The East Carolinian, September 25, 1980






�he iEast dartwman
��l. 55 No. 10
10 Pages
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
1 hursda , September 25. 180
Greenville. North Carolina
Circulation lO.tMMl
Officials In vestigating
Liability For Vandalism
Bv Mlkf NOON N
esidents of Jones Do1
o suffered damages to
ersonal property are deman-
�ensation. However. the
to ��� ail until Innersitx of-
w ho is leeallv liable toi
the dvim's
ast
Jed Saturday night
als clogged drains in the
's third floor bathroom.
ns, the I niversity
Al legal opinion is
I niversity is not legally
� against damages
icts ' vandalism.
the extent to
max be held in
. laniagc caused by
1 here is a respon
an ol the culprit
who committed the vandalism to
reimburse those students whose pro
h was damaged as a result ol
vandalism
It Univei si t property was
damaged in the ood. the university
would covet the cost ol replacing
the damaged materials, according to
Cliff Moore, ice c hancelloi for
Business ffairs
'� 1 he I niversity is self insured
Any thing that is damaged we
replace ourselves out of I niversiu
money. 1 he dorms built with bor
rowed money are covered for tire
but do not have flood insurance
he said
Moore added that, " those
students seeking compensation
should try to recover under their
parent's homeowners insurance.
Dan W ooten, Directoi of Hous-
ing, said students should be en-
couraged to insure then valuables
not covered under then parent's
homeowners insurance to help
guard against such a loss.
Detective C aptain Wiggins ol the
fCl Campus police said. "It the
person responsible is caught and
convicted, the judge could include
in the sentence that every individua
who received damages and tiles a
claim may be reimbursed in this
wa
"These would be treated as
sepaiate claims, separate cases, have
separate court costs, and would be
tried in Greenville District Court
he added.
In the meantime. Dr. Elmer
Meyer, vice chancellor for student
life, undei which all on-campus
housing tails, said that he is working
in conjunction with the directoi ol
housing and the University attorney
decide how and when � or if -
the -indents max be compensated.
Look, Ma - No Hands
ECU student Richard Rune practices some of his fancier defend his title again this year. I he sport seems to run in
boomerang catches on the College Hill IM Held. Rune the familv: Rune's uncle is an expert on the subject, and
was the 197 National Boomerang Champion and will wrote a book on it: "Main Happy Returns .
Campaign Headquarters Prepare For Race
U 1()M H l I
t C I
. Sepi
iville
1 van Sti eet. 1 t.
uest
ed a grou of
� Ri iga head-
it 526 S ' nche Si. ol
iallx opened Sept. 13. Dr. John
Republican cat
S s
!
. K Howard,
v
n, "a
the sup-
tered Republicans are
I
me can � t Pitt 'iinty
I
d R the t ountx
How aid ,aid.
ilson, manager of
i I headquarters,
al 1I .tudents have
irk. rhro
� . a � -me. the woi kers
reach 30,000 registered
Kv Sept. 30.
1 )emoci ats' ribbon-cutting
ceremony, Green said all the
Democratic candidates are in favoi
"running in unity President
limmxartei will carry the North
( arolina vote because he support"
tobacco farmers, according to
en.
'When Jimmv Carter spoke to
12,000 people in Wilson three years
ago, he promised a tobacco support
program as long as he is president
Green said, calling it "the m
portant thing in Pillountx. the
heait of tobacco land
"We've got a good ticket he dd-
ded. and urged the crowd to support
the Democratic candidates "not on
witl y �� ' lips but with youi
President ai tei doesn'i
know i! all, and we don'i know it
all. W � : m Raleigh
vou will talk to us. I think that's
. ii. 1 ef not lei oilier
forces destroy what we have
fhe "othei forces the
Republicans, heard last concern
himsell mainly with the I S
senatorial race.
'�()ui greatest task is to cut into
the vote in eastern North C arolina
asi s.ud. " I h;s election will be won
oi lost tight here
He accused the State Board of
Electioi
senatorial race" bv placing his and
Robert W. Morgan's names at
the bottom ol ei ballots, last
this would make 1
explained that
votet s overlook I he i at
"1 am upset when the referees in
the game are prejudiced 1 ast
told his supporters. "The
ought to be fair He said thai it
his party were in charge ol elec
tions and printed the ballots the
same way, local press would
"roast us alive
Unlike Green, 1 as; said too
man) people are tied up in party
loyalty. 1 he Republicans' cam
paign theme is "Country Before
Party
Boi h campaij n heauquai i art
staffed bv volonteers and stock
campaign literature for their
respective candidates
ee Walton, who heads the
"eei out-the vote" program foi
the local Democrats, said most
fI students at the headquarters
kolonteering as individuals and
not through the c ollege Young
Democrats.
The club is not officially because
it is inizing and is "Not really
inked up etW alton said.
He added thai rent for the cam
paign center, as well as other
financial help, comes from the Pit!
v ounty Democratic Party. in-
nate
citizens and fund raisers.
see BOTH, Page 3, Col. 1
Democratic Parly Headquarters
'OD
Republican Partx Campaign C enter
pru-i bv TERRY GRAY
Students Select Outstanding Teachers
Chancellors
Backed By
UNC Head
c HAPI 1 Hll 1 il PI) I niversi-
t of Northarolina President
W illiam C . Friday Vx
denied a claim bv a federal official
that Friday had been .
ficials in charge ol l N s live
predominatly-black campuses
�� he Board ol Governor's po
lion and m position since 1972
been to support the chancellors ol
the five traditionally black institu-
tions and the campuses they head.
to defend their integrity and to worl
in cooperation with the institutions
tor liven improvements Friday
said m a prepared statement. "Any
suggestions that we have engaged in
abusive criticism ol any of these in-
stitutions or of their chancellors is
untrue
David S. latel. formei director of
the Office foi Civil Rights in the
Department ol Health. Education
and Welfare, said earlier this week
Friday once told him the majoi
obstacle to improving the black
schools was the "weaknesss" ol
then top campus administrators,
latel is testifying in an ad
ministrative hearing on the
desegregation dispute between the
federal government and the univer-
sity.
Tatel was chief negotiator tor the
federal government in an attempt to
settle the dispute out ol court.
fridav also rejected a suggestion
b Tatel that the university did not
act in good faith in those negotia-
B PAl LCOLLINS
Stall v ritn
I wo professors have been named
winners o the I ast Carolina
I niversity Alumni Association
landing 1 cachet Awards foi
� I.
larv fowler, associate professoi
of education, and Edward
Markowski, associate professor ol
home economics, were voted bv
II students as the most outstan-
ding teachers among the faculty.
fifteen hundred students voted
last spring during preregistration.
with each student eligible to vote foi
up ti three teachers.
" I he students were able to assign
a ranking of ten. eight or six to each
teacher chosen, and this intensity
rating was used in determining the
winners explained lorn Sayetta,
chairman ol the faculty committee
that made the final selections.
Sayetta explained that this was all
part of a mathematical formula us-
ed in determining a teacher's rating.
Other factors used were the number
ol students taught and the average-
grade given bv a teacher.
"Each teacher was given an ad-
justed vote number Sayetta con-
fined. The committee then selected
the winners, also applying several
other criteria to ensure that no
teacher was given an unfair advan-
tage.
Both winners expressed great sur-
prise at receiving tire award.
"Surprise was mv mam reac-
tion Dr. Fowler said. "1 was flab-
bergasted
"1 was stunned Dr. Markowski
said. "It's the highest honor a facul-
ty member can receive
Markowski, who teaches family
relations, said the award was so
satisfying because it was voted by
the students. "You can't aspire to
an award like this Markowski
said. "It really makes vou feel like
your efforts are appreciated bv the
students
Expressing her teaching
philosophy. Dr. fowler explained,
"I'm not very authoritarian, but at
the same time 1 expect a great deal
from the students
Ron Hughes, a senior currently
enrolled in one of Dr. fowler's
classes, teels that she is an outstan-
ding teacher beacuse she makes her
classes interesting and informal.
��She makes a class interesting
Hughes saidand that's something
tew teachers can do
With their award, both fowler
and Markowski received plaques
and $500 checks.
tions.
�'The university always
negotiated with the government in
good faith Friday said. "Any
representation to the contrary is un-
true
Tatel testified negotiations broke
down last year because federal of
ficials did not trust the university.
Mrs. Leo Jenkins Dies
Federal Guidelines Tighten
Researcher Protests DNA Restrictions
SAN DIEGO, (A (CPS) � In the
first test oi federal guidelines gover-
ning highly-controversial university
DNA experiments, a University of
C alifornia-San Diego biologist has
resigned his academic position.
Ian Kennedy allegedly cloned a
virus that was banned by federal en-
On The Inside
Editorials4
Earl The Pearl5
Letters4
Metal And Jewelry5
ECU Hosts USM8
Ficklen Flashback8
Football Forecast9
vironmental guidelines. Kennedy
quit last week, some nine months
alter supposedly cloning something
called the "semiliki forest virus
He cited "irreconcilable dif-
ferences" with university officials
who were investigating the charges
against him. He denied any wrong-
doing, saying his leaving was
necessary "in light of certain things
1 want to do in science
DNA experiments themselves
have long been the object of furor.
Opponents worry that the risks of
creating hazardous new life forms
are high, and that the moral am-
biguities of creating and perhaps
selling life forms are legally impossi-
ble.
Scientists, while disagreeing
about the safety o the research,
have ceded to federal guidelines for
recombinant DNA experiments as a
means o quieting objections to the
experiments.
The federal government,
moreover, funds most of the DNA
research.
The government's National In-
stitutes of Health (N1H) guidelines
forbade the cloning of semliki forest
virus until questions about its safety
could be answered.
Last January, however, four
UCSD graduate students reported
that Kennedy was cloning the bann-
ed virus. The university's Biosafety
Committee ordered the cloning
stopped,
material.
and confiscated the
The committee has since
hypothesised that "either Dr. Ken-
nedy had known the source and
identity of the material used to clone
DNA copies of the semliki forest
virus, or Dr. Kennedy, due to poor
record keeping or lapse of memory,
cloned the virus by mistake
In its report, released in early
September, the committee ordered
Kennedy not to perform any more
cloning "until the situation is
resolved
See CLONING, page 3, col.l
Mrs. Lillian Olga
lacobsen Jenkins, 64,
died Tuesday in Pitt
County Memorial
Hospital.
Mrs. Jenkins, wife of
ECU Chancellor
1 merit us Dr. Leo W .
Jenkins, was born in
1 av alette, N.J. to a
Norwegian immigrant
family. She received a
B.S. degree in elemen-
tary education from
Trenton State Teachers
College and taught in
the New Jersey schools
for nine years.
Thirty-one o her
married years were
spent in Greenville.
Since 1978, when Dr.
Jenkins retired, they
had lived at Pine Knoll
Shores
Beach.
Mrs.
member
United
Church
founder
near Atlantic
lenkins was a
o St. James
Methodist
and was a
o the Aries
and Seira book clubs
here, a founder o the
Brookgreen Garden
Club, a Cub and
Brownie Scout leader, a
member of Chi Omega
fl .H
H Er � wm
WKt mjrim
'sSlAcw
WBPr jlHR .TrCr
BT - LmIe
1 . O.�
m m.
��. m.� r
Mrs. Lillian Jenkins
sorority and a
volunteer helper at a
Cireen vi lie nursing
home. During her hus-
band's tenure as presi-
dent and chancellor ol
East Carolina Universi-
ty, she acted as hostess
for dinners and recep
tions attended bv 5.uX)
guests annually at the
chancellor's home.
Memorial services
will be conducted
Thursday at 11 a.m. in
St. James United
Methodist Church.
A Lillian J. Jenkins
Scholarship Fund was
established by the East
Carolina Univesity
Foundation in 1975.
Those desiring to make
memorial contributions
may consider this fund?
t
1
K





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TO ITEM
POLICY
� '��duv
�� do
:� o �
j� ex a
fur �? !h�
1�B
I!

0
SUGG
Both Parties Open Doors
I HI i Sf knw
-I I'l I MM k 25, 1980
ontinued from page 1
ftei telephone
canvassing to the
registered Democrats in
l" C ounty, the cam-
paign workers will
begin theii mail out
campaign to voters
with no part) affilia
tion, according to
Walton. He said the
volunteers are now call
some independent
Neithei part) iv eon
ducting dooi to dooi
canvassing in Green
ville oi put (. ounty,
but the Ul c ollege
Republican Club plans
to knoc k on e ei doi
mitor) room dooi on
campus
Elizabeth Pegg, col-
lege campaign coor-
dinator, said the club
a I so canvasses b)
tele p h on will
distribute bum per
stickers and displa)
signs at home football
games, .and mI1 have a
floai tot cacti candidate
in the Oct. IS
homecoming parade.
Miss Pegg, an 1I stu-
dent from V inston-
Salem, became in-
terested in politics at an
earl) age. Her mothei
is a member ot the state
House of Represen-
tatives.
lis. 1 loward has the
onl) paid position at
the Americans tor
Reagan headquarters.
She explained that the
campaign center is not
officially the
Republican Part) or
Reagan toi President
headquarters. Accor
ding to Mrs. Howard,
there is no official
Republican Partv head
quarters in Greenville
because of insufficient
funds or support.
' A mer icans t o r
Reagan is an indepen-
dcut, conservath e
citizens' committee
she said, They do not
report to the federal
government as the
Republican Party must
do, she added.
"1 am impressed
more than anything
with the young peo
pie she said. "There
are more students in-
volved this yeai than in
the past eight years.
am amazed at the
nurn bei of l
students who came
down to the head
quarters attet waiting
foi hours in line to
register tor classes.
I he) studied the mi
port ant issues in
depth "
I he ca m paig n
workers want to remind
the public that Oct. 6 is
the last dav foi otet
registration.
Witness Claims Klan Fired First
t'REENSBORO, on the third of s Koenig discussed those men could be but it was fired b) a
77 (llh rhefirsl Novembe. 1979, the each shot, a red mark identified as Wood. , u
witness in the mernt the Klan was placed on the map Fowler Smith and communist. He sa,(jitne
mx Klansmen were attacked bv the to indicate where the Matthews U, ol tne mc,den
Nais accused in communists and. that shot came from. When s s " IOv,k a
the he had finished there Koenig said the fust (Clansman 12 seconds
cash were clusters ol red sho1 apparently came after the first shot to
torn the front ot a grab a pistol out of one
c o m m u
cstified V
; � ndani
were marks m areas where
�ponding
communists had been caravan of ears and ol the cars in the
driven
l came h
Ahich K
Na s Wei
1 HI
Wall said. standing. v ans
are Koenig also describ- Klansmen and Nazis
ol ed tout men who he W all.
bv caravan.

K1NSTON-LENOIR CO.STUDENTS
Pai
W all said the second
in his shot came 22 seconds
N ' aw'enc� said were tiring arguments to the jury, attet the first shot and
L,enc p,rgpn , weapons. From maintained the first came from an area
BlairPndrm I descriptions bv pro- shot was tired at the where communists were
l' on; David seeution witnesses. front 0t the caravan standing
Waym Mat! hew s ot
N � a id lack
I and
Roland Wayne VY
ol V : Salem.
Wa said FBI
' Is w ho
ew tapes ot
��s the tht i found 39
Nazis o He
� I 1 ol those
bv
wert K Mis opi-
on on w he e each
� � ' tired
Klan'
was

in great record
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Leaving Kinston at 8:00 a.m S1 50 one w,v
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SEPT. 30
&
OCT. 1
Sidewalk in Front of Lobby
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
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Cloning Virus Ends
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Dr.
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Qty �at (Earolfnfan
Serving the campus community since 1925.
Ru H klKikl i n
It KKV Hi KMHV i
Chris In hok, �
GlORi.l Hi 1 IK M.
ll I V. sll H,
Septembci 25, I1�m
1 1 RKV CiR XV . . tti
I ISA Dkl W . i
Chari 1 S CHAND1 1 K. -
1) ID NoRRIS. I
Opinion
Page 4
WZMB
Student, Faculty Support Needed
No, WZMB is no! deadyet. A
two-part series recapping past
events and exposing new
developments will appear in next
week's issues o1 The last Caroli-
nian which should shed new light on
the controversial radio station, its
former and present general
managers, and the station's format.
If you have read about the
ZMB petition, or have signed it, it
is important that you know exactl)
what it says: "We, the undersigned,
herebv petition the last Carolina
Media Board, the ECU Board of
Trustees, and Chancellor Thomas
Brewer in behalf oi John Jeter-
founder and designer of ECU'S
MB radio station. We fully up-
port John Jeter's efforts to get
WZMB airborn, and reject the
Media Board's forcing him to
resign. We further petition that
WZMB's present manager, Cilenda
Sue Killingsworth, resign for the
good of the student body and
WZMB. Finally, that John Jeter be
reinstated to oversee placing the sta-
tion on the air as was originally
agreed upon by the Media Board;
and that a search be made for a
qualified ECU student with a
broadcasting license to take over
managing the station once it is air-
born
Many faculty members and ad-
ministrators have voiced their opi-
nions, both for and against, the
petition, but few have made their
opinions known either by signing
the petition or by writing to this
newspaper. It's hard to blame them;
their jobs could be on the line. But
thev do care.
And students care too. According
to Van Brown, a concerned friend
o John Jeter and WZMB who is in
charge o the petition, about one-
third of the student body has sign-
ed. Brown adds that there are many
people who still don't know what's
going on.
There are some who claim that
the seemingly unending controversy
will be detrimental to the station,
but the opposite is true. If the sta-
tion ever gets on the air intact, it will
be a minor miracle. If student in-
terest in the station falls o' even a
miracle won't help.
If you aren't sure what has hap-
pened at WZMB since its concep-
tion, come by the office o The East
Carolinian. We'll be glad to show
you back issues and clippings that
will bring you up to date. Then it
you want to help, sign the petition.
Even if the petition doesn't ac-
complish exactly what it states, your
support in writing might be the best
thing you can do to assure the ECU
campus of having the best rock-and-
roll FM station around.
'Floater' For Students
After the recent damage to
students' personal belongings in
Jones Dorm Saturday, there aie
many people who want to know it
then possessions are protected by
insurance. An extension of your
parents' homeowner policy ,
ironically referred to as a "floater
policy just might be the answer to
your questions.
The only hope for those students
who lost valuable belongings in
Jones is that their present policies
will cover damages, or that the van-
dals are caught and some type o'
retribution can be made through the
courts.
If vou are a dorm student and are
in doubt o your coverage, check
with your insurance agent. Some
companies will cover possessions
that are damaged at school. But if
vour things aren't insured, ask
about a floater policy, or an
equivalent. For a nominal fee. you
can obtain coverage for stereo
equipment, cameras, televisions,
and many other expensive items.
The coverage includes theft as well
as damages.
There will always be unthinking
individuals in this world, so make
sure your insurance is adequate to
guard against a substantial loss. The
small amount that you pay will be
worth it in peace o' mind.
f
is rHrr t
AND HERE5
wzhB conN'Ajyou
WITH THIS WEEKS
HOTTEST ALBUM-
PERRY COM OS
OREATtEST HITS"
I 111 I VSI VR 1 IM V
r
Campus Forum
Abortion Is 'Murder'
In response to the article "Abortion Is
Not Murder" (Sept. 23 issue), I would
like to express a few facts. 1 irsl ol all,
man does NO! have the right to murdei.
Man. as a governmental body, has the
right to kill tor a justifiable cause (war
or severe crime), but no one. not even
the government, has the right to murdei
Maybe I should define kill and
murder. Fo kill means to deprive ol life,
while murder is unlawfully killing with
premeditated malice. Iheie is a dil
ference in the two.
Secondly, (od distinctly tells us.
�� rhou shah not kill (1 x 20:13). Aha'
It sas kill, not murdei. you say. 1 el me
submit to you thai according to the
Hebrew text, the word kill used in this
particular verse (ratsach) refers to, and
means, murder, rhou shall noi murder,
rhirdly, anyone willing to even con
sider aborting an unborn human being
cannot possibl) understand the two
most important commandments: to love
the lord with all tin heart, soul, and
mind; and to love one another. (Matt.
22:36 40).
1 his is onl a beginning. 1 could go on
dK on, but m compliance with the
(forum) rules. 1 conclude with some
words ot wisdom intended foi those who
sa thev have a right to make life cease
"Bettei is the pooi that walketh in his
integrity, than he thai is perverse in his
lips, and in a tool I he foolishness ol
man pel veteth his was and his heart I ret-
th against the Lord. false witness
shall not be unpunished and he thai
speaketh lies shall not escape (Prov
19:1,3,5)
kiin in rim
Sophomore.
1 tome Economics Ed.
On Sunday night, some close friends
and 1 attended a recital ol electronic
music b Dt otto Henry, a music facul-
ty member, lo begin. 1 should si thai
we lefl at the intermission.
What we -aw and heard was disap
pointing, rhe general attitude ol apathv
In Dr. Henry toward the performance
and the audience was disconcerting. A
screen tor the slides a mying the
initial pieee was nowhere in sight, and
the) were just projected onto the stage
curtain itself. The music seemed
uninspired and laconic. Finally, the
overall effect left m guests and 1
unstimulated and. trankK. eager to
lease which we readily did.
BRADTLK KER
Graduate Student.
Sociology
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes
ressing ail points oj view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner I ibrary
I etters must include the nam(
and classification, address, phone
number and signature oj the author(s).
etters should be limited to three
typewritten pages, double-spaced, or
neatly primed Mi letters are subject to
editing for brevity, obscenit ibel.
I etters by the same author are limin
one eai h 30 da s.
Tut m mxma
rmfewiutTVfrQ
To The Right
Carter's Accomplishments Built On Republican Precedents
lth-
S
B STAN RJDGLEY
No one can deny that much has been ac-
complished in this country under President
Carter's Administration. The question is
whether this country can survive another
four years of Jimmy Carter's
"accomplishments" as president.
While it is not fair to blame Carter for
much of what is wrong in the nation, it
would be equally unfair to give him credit
for much of what is good � simply
because he and the Democratic Party had
nothing to do with it. In fact, if one views
much of Carter's advertising, it appears
that Carter is running a campaign based on
what he will do the next four years while
giving perfunctory treatment to what he's
done-or hasn't done-the past four.
Syndicated columnists Jack Germond
and Jules Witcover say: Carter is not
really running on his record and the
thrust of his political rhetoric is far less a
defense of what he has done than a projec-
tion of what he would do, compared with
what Reagan would do, over the next lour
years This focus on the future is a
necessity for Carter.
Actually, Carter has done virtual))
nothing of any worthwhile note while in
office except for his foreign policy coups
of the Camp David Mideast Accords and
normalization of relations with China. But
those accords are falling apart, and the
China reapproaehement should be rightly
credited to Nixon's Administration.
What we find throughout four Carter
years is an inconsistency that belies his pre-
sent posture of being the pragmatic,
reasonable politician. And within the last
two weeks, Carter has made several
mistakes thai also jeopardize his image as a
cool thinker.
We've all heard Ronald Reagan accuse
Carter of "vacillation and weakness
Now just what does that mean? A look at
the Democratic position on national
defense over the last four years is
enlightening; you can almost see C arter
wetting a forefinger and putting it to the
wind. He steers a tortuous course, so hang
on.
In 1976, Carter ran on a Democratic
platform that pledged cuts in what he call-
ed a "bloated" Republican defense
budget. Now, in 1980, Carter blames the
Republicans for the decaying state ol the
military and is calling for higher defense
spending. Carter cuts the defense spending
then blames the Republicans for the
defense gap. Get the logic?
More recently. Monday, in fact-Carter
accused Reagan of warmongering, saving
that the election would decide "whether
this nation will make progress or go
backwards and whether we have peace oi
war Pretty strong stuff. Add this latest
nonsense to Carter's recent remarks on
"racism and hatred" and one gets an im-
pression that he's taken demagoguery
lessons from George Wallace. Even Carter
spokesman Jod) Powell fell compelled to
smooth things over, saying that Carter was
"guilt) of an overstatement
But Carter wasn't finished. 1 he Presi-
dent also said: "1 don't know what he
(Reagan) would do it he were in the 0al
Office, but if you judge b his past highly
rhetorical calls for the use ol American
military force m these (overseas) alterca-
tions, it is disturbing
Disturbing indeed, but no less than what
Carter's National Securit) Advisor
Zbigmew Brzezinski said in 1979 in for-
tune magazine: "1 happen to believe that
strategic-power advantage can be
translated into political advantage. Hence
the importance of maintaining a military
posture second to none As for toreign
military intervention under Carter,
Brzezinski says: "The Administration has
made it clear that there would be cir-
cumstances in which we would be prepared
to use force. "1 don't think it would be
useful to spell out what they are. but I'd be
prepared to say that Saudi Arabia and
Israel are two such areas Pretty explicit,
and it makes one think.
In response to Carter's persona! attacks
on him, Reagan said simply: "To accuse
that anyone would deliberately start a wai
is beneath decency Indeed.
So Jimnt) Carter continues his cam
paign of guile, relentlessly attacking
Reagan personally. He seems oblivious to
the fact that he is susceptible to the same
sort of personal invective-and perhaps
more justifiably so.
Stan Kidgley ts a Polt'ical Science major
with a degre in journalism from the
University of North Carolina at Chapel
HUl.
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V
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attacking
livious to
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perhaps
Features
1 HI I M t Kt U ll W
s I'll MM K .
Metalsmith's Exhibit
Now Open In Gray
Mthough little used in recent years, except by sun- be a center off activity when the 1980 Kail Fine Arts
bathers, the Flanagan Sylvan Theatre will once again Festival begins on Oct. 22 ami 23.
SGA Presents Arts Festival
BvI) II) ORRs i i .i
l. d(w ntow n,many
1a little-used
1 Isinagan
tted rightbehind
( :� rently. tlus am-
1 In sun-
ccasi on a 1
eople. e empty ie 1980 Soon, theatre all 1 ine
provide free entertainment foi I t I
students, and to create a showcase
for talented performers on campus.
�� 1 he idea originated from sitting
on the Appropriations (. ommittee
m the S to: two years and ha
ing to say to people. "I'm sorry, we
have no money to give you and
seeing then programs die says
Catherine Vollmer, secretary �1 the
Fine Arts in the S.G. A
1 m conv meed
campus, not
S.G.A the 1 all
ht Id on
1 hurs
"� k I m rhc
both to
She continued.
that people on
necessarily limited to the three n
buildings but certainly including
them, are willing to contribuu thiei
talent foi an opportunity to work,
possibly to show original pieces
1 his include any solo oi group art
shows, dance oi mime perfor-
mances, folk groups, quartets or
any othei musical group or solo,
that would lend
themselves to the Amphitheatre.
n ilied as art is eligible
on
Among people who have already
come to het with ideas for perfor-
mances are a graduate who is a
mime artist and a group with a
modern play involving no scenery.
It the 1 e goes over well, it
will be repeated in the spring for a
longei run. Interested people are
in;ibution ready
now f that there will be a
Spring Fin rts I estival.
B AMA MORRIS
It you have a few spate minutes
between classes, or it you get bored
and would appreciate an im
aginative, cultivating experience,
wander on ovei to Jenkins1 Gray
Art Gallery.
You will be fascinated by the in-
trinsic beauty and skilled craftsman-
ship characteristic ol each ol the
many metal pieces on display by
twelve participating contemporary
artists from eight southeastern
states.
Having begun on Septembet 21,
the exhibition will continue al 1 I I
until October 19 at which time it will
go to Northaiolina A& I Univeisi-
tv, Birmingham Museum ol rt,
1 emoy ne Ai t - I oundal ion in
lallahassee. Florida, and countless
other southeastern museum- until
its end in December ol 1981 Gray
Art Gallery is open from 10-5 Mon
dav through Friday, and 1-4 on Sun
days.
1 aura Jackson and 1 arry Shreve,
ECU graduate assistants oi the art
department, spent two full days ai
ranging the exhibit so that the ob-
jects are displayed using only one-
fourth Ol the total gallery space and
arranging the items on movable wall
flats spaced at appropriate intervals.
Having mastered the skills with
which to manipulate and combine
metals, these contemporary
metalsmiths'primary intent is to ex-
press imaginative and innova
concepts artistically.
Many ol the pieces on display
wearable objects, that is jewelry
I his pi tee b Richard
Prillaman, entitled "Double
Demon Rumup is one off
tlu works in tin- Southeastern
( on temporary Metalsmiths
Show, in the t.rav Gallery
such as necklaces and pins. Othei
:ts are utilitarian, and when
mean! foi use are indeed usable
1 ach metal objeel has a purpose.
whethei meant for wear, decora-
tion, use, or show .
An abundance ol jewelry is on
lay. A wide variety ol creative
pins, necklaces, and rings are
leatured. One such piece is a
"Miniature rool Box Pin capable
ol opening and closing. It is a
fabricated gold tool box drawn
togethei by hinges, and tilled with
tools created from silver, plastic,
hone and tape, gold, and titanium.
Rob lackson, from Athens,
Georgia, is the creatoi ol this and
many othei unique objects.
lohn Satterfield, an ECU faculty
member, has many fine work- on
display. He titles one necklace
"Textile Patterns Made oi sterl-
ig silver and electro-formed op-
pa. this lovely piece is sure to cap-
ture the eve oi all its viewers.
i. . exquisite obje
designed by Don Foree, from
C hapel Hill, N . Is the "Sun Dial
Watch Computer-controlled, this
rare objed is put together from a
combination ol sterling silver, 14k
pink, yellow, green, gold, 24K gold,
cornelian, pearls, and "exas In-
struments 1 D work Its digital
: suggests the shape oi a sun and
rays surrounded bv clouds.
Main of the participating artists
concentrated their talents on pro-
ducting objects of utilization. One
iri � Richard Prillaman.
See VR1, page f. col. 1
Going Home: Delight Or Dilemma
By DAN ID NORRIs
R sader's Digest
ntist's other
about how
� home. It
. � . home
. � Mom to do his
mi re goes home
does his own
es home less
loes his laundry at
�nor nevei coc-
as good a
on the subject
, I end
nly thing that
into one oi those
w n as "suitcase col-
- alluring to students
-uch as real food,
� rj . and romantic
people even
me to say hello to
during the busy
Material concerns are one reason
for heading home. Bv shopping at
Mom's, a student can save up to 100
percent oi his oi total food bill.
And. main people who shop at
Mom also get tree dishes, towels.
blankets, and even furniture.
Sometimes il is necessary to pick up
things left at home during packing.
1 need to pick up my coat and
some warm shuts sometime before
the first snow, not to mentionn my
albums and my extensive comic
book library.
Planning a trip home takes time.
Packing is always a big headache,
but it has to be done unless one
owns two wardrobe baking lots ol
iunk home is one o the best ways to
unclutter your room, and it makes
more space for new junk.
After packing, it's time to worry
about leaving. One rule to
remember is that your ride will
always be late. If you are driving,
then the rule is that at least one rider
will always t latt
The departure tune is something
thai i- often difficult to get worked
out. It seems that foi each student
who ha no classes on 1 ridays, and
cuttable classes on Thursdays, there
is someone else who is in an impor-
tant lab until six on 1 ridays. rhese
late Friday classes are ruinous for
anyone who wants to get home at a
decent hour.
Perhaps one reason why freshmen
� he relativ e ease
oi finding among one's old
high school comrades v hen 1 was a
freshman, there were beaucoups oi
people from my high school who
went home nearly every weekend.
Oi course, in those times, gas cost
hall o what it doe- now, and speed
law- wete indifferently adhered to.
It was possible then to get to
Charlotte in a little more than the
tune it takes to gel to Greensboro
now .
As time went on, ride- became
less plentiful. 1 he flames oi young
romance flicker out. and one depen
dable ride is not going home to see
his tenth-grade girlfriend anymore
People you know in your
freshman year have a way oi think
ing out, transferring or quitting
school. After a couple oi years, it
gets really difficult to get anv ride
home.
It's better having more than one
ride to pick from, so you can pick
the ride best suited to your needs
For instance, one ride may have a
car with great gas mileage, making
for an economical trip. On the other
hand, he may also drive like a
maniac, hitting an average speed ol
70 m.p.h. or so. If you are in a
cowardly mood, you might want a
subsonic ride instead.
Some rides can turn into real
odysseys. Once, 1 was with some
friends when we missed a crucial
turn at some microscopic hamlet.
and never found anv helpful land
marks until we ended up in layet-
teville Fayetteville is okay, but not
you arc trying to get to
Charlotte V ui ing the
twice, we finally -tumbled onto the
�citing lost
when we got h harlotte, the
rest of I neventful.
I he numbei and nai I stops
on the trip home have much to do
with the difference between a
tolerable afternoon lark and a grim
odyssey. Stop- for beet or ham
burgers are necessary, and not too
bad. Stop - O! to
retrieve fall out oi the
engine tend to rum the fun oi the
journey.
Distance has much to do with
how the trip goes, too. It you live
fairly close, in a place like Rocky
Mount or Wilson, a lot less can go
wrong on a journey to somewhere a
little further away, such as Chicago.
The last resort oi the homewa
bound student is our mass-transit
system, which in this area consists
oi the bus lines. Anv bus pulling in
or out oi Greenville on a weekend
has its -hare oi ECU students, each
person bearing a tale ol woe.
1 ragments oi conversation float
around the bus - but, 1 get my
licence back in December "my
van blew up and, they left
wihtout telling me and so on.
1 he bus that runs from Rocky
Mount to Greenville on Sunday
nights is kind o an "ECU Ex-
press and usually has a bunch o
luckless Pirate- standing in the aisle,
due to lack oi space. I he sad stories
serve to break the monotony o
standing around on a swaying bus.
Bus rides give rise to lots o hor-
ror stones, such as riding two or
three days on a long trip from
Wisconsin, or having luggage sent
to three different towns, all o! them
wrong
See HOME, page 6, col 1
Little Earl'
Conscientious Worker Earl Downs
Can Fix Anything On Campus
najor
from the
at ('hovel
U DANA NEILL
l look at I ail Downs left
� tical. How could a man
: laim the title o Mr
I . fie entire campus?
. rte "t 7 carpenters work-
ii maintenance depart-
ment Hut how can this tmy frame
amount io much against the unen-
ding tepait list o! the I C U campus'1
��I'm ovei here tot 8 hours a day.
Don't make no difference to me
whatevei va'll say do. I'll try and do
it 1 i I arl.
The men come trompmg into the
shop each morning. "Earl the
Pearl" ings out one of his co-
workers, patting him on the back.
� round here they're liable to call
you anything Fail informs me.
' 1 arl the Squirrel. Little Earl
f oreman Billy Dunn greets them
good morning with a pile ot work
orders in his hand. I he orders pour
in from every corner of campus with
anvthitik! from repairing ceilings to
unglueing locks. "It's the element
of the unexpected says Mi.
Dunn that makes the job in-
teresting "
Earl and I climb into the company
truck and set out for the day's first
assignment. Getting across campus
is a slow process, "these students
don't pay a air no mind. Don't
make a difference it a car's trvmg to
cross laughs Earl, "1 just sit and
wait till they let me We arrive at
Bloxton House where Earl is to put
up a door stop.
I arl takes his time with the new
doors. "If it takes a whole day's
work, better that than going down
here in a hurry and messing up 200
to 300 dollars and cuss a whole days
work
While waiting a few minutes tor
Mr. Dunn to bring a needed part, 1
noticed Ear! pounding and repoun-
ding the nails o' his bench. Earl's
bench, by the way, is as handy a tool
as his hammer. It aids him in
reaching high places that his small
sie won't allow. "Always keep that
bench on the back o my truck
"Little Earl" is a compact of
energy. "Couldn't have a job where
1 had to sit down and work. Can't
be sittin' down too long at a time.
Back there in the house when I'm
watchin' television I stand up half
the time I'm watchin
ail's been at it tor 35 years. He's
now 50. Out ot financial necessity
he quit school in the 7th grade and
began his tirst job as a carpenter at
Beaslcv Construction Company in
larboro. He later joined Hender-
son's Firm where he worked in the
shop pre-cutting materials for
building sites. He remained there
tor IS veat what he feels was too
long. "Most places you work, like
construction, aftei you work there
10 to is vears thev take you for
granted. They think they own you
alter awhile
I arl has been a part o ECU'S
maintenance department for a year
and 3 months, and plans to stay un-
til retirement.
Back in the shop. Earl showed me
a slip from a professor who wanted
a board made to hang on her wall.
There was no mention ot size. Larl
made a board that he believed
would suit her purpose and then
darted into his truck with it. He
remembered "this lady had a break
between 10:45 and 11:00 last week,
so 1 might could catch her now
Although he failed to contact her.
he left the board in her occ with
the intent of checking back.
"No student ever said a word out
o the way to me in any fashion
says Earl, but he did get irritated
about the Jones Dorm incident.
dene Howell, superintendent of
the maintenance building had to
send several men over to the dorm
to inspect the situation. Mr. Howell
remarked, "There's enough
maintenance work to be done
without this malicious damage then
they raise h� about us not getting
the work done Larl agreed and
added, "Then the students wonder
why fees go up year to year
Earl has had his share of "mercy
calls too. Monday night he was
called to work at 2 a.m. because a
lock at Cotton Dorm wouldn't
secure. The job took 25 minutes. 1
asked him what he had to say, about
the imposition, and he just chuckl-
ed, "Ain't got a whole lot
"Earl the Pearl just moves
along from job to job. His
philosophy: "If you're workin' and
can't have no fun workin then
what's the use in workin"?"
Farl Downs stands on his bench as he reaches for a screwdriver. In a
day's work, he will be called to nearly every corner of the campus to
do anything from repairing ceilings to ungluing locks.






I HI EAS1 . K()I ll N
m I'll im k 25, iy�o
Happenings
Campus Events:
Thursda 25
� 4:(X) P.M. Intramural Pun Pull meeting.
Memorial Gym.
� 4:(H) P.M. Friends o! the I ibrar) annual
mooting and banquet.
Kridu 26
� 5:00, 7:00, ,V :(H) P.M. Movie: ���Mien
Hendrix rheatre.
� 26 & 27 Womens Volleyball: N.C. State
Invitational, Raleigh, N.C.
� 26 � 28 intramural Raquetball singles,
Minges Courts.
Salurda 27
� 5:00, iK & 9:00 P.M. Movie: " Mien
Hendrix 1 heatre.
� 7:00 P.M. Football: Southern Mississip-
pi, Home. 1 icklen Stadium
� 2 28 UNC-Charlotte Invitational
tournament (UN c . ECU, UCU, 1 BA)
Charlotte, N.C .
I iu-sdu 30
� 4:00 P M. Soccer: Pembroke State,
Home.
� 8:00 P.M. Minoritv Aits Film Series.
"Watermelon Man" Ledonia S Wright
Afro-American c ultural Center
Wednesday I
� 8:00 P.M. Minoritv rts Film Series:
"The Watemelon Man" 8:00 i' M ! edonia
S. Wright Afro-American t ultural rts
C enter.
Sept. 26 - Oel 5
� Senior art show by Mike Lederstedt,
Mendenhall Upper Gallery, prints and draw-
ings. Reception October 4 at 8:00 P.M.
Now -Sept 28
� Senior Art Show by Ronnie Noles,
Mendenhall Upper Gallery, pottery, draw-
ings, painting, jewelry, and macramae weav-
ings.
Movies
Buccaneer:
� 1 - "My Body Guard" starring Chris
Makepeace, Ruth Gordon, Matt Dillon,
John Houseman. Shows at 1:00, 3:00, 5:00,
7:00 & 9:00;
� 2 - "Holv Moses" Shows at 1:15, 3:15,
5:15, 7:15 and 9:15;
� 3 - "The Hunter" starring Steve Mc-
Queen. Shows at 1:10. 3:10, 5:10, 7:10, &
9:10.
Pitt Plaza:
� 1 - "XANADU" Starring Olivia
Newton-John. Shows at 3:30, 5:20, 7:10, &
9:00;
� 2 - "Smokey and the Bandit Two" starr-
ing Sallv Field and Burt Reynolds. Shows at
3:00, 5:00, 7:00, & 9:00;
� 3 - "Don't go in the House" Shows at
3:30, 5:20, 7:10, and 9:00.
Park Theatre (Downtown)
� 'The Fog" and "Fantasm" Shows at
7:30 Monday - Friday; and 2:00, 5:15, 7:10,
& 9:00 Saturday & Sunday. Special late
show: "Coffy" starring Pam Grcir.
Nightlife
Carolina Opry House:
� Tuesday FARGO
� Wednesdav FARGO
� Thursday FARGO
� Friday VARIATION BAND
� Saturday VARIATION BAND
Attic:
� Tuesday LEVEL FOUR
� Wednesday SUPER GRIT
� Thursday SUPER GRIT
� Friday NEW WAVE 2 TO 2
� Saturday THE PEDESTRIANS
� Sundav THE PEDESTRIANS
� Tuesday BENEFIT BLUES
J.Js Music Hall:
� Thursday LUKEY OWENS AND
REVOLVER
� Friday LUKEY OWENS AND
REVOLVER
� Saturday TOMMY G. AND CO.
Klbo:
� Thursday COI 1 led NIGHT
� Friday END OF THE WEEK PARTY
� Saturday VICTORY PARTY
� Sunday 1 ADIES NIGHT
� Tuesday LADIES Peter Adonis show,
doors open at 7:00. Show begins at 8:00 and
ends at 10:30 P.M. Admission $5.00,
students $3.00.
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Mary Annaoost and at times convenient to you
Carroll
Elian LorettaSaturday abortion hooiw
Pam Mellasa TerryVary rJ praajaancy taa �?anlnf birth control boors
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Art Show In Jenkins
Continued From Page 5
from Memphis, rennessee, has two
of his works on displa in Ciray. As
you enter the gallery, you will be
confronted b a glass-encased
ker, made
formed, repous
r ound to th

walk
peer into the eyes and look out. This
work is genuinely remarkable.
These are just a few of the many
exquisite works, each unique and
captivating, on display in Ciray Art
Gallery. The skill, technical ability,
ation, and artistic concept
which goes into the creation of each
object markes the achievements and
npli '� m -Ms of each profes-
Coffeehouse Presents Concert
The Student Uri
( offeehouse i ommit-
tee will present Marl
Bear in concert 1 hui - .
Sept. 25 from 8-10:30
p.m. in the Co
feehouse, room 15,
Mendenhall Ad mis
sion is 75 cents. This
engagement is foi one
night only.
This is the comri
tee's first professional
act of the season, coi
ing on the heels of la
week's successful au
tions.
Marty Bear is no
the cof- the prestigious NECAA
Dur- (National Entertain-
summer ment for College Arts
alone, he played over Administrators) con-
20 campus vention in Washington,
engagements, not to D.C.
mention off-campus Members of the ECU
dates Student Union present
He was particularly at that performance
s humor were impressed not on-
audience rapport. y by his talent, but also
from Yonkers, Dy his aried repetoire.
NY, he has traversed ranging from Harrv
!n U.S. chapinand Neil Young
" years, t0 Judy Garland, as
he is rela el) ne wc as original corn-
to this ai : ast sPr- postions.
ing, he showcased at
THE OFFICIAL ECU CLASS
RINGS ARE
ON HAND.
Headquarters for your ArtCarved College
Rings is your Campus Bookstore.
Trained assistance by Store
personnel helps you choose from
a wide selection of ring styles,
stones and special features.
Don't leave college empty-
handed.
IKK7IRVED
V COLLEGE RINGS
Symboluirtx �ur abtlttx to achieve
ECU STUDENT
SUPPLY STORE
WRIGHT BUILDING
$10 Deposit required i 1980 ArtCarved College Rings
M ith Uncut Iink -
,o r ees
Make it a complete beach
weekend - - rain or shine
BEACH PARTY AND SHAG
CONTEST SATURDAY NITE,
OCTOBER 4th iSIOO and other
valuable pmei to winners)
Bring your blanket or lawn chair
' CH" ' �' rHl eo
CATA "D
bNd or Qz
Concert begins at 1 1 00 a.m
OCTOBER .5. 1980
HOLIDAY TRAUEL PARK
EMERALD ISLE. N.C.
(on the beach)
Adm
$10.00 adv.
$12.00 gate
Adv. tickets at Apple Record
Call now for your
camping reserve
tions.
354-2250
Have a Coke and a smile.
Let winter winds
blow
"� J G
triped rewnecr1 i
�� .
� �. -� na tht
�� � �� with
Petei Pa liar
� tradil
pastels Bi tl
warn ai 1
warn ,
� . �
the NAME
DROPPER ,nc
FAMOUS LABELS FOR LESS
B I
t
331 ARLINGTON BLVD.
10-6 MonSat. � 756-5844
Class doesnl cost at
he NAMEDROPPER .
GREENVHJJE SQUARE
10-9 Mon-Fri � 10-6 Sat � 756-4001
?





! HI i V
Sports
r
Hope To 'Bounce Back'
Pirates Host USM
the St � n
ie bcsl club' M
I S1
One Of Two
Uorida State fullback Ken Burnett jumps hij�h above
j. . f his tvo H) in the Seminoles
last Saturday night.
By CHARLES CHANDLER s,a, ,
rhough his team Tuff ered a 63 7 be a winnin I
thrashing at the hands ol 9th ranked ca
I lorida State last week, E( I head ol �
football coach 1 d 1 moi is v
somewhat awed by a Soul I ! '
Mi sissippi team thai will come to ' ���
enville on Saturday as the could I '1
Pirates' fourth opponeni ol
yeai,
"Southern Miss wi
team that evei play ed n Ficklei
Stadium 1 nun said. " I he;
got almost everybody back from a 1 n
supei � n lasi year. All the p th
I here talk about and want
to see big time football. IThis is theii
chance.
1 moi s pointe
USM (2-0 ear) had downed the Fi
h; me earlier l
(rleans. " 1 ulane was picked u �
in the top 20 this veai by peo
pie he said. "They had evei
: im plaver back
I f nse from theii I
Bow ! 'cam lasi yeai
So the Pirate head coacl as ab
I SM, noi i SI . on his mind "I
hell with i
w
to th ' that
s
Emory Claims Eagles
'Best Ever' Home Foe

nnec I
Gotcha!
Florida State split end Kurt I'ngluuh hauls in a 12-yard
pass in fourth quarter action in KSls 63-7 win over
ECU Saturday. Defending is Pirate cornerback Adam
Maddocks.
w
'
. Ol
ting unit need a resl during the
� � � . ich Bo I
an pia
"We hone b ac k
kids
'
iad hop(
to be tw
, iI i e:
we could be
. e a
-two. Bui
s-ai
Essence Of The Wishbone
i quarterback i arlton Nelson is caught State defense while fullback rheodore Sut-
at the critical point of decision in the option ton reaches for handoff and halt buck n-
wishbone attack in photo above. Ihe thony Collins (3 prepares to run wide for
sophomore QB's eyes watch the Florida pitch.
i Photo In Pele Podeszwa)
Ficklen Stadium Flashback
Bradshaw Helps Down Pirates
ho's the greatest football player
ever to play in 1 icklen Stadium? An
mpossible question to answer,
right? Not really.
1 he man considered the top
quarterback in the National Foot-
ball League today, rerry Bradshaw
of the world champion Pittsburgh
Steeleis, gets the nod.
Unit's right, the leader ol the
tour-time Ml champs performed
in Ficklen Stadium. Ihe date was
September 27, 1969, exactly 11 years
ago come this Saturday when the
(Mi ales host Southern Mississippi.
Coming into the game, Bradshaw
received a greal deal ol publicity in
Greenville. Much ol that came in
this newspaper, known then as Ihe
1 ountainhead. A pre-game feature
lead as follows:
"last Carolina's football team
will open its 1964 home season
Saturday night againsl rerry Brad-
shaw. oops, Louisiana "ech.
"Well, when football fans hear
the name I ouisiana lech. All-
America quarterback rerry Brad
shaw is usually the first thing they
thmk of. Oi maybe they think ol the
Blond Bomber, the Rifle Man oi
Terrific Terry, because he is all the
same person.
"Bradshaw has been called the
nation's number one quarterback by
his coaches at I ouisiana lech and
not because they are prejudice, but
because lie is the nation's number
one quarterback according to
several pro scouts including Gil
Brandt, the chief talent scout for the
Dallas Cowboys
s is obvious, everyone knew
whai was com � haw
came to (ireenville. 11 for no other
reason, people knew ol ii because
one heard earlit i Lou siana 11
had hosl Pirates and won 35
behind the strong arm
OB
1 oi mei 1 (. I assistant coat
current physical education instrm
toi Bob in : membei �� b
game
� v e did a good iob for a liti
while in the game in '68 Ga
said. "By the end ol the Firs!
quartei. Bi � had no comple
tions. 1 Ikw changed then game
plan, though, and got things go-
ing
i ianti has a go d memory ol his
days in the coaching tanks and
remembers not only Bradshaw's
performances but also when he first
heard ol the prize quarterback.
"We (the staff) would see pro
scouts fairly often he said. "Once
1 asked one o them what was going
on. He told me there was a
freshman down in 1 ouisiana thai
will be a top drat; pick someday He
told me the guy had it all, an arm,
the sie and a good head
1 his information did not bring
about thetwowear series with lech.
though, (.antt said "Somehow they
lust happened to net on oui
schedule he said.
Ihe highly-touted Bradshaw's
performance in Ficklen was a good
one. A story in a local papei read
the day following the game:
"Terrific rerry lived up to his
nickname despite a great rush put
on him b the Pirate defenders
Charles
Chandler
night, ng -a, �
times, a
whih �' 22 attempts
in lea 1! lo a 24
"ouchdow pa e ol 70. 61
s were also recc
t utu lei
GAntl r
performance � - II "Th
strictly passing
" l He i unning Lame w so
good bui Bradshi
only was he a
he was also then best i ui
Ihe former coach n
Bradshaw's scrambling ability was
amazing thai night
1969
"He was heck to get a hold of,
Gantl said "We had a great rush all
night but he always seemed to get
away He was so big and quick thai
our guys jusi couldn't seem to get
him on the ground
Gantl noted that 1 ouisiana 1 "ech
used its two wide receivers a great
deal in '69 and said that the Pirates
held the two 9 hing
speedsters to only seven catches on
the night.
"1 ive oi those were hitch passes
I
I he
1 he -
shaw 's
I
d he
�� ;
side
1
to lean; the
u a reel ause
Bradshaw
in othei ways "II we attemi
heavy outside ccnera
"he'd hit his bacli
the He was vi
bad
1 h( �� adshaw impressed h
al as a collegian, Gantl
says that the Stteelei mam n
come a long w
"He's really come a long way his
poise he said "Hi. was poised
then but he is the greatest with poise
now He played a lot more on
his physical abilities back I I
He' a r il thinker n
No question the talented young
golden boy who once used his
awesome abilities in ECU's l icklen
dium has becoime a supei
quarterback. Alter all, ng a
team to tour Super Bowl titles is not
bad for a I ouisiana country boy, is
it'
V.
B

t
I





THE LAST CAROLINIAN SI I'M MHI K 25, I9M�
r

4
Vn-
tdeszwa)
es
his
Klen
i super
ng a
Hies is not
The Fearless Football Forecast
SOI rHERN MISS A I E( I
VIRGINIA AT 1)1 Kl
MARYI AM) Al UN
W AK1 FORES! 1 N.C. STATE
NORTH rEXAS SI I HOI STON
II NNl SSI I Al Al HI KN
11 Ol RIDA ST. A I Ml Wll. 1 I A
SOUTH CAROl INA 1 MM H1GAN
ARIZONA SI . A I OHIO SI
HAWAII AT WYOMING
SI ANFORD AT OKI AHOMA
NEBRASKA A I PI NN ST ATI
CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
(28-8)
ECU 21-20
Virginia
UNC
N.C. State
Houston
Auburn
I londa State
Michigan
Ohio State
Wyoming
Oklahoma
Nebraska
JIMMY DhPREE
Asst. Sports Editor
(26-10)
K U 17-14
Virginia
UNC
N.C. State
Houston
Tennessee
Florida State
Michigan
Ohio State
Wyoming
Oklahoma
Perm State
Lady Pirates Victorious Over
Demon Deacons In Opener
E TERR HERNDONKEN SMITH
r Advertising ManagerECU SI I)
(25-U)(24-12)
1(1 23 21ECU 24-17
irginiaVirginia
I NUNC
N. StateN.C. State
HoustonHouston
1 ennesseeTennessee
1 londa StateFlorida State
MichiganMichigan
Ohio StateOhio State
WyomingWyoming
()klahomaOklahoma
Nebi askaNebraska
GUES1 PICKER
(HIP ALEXANDER
Raleigh ews and Observer
E( I 23-17
Virginia
I N(
N.c . State
Houston
Auburn
Florida State
Michigan
Ohio State
yoming
()klahoma
Nebraska
B J1MM DuPREE
sl Spi.rlv I ililor
1 he East Carolina
held hockey squad
opened the 1980 season
Iuesda the sa no
1 ady Pirate unit under
nead coach I aurie Ar-
ranls evet has: with a
2-0 victory over Wake
1 orest in Winston-
Salem.
"I'm ecstatic says
nants. "We didn't
tick with our game
strategy, but we won
anyway.
;e had a 50-50
shot at wmnmg she
adds. "But we plaed a
good midfield game
and that make the dif-
ference
The 1 ad Pirates
wasted no time in tak-
ing the lead, as senior
Donna Nicholson slap-
ped an assist from
Carol Belcher in tor the
first goal with just 15
seconds elapsed in the
contest between the two
NCA1AW Division 11
schools.
In all the Deacons
had only tour shots at
the East Carolina goal,
with the tight Pirate
defense and steady
goalie Jane Radford
stopping those short of
their destination.
"Defensively, our
technique wasn't what
it should be Arrants
admits, "but mentally
we made up for it.
1 here were er few
good shots on the goal,
but that was because
our defense held. I he
strategy they used was
not what we had plann-
ed, but it worked
The Pirates had just
eight shots on the
I orest g o a I.
freshman Sue
converting anothi
pass from new
Ros Major.
"I thoueht we
W ake have had mote shots on
the goal Arrants
said. " )ur ol tense was
inconsistent, but 1 ex-
pected thai with all the
youth we have on the
team.
w 11 n
Sat t e
r on a
:omei
Could
"Our upperclassmen
provided good leader-
ship during the game
and the freshmen turn-
ed in solid fundamental
performances
Arrants praised
center fullback Beth
Christum for outstan-
ding performance in
her firsl contest, and
former All-Deep South
sophomore Dana
Salmons for being the
Pirates' "stallwart of
the defense
" e lost the two top
scorers from last ear's
team (Kathy Zwigard
and Sue Jones) said
Arrants. "So I wasn't
expecting that much of-
fensively, but then we
scored two goals in the
first game and played
defense well enough to
win
Arrnats must now
prepare her troops for
the "grudge" match
with High Point, who
last Carolina
eliminated in the open-
ing round of the 1979
state tournament.
"High Point will be
much tougher said
Arrants. "They have
vowed that they will
avenge the game they
lost to us in the tourna-
ment last year. 1 hey
say it was just a flake.
but we've got six days
to work on out game
and iron out some pro
blems
CLASSIFIEDS
FOR SALE
FOR SALC PEARL SMredrum
6 5 � U in S23S iu-yv Bi's' OH. i
Call 7S8 3076
FOR SALE TfChn.cs SA WO 60
watts SL 230 fully automatic
turntabli' with Empire 2000 EIII
Phasi Lineai s peaher s
Aiuminun anl a l -nfl si 100
:�� ' offer Cai: 7S2 Sin ask foi
Gr aham
FOR SALE Sturdy horn mart.
water bed tramc Q VS0
752 S2s6
FOR SALE Mm: Tap.
Recorder S2S 2 Calculators S6
each Telephone s t o Jimm
Camera S2S Guitar U5 ?S2 1�83
CARPET FOR SALE Cut �0 �t� A
& B rooms m kSco" Liqhi Blur
S40 or reasonat) offei � -
PERSONAL
CUSTOM CRAFTING and repair
ot gold and silver Buying and
selling ol qold and iver b, I �
Jewelers t 20 E Sth St ?S8 2127
ANYTHING YOU CAN ARiTL
�re can write bettei Tipmq P'�
Allan Handelman's
Concert Billboard
1-2 with the loss
ECU owns
unblemishec
in 1980 play
Sept.
25-26 B-52's
26 Rush $8.80 7.70
Black Sabbath
Beatlemania
Marshal Tucker
Robert Palmer
Sea Level
Agora-Atlanta
Capital Centar
Charlotte Col.
Chyrsler Hall Norfolk
Hampton Col.
Richmond Masque
Rouges
Capital Center
Greensboro Col.
Capital Center
Rouges
Premier Thet.
William �Mary
Premier Thet.
i: adinq rj ��� � I
'St, V946
S U N S H I Si STUDIO
classes in Balii I ai � � 4 and
Exerc isi Spr
Within v - .
pus 756 '
LOST Gold I
q r e a' sen11 m i rtta
- �
FOR RENT
I I V ft LE ROO ��� ' i
S3 L D �
� . W ash I dry,
WOOMMATE NEEDED Dunn
from Garr n
ContaC Hei b � � �"
ill 753 6636
FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE
CLASSIFIED tD N 'UR
CHASED AT THREE IOCA
TIONS
Student Or qaniXatton Booth
Mendenhall. v n il 4 oo
Student Suppi ' . �" �'�'
10.00 11:01 rTH '2 00
I � Cai oliman Offi i WTTH
S 00 WF 2 00 3 00
Bob Seager $10.00 12.00
Outlaws-F ghat
Jethro Tull $7.70 8.80
John Prine
Al Jarreau
Outlaws-Foghat
Joan Armatradin
Black Sabbath-Blue Oyster Cult Capital Center
$8.80 9.90
17 Yes
18 Yes
19-20 Led Zepplin
20 Kinks
Nov.
1 Harry Chapin
Kansas
Cars
Rossington CoIlins-38 Special
Pat Benatar
14
21
25
28
Dec
12
Greensboro
Hampton
Capital Theater
Fox Atlanta
Premier Thet.
Wi'liam-Mary Hall
Hampton Col.
Scope
Premier Thet.
Ramsey Lewis
Fox Atlanta
For any lagt-minute concert details or ticket information contact Allan at JJ'� Mon
Tues and Wed after 10:00pm.
Nicholson dries on goal
Pirate Jayvees After
Revenge With Cho wan
The Last Carolina jayvee toot;
team will host Chowan college in its
1980 home opener tonight
(Thursda) in a 7:30 contest at
Ficklen Stadium.
Earlier this year Chowan downed
the Pirates in Murtreesboro by a
16-0 eount.
JV Coach Garry F:ast said the
game would be used to evaluate
players that would most likely be ol
help to the Pirates in future years.
Current ECU starts such as
Theodore Sutton got then start on
the jayvee level, though injuries
limited the Kinston fullback to only,
i games.
Fast also said the jayvee games
gave players who went up against
first line Pirates in practice a chance
to perform on their own. "It gives
the kids who get their brains beat
out every week a chance to get in a
game he said. "They gam
valuable experience with game situa-
tions and get playing time that will
help latei
I he jayvee Pirates have two more
home contests scheduled, both com-
ing in November.
jtoHtatt
A MEN'S SHOP
STE1NBECKS OF PITT PLAZA
14th
ANNIVERSARY
SALE
PITT PLAZA STORE ONLY!
Select Group
SUITS25 o� �i
T.A.J
S
- -
Downtown
Evans St. Mall
Greenville
Phone: 752-8965
Carolina East Mall
Greenville
Phone: 756-8242
GrouD Of
OXFORD
CLOTH
Dress Shirts
25 on
Large Selection
V-NECK
SWEATERS
Lambs Wool
$25.00
COASTAL BAIL BOM) CO.
24 Hour Prompt Service
2721 E. 10th Street
Greenville, N.C.
758-0675 7584988 758-4959
"The Student's Friend
ATTIC fr!Pay ATTIC
by
Custom Crafting
and Repair
2 to 6pm. pun.$1.00
6 to 2pm. am.$3.00
OIO
AFTERNOON
DELIGHT 504
BEVERAGE
NEW WAVE
BEST DRESSED!
CONTEST
Original Handcrafted Jewelry
in Silver and Gold
120 E. 5�t.
(ireenrilie, N.C 27834
Buying and Selling
Gold and Silver and Coins
7582127
1 - THE PEDESTRIANS
2 - THE X-RAVES
3 - THE FABULOUS KNOBS
4 - BUTCHWAX
5 - THE TOUR
THE SINGLE BULLET THEORYI
These
Names
Are On
Everybody's
Hips
JiP But Not
I jy At D. A. Kelly's
l Prices
VIDAL
SASS00N
U
e
n
To
$29.90
DESIGNER DENIM
JEANS
Gloria Vanderbilt$29.90($41 values)
Calvin Klein$29.90($41 values)
Sasson$29.90($41 values)
Vidal Sassoon$26.98
Sale Now In Progress
r. Aeutfs



fc
i





t Methodist Invitational
ECU Golfers Sixth
How Jackets Practice
r Loss To LI or i a a

Released By
York Giants
ik-all uj for KCl
I ooibalS Picni
hi lake Out
iimnt: THRl
In i Orders
2 11.1 K I Oth
ws
ADIES!
is Mai Be Your Last
Chance To See The
PETER ADONIS
Traveling Fantasy Show
With Six Male Dancers!)
o
1 00
I � s 00
at lO 30
ON . ;u r
Mi - II DEN IS S3.00
FOR LADIES ONLY!
ad in Pirnti





uu the Plaining
BaJ ftlsruify
t a. rmsonaiiln
.tu.
n hour
�600
NANC I
i�clv�i��
� con
em prevw
- i'
1 13
� ear �
�an S'
I

V
�4001
AfyBodyguard
Refreshing Film
L�A�0IaJ6 About CoccfGC- Ti� H�cp lAJN
� -ra �
B JOHN
Mall M rilri
V : .
lo you do when someone
bullies sou and you are afraid to
stand up to him? I his is the ques
lion posed b 20th century Fox's
new release: "Mj Bodyguard
I ite is tough enough on the
streets olhicago Still, it can be
even toughei in the halls ol public
schoolslifford Peache �
Makepeace) quickh finds this
when he attends one foi the first
time aftei nine years ol private
school,
(' lay, most kids have a
to then new
1 ford has the pooi foi
turu : Moodv, the
od bulls Moods, played
" Matt I) lion, is the t pe ol guy
that sou would expect to see stealing
a walking cane from a blind person
oi bt i up ol foi the
in theii pin ses He is hi son
Cool w ho
could make life miserable.
1 ' ' lents, (. lifford
1,000 fit tha Mood . and his

� - in I he sc hi . Hinder.
'hem theii
eel throu
fullj lifford asks
onc dents vh Hies do not
1 him : idem puts n
'�' addicted to
kl learns tin
aws ol the jungle when
. bathroom and
�Id b Moods to pus up. lien he
penalty I defiance is
Daily, h . ased alter and
� : ' our.
ands help from
,i,l prim it onh makes
rd. Moods
: school
i 'i an case,
pis well in the
and � i ioms.
dthough Mo
iase
ne ai in a dif-
He must bring C lif-
m ring' oi
example, in
little
an;
oih hh
ems He
: � ame ol
S : im Baldwin)
I m has quite
jnd him. 1 he en-
tile school, including Moods, is ter-
rified ol him. 1 his overgrown hulk
is rumoured to have shot cops and
broken teacher's lees in his time.
rogether, the tsso become close
friends gaining from each other's
strengths.
t in si, when c lifford gathers
the courage to approach him about
his job offer, 1 inderman rejects him
and returns to isolation. It is only
aftei he witnesses Clifford's abuse
at the hands ol others that he agrees
to help out.
I" the meantime, t lifford tries to
break through the stnistei
mythology thai surrounds 1 inder-
man Somehow, he finds it hard to
belies e the horror stories about him.
IK knows that there is something
mote to tin- sun dipped giant Clif-
ford continues to seek friendship
with him using desperately to learn
the secret behind th is troubled
lone'
Finally breeching his silence, Clif-
ford learns that 1 inderman is still
recovering from the loss ol his
youngei brother due to a freak gun
accident. Behind his terrible mask,
Linderman is just anothei lonely
person in need ol help nh Clif-
ford as his friend, he finally does get
the help that he needs to come out
ol his shell.
It is refreshing to see a movie like
this come around to the theatres
once in a while. In past movies,
most teenage characters had pro-
blems that came down to whethei or
not Bob would still be able to take
Miss Beauty Queen to the Junior
prom in his brown sun. Another ex-
ample might ssell be: Can Susan
make the cheerleading squad before
fall?
1 hen. there is aiway s the other ex-
it erne thai has been popular in re-
cent seats All high schoolers are
shown as dope fiends, drop outs,
gang leaders, or teenage prostitutes
Like "Breaking Away this
movie shows that Hollywood has
grown up itself. Moviemakers are
finally beginning to realize that
teenagers are just people too, each
one having their set of emotional
problems that are often quite pain-
ful. Director Ions Bill can be
credited for showing us that kids are
very complex creatures who can get
into bad situations. Bs doing so, lie
gives us a very entertaining film thai
one can relate to and enjoy. Wall
Disney productions might base
something to learn from this film.
MAIL'S AAASSr6� PWlOfc
1AMHClP YOU ?
I HI I AM c ROJ IM SEPTEMBER 25, 1980
P-W Dfnp lionet
Seafood
Lovers
Homebound Students:
Drive Fast, Ignore Signs
( untinued From Page 5
good
us rule One is a tree
cts of even
Another is
. O'
1 sen
plight ol
�mes
with trail
then

who
h distant out
;ontent
ne schedules, and
�meone
Raleigh a i
1 h
: I hose
planning leave this
make sour journey a
ei and more efficient. Stop
noi only sloss
sou down, but they waste fuel; ig-
nore them. Ir driving taster; foi
example, at 120 m.p.h
Washington, D.C. is a scant two
hours assay. It possible, avoid get-
ting tickets. speeding ticket will
cost sou at least ten minutes, which
is hard to make up with a police ear
i by.
Don get a Hat tire, or have
' the engine tall out. Drugs
do not really improve mileage or
-peed, but they gise that illusion it
used properly. Getting lost in layet-
tes die takes up an unbelievable
amount ot time, so don't do that.
Finally. see if you can get your Iann-
is to move to Greenville, since get-
ting ECU to move closer to home is
impractical.
VILLA ROMA
ITALIAN RESTAURANT
2713 E. 10th St. 758-1042
Hrs 11-2 and 5-9
5-10 on Weekends
DINE IN or CARRY OUT
NEW YORK STYLE PIZZA
MOZZARELLA5.35 16" PIZZA
EGGPLANT5.65
PEPPERS5.65
ONIONS5.65
GREEN OLIVES5.65
MUSHROOMS5.65
ITALAIN SAUAGE5.65
PEPPERONI5.65
SLICED MEATBALLS5.65
HAM5.65
EXTRA CHEESE5.65
PECIAL-ANY 4 ITEMS7.50
ALL ITEMS8.50
EACH EXTRA ITEM���� 80
$1 00 OFF ANY PIZZA
�4 A � V V� ONE COUPON PER PIZZA
OFFER EXPIRES OCT. 1, 1980
Fosdick's
"All You Can Eat"
Seafood Buffet
Every night from 5 till closino. we will feature
our fabulous new Seafood duftet - Delicious
Fried Shrimp. Golden Brown Oysters. Fish,
Deviled Crab, Shrimp Creole. Fried Chicken,
Clam Chowder. Slaw, Hush Puppies
All You Can Eat
Only
6.99
Fosdick's
1800
Seafood
A Great Place for Seafood
Lunch Dinner Catering
All You Can Eat Special
To all students and faculty Sunday thur
Thursday 5:00pm. 'Til closing you may
purchase our Fried Fish Special for only
$2.50
Coming Soon:
Oyster Bar
Fresh Seafood MM.
VIRGINIA
CRABTREE
SALE
FRI. & SAT.
ONLY
& VOUR �
VSAV,NGSA
CJL VIRGINIA CRABTREE 4
SUPPORT &S V
E.c.u. y
Party Room Available Well
furnish the Cake lor Blnh
day Anniversaries etc lor
Parties ol 8 or more Call lor
Reservation. 756-2011
Hours:
i-unch
Sunday-Friday
11:30 A.M. 2.00P.M.
Dinner
Sunday-Thursday
5 OOP M -9 30 P M
Friday and Saturday
5:00 P.M10:30 P.M.
231 1 S Evans Street
Greenville. N.C.
20 OFF
ENTIRE STOCK OF
SEPERATE PANTS
AND SKIRTS
20 OFF
ENTIRE STOCK
OF
COATS
SHETLAND
WOOL
SWEATERS
SALE $13.90
20 OFF
ENTIRE STOCK
CO-ORDINATE
SPORTSWEAR
20 OFF
ENTIRE STOCK
OF
OXFORD SHIRTS
HOURS
10:00-9:00
PHONE
756-9955
VELOUR TOPS
V AND CREW
NECK
SALE $14.90
VIRGINIA
-ZaJfae
LAYAWAYS
AND
CHARGE
CARDS
WELCOME
4 ' -
� a
OWENS and
REVOLVER
HAVE A HAPPY
FRI. AFTERNOON
5-7:30
REDUCED BEVERAGE
THURS, FRI
SEPT 26-7
S
v

&3
SAT: TOMMY G and GO

1






Title
The East Carolinian, September 25, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 25, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.79
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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