in-
volved. They don't realize how
serious this situation is. We're not
even going to ask who it is reporting
it. The name wouldn't ever be men-
tioned even if they did tell me who it
was because it's kepi confidential
he added.
"In a case like this the police
department is no better than the
c v
help they get. W e even give a reward
for the information if the person is
caught and convicted he said.
Wiggins aKo recommended
students park then bikes in the
designated racks located around the
dormitories.
"The more concentrated the bikes
arc, the easier it would be to keep an
eye on them. It the bicycles were
registered betore they were stolen,
there is a good chance oi recoermg
them he added.
Also included m the breakdown
ot campus crimes are 49 breaking
and entering and larcenies which
resulted in $1,320 worth ot ptopeitv
loss and damages. Ihis includes a
$170 larceny from the Aycock Dorm
game room business office. 1 he
money had belonged to the Student
Residence C ouncil. Of the reported
49 breaking and entering and
larcenies, 25 were in the S50-S2(X)
range, according to the report.
Thirteen instances ot vandalism
were reported in Sept. including
S2.278 worth of damage in a
flooding incident in Jones Dorm.
Polic estimates the total property
loss and damage as a result of van-
dalism at $3,300.
On The
Announcements2
Editorials
Classifieds
Letters
Concert
I
m






I III I S1 Ki 1 IM
I I
A n n o u rfc em e nits
ECU DANCE CLUB
CRAFTS
EXHIBITION
HONORS
LEARNING
PI C N IC
SAM
VAC
Ml
PHYSICS TUTORS
EVENTS
PHI BETA LAMBDA
HONOR COUNCIL
EPISCOPAL
SURF CLUB
AI I It V Ht A I T H
ON tM 1 AU
PPH A
-GO
SK i
SECURITY
HO
CHANGE D
CHEMISTRY
CORSO
The
More-Than-Wine-and-
Cheese Shop
Delicious imported and domestic
cheeses tasty biscuits and crackers,
gourmet delicacies, candies imported
and domestic wines or beer and party
foods to make your entertaining a sue
cess Stop n and browse- it is the shop
that has moral.
POPULAR DOMESTIC BEER
NOW ON LY$2.15
STROH S MILLER PABST
BUSCH BUDWEISER SCHLITZ
pkg ofSixl 2-01.Cans)
AMERICA LIGHT BEER
FAVORITES$2.31-2.70
SCHLITZ LIGHT MILLER LITE'
NATURAL LIGHT
MICHELOB LIGHT
(pkg ofS�xl 2 Oz.Bottles or Cans)
Drummond Bros. Beer$2.19
(Pkg. ofS�x!2-Oz. Cans)
Rolling Rock
BeerS2.65
Pkg. ofEight7-Oz. Cans)
Ask About Our Party Trays and
Cheese Balls
Shop Monday Through Saturday
10a.m. Until 9pm
Phone 756 BEL K.756-2355)
NEED MONEY
i homcoming.a road trip a party,more books,a decent
rneal.debts.a hoi dd! earl) � hristmas presents.whatever
WE PAY CASH FOR YOUR UNWANTED
GOLD & SILVER
Break out that old class ring you never wear anymore or
anj old jewelry thats just lying around unused.
COLD JEWELRY
Regardless ofondition
Bracelets - Rins
Neckiaces - Pins
tarrmgs � Charms
BECAUSE Or HIGH GOLD
PRICES.THh GOLD CON
TENT IN JEWELRY IS VfcrO
VALUABLE
WEDDING BANDS
Are valuable Can be
worth up to
$150 ea.

COUPON
CLASS RINGS
Bnntf hitfh return. Because of
their weight.they can easily br-
iny, up to
$200.00
Bruix this coupon for $S Bonus OH classr ing
SILVER
DOLLARS
S 13.00 w,th rims
ALL SILVER
COIN- PRE 1964
Dimes�$ 1.10 ea.
Quarters-2.20 ea.
Halves -6.00 ea.
Price Subject To Market Fluctuation
SILVER SALVAGE INC.
Your trained professional metals buvers will be at the
HOLIDAY INN 758-3401
rri.Sat.Uct.lu.ll, 10am- 8pm Sun Oct. 12 10-5pm
BOOKSALE
CONT t SI
ABORTION
MU!
SOULS
Saturday abortion hours
Free pregnancy tests
Very early pregnancy tests
Evening birth control hours
Call 781-8880 in Raleigh anytime.
THE FLEMING
HW
M'L'L
REBEL vVORK
UNION
CHI BETA PHI
Sell It Faster
Through
Classified Ads
MEET YOUR FRIENDS
for good times and fun at
NEWBY'SSUBSHOP
Downtown Greenville Featu
Subs,Steak Sandwich and
Pocket Sandwich Plus
Dollar Day
Every Weds.
. Sub with pure base
of tea

25 c OFF POCK hi
VINDWICH
GOOD : o OCT. 14
16
UU:00ai -am DAILY,
siotf
ou�
EM
POLICY
tact ��� edvactisad
Itami It required to be readily
available (ex �a la n Mch Krogex Sa�-on
eicept as �pe Iflcal � ted in thla ad H we do
run out O �n Item Mr wll of�r you your choice 0 �
copi'ib'i ltem when availab � ��' eel � , �' a un � savings c a
rairtchacl ' " � � I � ou to purchase a advarttsed Item �
advert tad price with n 30 dayt
Items and Prices
Elective rhu'� Oct 9
thru Sat Oct 1 i 198C
Copyright 1980
Kroger Savon
Ousr'
Before, During
After the Game
Kroger Savon
everything
you need!
WISHBONE
12-Piece
Fried Chicken
'��.
xzae
Ea
$5
49
COUNTRY OVEN
Potato Chips
8-Oz.
Pkg.
6
12-Oz.
Cans
SJROH'S
BEER
$1.99
U.S. NO. 1
Red or Golden
Delicious Apples
MELLO YELLO OR
8
16-Oz.
Ret
Btls
PLUS DEPOSIT
EMBASSY
Ground Coffee
NONE SOLD
TO
DEALERS
OPEN 7 AM TO MIDNIGHT
OPEN SUNDAY
9 AM TO S PtJ
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
Phone 756-7031
V





I HI I SI,KOI IMAN
K lOHl.Ky. I WO
X
V
ITEM
.ICY
� �d
�� -1 ;
S-On
� do
bo�c� o a

n
0
o
OFF
SUGG
RETAIL
eenville
Futrell: Soldier, Newspaperman, Trustee
i i
B ROBERT SWAIM
Ashle Brown Futrell
is known as a man ol
many talents and oc
cu pat ions. He is the
N ice chairman and
senior membei ot the
1 Cl Board of
rrustecs, a former
school teacher and
coach, former tobacco
buyei. a former combat
soldier, and since N46,
a newspaperman.
Ashle Futrell was
borm in Northampton
Count) in Wl 1. the son
ol and optometrist.
In the mid-1920's
1 ut rolls family moved
to Wilson, where he
graduated from high
school in 1929. in the
fall of 1929 he enrolled
at Duke I Inivei sit .
Vftei gradual ion
from Duke in 1933 with
a degree in economics,
Futrell went to work
tor I he lnperial Tobac
co c ompany .
Atici working foi a
couple ol years in
tobacco, futrell taught
and coached on the
public schools of
V ilson foi two yeais
and then went back to
Imperial 1 obacco as a
buyer. During his
v near s as a buyei. prioi
to World Wai II.
1 utrell traveled the
i arolinas and c ieorgia
buy ing tobac i o
In 1942 1 uc join
ed the army anbd was
sent to Harvard
University for in-
diligence training.
�in there he wen'
1 mope to become p
bought the paper when
the owner died.
In the early 1960's
futrell began to toy
with the idea of runn-
ing of political office.
futrell ran toi the
state senate against in-
cumbani Senator P.D.
Midgett and Dr. W.T.
Ralpg. Both opponents
were seasoned politi-
cians. Midget! being
the incumbant senator
and Ralph having serv-
ed as Mavoi Belhaven
intelli gen c e
with
the
operation
General Pa � third
army.
After the w ai 1 utrell
returned home to
Yv ilson where he look a
job wuh the Yv ilson
Daih I nnes. Futrell
said thai he had not
had any trainii in
new spapei w oi k bun
the ow nei of the paper
was desperate for help
because or the critical
shortage o I
rieht aftei
late 1940's
e m p
lo vei
manpower
the �
In the
I utrell "s
ight the & ashington
News and sent
; the
SI rtly
utrell
i
: 1941
CPAs Will
Find A Job,
Survey Savs
I'M e an
ijor.
1 hat's the adv ice im-
plicit in a new reporl on
Job prospects by the
merican Institute of
C ertified Public Ac-
countantsU PA).
1 he institute predicts
that demand foi ac-
countants, auditoi s and
CPAs which is
already strong - will be
even strongei when this
I's freshmen class
graduates in 1984.
(. P tirnis. accor-
. to the AK PA,
will hue some 32 per-
ceni ol the accounting
majors who graduate in
1984, a three percent
rise over 1979 luring
levels
I he K PA, in its
just-released survey o!
job prospects, further
suggests that students
go on tor graduate ac-
counting degrees. It ex-
pects that 56 percent ol
the students with
masters degrees will be
hired in 19X4. com-
pared to just 2S percent
ot the students with
baccalaureate deg rees.
And more ol them
will be women. The
K PA says that, by
1984. women will com-
prise 39 percent ot the
students getting ac-
counting degrees.
Job prospects foi ac
countants typically im-
proves during bad
economic times, when
private businesses are
more cost conscious.
tor
almost
)5
years.
Both will to do and
highly regarded pillars
ol the community.
Futrell deteated both
to receive t h e
Democratic nomina-
tion and want on to ve
elected despite seilt op-
position 11 om t he
powerful political
machine ol 1 indsay
ai ien.
I Ipon ai ri ing at the
state house in Raleigh,
Futrell found that his
first task would be
securing a nursing
school for I Cl .
futrell recalls that it
was Waltei B. Jones,
now the first district
congressman, who was
a stale senatoi at that
time who introduced
the nursing school bill.
�'1 co-signed the bill,
I was the nearest
senator to Pitt Coun-
tysaid futrell. "We
had a whole group ol
people from Eastern
North Carolina who
had signed the bill
futrell says that it
took a lot of lobbying
to get the bill passed to
establish the nursing
school.
"We had to but-
tonhole a lot of people
and try to sell it,
sometimes we succeed-
ed and sometimes we
didnt said futrell.
"Bob Morgan would
assign me two or three
senators to see,
sometimes they would
say that they had a bill
coming up and they
would offer ro support
the nursing school in
return for support of
their bills.
futrell said that his
main opposition on the
nursing school came
from "the Chapel Hill
area and west
"There was very lit-
tle support from the
SPeidmont, but we got
a little bit in the moun-
tains said futrell.
" I he same thing was
true on the bill for
university status and
the med school
1 utrell said thai ECU
did not receive any sup-
port from Governor
Moore, but the 1 t.
Govenor Bob Scott did
support the nursing
school and the universi-
ty status bill.
"Leo (I eo Jenkins,
former ehancellor of
ECU) was up there
about every day and
one of the prefessors
from Fast Carolina was
up there researching all
the time, all we had to
do if we needed some
imformation was to ask
him. Leo kept him up
there as much as he
could to provide us
with the information
said Futrell.
'They were pretty
rough on us, the people
from Durham, Chapel
Hill, Raleigh and
Greensboro, we had all
of that to contend
with said Futrell.
futrell said that
I CU's allies were well
organized and that
legislators supporting
the med school were
assigned to combat
every argument that the
oopos i t i on c o uId
possibly bring up.
Just before the final
vote futrell addressed
the senate to respond to
I indsey Warren, saying
"1 indsey Warren and I
have been friends for
many, many years, fie
was born less than 20
miles fro m Fast
Carolina. If any man
would have a natural
right to support fast
( arolina it would be
I indsey Warren, but 1
can'l understand why
he opposes it. I have
tried hard lo unders-
tand it but I can't. I
don't know what he is
hoping to gain by being
against it. Other peo-
ple are for il and in his
own argument he at-
tacks the wisdom of it
but he doesn't give the
basis of that attack. 1
think Lindsey Warren
is one of the smartest
members of this senate,
but 1 think even the
smartest of one can be
wrong sometimes, adn
Senator Warren I think
you are on this and I
wish that you would
stand up here and tell
the senate that you are
wrong
Futrell has enjoyed
his years as a trustee.
Jones Cafeteria Praised
( untinued from page 1
doing a tine job, especialy tot as
many metis as they put out and foi
no more than they charge foi it.You
can't go anywhere in North
Carolina unless it's another college
oi soinc government tood service
and cat a hot meal of youi choice
one roof he added.
"Mi s mon arid Servomation are
tor that amount of money. The peo-
ple who complain should go out to
eat for a month. They'll go broke
and complain about the same
thigshe added.
1 he average cost of a meal in
Jones Cafeteria based on the
average of SI.75 allotted for
breakfast, S2.75 allotted for lunch
and $3.25 tor dinner served on an all
vou can eat basis is S2.5S
Continued from page I
ol what would be involved in adding
two dav's vacation in the tall
semestei.
According to Di Malcolm South.
the present guidelines tor the calen-
dars requires minimum ol "1 in-
struction days per semestei. Anv
new holidays would have to be made
up on other days, and if they are
made up at the beginning ot the
school year, it could mean that
students would have to come to
school four davs earlier lo get the
two dav"s break, explained Dr.
South. I his is because pushing back
the calendai dates may involve ad-
ding an extra weekend, he said.
Committee members asked Sher-
rod to supply them with more
reliable information, especially alter
students consider that a break
would mean coming to school
earlier in Angus
(me ot the option that was
J.D. DAWSON CO.
2818 E.10th St. Greenville,N.C.
WE WANT YOUR GOLD RINGS,
DENTAL GOLD,ANYTHlNG GOLD
COME BY
AND GET
TOP DOLLAR
FOR YOUR
GOLD
WE PAY
CASH
srt.
9
i
- a . �wx4ws: ����a�kiijnj.�
� i.ii.ii.i.A.iu.i.ri.A.i.i.jLjti.i.i.i.i.i.i.i.A. S5
1 m
He says that he believes
the major growth days
are over.
futrell does have one
more ambition for the
ECU though, approval
to grant doctoral
degrees in diciplines
other than medicine.
FREE
Bring
This
Ad For
One
Free
Game
FREE
Fall Break Discussed
By University Committee
discussed is moving the 1 abor Day
break into October to serve as one
of the tall break days.
Aftei the meeting, Sherrod said.
"We're going to answer all of the
questions the committee wants
answered, give them all ot the infor-
mation they want, and if the student
reaction is still favorable, we're go-
ing to gel a tail break
"I he bottom line is, there is no
reason whatsoever that we shouldn't
have a fall break at ECU. While
we're in classes later this month, the
two largest universities in the state
will be out for a break. There's no
reason why the third largest univer-
sity shouldn't be doing the same
thing Sherrod added.
Sherrod said he would work to get
more accurate information for the
committee, but said, "1 don't think
there is any doubt that the students
will want a semester break in Oc-
tober
Good Thru Halloween
Arcade
FREE
On
Fifth St.
Across
From
The
Rathskeller
FREE
The Army was no laughing matter
until Judy Benjamin joined it.
v
THE SGA THATS THE
FOLLOWING GROUPS
FOR THEIR HELP!
WITH THE SGA ELEC-
TIONS:
CAMPUS CRUSADE
CIRCLE K
GAMMA SIGMA
SIGMA
SIGN LANGUAGE
CLUB
S.OU.L.S.
L D I E
HAWN
PRIVATE BENJAMIN
A HAWN � MEYERS � SHYER -MILLER Production
A HOWARD ZIEEE Film
Siainng GOLME HAWN m "PRIVATE BENJAMIN-
EILEEN BRENNAN � ARMANI) ASSANTE � ROBERT WEBBER � SAM WANAMAKER
BARBARA BARRIE � MARY KAY PLAtE � HARRY DEAN STANTON
Special Appearance ALBERT BROOKS � Mu bvBILL CONH � 1 ��� Pr.r, GQUME HAW N
Wnam and Product bv NANtY MEYERS CHARLES SHYER �� HARVEY MILLER
I "RI RESTRICTED J i wm �u Howard ZIEEE
QuHMMfei �"�'
OPENS OCTOBER 10TH
AT A THEATRE NEAR YOU
50 OFF SPECIAL GROUP FALL FASHIONS
INCLUDING
SHIRTS BLOUSES DRESSESSKIRTS SKIRTSETS BLAZERS
0NeSgMAu
fA0Lh. 528965

!





Sty iEaat (Earnliman
Serving the campus community since 1925.
Richard Green, �,�,� uu�u
TERR HERNDON, Oinctoro) Uhxnismt TERRY GRAY. Ummgmg Mm
Chris Lichok, � Lisa Drew, �,� �
George Hettich, am, Hm�u� Charles Chandler, sm�
Anita Lancaster, .���. x,unJW, David Norris, (
Viober4, lKO
Opinion
Page 4
Media Board
Voting To Be A Itered
Minority Seat Considered
The Constitution Committee of
the ECU Media Board met yester-
day to discuss several amendments
that will affect all students and their
representative power on the board.
The weight of each organization's
vote could be drastically altered,
rendering certain groups more, or
less, powerful. But more important-
ly, does the board have the power to
make these changes?
Until this year, there were nine
members on the board: 1) SGA
president (1 vote); Student Union
president (1 vote); Men's Residence
Council president (1 vote);
Women's Residence Council presi-
dent (1 vote); Inter-Fraternity
Council president (one-half vote);
Panhellenic Council president
(one-half vote); day-student
representative (1 vote); ad-
ministrator appointed by the
chancellor (1 vote); faculty member
(1 vote); and the dean of Student
Al s (c . jfficio mcinbei without
a vote).
'Because of the merger of the
MRC and WRC into the Student
Residence Association (SRA), SRA
President Nelson Jarvis recom-
mended that his group have only
one vote, reducing dorm reprsenta-
tion by one vote. Another proposal
will be that the IF:C and Panhellenic
presidents receive one full vote
each, incresaing the voice of frater-
nities and sororities by one vote. A
new seat on the board will be
created for the president of SOULS,
the Society of United Liberal
Students, a minority organization.
The SRA and Greek vote changes
will, in effect, take one vote from
dorm students and give it to the
Creeks. Creech and other board
members maintain that the Greeks
are more active and they deserve
another vote. How can the board
justify giving one group an extra
vote because it is more vocal and
another a vote because it is less
vocal?
The creation of a minority seat on
the board is cretinous, as the
board's founders determined and
the ECU Board of Trustees affirm-
ed. One problem of a minority seat
is assuring that the position is truly
representative of the minority
groups on campus. Will the presi-
dent of SOULS meet that criterium?
Another fault with the proposed
minority seat is that it will not assist
in erasing any form of segregation
of minorities and the majority; it
will only perpetuate and accentuate
the situation. The (Raleigh) News
and Observer put it this way in an
editorial:
"There is a growing recognition
in America today that many efforts
to bring minorities into the
mainstream of the society have
violated the democratic principle
that all citizens should be treated
alike. It is no solution to the pro-
blems of (minorities) to make their
paths artificially smooth. It is not
justice to limit the rights of the ma-
jority in an effort to ensure the
rights of a minority
Perhaps the most serious question
is whether the board has the
authority to change its own
membership. The present member-
ship was established by the ECU
Board of Trustees in January 1978.
Although the trustees did provide
for the establishment of the con-
stitution, they were specific. They
left nothing for interpretation.
The trustees wanted to assure a
specific membership, so they
specified it prior to the drafling of
the Media Board Constitution. Any
change of the membership and
voting must be decided by the Board
of Trustees.
All of these changes are totally
unnecessary. The proposals are just
another example of how bureacracy
is constantly shuffling and reshuffl-
ing itself at the expense of its consti-
tuency. Students need to speak out
within the next two weeks before the
board makes its own decision.
Your Media Board represen-
tatives are: SGA President Charlie
Sherrod; Student Union President
Karen McLawhorn; SRA President
Nelson Jarvis; IFC President Harry
Tumus; Panhellenic President Beth
Hignite; Day-Student Represen-
tative and Chairman David Creech;
Vice Chancellor for Student Life
Elmer Meyer; and Dean of Student
Affairs S. Rudolph Alexander.
These people can be reached in their
offices or through the Media Board
secretary: 757-6366. Let them here
from you.
Futrell: 'A Patron Saint'
Throughout the years, ECU has
had many patron saints. Among
them are Robert Morgan, Jesse
Helms, Jim Hunt, Bob Scott, Jim-
my Green, and many other political
and business leaders. But there is
one local leader who has been in the
forefront � and occasionally in the
back rooms � of every major battle
fought for the university. That man
is Ashley B. Futrell, senior member
of the ECU Board of Trustees and
editor and publisher of the
Washington (N.C.) Daily News.
Futrell was appointed to the
board in 1969 by Gov. Bob Scott.
His appointment came after Futrell
helped lead the fights in the North
Carolina State Legislature to gain
approval for a nursing school at
ECU in 1965, and to gain university
status in 1967.
During his 11 years on the board,
he has proven to be an exceptional
leader and protector of ECU.
Always acting with the best interest
of the university and "the boys and
girls he has worked tirelessly on
behalf of our school, and he has
refused to accept any compensation
for his work. His charity is exceeded
only by his modesty.
It was Ashley Futrell who stood
alone and cast the only negative
vote when Larry Oilman was hired
as basketball coach a few years ago.
Mr. Futrell is a man of great
foresight, and in the end, everyone
realized that he was right.
It was Ashley Futrell who made
the motion to create the ECU Media
Board in 1978 over protests from
other board members that the pro-
posal didn't have the blessing of the
SGA Legislature. Futrell responded
with a classic statement: "The will
of the people is supreme to the will
of the legislature How right he
was.
Ashley Futrell is one of the last of
a breed of cavaliers we know as
"Southern gentlemen In him we
see a man of strong character, high
values and respect for tradition.
The people of North Carolina,
and especially the students and
alumni of ECU, will never be able
to repay our great debt to Ashley
Futrell. Now approaching 70 years
of age, Futrell has a long and
distinguished career as a political
leader, a newspaper editor and
publisher, and an unfailing public
servant.
His wholehearted support for this
newspaper and the ideals that it
stands for will never be forgotten.
We sincerely wish "Mr. Ashley"
many happy and prosperous years
to come.
CDeMler
Campus Forum
Student Blasts 'Officials9
I would like to direct a leu comments
to the university officials who were
referred to in the article "Housing Shor-
tage Puts Squeeze on Rooms" in the
Sept. 23 edition ot I he Easl Carolinian.
If university officials were predicting
a housing shortage tor 1 C I students
this tall why is there a housing shor-
tage? And would it have been too much
trouble to notif) those of us who were
tripled a little earlier than two weeks
prior to tall semester? If such a problem
was so brilliantly forseen, why wasn't it
so brilliant!) avoided?
I he shortage is putting the squeeze on
the unlucky students who are jammed
into a room with two roommates, i am
sure this mistake and its consequences
seem pretty tar removed from you. Win
don't you come oer and isit us
sometime ()! course, it would be wise
to call tirst so that we ma) clear a
pathway at the door so you may enter.
And it we are a bit rude, don't be of-
fended, we have learned to take rudeness
id stride since we have been calling the
housing office only to receive that same
rude treatment. You probably would not
be so cordial yourself it the onl) privacy
you ever had was in a shower or
bathroom stall. Nevertheless, we will do
our best to be polite. Perhaps we can
serve sandwiches � finger sandwiches
(always conserving space, you know.)
Whatever you do, don't ask how our
classes are going. 1 iving the life ol a sai
dine doesn't do too much for attitude or
moraN.
We, oi course, have been studying in
the library (since one desk and
chairs are hardly sufficient) in ord
keep up the ol' GPA. Bui you know
what effects anxiety, pressure and
frustration can have on our perfor-
mance.
Please don't tell us how concerned
you are and how hard you are tryinj
remedy the situation youi lack ol
preventive action is all the explanation
we need. Don't worry. We will most
likel) be living in apartments next yeai
Yes, you have succeeded in making us so
uncomfortable that we will give up oui
rooms to the next poor victims.
Bravo to you. universit) officials.
You will surely succeed in making more
housing available next year
SANTAC HOP1 IN
Sophomore, An
Med School Chairman
Praises Newspaper
Congratulations on your superb im-
provement oi The Easl Carolinian. I he
writing is now crisp with far better
editing, the lav outs are attract
photographs arc well chosen
teresting. I he cart ns are ;
fresh and compete well with ou
mercial dailies. Be ill, the
approa d meas
lasi yea
W ell done, keep il up.
wai 11 k i p kii - '
( hain
ECUScI
Forum Rules
The I astarolii �
expressing all points
drop slum by our ofin in (hi )d 'iouih
Build �
I (
and class; fu ation, . .
number and v
ciicrs should be limited
typewritten pages, doui
neatly printed h U tiers an
editing foi bn vity, obscenti
cncrs by iin same author at
t�a h 30 davs.
Student Gets 'D-minus'
'Opinion' Disagrees With Professor's
B STAN RIDGLEY
Back in the 1950's, William F. Buckley,
Jr. claimed that a lot oi universities were
"indocrinating" their students with the or-
thodoxy oi liberalism. The claim was
poohed-poohed by many (mainly liberal
university faculty).
Nevertheless, Buckley's magazine Na-
tional Review sent this letter to editors of
college newspapers: "It is the contention
of virtually all educators that it is the
business oi colleges and universities to
'educate not to 'indoctrinate By this
they tend to mean that teachers should ex-
pose students to all points of view ade-
quately and impartially, and should not
endeavor to inculcate in them the par-
ticular point oi view oi the teacher, let
alone anyone else's views.
"It is the contention oi many informed
conservatives that a very large number oi
teachers in this country are in fact engaged
in indoctrinating their students in
liberalism
You ask what this has to do with East
Carolina University? Just this: one always
hopes that the tendency Buckley spoke oi
20 years ago will never surface here, but it
apparently already has. Faculty members
at ECU would be among the first to deny
that there is any sort of indoctrination go-
ing on in the classroom; they like to think
of their insititution as fostering the free in-
terplay of ideas. But a blatant example of
indoctrination in the ECU'S Philosophy
Department has come to light. And it's
very disturbing.
The names of the professor, student and
course won't be revealed to protect the stu-
dent and to avoid "slandering" the pro-
fessor. All else is true and occurred two
weeks ago.
Students in this particular class were
given the assignment: Define freedom, and
cite which concept of freedom you perfer,
the Capitalist concept or Socialist concept.
An essay by Louis Blanc was assigned (a
socialist essay) and sources were cited
where students might find information on
capitalist thought. The paper was to be two
to four pages long. This student chose the
"Capitalist Concept of Freedom wrote
the paper, turned it in - and received a
grade of "D�
Let's pause here to acknowledge that a
paper so poorly written and devoid of
reputable sources may deserve a poor
grade. But that is not the case in this in-
stance.
The paper was well-written and made an
excellent argument for the "Capitalist
Concept of Freedom Sources quoted oi
alluded to included John I ocke, Adam
Smith, Dr. A.J. Beitzinger ol Notre Dame
University, and former Secretary oi the
Treasury William Simon. It is important to
keep in mind that this was an opinion
paper, not the kind oi report one can gel
from World Book Encyclopedia.
What did the professor have to sav
about this student's efforts?
The student's first quote bv William 1
Simon said: "A nation that decreases its
economic freedom must grow poorer. It
follows as night follows day. one
understands the polar systems The pro
lessor commented in the margin: "I'm not
so sure a capitalist eeonominisl (sic)
understands the issues?"
If this profesor isn't sure oi that, then
one wonders if he is sure of anything.
Earlier in the paper, the link between
economic freedom and political freedom
had been established. Who better to pre
sent the capitalist viewpoint than a
capitalist economist intimately acquainted
with the economic intricacies oi the largest
capitalist country in the world?
The student concludes the paper nicely
with a vote for capitalism. The professor
writes this at the bottom of the paper:
"How then has the Soviet Union come
from a devastated nation in 1920 to a super
power in 60 vears? William Simon is full of
bull
The ECU professor thinks William
Simon is full of bull. This is what Nobel
Prize-winning economist Milton Friedman
said about Simon and his book A Time For
Truth: "A brilliant book by a brilliant and
passionate man Another Nobel Pne
winner, F.A. Hayek said of Simon: "If we
learn from him and the few people who
think like him, we may still avert the
threatening coliapse of our political and
economic ordei a firs! class young
brain
Simply saving Simon is full oi bull
doesn't make it so. One wonders what
Friedman, Hayek, and Simon would
about this ECU faculty member.
s foi the professor's remark about the
I S.S.R it is inconceivable that a holdei
ol a Ph.D. would back himsell into sue
cornet. Ironically, the Soviet Union's
economic success was built largely
American investment and the repressionoi
human freedom not its expansion. But thai
is another story.
I he inescapable conclusion is that tl
student received a "D- " on a paper solely
because he prefers the capitalist concepi ol
freedom to the socialist concept he
understood corollary is that to receive an
" " one must espouse the socialist con
cepl oi some mixture of the two.
Another paper from that same class con-
cluded: "I now believe the true meaning ol
freedom lies between the capitalistic defini
tion and the socialistic definition " This
conclusion was reached after the student
repented o thinking that he might
"conclude the paper bv stating that
freedom under capitalism is better than
under socialism
Fine. This student came around to the
professor's wav ol thinking and received a
"BV I he titst student concluded that
capitalism is preferable � he received a
"P- �" !t ls obvious that assignments are
being graded from a pro socialist or pro-
mixed economy bias. This smacks oi in-
doctrination and indicates that there is no
room for capitalist purists m the
classroom.
As Buckley said earlier: "Teachers
should expose students to all points ol view
adequately and impartially, and should not
endeavor to inculcate in them the par-
ticular point o view of the teacher
So much for academic freedom at Ft I
Stan Hulgely ,s a Political Science major
with a degree in journalism from the
University of North Caroltna at Chapel
Hill.
I
I
r
abou
fanti
stud
ing I
men i
s a e -
gene
has
But
Depr
?





s
( I
till I sU R(1 ll N
Features
t I OHI KM. 1980
Nantucket Appearing
At Minges Monday
Nantucket will be appearing Monday evening Oct. 13
at 8.00 p.m. in Minges. Above from left to right are
Parties:
Mark Dowining, Eddie Blair. Tommy Redd. Pee
Wee Watson, l.arry I ell. and Kenny Soule.
The rock and roll of Nantucket
returns to ECU at Minges Coliseum
on Monday, Oct. 13 at 8:00 p.m.
Also appearing with Nantucket will
be the Dalton Hoys and Dik Holi-
day. Tickets for the concert are on
sale for $5.00 in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center.
Nantucket, a popular band in this
region, has been around a long time.
Eleven years ago, the band was call
ed Stacks of Cold. They plaved at
parties and other small gigs m
Jacksonville, N.C. In the earl
'7()'s, the band changed its name to
Nantucket Sleighride, then later
became Nantucket. They signed a
contract with Epic records in 1977,
and hae recently completed their
third album, entitled On the Way
Up.
The band is made up of Larry
I el vocals and trumpet; Mark
Downing, lead guitar; Tommy
Redd, rhythm guitar, vocals and
music; Eddie Blair, saxophone,
keyboards and vocals; kennv Sonic,
drums and vocals; and Pee Wee
Watson, bass and vocals. I ell.
Downing and Redd are from the
Jacksonville area; Blair and Soule
are former ECU students.
Asked in a telephone interview
yesterday about how the band's
music has changed since its beginn-
ing, band member Eddie Blair said,
"It's a harder sound now. Back in
those days, (the early vears of the
band's existence) we would rock and
roll, but were a little more into R&B
than we are these days. We just have
a straight-out good time rock and
roll sound now
The first two Nantucket albums
were 7.98 list; the new release is a
$5.98 list album. "Actually, that
doesn't have anything in do with us.
It's a new policv thatBS has to sell
more records. 1 he ed the
price ot all records about a vear and
a halt ago. Aboul lour months alter
that, the bottom dropped out ot the
industry
Nantucket's new album, On the
Way Up, is now ranked at 159 on
the Record World charts I heii first
release reached 124 on the chart.
The band's appeal has broadened
since their first album Recently,
See NAM I CKET, pae . col. 1
Gem Of A Musical
Playing At Fletcher
Thank God It's The Weekend
ihe
Bv l ID NORRIn
� - es and w or k
� �
ie o! the
ei apeutic
long been
AX as a
know why
with it- mev liable un-
rapeutic return io reality is not
� hing called a
. work would
ind no one
'T Oils
Will
: 1CI
n
entnc
economy, remember') would follow
suit. Mankind owes much to the in-
ventor o the weekend, whoever he
w as
Weekends were invented about
the same time as the origin o the
six-da) work week. Before that
time, there was a seven-day work
week and nobody got any time o
except tor holidays. Ot course,
some cultures got around this
obstacle bv declaring lots of
holidays, but tins was a complicated
solution.
When the five-day work week
became standard in the 19th cen-
tury, the Golden Age o the
Weekend began, and still continues
lay
Parties are one o! the standard m-
f a weekend. Pai ties date
even earlier time than
all the wav back to a
t Mesopotamia tanner-

bunch
who S.000 vears ago learned what
drinking fermented wheat can do to
people. Other cultures at a later time
made similar discoveries about the
effects ol drinking fermented grape
juice.
Students ol 1 as! Carolina I nivei
sity are in a unique position to learn
about parties, since the school's
Department ot Partying lias a na-
tionwide reputation, lor new
students or for those who have been
seriously studying, a brief outline ol
the types of , a ell as their
general structure, would be helpful.
Par tie- come m a number ol more
or less self-explanatory types, such
as boring, loud, keg and raided.
some types have specialized names;
the PJ party, named alter a kind of
drmk cons it ty pe ot par-
ty, is an example.
Although different kinds o par-
ties have various names, thcv have
in common a similar structure in
both organization and the pattern of
growth and decline.
1 here is no specific time for a par-
ty to begin but they generally start
alter supper, to allow the host to get
something to eat before general
madness make- this impossible.
(Also, you don't want to run off to
a restaurant during your party,
unless sou don't have anything
worth stealing in the house.)
Besides getting supper, the host
has other functions to carry out
before the party, like hiding the
good stereo and favorite albums.
Guests soon start to trickle in,
beginning the first, or boring stage
o the party. This part is
characterized b the room, house or
apartment of the partv having in it
only a very few people, none o
See FOREVER, page 7, col. 1
"Dames at Sea the award-
winning New York musical comedy
will be presented by the last
(. arolina University Playhouse Oct.
9 - 15. Performances begin cash
evening at 8:15 p.m. in the Fletcher
Music Center at ECU.
ccording to Playhouse Managei
Scott Parker, "Dames at Sea" is "a
delightful thirties musical with lap
dancing and wave-to-wave fun for
all ages
When the play opened in New
York it received the Outer Circle
Critics Award as Best Musical of the
Year. Based on the "campy"
nostalgia o' the Hollywood musicals
ol the I930's, the New York produc-
tion enjoyed a long run.
"Dame- at Sea" is set in Big-
rime New York and feature- a
-weet and innocent girl from
faraway Hometown, U.S.A. who
has come to make it big on Broad-
way.
She chances to meet a Hometown
boy, now a sailor, who has ambi-
tions to become a songwriter.
Hometown girl begins in a chorus,
and the show's female star makes
overtures to the sailor, thus rocking
the boat of true love.
In typical Hollywood fashion, the
songwriter-sailot saves the flounder-
ing show with a smash tune, and
Hometown girl achieves stardom bv
singing his song on the deck ot a
battleship which happens to be pa
ing bv tor the occasion.
"A winner' A gem of a musical
said the New York limes theatre
critic of "Dame- a! Sea lot the
1( I production, director Edgar
I oessin and choreographer Paula
Johnson have assembled a cast ol 14
student actor singer dancer- who
have been intensively rehearsing the
lb musical numbers featuring lavish
tap dancing routine
Sally Clodfeltei ol hapel Hill
and Barry Ambrose ot Elizabeth Ci-
ty portrav the Hometown girl and
bov. The roie o! Mona is piaved bv
1 illian Ruth Norris ot Williamston;
Joan I- Renee Dul aney ol Mon-
tgomery, West Va; and Eric van
Baars oi New Bern plays 1 ucky
Butch White o Garner appears as
Captain Hennesy
Chorus members au dancers are-
Michael Summer- ol Virginia
Beach, Va Lynne Michele Bar
nhardt o' Hickory, Mary Purdue of
Fayetteville, Nora Parker ol
Kinston, borer. Watkins o Raleigh,
Robbie Lemmons ol Wilson, Scott
Rodger o Jacksonville and Cindy
c arol Williams ol Newton Grove
"Dames at Sea" tickets are on
sale at the ECU Playhouse Box Of-
fice and can be reserved bv
telephone, 757-6390. Because ol
limited seating, early reset
are suggested.
Hollywood Actresses
Discussed In Course
Offered In Spring
All ol i v w ood has
and their lives on
the actual careei s ol
.ood female star
s, will be the
. urse in Spring
-Si idents in the class,
in American Film:
1 K. ty will hav e a
issk feature films
! an Gish in M as
Diane Keaton
I I he legends
and: the past such
'e Dietrich, Bette Davis.
1 ay lor will be studied
atest films. So
e ol women's films in
the ki-70s.
)!
Wll
I
am Stephenson, pro-
film literature in the
partment, recently ex-
plained the course offering.
Vctually, the course number is
5900, and it appeals in the
catal" gue a- special Studies in Film.
That's the general course title I
choose a different topic for study
each year. I've only ottered the
topic ol women in film once betore,
about five years ago. and it was a
tic class experience. The
student- really enjoyed it. I'm look-
ing tor ward to offering it again in
1981
Asked what the prevailing image
ol women is, Stephenson com
mented, "A lot of times it's just the
sweet little homebody who only
wants to knit socks for hubby and
bake cookies for the kids. That's
generally what the American public
has wanted to see over the years.
But there have been times, like the
Depression and Second World War
when women were forced into
the labor market. Then you had
some tremendous films about
women who could make it on their
own. like Joan Crawford in Mildred
Pierce and Catherine Hepburn in
Adam's Rib. Yes, I'll be showing
both of those
Besides the big-star films,
Stephenson will offer offbeat films
ol special interest. "There have
been some devastating comedies
made about how men treat women,
and how some women hook onto
men like parasites said Stephen-
son. He spoke of another very
unusual film. "There's a film o
1958 nobody ever heard o. called
The Goddess, that offers the best
comment on the life ol Marilyn
Monroe I've ever seen. It even
predicted her suicide, four years in
advance
He expects sharpest class reaction
to a star will be Creta Gar bo, in
lesh and the Devil. "The last time,
class reaction was amaing. Garbo
plavs a temme fatale who has an af-
fair with a married man. All the
men m the class sympathized with
her, thought she was adorable and
misunderstood. All the women in
class hated her. They called her a
homewrecker who broke up another
woman's marriage.
Stephenson said the class will
meet on Mondays and Wednesdays
from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. "There are no
special prerequisites. I'll welcome
all students with a personal interest
in film or in women's studies. The
course can be taken for credit or
audited
For further information, contact
Protessor Stephenson in Austin 330.
The Kids Are Alright is playing Friday, Oct. 10 at 11:00 p.m. in the Hen-
drix Theatre in Mendenhall. Starring the members of the Who, the film
focuses on the band member's personality as well as their music. Above
is band member Roger Daltrey.
The Kids Are Alright Showing Late
For all you Who tans. Ihe kids
Are Alright is a must. Appearing at
Hendrix Theatre October 10 at
11:00, this thrilling film stars Roger
Daltrey, John Entwistle, Keith
Moon. Peter Townshend, and
Ringo Starr, along with comedian
Steve Martin.
The Kids Are Alright chronicles
one of rock's most vibrantly
creative bands. The Who, in what is
much more than just a film for their
tans; it is a superbly edited
documentary that reveals a chang-
ing youth culture acutely perceived
and forcefully reflected by the
Who's music.
Band members Roger Daltrey,
John Entwistle, Peter Townshend
and Keith Moon are captured
together in rare and electrifying con-
cert performances (including the
late Keith Moon's last performance
with the group while performing for
the album Who Are You), as well as
in creative and revealingly somber
moods that are disarming, honest
and engaging. There is a penetrating
energy to this film about a band that
created and still exudes its own kind
of energy, even after 15 years.
It's nearly impossible to believe
that anyone who has ever loved The
Who won't love The Kids Are
Alright, a film which succeeds
remarkably in reminding us of the
unsurpased glory that has been The
Who's for a decade and r half. The
Who is amaing to watch, each
player's gestures juxtaposed with
those o his accomplice.
The film contains some
fascinating footage. Director and
writer Jeff Stein hs managed to
tackle his very interesting subject
with diligence and intensity. The wit
and antagonism of the British
group's members, their herculean
efforts to make themselves
glamorous, the thinking man's
ecstasy that animates their music
and the harrowing cost of a commit-
ment to rock and roll when one is
well into adulthood � these are all
ingredients.
The film begins for tne
uninitiated with some long clips
from the group's appearance on The
Smothers Brothers Show. The
visuals are crisp and the sound is
wrap around Dolbv. 1 he Who wear
well through the years. John Fnt-
wistle and Keith Moon are en-
thusiastic practitioners of the put-
down and absurdist interview with
media tvpes.
The film delivers a good time even
to anvone who might wander into
the theatre bv mistake. It helps that
The Who. collectively and in-
dividually, are unpredictable and
colorful. Any documentary Aim
eithei succeeds ot fails depending on
the concept, and the approach here
See KIDS, page 7. eol. 1
?
��





THl I S1 CAROl 1NIAN
(K lOHI K. IKO
Happenings
L
Campus Events:
Thursday 9
� LAST DAY TO DROP A CLASS OK
WITHDRAW FROM SCHOOI ;
� 8:15 P.M. Faculty recital: Brad 1 oley, sax-
ophone, A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall.
Fridaj 10
� 10:00 A.M. Womens volleyball. Frances
Marion, Florence, S.C
� 5:00, 7:00, 9:(X) P.M. Movie: "Manhattan"
Hendrix Theatre'
� 11:00 P.M. late Movie: "The Kids are
Alright'1 Hendrix Theatre.
� College Bowl competition. Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center, 7:00 p.m.
Saturdav 11
� 10(H) A M. Womens field Hockey: Davidson
College. Home,
� 10:30 AM Womens Field Hockey: Catawba,
Home,
� 1:30 P.M. Football: University of Richmond,
Richmond, Va
� 1:30 I'M Womens Volleyball: fiances
Marion, Florence S.C
� 8:00 P.M. Soccer: Championships,
� 5:00, 7:00, 9:00 P.NT Movie: "Manhattan"
Hendrix 1 heatre.
� College Bowl Competion, 1:00 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student Center.
Mondav 13
� PRE-REGISTRATION SPRINc,
si Ml S 1 1 R .
� 4:00 PAP Womens Field Hockey: Pfeiffer
College, Misenheimer College,
Tuesda 14
� 4:00 PAL Soccer: Christopher Newporl Col
lege, Home.
� 7:00 PAT MSC Bingo Ice cream Parts
Mendenhall Student Center Multi-Purpose
Room.
� 7:00 P.M. Womens Volleyball: UNC-CH,
lmees Colliseum.
Coffeehouse Hosts
The Jazz Bones
ednesda 15
� 8:00 P.M. Movie: "MUhouse: A White Com-
edy" Hendrix Theatre.
lhursdav 16
� 4:00 P.M. Intramural Archery Tournament.
College Hill,
� 8:00 P.M. Artists Series, Pressler Bressler,
Hendrix Theatre.
Oct. 10-16
� ECU Playhouse Production (Musical).
Oct. 13-19
� Homecoming Week.
Movies
Buccaneer:
� "Terror Train" R shows at 1:15, 3:15, 5:15,
7:15 & 9:15 P.M
� "Till Marriage Do Us Pan" -R- starimg
1 aura Antonelli, shows at 1:00, J:00, 5:00, 7:00&
9:00 P.M
� "Hopscotch" -R- starring Waltei Matthau,
shows at 1:10. 3:10, 5:10. 7:10. &9:10 P.M.
Plaza:
� "Oh Cod! Book I"wo" PC starring George
Burns, shows at 3:15, 5:10, 7:05, & 9:00 P.M
� "Resurrection" -PC shows at 3:15, 5:15,
7:15, cs: 9:15 P.M
� "loni" -Cr- stairmg, Joni Eareckson as
herself, shows at 3:00, 5:00, 7:00, & 9:00 PAT
Park:
� "Zombie" shows at :KWs 9:00 P.M.
Start Friday
Plaa - "How To Beat 1 he High Cost ()! 1 iving"
Park - "From Night"
� Tuesday CRAZY TUESDAY
� Wednesday GENTS NIGHT
� Thursday COLLEGE NIGHT
� Friday END OF WEEK PARTY
� Saturdav VICTORY PARTY
� Sunday LADIES NIGHT
Carolina Oprv House:
� Thursday NORTH STAR BAND
� I ridav NORTH STAR BAND
� Saturday NORTH STAR BAND
Peaches:
� Thursday Greenville's original FOXY LADY
NIC HI
� Saturday COME PARTY WITH HARDY,
Steve Hardy's Beach Party.
Attic:
� Thursday THE DAITON BOYS
w GLISSON
� I-ridav THRUSH
� Saturday THRUSH
� Sundav N1GHTHAWKS
� Tuesday BRECKENRIDGE
� Wednesday SPIRAL
� Friday SPJRAL AND DAC HOLIDAY
J.Js:
� Thursday MAGNUM
� Friday AQUILLA, Hav-a-happy 4:00
� Saturdav AQUILLA
� Sunday OLD FASHIONED SQUARI
DANCE
Manhattan Showing At Hendrix
Manhattan, starring Woody Allen and Diane kealon. will be plavinu
ai the Hendrix Theatre Oct. 10 at 5:00, 7:00. and 9:00 p.m.
Nantucket To Play
Minges Coliseum
Nightlife
Elbo:
� Mondav Closed
rhe Student Union
Coffeehouse ommit-
tee will present the
1 C I School of Music's
"Ja.v Bones" this Fri-
daj and Saturdav. Oct.
10 and 11, at 9 p.m. in
the Multipurpose
Room MSC. Admis-
sion is 50 cents.
The Jazz Bones were
organized in 19"6 as a
branch of the large:
Trombone Choir and
the Jazz Ensemble.
Composed of five
student trombonists
and a t h r e e m a n
rhythm section, the
group has performed
tor the N.C . Music
Educator's Association
convention in 1976.
and will perform again
in 1980. The Bones
have aKo appeared
before the Eastern
District All-State Band,
On slow Count
Schools, the Kinston
A r t Council, t h e
Beaufort Art Council,
as well as touring in
Virginia, South
Carolina, and the I.e
Heel state.
1 lie ensemble has
backed such ia greats
as Bill W atrous and Kai
Winding (one of the
originators of the jazz
trombone ensemble
concept, and a leading
figure in the develop-
ment ot jazz trombone
playing).
In addition to a bus
schedule of campus
performances, the ,1a
Bones have appeared at
J.Js Music Hall here
in Greenville, and have
been featured on
various area charit)
telethons.
The Jazz Bone's
repetoire includes jaaz
standards, big band eia
sounds, student ar-
rangements, jazz rock
fusion, and ai
rangements written
especially for the
group.
SAAD'S SHOI
KKPA1K
1 I i Grande -V' ��
758-1228
Qu.tlm Kepaii
APPY 28 th BIRTHDAY
CHARLIE
SHERROD
WHO LOVES YA BABY?!
by
CuBtom Crafting
and Repair
Original Handcrafted Jewelry
in Silver and Gold
120 E. 5 �t. GrtnviMt, NX. 27834
Buying and Selling
Gold and Silver and Coini
758 2127
Prompt Professional
Typing at
Reasonable
Rates
( all:
l
291-0723
i cmporari Secrt'lary
"t h c. I) iisitn A.( .
In last weeks edition of HAPPENINGS we
mistakenly said that there would be no cover for
the Gatemouth Brown show at J.Js. There was a
cover charge and we apologize for any inconve-
nience that it may have caused.
It you have anything that you would like to put
in HAPPENINGS, send 'them to T. Ashe
I ockhart Jr The last Carolinian, East Carolina
University, Greenville, N.C. 27834.
j ARMY NAVY STOKE -
Backpacks, B 15, Batwbtr. ��
FiHd, Deck. Flight, Snorkel �
Jackets, Peacoats, Parkas,
SIms, Combat Boots, Plus.
1S01 S Evans Straat
TTXTT
Nessie Has Chinese Cousin
PEKING (I Ph
1 he Chinese cousin of
the 1 och Ness monster
has been seen swimm-
ing in the flooded
.rater ol a dormant
volcano on the border
between China and
North Korea, a Peking
newspapet reported to-
I he Peking Evening
News said five sightings
hae been reported bv
the staff of a weather
station and visitors to
the crater lake near the
top o' 6,400-foot
Baitoushan in nor-
theastern Jilin pro-
vince.
The witnesses
describe the large beast
as having the Hat beak
of a duck and a head
shaped like that ol a
cow, but much larger.
The newspaper said
the sightings were tirst
made in mid-August,
and the aquatic animal
was observed I torn a
distance o between 95
and 130 teet the last
time it was seen.
The witnesses said
only the head of the
creature was seen above
water. Thcv estimated
that its body was bigger
than that of a cow and
the wake generated bv
its motion is similar to
thai of a motor boat.
The newspaper said
the monster "is a new
discover) " at Tian Chi,
t h e Chinese n a m e
meaning lake in
heaven" uiven to the
flooded crater of the
snow-capped volcano
that last erupted in
1702.
�'It is a large, strange
animal that has never
been seen over the
years, ' it said.
Like 1 och Ness in
Scotland, the crater
lake is a large, deep
bodv of water that
abounds with marine
life. It has an average
depth of 653 feet and in
spots its depth exceeds
1.184 teet.
Weather station of-
ficials said the lake
"has all the necessary
conditions" for large
marine life but could
not explain w h y
sightings had never
been reported before
Continued from page 5
Nantucket finished a tour with
ACC, going across the United
States, including three dates in
North Carolina. Other bands
they've toured with include the
Doobie Brothers and the Charlie
Daniels Band. The band will be
touring soon with Moll) Hatchet,
and later with Charlie Daniels
again.
The members of Nantucket were
pleasantly surprised recently to
learn that their albums were selling
well in Puerto Rico, and that their
band had an otter to plav there.
Nantucket's albums have been
released in several foreign countries.
including England, Italy.
Switzerland and Canada.
Nantucket's first
album was. according to Blau.
"produced during the Boston era.
when everything was double-tracked
and triple tracked and had millions
ot paiis here and there. Now, we are-
August, going on the iheorv ot less is more
A similar mysterious rhe lust album took two months to
marine animal vvas record, the latest one took three
reported seen in Tibet weeks, with anothei week tor mix-
earlier this year jnK.
Band members Blair and Soule
both seem to agree that New Wave-
rock was a good thing tor contem-
porary music, rather like "sticking
your face oul ol a window and
ting a breath o! fresh air I Ik
band will be sticking to the same
torniai as thev have in the pasi.
however, although thev remain
open to new influences that catch
the interest o group members.
"There has always been at let
six people in the band. 1 hat is si
different people that's a lot ;
differem tastes Kenny Soule ex
plained the influences ot Nantucket
in this way:
Rhythm guitarist I
writes mosl ot nip's musi
but other band members contribute
"We might go in and char
change that, and the whole b
involved m the a; rang met
I he band's stage show I ng
ed shehtlv since their las; 1 C t
cert, with the elimination ot oi
ot keyboards, rhis leaves more
room tor action on the si
"Generally speaking, we're knock-
ing ourselves out more than before
1 hat's what you've got to do it you
plav rock and roll
FREE
VIRGINIA CRABTREE
OCTOBER FEST
SPECIALS
FOR FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
KING SANDWICH DELICATESSEN
OPEN DAILY 11AM-9PM MON-SAT
HAPPY HOUR MON. 2PM-6PM
2711 E. 10TH (COLONIAL H1GHTS SHOPPING CENTER)
BEGINNING OCT. 15th WE WILL
DELIVER TO CAMPUS BETWEEN THE
HOURS OF 12 AND 2PM AND
5-9PM MON SAT.
FOR DELIVERIES AND ORDERS
TO GO CALL
752-4297
$5.00 MIN. ORDER
DRIVERS NEEDED
HOUSE SPECIALS
STEAK � GreenvtUe'j original rteak sandwich � Thin sliced steak cooked
on the null with onions and served n a auslv Italian mil with our special
tomato sauce. $2.50
HOACJIL � Hard salami, danish ham. . anadian bacon, and provolone
cheese with all the trimmings, lor those with a hearU appetite or share it with
a freind. $2.60
CHEESE HOAC4E � A delicious blend I'nnolone. Moarella. Colbv.
American & Swiss cheese, garnished with oil iagar. I lot or Cold � our
choice. d.
( Combination turkey and ham or turkey and bacon � our choice.
Sered with lettuce, tomato and mavo. $1.95
KING CLl B � Combination turkev. ham. and bacon. !2.bU
KING BIRGLR � Quarter pounder � all meat with all the trimmings
served to vour preference.$ 1 .0 � With melted cheese. $l.0
KOSHER CLUB � Corned beet and pastrami piled high on rve bread �
This triple decker comes with a double laver of melted Swiss cheese, hot
mustard and vour choice ot either slaw or kraut. $2.55
Attitutde Adjustment Hour
MON-SAT2-6PM
12oz. Mugs, only 35
on regular price sweaters,shirts &
jumpers this weekend
20 OFF
ENTIRE STOCK OF
CO-ORDINATE
SPORTSWEAR
GROUPS
20 OFF
ENTIRE STOCK
OF BLOUSES
LARGE SELECTION OF
JUNIOR AND MISSY SIZES
VELOUR TOPS
BUY ONE AT REGULAR PRICE
& GET ONE FREE!
20 OFF
ENTIRE STOCK
OF
OXFORD SHIRTS
20 OFF
COATS
WOOLS,LEATHERS,RABBIT S
FAKE FURS & MOST
ALL- WEATHERS
HOURS
10:00-
9:00
PHONE 756-9955
CHARGE CARDS
WELCOME
LAYAWAY NOW
FOR CHRISTMAS
.
Hi
77i
it
T
more
I
I

' -�-





v- .
i
l
pp�
uo uii
y
:day
G
F
OF
�S
i "�
F
BBITS
IOST
ARDS
Y NOW
TMAS
kjjAouTCoaabThe Wnlo IAj
1HI t siroi i OCTOBER9, 1980
' K I'D Line
6V DtNto A-Wis
ONE Of TH� SdeAT
sT&eiss of ufe
i HOWTHfsr 00v
�fAlG�M7Z6S CW
F&��z� Lf Truce five
N�LT TV ViAJveL b
Hendrix Presentation:
The Kids Are Alright
Continued from page 5
i- a good one i he film socks across
its impaci b a fascinating, breez
equivalent to an indoor rollercoaster
ride. Musk, of course, abounds.
Some Z!6 Who songs receive either
lull or partial treatment, beginning
with their breakthrough 'My
Generation and including old
favorites, such as 'Pinball Wizard'
and 'Tommy Also included are
'Baba ()' Riley' and "Won't Gel
fooled Again.1 Vmong other songs,
a very felicitous jam session parody
of the Beach Boys is included.
Snappy interviews spice the pro
ceedings. Moon is consistently
outrageous, but he's also poignant
a! times.
Slapstick chaos doesn't let up foi
two hours. 1 or the unconcerted,
1 lie Kids Are Alright otters a glimp-
se o rock and roll as it was always
meant to be: a force of elemental
anarch) that dispels gloom without
denying it exists. I or veteran Who
fans, "It proves that The Who were
the greatest rock and roll band in
the world as directoi Stem put it.
At the end o the film, 'long Live
Rock' tills the theatre and
lownshend stands and waves, his
eves are red from tears, while the
camera pulls back one last time, to
show a sea of hands raised and wav-
ing, saying goodbye for all of us to
the final expression of our dream,
our innocence, our vision. That mo-
ment is as close to the truth about
rock and roll as anything that ever
hit the screen. It's not only an
emblem o( the last time rock cap-
tured you, it's a symbol of the first.
Yes, the kids are alright.
Also playing at Hendrix at an
earlier time Friday night is Manhat-
tan. Showtimes are 5:(X), 7:00 and
9:00. Manhattan is Woody Allen's
amazing portrait of modern rela-
tionships and lifestyles of New
Yorkers. Daring to shoot the
world's most colorful city in black
and white is only one of the unique
touches in the film. It combines the
humor o Allen's Academy Award-
Winning Annie Hall with the drama
o! Interiors.
It Takes Forever
To Reach A Friday
ii
til
1
rt
lein
(Ontinued from page 5
whom know each oilier. 1 he u
comfortable silence is deepened I
the tact that at this earl) stage, i
the party-goers are sober.
Luckily, this stage soon ends .
more people arrive. People su
talking, meet old and new
and the second or random co
tion stage begins. I his time
party is the time for mo ing
from group to group (or,
group to keg) and talki
everybod) there.
1 oud, but not raunchy
roll is the customar) music
time. 1 he rauncl k and roll
comes in during the next, and most
intense phase ol the party: the hell-
raising, or the "All right, lei's par
ty" phase.
The hell-raising phase is the
source ol most of the legends and
tail tales told about parties. With
many people, part) mytholog) is a
maun topic ol conversation all
through the week. Deriving in part
ol the exploits ol Beowull and oilier
superhuman heroes of the past.
these stones are greatly exaggerated
and reall) impossible exploits, told
by (or, bragged about b) those who
claim to have actuall) performed
the teats.
Buy One 10" Pizza
Get One FREE
Dine-In
Luncheon Special
Sh rf Sandw i h Dinner
Salad ! arge l ed Ten
H.79
N.Y.heesecake price
CHANELOS
507 E 14th St Greenville
758-7400
tm �' vK.T ��k �MriPi4V ABORTION LPTO
llthWUKOF
IBk tfPRKONANCY Jl 76 00 "�IM�Klullv�"
1 W mK Mpregnancy tttt, birt con
SBtrol. and problem pregnn cy counting For ?wrther information call �37 0S35 (toll ' lr�t nomter
HH 5� tAAltoo 221 3SS) betwaen ?
0r 11A MS P.M weekday
Ralaflti W��nn-�
Heattn Or� anli j�ion
� ITWettMorfanSI.
Rakatak, N.cmn
Everyone is familial with stones
ol this type; the) are extremely com-
mon in this area, and usually have
ver) little imagination used in their
creation. Most of these patty stories
involve someone drinking an im-
possible amount of beer, liquor, or
in some cases, both. After finishing
the keg, case or whatever other
alleged quantity was involved in the
story, the hero attempts some
dangerous feat, like driving home at
120 m.p.h. and outrunning three
police cars b) turning onto the
railroad tracks. Some stories are not
as involved, and mostl) concern
things like three-da) hangovers.
Alter this exciting but rather
violent stage of the party, things
quiet down. The really hell-raising
tolks are all out driving down
railroad tracks, leaving the quieter,
intellectual people behind for the
mellow, or passing out stage of the
part).
1 he mellow stage is the most
rewarding stage in regards to con-
versation, thinking, reaching new
insights, and seducing people.
It should be mentioned that many
of the brilliant ideas brought up in
conversation and thinking at this
stage must be written down to en-
sure their being remembered the
next dav. Writing things down for
later does work � how else could 1
have written this article.
ATTIC
Souths No. 6 1 Rock Nightclub
In A Concert
:
The Harvey Dalton Arnold Band
The Dalton Boys
w former members of the
Outlaws, Super Grit,�Grinderswitch
Fri.�SatThrush
Sun-The Nighthawks
Come Home
to Susan's
Vj'H:
20 OFF
All merchandise
Through Saturday, Oct. 7?
GET DRESSED FOR HOMECOMING
with:
J.G. HOOK
LADY THOMSON
ASHER
and many others
" 4.
"�?'�
I u
1 �?
'����
1 v
. 1 ! ill
&
331 ARLINGTON BLVD.
10-6 Mon -Sat � 756-5844
See Your
Favorite Stars
Perform Their
BIGGEST
HITS

Featuring:
Irene Cara
�Fame
Mickey Gilley
'Stand By Me"
Oldies With
Chuck Berry
The Solid Gold
Dancers
Comedy
Surprises

TOP 10
COUNTDOWN
VARIETY SERIES
�����������������
WNCT-TV
ftREENVILLE
SAT7PM& 12 MIDNIGHT
t





I 111 I S r K(l IM AN
Sports
Pirates Still A iling
Spiders Host ECU
B CHARLES CHANDI r R
S11M. I dttoi
"The loss oi manpowei must be they will have to do so without help
made up b others playing haul We
i his Wednesda) press luncheon believe out morale is in ei good
1 ast . arolina head football coach shape right now
1 d 1 mory spoke ol the "five Mi's"
ot success: manpowei. method
motivation, management and
mot ale I he rookie head coach add
ed that his team could depend on
. tour of those in Saturday's
e w ith Richmond.
"It's the same old story he said
"We're pretty battered up. We
don't have a person who will play
Saturday on our defensive line who
went through spring practice
1 mory was referring to the injury
bug that tuts haunted the Pirates all
m the club's two starting defen-
sive tackles. One ol them, George
rump, I- injured and may be out
Hi-team saddled with a 1 3 mark the season while the other, Doug
season long. Due to those injuries, "Ihis game is critica
nb would not be able
lo depend on manpowei Saturday
V one pei son is more impoi
i morale, though he said.
Doug Smith Suspended
las' Carolina starting defensive
tackle Doug Smith has been tern
porarily suspended from the team
two weeks, n was announced by
a te head coac h 1 d 1 moi s
V ed i ie day
"D .a great, great talent
Fm i d, "but there are certain
?visions he must meet He
understands them and has the op-
come bad two
�eeis ihem
Si ed and missed
Pira � e, a $5 7 loss ai
home to Southern Missippi.
Smith, ha- been suspended foi two
games by 1 molry
(i Smith's suspension, Emory
said it was a mattet ol principle.
"It's something we had to do and
we felt necessary he said
"D ; lands this and will be
rein I � weeks i he meets
orities we hae set loi him
W ith Smith andi ump two ol
ttes who will miss Satut
day's game (others include All
�me uard Wayne Inman who
it lot seasoni the club will can
� youngsters act oss I he
nginia b
1 mory m �ted that ol the 66
to Richmond,
freshmen ot
res.
"1 had a lady to week
was tired ol hearing
we are he said,
s, thoi at we really
25 pun d vperienc-
blems ; ecentls n .
following three consecutive defeat
I mory has declared to tl e team and
everyone interested that a "new
season" will begin Saturday at 1:30
p.m. when the Pirates take the field
against the Spidei s.
"I've told th we're puttini
w hat's happened so fa
like i! was an exhibition season
1 moi pi Os laimed "It's a wl
new season now
1 he first yeai men
sa that ,i win Satut da a as
h
-aid. "It's a season
must gel back on
got to beat His hn
11 the I'm
sell w
t. We'
Will ot Play
11101 'v
�Its.
ami praetu '
"Ik
� am met I
1 m
ing i he reas
first and an ath
IfS
dow n by Hi
i
i H
.
casons the Pirates are
I mot y explained, w I
nioi class was
( I starting defensive tackles Doug Smith iV2i and
ieorgerump (91) w ill miss Saturday 's game.rump
-hip. 1 moi a
" 1 he expei it
usually I- pro
o r s i s n o l
is nut with an injury w Ink
t rum I he squad
smith has hi i u suspi
11 C
! "
-
fifth yeai
� � id they can 1
� eai - agi I ai Ith
In Richmond the P
2( �' players club tha
. � new
S
.
Minges Takes
On New Look
Karr Appoints
Five Assistants
w t

BvII KI I s( 11 MI I K
geet
. beginning my
ectives have been
improving the
itmosphere in Minges
Second yeai E I head basketball
h Dave Odom has nevet made a
secret ol the fact that he wants to
chan ings in the Pirates' home
Minges Coliseum. Some major
step- towards what he wants have
been taken, much to the pleasure oi
the former Wake lores! assistant.
I he C oliseum is currently h
renovated tor the upcoming sea
rhe main change is occurring
low : he not th side sea
i Ail bleacher seals in this dd
have been removed and placed in
each end zone. Smaller bleachers
that were in the end ones have been
Jo' with.
rhe now empty lower north area
will be filled with modern individual
collapsible seats later this month.
rhese fiberglass seals, which will
hav ba ks, will be reserved tor
Pira l lub members.
I � 5 moement of all club
e -ais! "My
is n i
men
entire lower sow
two end ones i
s change in
()dom excited.
"I've alwa
create atmosphere
experience has bt
cout t ad antage t -
because ol stud
e fell thai
r angement did not
tward at end
1 he new st
diffi �� , thoi
"1 he new a
ly gi v e
ty foi ma
he claimed, "li
ever. Getting the studei
lower level at cou �
percent ol the c oliseum
ly help the cam 1 no
students w HI take adantgag�
opportunity to help lib
In the past, students had
allotted a portion ol
sharing it with the P
reserved seal
Reserved, -eats will now be
lub north side, eithet lowet oi uppci

Pictured above is an empty lower section of the north side
ot Minges Coliseum, where bleachers have been removed
and will be replaced with chairs. (Photo h Jon Jordon)
n i
Pirate C lub i
hat he had worked
haru ges and wow . This w
the mity fi
pan men in impn en t
'II was all made possible seined
ol meetin the
n he said i ash
: hem w as sensitiv i isket �
s needs fhis shows i
univi . . -nation as a w hole
is in favoi ol in pi ihe ba-
tes v
hill
pi oci am
C ai.
mi added that
would benefit both
tin
nanj
ts and
( idom's P
the .
remodeled C olise im. I ht
1 ady Pirate opt
, . 2 against irginia I e
men's leant will p
with Marathoi
inch
1 Ol

"1 i

i
Goalie Brown Still Seeking Potential
it
r
I
-�.
Steve The
ECU goalie Steve Brown displays ihe form
that has brought him three shutouts this
BvII VRl KSCH M)I IK
ollow ing hi - team's 11
thrashing at the hands ol North
C arolina in the Mayoi 's c up I out
nament las! month, 1I
coach Hi ad Smith knew some
changes had to be made I he
following game he made one
has paid ol t royally.
In the club's nest i he in-
serted Sieve Hi own into the club's
starting lineup as goalie Br
turned in a mastei ful perfoi
despite his team's 3 0 loss to N (
State in the tourney's consolation
match.
�Ml the New York native did was
set a school record with 34 saves in
the contest 1 hat was the fii
several records to come his way
Following the tournament,
Brown picked up three shutouts in
the next six games to tie the club
record for shutouts m a season by
both an individual and a team.
During that span, the club bounc
ed back from an 0-5 si an and posted
a 3-2-1 record. I CU head coach
Brad Smi th gives Brown mucl ol
the credit tor the turnaround.
"Steve has been super Smith
.
Sut 1 -
:
I I
I
� - cai
1
!
Stopper
season. His goals against average is a mere said. "He's given us all we could ask
1 55 per game. (Photo b Jon Jordan) foi in a goalie. I look tor big things
��� �
.
l �
nee will
season. Brow

"I
Suffolk he sa
lying I
and
way to 11
B ow n c red ts fellow Bi ian
w'ii ell, wl the
ting po ason
lost out, foi mn
"A B
was playing super Brown said
"I've come a long way because ol
him. 1 had to il I wanted to play. By
him playing so well I've progressed
Brow
I
linisl
ng the
'81. "1 feel this I
ball next
nfidently "1 see no
ble
.
"I'd defilnitely like foi u-
some c c schools i �
said. " e can do h to P
I'd liklc to get mv goals aga
average dow n to one "

1





u
I Hi I M R()1 ISI-W
1 BI K 9. 19Mi
7 fa
1
Spiders Display 'Split Front9
Richmond Coach Dal Sheah
B JIMMY DaPREE
at. NpnrN I dlltir
It's been a long time
since the Pirates of 1 ast
Carolina crushed the
Rich m ond Spiders
52-10 a year ago in
Ficklen Stadium, and
both programs have
undergone a great deal
of change since then.
After finishing the
19"1 campaign with a
dismal 1-11 mark,
Richmond coach Jim
1 ait followed the route
of coaches who fail to
produce a winning pro-
g r a m a n d t o r m e r
Auburn assistant Dal
Shealy was named to
fill the acancy.
Despite the tragedy
ol the Spiders' record,
Shealy found a group
of veteran football
players ready to learn
and readv to win.
Learning was exactly
what Shealy had in
mind.
"They do something
I've neer had to coach
against says ECU
head coach Ed Emory.
"I've coached it
before, but never
against it. They run a
split-line offense.
"There might be a
three to four or five
yard split between the
center and the gaurds
on any one particular
plav.
"If the ball is in the
middle of the field,
the) might line up from
hash-mark to hash-
mark Emory adds.
This unconventional
approach could pose as
many problems for the
Spiders as their op-
ponents, but the proof
is in the record books.
The Spiders opened the
season with wins over
Bowling Green and
Villanova before drop-
ping to 2-3 with road
losses to Wyoming,
West Virginia, and
most recently, Auburn.
Films of the Bowling
Green contest show
that even early in the
season, the Spiders us-
ed the split-front with
impressive results. I lie
confused Falcon
defense repeatedly got
caught off guard, with
junior quarterback
Steve Krainock dump-
ing passes which led to
the 20-17 Richmond
victory.
Krainock, a transfer
from Palomar Junior
College, has connected
on 70 out of 122 pass
attempts in 1980, good
for 895 yards and live
touchdowns. Opponent
pressure has resulted in
seven interceptions, but
his 57.4 percent ac-
curacy rating ovei
shadows that statistic.
"Steve Krainock is
probabl) the most im-
portant factoi ot then
offense praises
Emorv. "He gave them
instant success.
"They have real
good backs; big
backs
1 eading 'hat
back field is senioi Reg
gie Evans, who has
Rugby Club
Hosts Tourney
MUSIC HALL
THURSDAY:
MAGNUM
STUDENT SPECIAL
Bring coupon for reduced admission
B JIMMN DuPREE
Nt S(Mf . illH'T
SCRUM
No, sports tans, this
is not a new form of
profanity introduced
recently . I he term is a
rather common one,
especially in the areas
ol Great Britain where
the game ol rugby
began
1 as: c arolina's own
Rugby Club hosts the
tte rugbv tournament
this weekend at fields
located behind Allied
Health and between
I icklen Stadium and
Hunting I rack. Accor-
ding to spokesman
Man Poindextei. this is
the attempt to br-
ing the members o' the
Noiih (. arolina Rugbv
(. fnion together in com
petition.
�" 1 his is the first time
anybody has ever tried
to get all the teams in
the state together he
aid. ' e're realh ex-
"There will be 19
team- divided into two
�is; collegiate
I city
I asiarolina is seed-
n the tourney,
with the I niversity of
North Carolina at
I hapel Hill ranked first
out ot the eight col-
entries. Also in-
ided in the division
are ppalacham Slate,
Belmont Abbev. UNC-
boro, North
State, Duke
W ake Forest.
( ompetition begins
Saturday at 9 a.m. con-
tinuing until 4 p.m
on concluding
S mda from 11 a.m.
1 ast c arolina's most
recent competition was
a K 8 loss at the hands
oi Old Dominion
University last Satur-
day . but Poindexter re-
mams confident o' the
ECU Club's chances in
the tournament.
"It we do well this
weekend he says,
"we could change all
that. We could really
turn things around. We
have a good team with
some real potential
ECU is led by
player coaches Mike
farmer and Mike
Davis, as well as Keith
Dixon at fly-half, Scot;
fayloi at wing and
Mike Alberts at scrum-
half (Poindextei
describes this position
as similar to football's
quarterback).
Another name which
may be a little more
familiar to followers ol
1 asl Carolina athletics
is that ol foi met Pirate
football star Gerald
Hall, who has recently
taken up the sport.
"Gerald came out
tor the team late but
has really picked up the
game fast Poindextei
said. "He still needs to
learn the plays apd
some of the basics, but
he is extremely fasi and
that is very important
in rugby.
"It (rugby) is
something different,
something interesting
for fans to watch. It's
very m u c h 1 i k e
American football, on-
ly without pads.
"We usually have
several people get hurl
during each game he
added.
Aggressive perfor-
mance by ECl senior
Omar Rafey drew
praise from Poindex-
ter, who added. "He's
probably one of the
most aggressive players
I've ever seen in the
-port. He's always in
the middle of the ac-
tion
ECU will face Bel-
mont Abbev in the
opening round ol the
tournament Saturday.
to
204 E. 5th St.
Across From
Newby's Sub Shop
Open Til 9:30 Nightly
THIS WEEK'S SALE ALBUMS
ALL CURRENT RERLEASES
Us MS Lint for 5.99
Al 1 MAN BROTHERS
I'M BENETARttsi & 2ad L)
iQt EEN
TEDDY PEFHHERGRASS
I DIANA ROSS
MOLLY HATCHKI
rolling STONES
Bit.I Y JOEL
doobie brothers
KANSAS
Al STEWAR1
JACKSON'S
$7.98 List fur 4,99
CHOICE
8525
DLVO
ELVIS COSTELLO
VAN MORRISON
CHRISTOPHER CROSS
117.98 L��t for 11.99
NO NUKLS
50 OFF ON PARAPH AN ALIA
WE BUY USED ALBUMS
COMING SOON:
NEW BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN
FRISAT.
HAVE-A-HAPPY
AT 4:00pm
AQUILLA
A SOUND AND VISUAL EXPERIENCE
ONE OF THE BEST LIGHT SHOWS IN THE SOUTHEAST
amassed 264 yards on
61 carries. Sophomore
Steve C atiett follows
with 152 yards on 35
carries for an identical
4.1 yards per carry
average.
Defensively, corner
backs Reuben Turner
(senior) and Ken Still
(minor) lead the squad
with 51 tackles.
1 he onlv major m-
iuiv of the season lor
the Spiders was to all-
stai candidate Steve
Braun al defensive
linebacker. Braun suf-
fered a knee injury in
spring practice which
required surgery in
March and will work
on rehabilitation dur-
ing the 19H0 season.
" I he are not the
Richmond ot old
morv c one 1 ude .
BOND'S SPORTING GOODS H.L. HODGES CO.
218 ARLINGTON BLVD. 210 E. 5th.
GREENVILLE,N.C. GREENVILLE,N.C.
ATTENTION GREEKS
NOW AVAILABLE AT BONDS & H.L. HOIXiES
SPORTING GOODS
HOODED PULLOVER COATS
ZIP-UP COATS
FOOTBALL JERSEYS 4 SLEEVE
FOOTBALL JERSEYS all colors
' i SLEEVES WITH LETTERING 10.95
PLAIN 8.95
HOODED PULL OVERS
WITH LETTERING
PLAIN
NAV OXFORD.
GOLD WWTS KELLY
11.95
9.95
HOODED ZIP-UP
OXHiKD NAV
WITH LETTERING 12 95
PLALN 1 1.95
CALL 756-6001 FOR COLORS & AVAILABILITY
BONDS SPORTING GOODS
GOLD & SILVER
PRICES ARE UP!
If you need money for fell clothes or football tlckete, row li a
good time to tell your gold and allver valuables. And here's a
good way to get EXTRA CASH!
SELL YOUR
CLASS RINGS
TO COIN & RING MAN!
$
Almost everyone has a high school or college class ring
they don't wear anymore. Check your dresser drawers
and bring your class ring Into Coin & Ring Man. We're
your professional buying service and we guarantee you
fair prices and good service.
Wl PAY CAIN ON.TM.SPOT
FOR JtWILRY, VAIUAIUSANYTHINC
MARHID10R - UK - UK-
S GOLD S
� IINCS � ilCKUCiS � WATCH! � DIAMONDS
� CLASS IINCS � WIDDINC SANDS � DtNTAl
C01D - IIACIUTS � ItOOCNIS � 10CMTS
� CHAINS � UtMTUS � CUM LINKS � IA1IINCS
r-lD
r
PAYING ON TMI SPOT
CAIN FOR ITIMS MAIXIO
STERLING SILVER
tICABDIIIS Of CONDITION
� COFFEE SERVICES GOBLETS
� RINGS ' SPOONS � TRAYS � KNIVES
� FORKS�NECKLACES�BRACELETS
� FRANKLIN AND HAMILTON MINT
MERCHANDISE .
$
I & RING ft
of K6V SAIES CO ,J
401 S. EVANS ST. ore-� '
IHABMONY (VOUSE SOUTH) PHONE 752-3866
pVOW PHOriSSIOMAl PERMAMINT OlAUR
f
' 1





MJ
I HI I S1 kil !M W
( H I OH! K 9, IM
r
7Yie Fearless Football Forecast
ECU AT RICHMOND
APPA1 AC MIAN ST I N.C. STAT1
WYOMING Al BR1GHAM YOl NG
c I I MSON M VIRGINIA
DUKE I Sol R()1 INA
I'll rSBURGH AI 11 ORIDA SI ll
1 EXAS &M I HOUSTON
V NN STATE M MARM ND
MIAMI, 1 -V I NO! Rl DAMI
I c M WAR I FORES!
OKI HO1 M U XAS
si NFORD A I U( 1 A
CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
(42-18)
ECU 21-20
N.C. State
Wyoming
Clemson
South Carolina
Florida State
1 exas A&M
Perm State
Miami
INC
Oklahoma
UC1 A
TERRY HERNDON
Advertising Manager
(40-20)
ECU 17-12
N.C . State
Brigham Young
Clemson
South c arolina
Florida State
I exas AM
Penn State
Notre Dame
INC
I exas
K I A
JIMM1 DuPREE
Asst. Sports Editor
(39-21)
Kl 24-17
N.C . State
Brigham Young
( lemson
South Carolina
Florida State
Houston
Penn State
Notre Dame
I NC
I exas
UCLA
KEN SMITH
ECU SID
(38-22)
E( I 24 21
N.C . State
Brigham Young
C lemson
South c arolina
1 lorida State
Houston
Penn State
Notre Dame
I NC
Oklahoma
UCLA
(,l LSI PH KLK:
DAVEODOM
ECU Basketballoach
ECI 2h 14
N c State
Brigham Young
irginia
Southarolina
Florida State
Texas &M
Penn State
Notre Dame
Wake I �
I exas
UCLA
Pirate Booters Face ODU
In Harborfront Classic
1 he 1 asi c arolina
soccei team squares olt
against nationally
ranked Old Dominion
in the opening round ol
the Harborfront
Classic Friday ii Nor-
folk,
rin's and North
c arolina pla in the 6
p.m. openet in Norfolk
he!ore the Pirates and
Monarchs face of! in
the 8 p.m. nightcap.
Con on play
gins al 6 p.m. Satui
with the title game
m.
weren't that good in a we're playing a lot bet-
hurr Since then, tei
we've improved and Ihe Pirates host
Christopher New pott
on I uesday (Oct. 14) at
4 p.m.
Classifieds
PERSONAL
CUSTOV CRAFTING �nd repaM
:d arid Silwei Bunnq and
� qold and silver h .
. E Sth St 7Sh
SUNSHINE STUDIOS offering
Ballet j.w; Voa .1
f Spi 1 a iu�J rti ai
, �� wait . ' '
HE LI WANTED
.i p Hi �'�'
B. �� . 1 � d kilts T vp'iig
� . wledqi Accounting
. - -
BS Sumn
� -
ft i I F �
S1TTF R NEEOI
old '
week : ��
- 1 - - �� I
8 00 00
Alumm n 1 �
pensivi
TYI'iN
GUITARS Kay Bais cast goid
1 ' n S81 01 best otter Conn
'niiq rnod�l H 20 Jum
t body 460 or bf�.� ottor C.lH
�1 t 00 p m ;S2 �050
. �
!835
r d a v
. nt St
'htnij
FOR SALE
FOR
A.t"
Stev H sets his
sites on a n o t het
shutout this week. He
equ the Pirate
season sh il
b an individual and
h his third
ss pei
' 1 he yeai lasi week, a
blanking ol Pern
ke State. He I
PERFECT CHRISTMAS GIFTS
I I � ' 1.11' i
� � o. tipii pi Is
John A
HE
flex able to
S ft S Cat
beet th mar
Iress ' idboard
d k hi alei

FOR SAi I
t.ibli R. d and Whit-
neg Cal
FOR SALE wrist
wa'cn ed, retail St;
taki M0 Craiq �'�"��'�' 8 � 1 ac�
4781
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE NEEDED IM
vi diately Threi bedroom
v � a Di 1 .� SUS
ittl plus utilities Call
00 p m 01 7S6 1SS8
���� S I p r'l
FOR rent Completely lurnish
1 nc, apartment utilitil
! d Ni .11 Campus 7S8 ?S8S
1 1 �� I ROOMMATE NEED
duple) Fui
� sui 1 oundings Big
. - i hall itilitu
FOR YOUR CON.EN'fNCi
iSIFIEDADSCANBE PUR
'ED AT THREE IOCA
Organuation Booth
M � 'H 00 4 00
90 10 00
S'udtnt Supply Store I bbv MWF
0 TTH 11 00 12 00
� Carolinian Olftt. TTH
f . 00 3 00
I Classified Ad Form
� A e t mails caught �
th what was giv
� PRICE -
, . �! ' .� Ai.r d
trouble s a
lh getting
shot on goal saic
I
I Make checks payable lo Trn Eas
Carolinian
m Abbreviations count as one word
I . do phone numbers and
� h�ph, nations
"Ai first, we were a
little too smug We
found out that we �
ilL TO
The Ea Carolinian
� 1 Ads
111 Building
. N C :783
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I


il�L
ra
the NAME
DROPPER inc
FAMOUS LABELS FOR LESS
Homecoming
Special
bring in this ad and get
$10 off
any 2 piece outfit
Suit. Pants & Top. Skirt & Top
OFFER GOOD THROUGH SAT. Oct. 11
CLASS DOESN'T COST
AT THE
Name
Dropper
Greenville Square
Layaway
Turner's Sleep Center
628 S. Pitt Street
Greenville, N.C.
758-7332
4 Drawer Chest - 59.95 up
Bedding all sizes - 99.95 up
2 pc. Sofa Chair - 259.95 up
Dining Room Suites start at 69.95
Love Seats Only - 79.95
Headboards- 11.95 up
Frames - 16.95 up
N.C.
LOOK AT THE THESE
SAVINGS
CLEAR-VUE OPTICIANS
SPECIALS
5495 BIFOCAL
4695 SINGLE VISION'
� WIDE CHOICE OF FRAMES -ANY TINT
�Gl A no Dl atio i FNE
CLEAR-VUE OPTICIANS
10�o Student Discount on Glasses
Excludinq Specials
GREENVILLE
pnys.i.irii Quadrangle Ouiiomq A i;us W 4�n S!
Adiac.T.t to East Car olma E �� Ci"i,r
�AMTtl5:30PMMon Tu" Thur. Fi
1st ANNUAL
RUGBY
CHAMPIONSHIPS
OCTOBER 11-12
COME SUPPORT ECU RUGBY
BEHIND ALLIED HEALTH BUILDING

Oct. 1 1 9am-4pm
Oct. 12 1 lam-4pm
CHAMPIONSHIP
MATCHES ON
SUNDAY
2:00-4:00pm
TEAMS INCLUDE
WAKE FOREST
NC STATE
UNC
DUKE
ECU
����

E.C.U. and C.M.C. Productions Present
Homecoming Concert 1980
NANTUCKET
Live in Concert
MONDAY Oct. 13th
Doors Open at 7:00 P.M. Show Starts at 8:00 P.M.
Plus Special Guest
OnA&M Records
DOC HOLIDAY
� Plus �
THE DALTON BOYS
With Former Members of the Outlaws
Tickets $5.00 Advance, $6.00 at the Door
Available at Student Box Otfice and Apple Records and The Music Shop
?





Title
The East Carolinian, October 9, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 09, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.83
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy