The East Carolinian, September 23, 1980






She izaat (Earuliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 192.
Vol. 55 o. )
12 Pages
1 Ncsda), September 23. 1980
�reenille. N.
( iniiblion lU.tHX!
Housing Shortage Puts Squeeze on Rooms
Bs Mil 1 II WHIN
still waiting to be assigned to double
rooms that have onl one other
t oommate.
Mis Bunting sas the housing
crunch can he atti ibuted to two fac
enrollment, and
stud to stay in the dorms
il i easons 1i s. Bun-
la t thai "costs tor ot t -
housing at e spit aling up-
ward. lthough the cost fot on-
campus housing ha gone up, is has
not gone up as much as the cos! off-
students living on campus; students who were assigned to the
although, the normal capacity foi infirmary have been reassigned to
5 580 Jorm rooms. hut as foi the students
being housed in the Bloxton House.
says Mrs. Hunting, "there is a
possibility thai some ol these people
will be there the entire semester
the 2, 95 dorm rooms is
students.
I mil looms can be located for
them, many students are being
housed as a thud person in a double
i oom.
been
Present I
thei
a i e
'02
According to Mrs. Bunting, cei
Not only are the dorms being used tain stePs are being taken to find
to house extra students, but the in- rooms.
firmary and the Bloxton House are "When school opened we had 152
being used as well (The lower por- women assigned as third persons, so
tion of the Bloxton House is also be- we had to set up some priorities to
ing used as a lab for Home reassign these people. I he plan that
Economics students.) All ot the we came up with was that we would
reassign thud persons from the
senior's rooms lust We have
reassigned all ol the senior's room
mates and, basically, all ol the
junior's roommates. We are work
ing with the sophomore' room
mates now. So what this means is
that the freshmen assigned vmiIi
freshmen will probably be there all
semester
Nexl semester probably will offer
no relict to the housing problem,
I here are 70 "third pets. �
reassign runs and 77 women living
off-campus are on the waiting list
tor on-campus housing.
I hei t
there will I
women lid Mi
Buntinj
� ording t D
celloi ol Stu I '
open discussion
future ol these student wil
the Student' H-
ociatioi the R
Staff, and the Coi
den' I ife Som i
thai will bed
See (Jl IM loss page 3,ol. 1
Xew Hours if Minges
Students Make Waves
Over Pool Changes
am students m floatation I
�s and preliminarv dive;
jool in Memorial Ciym is operated
,w imminc
and
said
of-
ation
ourse
en
D
the
Offi
ol Intramural-
Recreational Sen ices.
here
attempt
an tin
iua
rom
at
he students.
Martinez said. "What we are trying
to do is expand our aquatics pro-
he cram and to make the facilities more
.
tuition.
tion
�om
c o m-
i
am
accessi
'or evervone
I )� Mai tinez also said
nai a class
in sailing was also planned foi
a
d I'hur
av
mehts m Minuii
According to Marline, student
,e ot the pools c
ban
ees wi
th tin
eat her. with the greatest use in the
v
wanner montn-
MU
tng.

nm-
'wards.
I
iur sd.
i icsaays
all since it's
n it
th.
the
"What we go by is usage. It there
had been a lot ol attendance in the
winter, this wouldn't be happen-
he
said
Martinez added that he thought
the 14 hours now reserved for
dent
enougl
ecreati
swimming was
best one on campus,
ale t'l "If
"But it the students are really
sod one concerned about not being able to
swim in Minges on those two niehts.
set-
ring
use
are
we
ae to
talk about it
Martinez also said that the money
aken in from the Master's swimm-
as
used to
uy new equip
Swimming Hours Reduced
ses mil.
Memor
iht
lai
ment tor the Minges pool facility
Money trom the viib.i
ass goes
Because ot new classes in scuba diving and advanced 1 he pool in Minces (above) is n
a ue:
ment
facility
as no
to
he Division
Education, he said.
Continuing swimming, swimming hours for KT students have been from 8 p.m. to 111 p.m. on
im closed to students
Tuesdays and lhursdas.
cut from approximately IX hours per week to 14 hours.
Memorial Gym's pool (below) is open on those days.
Dormitory Flooded Over Weekend By Unknown Vandals
ii MIKf NOON W

�n p
and

: pth t
on both tic
i
clothes luggage, and furniture, ac-
cording to the repot
Several students on the thud flooi
said, "We got hit worst ol all
Norwood 'Corky' Ieache. ol
room 358 received an estimated
$300 m damage.
"1 woke up at 4:15. someone
rom one to three bea.mg al m door, l jumped out o
ors, according to bed and water spiashed all over me.
The fan in the room was spraying
onal property on water at me like an outboard motor;
vas estimated b sparks coming out the back. I said,
78. I his includes 'What asshole did this?'
s, rugs, speakers. There were about three inches of
iding the
. and floor
d with toilet
: of the 1 ast
. e report s.
i st floors ol the
wine had water
water in m room. Everything in the
room was floating around he add-
ed
Community sentiment on the
third floor of the dorm was. "We
can express m two words what we
feel about the character of the per-
son who did this. We spent S hours
cleaning it up several residents
said.
A spokesman for the Greenville
Fire Department said, "The tire
department responded to the call
and assisted in the clean up.
Howeet. we did not file a report on
the incident since it did not involve a
fire
According to the residents, the
smell of the watei was overwhelm-
ing. "Think about it. It had been
setting in the bathroom foi hours
they added.
Jell Hill, ol room 361 said.
"There are 80 people up here who
want to know who did it
We want compensation he add-
ed.
Joseph C alder . I) ' of
Security, ren nd
re i- a �

e

the Maintei ai i Dep
no structu:
the building.
Monetary value ol tnd
gallons ol watei. accord the
enville Utilities (
ing department is S9 2
sewage fee v
Printer Sets October
Deadline For Rebel
in
k e b
( ! 's relumed the I
let IS
tingo. because
i way the coxei ai me
foui ol the color prints tui n
t ed out.
th the I 'truer ssi iate
Editor, Sue Aydlette,
was said that in the first
ed to printing, the magazines
May, cover appeared splol
itters ch and inconsistant in
n
He Were Wrong
In an an tele headlined
"Abortion" in the last issue of I he
East C arolinian , we mistakenly
reported that elections for the
1980-81 SGA Legislature would be
held on Nov. 1.
I he correct date for the elections
is Oct. 1.
ii 1 he inside color
tes ol student art-
work also contained
too much blue Aydlette
added.
Walter Griffin,
Chairman ol National
I'rintmg Co agreed to
reprint the Rebel but
has not been able to do
so until now because of
other contracts.
But, "We have a
written commitment
from Mr. Griffin that
the Rebel will be
printed 'No later than
the week ot October 6
kathv Crisp, editor of
the 1980 XI Rebel said.
I his year's edition of
the Rebel will be 60
pages of drawings,
prints, poetry, short
stories, and
photography. The
Rebel is free to all
students with a valid
ECU ID and activity
card.
Judge Rules In White
Discrimination Case
A Balancing
.performed h
Act
v a master window-washer
Nl W ORl EANS, 1 A (( PS) In
one ol the few racial discrimination
cases ever filed a g a i n s t a
predominantly-black college, a
federal judge has ruled thai Dillard
University here unfairly paid one ol
its faculty members less because she
is white.
Caroline Fishei became one ol the
21 whites on Dillard's 4 membet
faculty in 1975, soon alter earning
her doctorate in psychology at
Bowling Green. In 1977, however,
she learned that two of her black
colleagues in the psych department
at Dillard were earning nearly
$16,(XX) per year while she got only
SB.900, though she had similar
duties.
After two and a halt years ol
complaints and litigation, federal
Judge Fred Cassibry has ordered
Dillard to pay 1 isher-now a public
school psychologist in
Louisiana-Si 1,127 in back w. and
$60.tXX) in persona and punitive
damages
Two years ago this month another
federal court found that Alabama
State University, also a
traditionally-black college, had in-
dulged in the "pa
discrimination again
But George Stricklei. I ish
torney and a faculty men
lulane I aw shoo emph;
refused to assess the 1 ishei cas�
part of larger, growing body ol case
law about "reverse discrimination
"This was absolutely noi
precedent-setting jase Strickler
swore. "It's inst a garden-variety
racial discrimination case. 1 here are
literally thousands just like it. 1 he
only thing differenl about it was
that it was against a black institu-
tion
On The Inside
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1 etters Surfing Pirates Bhted Volleyball4 6 9





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I

Appearances Deceiving
I HI I AS1 AKOl IN1AN
SI I'll MB! K21. lyw)
Professor Does Study On Myths
Surrounding Looks And Living
ROCHESTER, N.Y
(UPI) 8 Beautiful
women hae no pro-
blem getting dates, are
never home Friday and
Saturday nights, have
doting male compa-
nions on both arms and
have rewarding social
lives.
Right
r o n g .
So savs a University
o 1 R o c h es t e r
psychology professor
who studied the rela
tionship between
physical attractiveness
and social relation
s h i p v
Harry Reis savs a
pretty college student is
likely not to be asked
out as often as general-
v thought. She is also
apt to have a less sue
cessful social life than
"plain Janes Reis
said in an interview.
Is it possible that
Farrah Fawcett, Sophia
Lor en and Raquel
Welch had problems
s o c i a 11 in their
younger daw
"Beauties are sup-
posed to be incredibly
desirable said the
bearded Reis, 31. "But
that's a myth that's not
n e c e s s a r i 1 v so
In his recently releas
ed study, Reis surveyed
3 6 males and 3 5
females at the Universi-
ty of Rochester. The
participants v ere
chosen for their
physical attractiveness.
Thev were asked to
keep standardize d
diaries and record for
eight weeks their social
interactions with
members of the op-
posite sex.
Reis, who is conduc-
ting a follow up studv.
drew two major conclu-
sions from his findings.
"One is that physical
attractiveness does not
relate to the quantity of
social interaction that a
female has he said.
"That's contrary to the
mythology we hear
"They do not have
more dates, thev do not
have more male
friends, they do not
spend more time with
males Reis said.
"Unattractive women
or women considered
to be plain looking do
as much dating as at-
tractive wo m e n.
"With males, on the
other hand, there is a
strong relationship bet-
ween attractiveness and
social inteiaction with
everybody, especially
f e males.
"The more attractive
a male is, the more he
goes out and the more
times he goes out with
temales
Reis said he wished
he knew why the survey
turned out the way it
did.
"Unfortunately, 1
don't k now t h e
answer Reis said. "1
guess the first reason is
that myths are not
a 1w a y s cor re c t.
"Everybody has this
myth about beautiful
women he said.
"Most beautiful
women sav people
assume their lives are
wonderful. "
Another reason why
beautiful women's
social lives are less than
wonderful, Reis thinks,
is because men are in-
timidated by them and
afraid of being re-
j e c t e d .
"Men see a beautiful
woman and say, T'd
never ask her out. She
must have hundreds of
dates Reis said. "A
good looking man,
however, is less afraid
o' being rejected and
has the confidence that
he won't be rejected
He also said attrac-
tive women tend to lack
a certain social
gracefulness.
"Beautiful women
don't usually have to
try as hard socially
he said. "Certain men
will always approach
them. Arrogance and
unsociable attitudes
may be accepted in
them
On the other hand,
plainer women who
have had to depend
more on personality
and character may ac-
tually have an advan-
tage in relationships.
Although Reis said
he was surprised by the
findings, he said he sees
evidence of the conclu-
sions "in the real world
constantly
"But then again, I
suppose you can see
anything you want and
make anything of it
that you want he
said.
Questions Raised
On Room Situation
Continued from page 1
�Shou! e rooms be tripl-
ed permanently
�-should academically ineligi-
nts who mi
ichool be allow .
foi the following
yeai
�Since housing foi women is
the bieest problem, should
lormitory pace be
'd'h females
�Must we move to the lottery
tem in order to guarantee
�� hmen housing?
�Should the University .on
sider building more dorms'7 1'
so. the cost increase of living
an )us must be c
Because oi the rising
bui - osts, the total cost ot
living in the dorms will be raised.
rhese are just some possible solu-
tions to tiie problem, and students
are encouraged to express their opi-
nions and ideas io the SGA or to
V. larvis, President ot the Stu-
dent I He Association.
Suggestions must be made soon:
policies concerning the securment ot
freshman housing must be set up
and given to the Board of Directors
in November. Dr. Meyer stales that.
�'we seek anyone's suggestions on
was to help solve the situation;
everything is open to new ideas
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Qttr Saat (Earnlftifatt
Serving the campus community since 1925.
RichardGri in. WM
Terry Herndon. �.� � . n rrv Gray, votmt eiho,
Chris I.k hok. ���� Lisa Drew, m ��
George Hettich, c�, w Chari i s Chandi er, v�"� i��,
Anita Lancaster. �Wu David Norris. ,��,��W
September 23, WSI)
Opinion
Page 4
Minges
Student Hours Cut For Pool
If you are a student and have any
desire to take a dip in the Minges
swimming pool, forget it on Tues-
day's and Thursday's. The last time
slot � 8-10 p.m. � on those days is
now devoted to masters' swimming
and scuba diving classes for faculty,
staff and the general public.
Dr. Ray Martinez says the pro-
gram was implemented to raise
funds for Minges and to broaden
the scope of services. The total
number of hours available to
students has now dropped from
18!2 to !4 per week for students.
Although the decrease in hours is
objectionable, the fact that two
weekdays are eliminated for student
use is downright inconvenient.
According to Martinez, the pool
was used very little by students dur-
ing that time period, but judging by
complaints there seems to have been
some miscalculation. Student fees
do pay for the building and opera-
tions, and students expect the
facilities to be available at
reasonable intervals. Martinez said
if students objected to the reduced
free-swimming time that something
could be worked out.
If the swimming pool is not being
used by students during the period
in question, there's nothing wrong
with trying to make money for the
department. But if students are tru-
ly being inconvenienced, something
must be done.
Students who object to this infr-
ingement should direct their com-
plaints to Martinez individually,
through petitions, or in the Campus
Forum of this newspaper. If you
don't speak up now, don't plan to
go swimming in the Minges pool on
Tuesday's or Thursday's.
Glorified Press Conference
How can there be a winner when
there is no contest? Just leave it to
John Anderson and Ronald
Reagan's campaign chairmen and
they'll think of something.
The so-called debate Sunda)
night between Anderson and
Reagan that was sponsored b the
League of Women Voters wasn't a
debate at all it was a glorified
press conference. The very format
of the event precluded any type of
give and take between the can-
didates and the press. Each member
of the panel was allowed only one
question and was denied the oppor-
tunity to question the facts oi the
delivery of the answers.
Both candidates and a number of
commentators suggested that the
American people were the winners.
This is probably the best assessment
of the event. Reagan didn't really
say anything that he hasn't been
saying all along, but at least Ander-
son had the chance to put his views
side by side with Reagan's. To the
most casual observer, Anderson
came off as the moderate maverick,
Republican that he is.
It is sad that Jimmy Carter decid-
ed not to participate because his
presence would have facilitated a
"debate in spite of the format.
But what choice did he have? No, it
wasn't that he was scared to face his
record, as his opponents would have
you beliese. He simply wanted to
avoid a two-against-one confronta-
tion.
Anderson and Reagan would
have turned from criticism of each
other and taken pot shots at Carter.
That would have hurt both Carter
and Anderson. As it turned out,
Anderson probably got the most
beneficial exposure of his cam-
paign, Reagan got the chance to
prove his ability to speak for an
hour without making any serious
mistakes, and Carter got the least
damage to his campaign, under the
circumstances.
of COURse we ueet th& draft!
weve uviSHfcD ail this num on ths
U0UMT8R ARMY AND We STILL CAN'T
W OUR BATTLE STATIONS NlAMNeO
'�:�
0,N0 roofltiv w
THT I S1 C AKOI INIAN
r-Campus Forum
Abortion Is Not 'Murder'
I am writing this letter in response to
an article that appeared in the
September 18, 1980 edition of The East
Carolinian. The article reported opposi-
tion to state funded abortions on the
premise that "abortion is a type.of
murder Murder can be satisfactorily
defined as, "the killing of another
human being with premeditated intent
So logically, their argument is that.
assuming the fetus is a human being,
aborting (and killing) the fetus is "a type
of murder Very well.
Let us now turn our attention to the
subject of rights. Mainly, the right to life
vs. the right to privacy. The opposition
to abortion has an argument something
like this. Assuming that the fetus is a
human being from the time oi concep-
tion, (of which 1 do not agree, but will
grant for mere simplification) it follows
that the fetus, from conception onward,
has the right to life.
But just what is the right to life? Sonic-
say it is the right to live, or rather, the
right not to be killed. I amend this by
stating the right to life is not
synonymous with the right not to be kill-
ed, but with the right not to be killed un-
justly. Furthermore, the right to life
does not guarantee the right to use
another's body even if it is essential
for survival. I say this because to use
another's body is an intervention of the
right to privacy unless one is granted
that right by that person. It a pregnant
woman has any private right at all. it is
that right to her own bod) .
I can conclude mv argument by
stating that since a person has the right
to privacy, and using the definition thai
justice is determined bv one's rights, n
follows that abortion is justified. In
other words, with the issue of abortion,
the right to privacy takes precedence
over the right to life. So to all those anti-
abortionists who call abortion "a type
ol murder call it what you will, but it
is justifiable because you have got the
right!
Ciregg A Howe
Sophomore, Bio
Forum Rules
The East Caroliman welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Man
drop them by our offit e in the '
Huildinu. across from Joyner Lib
I fliers must include the name, n
and classification, address, phi
number and signature of the
letters should be limited to
typewritten pages, double-spacea
neatly printed. All letters are su
editing for brevity, obscenity anc
Letters by the same author are limiu .
one each 30 da vs.
Nixon's Revenge: S. 1722, H.R. 6915
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
If you think the Watergate era ol
government secrecy and repression ended
when Richard Nixon was forced from of-
fice, think again. It's not only still here,
it's about to be legalized.
Nixon and his partner in crime, former
Attorney General John Mitchell, drew up a
bill before they left office that, had it been
law at the time, would probably have-
squashed efforts to unearth incriminating
evidence on the administration. Called
Senate Bill 1, a sweeping revision of
federal crime statutes, the bill was stopped
several years ago by a coalition of civil
libertarians. Now, renamed Senate Bill
1722, this legacy of the Nixon era is back,
with bipartisan support and nearly all of its
repressive measures intact.
S. 1722, expected to be voted on by the
Senate Judiciary Committee early this fall,
has the backing of liberal Senator Ted
Kennedy and conservative Senator Strom
Thurmond. A very similar bill, called H.R.
6915, is pending in the House of Represen-
tatives. At this writing, both bills have
good chances of passing. That could spell
disaster for American civil liberties, as the
following "top ten" features of S. 1722
make clear. If passed, the bill would:
1. Authorize the arrest of persons who
"physically interfere" with military
recruitment or induction, or "incite
others" to evade military service. Broadly
interpreted, this could make many types of
draft resistance and draft counselling il-
legal.
2. Prohibit physical interference with the
"performance of an official dutv which
could be used to arrest persons who, sav.
block a door to a post office in an anti-
draft registration demonstration. Violators
could be fined S25,00() and sentenced to a
year in prison.
3. Make illegal any property damage
that may occur at a nuclear facility or any
energy-producing or distributing plant
during a demonstration. The punishment:
up to five years and S250.0O0 for in-
dividuals, a cool million dollars for
organizations.
4. Prosecute journalists who refuse to
reveal confidential news sources. That
would have spelled the end of
"Woodstein" and "Deep Throat" a few
years ago.
5. Make illegal the leaking of confiden-
tial information relating to national
defense. This is a codification of the law
used, unsucessfully, to prosecute Daniel
Ellsberg for making the historic Pentagon
Papers available to the public.
6. Narrow the U.S. Supreme Court's
definition of "contemporary community
standards" to "local community stan-
dards" in judging allegedly obscene
material. This means that any locality
could spark prosecution of a national
publication � in effect, setting artistic-
standards for the whole country.
7. Enact stiff mandatorv sentences for a
multitude of crimes, disc i
natives to prison. This would
crease the number of inmate?
overcrowded federal prisons.
8. Order landlords an
company to cooperate "forth and
"unobtrusively" with government
wiretappers � and pav then I
9. Give judges broad new powe jail
and deny bail to person- a any
crime, before the defendants stand trial.
This, of course, would viola the
basic tenets of law, the presumpti
one is innocent until proven a
10. Restore the federal death p
a number of crimes, including p
espionage.
C ivil liberties organizations have b
together to stop S. 1722 and H.R 6915
which will be hammered into a single.
reaching law if both bills pass � be!
this extraordinary revision of federal law
scuttles much of the Constitution. Civil
libertarians are urging Americans to write
their represnetatives, asking that thev op-
pose the bills.
Opponents of the House and Senate bills
also hope that an open, in-depth debate
will call overdue piblic attention to what
could be the most important civil liberties
legislation in this century. We don't have
Richard Nixon to kick around any more,
but if this ominous legislation pases, he
just may have us.
To The Left
Carter's Achievements Justify His Reelection In 1980
By MARK CULBRETH
The American voter may find
himself looking back over the last
four years and wondering if a vote
for Carter will prolong this coun-
try's problems. President Carter has
been blamed for the state of this
country as often as Herbert Hoover
was during the Great Depression.
What has been the state of the
union? A brief look may shed some
light.
Economically, the United States
has been in a state of chaos. The
consumer price index is up and the
prime interest rate seems to fluc-
tuate like the weather. Yet Carter
has increased the average farm in-
come by 25 percent. He has expand-
ed exports and raised prices on
American farm products overseas.
Corporate profits are up 50 percent
since Carter took office. And he has
deregulated the airline and trucking
industries as well as the financial in-
stitutions.
The ev erpresent energy crisis has,
of course, been a major isssue dur-
ing the Carter administration. In
1979, for example, the Organization
of Petroleum Exporting Countries
(OPEC) increased prices by 80 per-
cent. The increase certainly has un-
balanced the American economy
and is largely responsible for present
double-digit inflation. To offset
overconsumption, Carter has had to
enact unpopular odd-even gas ra-
tioning programs. Carter even call-
ed for a 10-cent-per-gallon tax to
curb American misuse, but an un-
cooperative Congress was unwilling
to inconvenience the American
voter. Carter has repeatedly stressed
the need for conservation, while at
the same time appropriating money
for fuel exploration and alternate
fuel sources research and implemen-
tation.
On the subject of defense, Carter
states: "There is no way I can cut
down the ability of our nation to de-
fend itself. Our security obviously
comes first In October 1979,
Carter urged NATO to increase
nuclear arms deployment in
response to the Soviet Union's
development of the more destructive
SS-20 missile. He has encouraged
the production of the Poseidan sub,
which carries enough nuclear
weapons to destroy every large and
medium sized city in Russia, as well
as the Trident Sub, which has a fir-
ing range of 4,000 miles. He has
placed cruise missiles in our once
antiquated bombers, and has push-
ed for the production of the neutron
bomb. He has increased the defense
budget by 4.5 percent over the next
five years. He has pushed for SALT
II, seeing it as a means of monitor-
ing Soviet arms production, not as a
submissive compromise. Carter
showed his tenacity on the issue of
defense when he enacted the un-
popular Selective Service Act. This
almost politically suicidal measure
was taken by Carter to strengthen
the decaying volunteer armed
forces.
Foreign relations over the last
four years have been both good and
bad. Carter has reestablished rela-
tions with Communist China, which
constitutes nearly one-fourth of the
world's total population. Carter
has, with the Arab-Israeli Peace
Treaty, brought together two ethnic
groups which have been violently
bitter since the migration of Jewish
tribes into Egypt in 1600 B.C.
Speaking of the treaty Carter said,
"At Camp David we sought pece,
which is not only of vital impor-
tance to their two nations, but to all
the people of the Middle East, to all
the people of the United States �
indeed to the rest of the world as
well
Yet these two events have been
overshadowed by the violent actions
of two countries. Russia invaded
Afghanistan, placing a communist
government in control of its unwill-
ing citizens. In response to this,
Carter, in the tradition of the
original Olympic ethics, called for a
boycott of the games which were to
be held in a country which was sub-
jugating another. This initially un-
popular proposal eventually gained
favor not only in the United States
but around the free world.
In addition, the government of
Iran, as every American is painfully
aware, invaded the American Em-
bassy in Tehran and has held
American citizens hostage for over
300 days. This abhorable act of
violence has had a great influence
on President Carter's popularity as
it has developed. Certainly no
American would question Carter's
handling of the delicate crisis, in
which he has been both cautious and
forceful. And it is not incorrect to
assume that of all the issues of the
last four years the hostage crisis will
prove the most influential in the
coming election.
Despite the overwhelming
number of problems this country
has faced over the last four years,
President Carter has always reacted
rationally, seeking solutions in his
direct, honest way. Admittedly, he
has not been perfect, but he has
given the impression that he is
ardently trying to work in this coun-
try's best interest. He has proven
himself fit for the burden of the
presidency, and is the most logical
choice in November.
Mark Culbreth is a sophomore
English major from Favetteville,
N.C.






5
North Carolina Lobby Groups
Plan To Make Abortion Issue
rHfcfc AST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 23. 1980 5
lKHOKliiKs( ii
i
(Editors note t
of ECL studi
to begin distribu
anti-abortion p
campus this wee
The pennon asks
SGA to pass a r s
'ion that woula i �
practice
I c L studi nts '
have mch operatu
performed The SG
sponsored
Emergency I oan
was set up origina
� ad mone t �
purpose, ! .
recently exp
cover anv
emt rgency
might have.
Tht
dicates ' hai
n issui
much alivi
people. Tht �
artnie. r,
permission
Daily Tat ih
at the issui
ieve
North aro!
abortion
planning to mak(
view s k
fall vac.
scar's sess �
General ssembl
" b
l -Mis,
Rep I illey,
D-1 "We'll
h� h about
I lamentalist
e active
ii tie)
etar
i aroiina
aid his
live
i rrpa
at al
in
"The
� ab
e
Ad I ibertj. a non-
profit corporation said
il would like to educate
the state's citizens
about ke abortion
issues. "We send out
literature and conduct
telephone surveys
said the Re. Kent Kel
i. " e're just ti ing
to get organized and
identif) the people who
agree with us.
' 1 he state abortion
fund is not necessai s oi
right in terms ol what
the Bible tea hes or
what the Declaration ol
Independence says
Kelh said. " I his coun-
was founded on the
right to life. lo deny
that undermines the
u hole pi em i se on
inch our counti was
founded
In addition to cam-
paign work, Kelts said
tiis group w ill travel to
Raleigh in the coming
yeai to talk with state
latoi s.
Rep Mar N. P
K I orsyth, said she was
nfident there would
be anti-abortion legisla-
tion introduced in the
General Assembly in
51. She also said
there would be a bill
funds foi electh e aboi
tions.
1 illey agreed that
abortion legislation
would be introduced in
the coming session, hut
said he would not be in-
volved. I don't plan
t o introduce any
lee i slat ion againsl
irtion I illey said.
"In 1979 I introduc-
ed an amendment on
the floor ol the House
that would luoe remo
ed the SI million from
the abortion fund he
said. "1 luoe mixed
emotions about it now .
"In the case ol rape,
incest and where the
mothei 's life is involv
ed. abortion is fail. Hut
I thmk we'c gone way
too far
I illey also said he
thought abortion en
couraged people to be
u responsible.
" Thousands ol abor-
tions are funded by tax
money and many peo-
ple feel abortion is
wrong I illev said.
"It these deaths were
happening on the
highways there would
be something said
about it
"II you had a public
referendum on elective
abortions, I thmk it
would be deteated by a
wide maigin I illey
said.
I illey predicted a
fight in the lSl
legislature over the
itate's abortion hind.
I asl week the N.C.
Department ol Human
Resources recommend
ed increasing the aboi
tion fund to S4.4
million during the next
two years. It passed,
this would double the
amount spent during
the current two-yeai
period.
lite concerned with
ate
Debates Continue On Trail
R ea j
was
country, n
same ;
President .
California, Rei
nom i;
Reaj
ndersv :
all had obs
about the Sunday n
debate. So did I
V.nd so
t a n d e r s. W
Reagan was en route
'� the W est v oast ilso,
i th long way
b ola, i la Baton
Rouge, I a and v
field, Mo. nd
son's schedule covered
Philadelphia. H
irg and Sc i anton,
i 'a and New o: k
Cartel ress
secretary, Jod Powell,
Ii the defc
with reporters Monday.
i id but Carter did noi
all until he was asked
it in Ionance,
c al �
S.O.U.L.S.
will sponsor "S.O.I .L.S. On The Mall"
riday Sept. id. I here will be speakers,arl
exhibitions.creative dances,a disc jockeyi and
other forms ol entertainment. Please come out
nji iy the tun!
S.( ).l .1 S. is asking ail artist interested
in exhibiting their work during the
"S.O.I .L.S. On The Mall" to contac
Dwaine ;on or Barbara Battle at
752-8028
'rompl Professional
typing at Reasonable
Rates
( all:
l emporaru Secretary
Services M ilson NX .
291-0723
COASTAL BAIL BOM) CO.
24 Hour Prompt Service
2721 E. 10th Street
Greenville, N.C.
758-0675 7584988 758-4959
The Students Friend"
Bono
U"jry Anne
Carroll
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Lor-etta
Pam
Mellsaa
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Lynn
Denise
W� are U� woman who mk� tf Flaminf
Canter � special plaoa cflhrtu frtandjjr,
pwauruLL aonflAmUal �� 1 � w�Ml
oost nS uunM aanv�ni�ni to you.
MtckaTdrnj abortion, hoax
Vtoy mortj
tixtb.
Call 781-8660 In Ralrt anytime
The Fiennng Osxuar 3613 Haworth Drtv BmiMigtx HjC 87QO0
KING SANDWICH DELICATESSEN
OPEN DAILY II AM-9 PM MON-SA1
HAPPY HOI R MON. � I Ml R. 2 PM-6 PM
I I . 10111 (COLONIAL HIGH IS SH PPIN iI MI.Ri DAIL 752-4297 I� K ORDLRS I'OO
HOUSE SPECIALS
S I LAk � Greenville s original steak sandwich � i Inn Sliced steak cooked on the grill with onions
and served on a crusts Italian roll with our special tomato sauce. $2.50
( )rdrr aheese Steak and ge! Greenville's original with cheese melted all the wa through. $2.65
I)AGIE � Hard salami, danish ham. i anadian ba on, and provolone cheese with all the trimmings.
lor those with a hearts appetite or share it with a friend. $2.60
CHEESE HOAG1E � A delicious blend ol Provolone, Mozzarella. Colby, American & Swiss
cheese, garnished with oil cV viagar. Hot or Cold � Your chime. $1.95
C LI B � C ombination turkey and ham or turke and bacon � Your choice. Served witl � n
tomato and mayo. SI .95
KIN(j CIA B � Combination turkey, ham and bacon. $2.60
kl.Vj BUR( i ,R � Quarter pounder � all meat with all the trimmings served to sour preference.
SI.50 � With melted cheese. $1.70
K )S1 II R1 A B �orned beet and pastrami piled high on rye bread � This triple decker comes
with a double laser ol melted Swiss cheese, hot mustard and sour choice ol either slaw or kraut.
$2.55
Attitude Adjustment Hour
MON-THURS 2-6PM
12oz. Mugs, only 35C
Open 11 AM Til 9 PM MON-SAT
Call 752-4297 For lake Outs
will
in the
e i m i n g
citrv
r ears,
reacted
s in his
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he has
t he is
oven
i ol the
t logical
H0RRELL Pride
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Steaks
$2-59 lb.
Grade "A"
Whole Fryers
lb. 51C
Phone:
752-5025
Home of Greenville's Best Meats
Upton
Tea Bags
cL pkg. 98$
Maola Fresh
� Lowfat Milk
gallon jug $1.69
Kraft
Macaroni Cheese Dinner
7 ozbox s$i00
I Super Coupon �iant r�U
Bounty Paper Towels 58C
I with this coupon and $7.50 food order
J excluding advertized specials. Without
85�, Limit one per customer. Expires 9-27
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I
P
I BUDWEISER or MILLER BEEK !
! $L79
6-pack of 12 oz. cans S1.7 nith this
coupon. Without coupon 2.1)
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Expires 9-27-80
Fab Detergent -giant box
98C w'1 lm couPon an 57.50 food
order excluding advertised specials.
Without coupon SI.79.
limit one per customer. Expires 9-27-80
S KRAFT Mayonnaise
I 32 oz. bottle .98
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advertised specials Without coupon $1.59.
limit one per customer. Expires 9-27-80
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7-Up Drinks
16 oz carton of 8
plus deposit
98c
Redeem your 7-Up coupons at Overton's
Morrell
"Nuggett Brand"
Slice and Eat Hams
lb. $2.29
Colony Gold or Pink
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Regular $4.59
Liter $2.79
Just A DIME & TWO
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�White Potatoes lb. .12
�Yellow Onions lb.
�Green Cabbage lb.
Limit one per customer. Expires 9-27-80
i
i






Features
HI I M . XK i IM W
SfcPTI MM K -
-
Southern Funeral Customs Benefit Us
, , A printed b) permission
. and (ibservet
U SMALI WOOD
ked. Hei hus
had time to
trt life before the
d hams began to arrive.
Illinois, Mrs. H
barrassinglv open
first I d of sym
ias deliv ei ed bv a
William H.
Northside
list hurch in t ireen
3 v , Mrs B '� him back
and apologize for hei
ouldn'i believe
I didn't know would
somet hing
ills
1 hese sympath) visits and gifts of
food, with thru close ties to the
church, distinguish the rural funeral
tradition. It's a tradition that re-
mains relatively unchanged in the
South, even in it growing cities.
Whethei from cih oi town oi
count) crossroads, the ladies ol
church cin e and Sunday schools
are experts m organizing and
preparing foi the funeral and the
usual onslaught ot out-of-town
relatives Sometimes, when families
don't belong to churches, neighbors
oi civic club members fill the void.
I rom the days when the deceas-
ed's friends would actually "la)
out" the bod) and strip the deathb-
ed, little courtesies have helped both
the berea famil) and then con
cei ned ft , says illimon, who
studied funeral ons while
teat hing at 1 Hike I niversit) Divini-
t School foi foui years before mov-
ing to (ireenvdie this summei
"It you don't know what to say.
and you never do, you can just go to
the door and sa. 'Here's a ham
he says. "It's better to act out your
feelings in a way that will help the
famil) than risk saying the wrong
thing.
"One problem of modern, urban
life is our tendenc) to withdraw and
work out our problems on out own.
But it's very hard to i.o that.
"Usually, the presence of other
people, friends and relatives,
reminds us that we've got to go on
when the natural tendenc) with griel
is to think, 'M world is ended; it's
all over.1
J. Randolph Rutledge, director ol
Raleigh's Brown-Wynne funeral
Home, also notes differences bet-
ween Northern and Southern city
funerals he has seen since he moved
from Ohio to North Carolina 11
years ago.
"1 still find it remarkable the
number of people who take oft
work to attend a funeral he sas.
"I p North, especial 1) it the deceas-
ed were an older person, we
wouldn't expect more than about
20. Here, we're liable to have 200
packed in our chapel
Southerners also cling to more
elaborate funerals. In the North and
West, the trend has been toward
cremation or donation ol bodies to
medicine, with a -unple, upbeat
memorial service. Not so m the
South.
At Hillsborough's I riangle
Cremation Services, even some peo-
ple who've chosen cremation re-
quest embalming and viewing in a
casket bet ore cremation, says
managei William Ward, hout hall
of them prefei to bur) the ashes
rather than scatter them.
There is disagreement over
whether viewing The bod) is good.
Most people who request the
traditional "laying out" seem to be
clinging to the past at then own ex
pense, Ward ;ays "People simplv
do not look natural King in a
casket. It's bettei to remembei so
meone as he was alive . . 1 he tinah-
tv o! accepting death doesn't come
from seeing the person dead. It
comes when he doesn't come home
and sit m his favorite chair. �
C an'l avoid tl
Rutledge takes the other view.
Most people seem to need thai final
glimpse to confirm th death, he
savs, even it it means looking at a
11) injured accident victii
"It someone .ailed me and told
me mv w ite was killei I
dent. 1 would luo. e .i hard time
be!icv ing it because I see-
ing her at breakfast he savs.
"Maybe then the most important
thing tor me is remembei iving
seen hei ji
Although this viewing ot the b
remain ' Southern funeral
lition, the actual visitation ot the
tamilv and corpse is changing. Most
modern wakes are tot a relath
sedate two hours at the tuneral
home the night before funeral
��I he visitation is not rtecessaril)
,i two hour meditation people
often drop bv foi jusi a part ot that
time Rutledge savs "And people-
ate more willing to laugh now
"I think ot the '70's with so m
more awareness ot death, it i
US that it's OK to share an) feelings
that some up. And I think tin
therapeutic
Even the sanitized, flower-stn
� rvices of the South's conservative
upper classes have begun to adopl
the rural churches' tradition ol
gregational participation, joyful
singing and full, positive spiritual
release, Willimon savs. He belie.
is free expression of weepii
laughter is a health) chang
�'I here has been a tendency
among rducated white people
See SOUTHERN, pane 8. col, 1
Co
( ontin
Surfing Contest Over;
Scholarship Established
Mai
Bv UK H RDGREEN
an)
the name
. M
� �
Mlai l'Bi hat sells
and
an)
� surfing in N
�he Eastern Surf-
(ESA) Hei sv
M . sre always
? ESA and I S
pionships.
Mike. 26.
tumoi in the
. Things
t, but a
times a
. treatment,
Mil - ol.
� ins quick recover) was
s age. but alot of it was
savs Mis
1 i " I he mam vein in his
removed and lie had to
new one. re grew in six
ks
A, i Mis Marsh, Mike
six months from
I Iniver:
! a year, Colin "Doc"
1 S
iwai foi sportsman-
's name to be presented
East Coast Surfing Cham-
par I he winner this vear was
How ;e 1 -
i we announced the award.
11 u r e said. " con t r i but i o n s
developed spontaneously, and
we knew it we had over a
isand dollars With that kind
of response, the association decided
form a scholarship fund for
amal ithletes, the tust o(
its kind
In honor ot Mike's struggle with
canc 'ainiiv's dedication
fing, Couture said
the fund will be called the Mike
Marsh Scholarship I uni
, �Mrs. Mat a com-
mittee ol foui ed �� ill select
one amateur surfer annually, and
the - ' ship will p 'he reci-
pient's education at the universit) or
technical school ol Ins or hei choice.
The ci fcill be academic and
mcial, not surfing ability. I he-
only requiremeni is that the scholar-
ship candidate be a member ot the
! SA
" 1 he Ma as done so
sport of stii fing, said
( outure, "I can'l think ot a better
name foi lie scl i p
If you w upport
scholarship, st ions to:
1 SA Marsh Scholarship Fund, 17
1 ast Rampasture Road. Hampton
Bavs, Y. 11946.
The fund is non-profit and tax
deductible.
Contest Results
B Kl( HARD GREEN
.cm rat Manage
North . arolina sui fei won fust
place in the Men's Division during
the 1980 East (oast Surfing Cham
pionship held in Buxton, N.C
Sept. 2 7.
Bill) Curry, o the Southern
North (arolina District which in-
cludes the area beaches around
Wilmington, also won first place in
the 1 ongboard Division and second
place in the Kneeboard Division.
Ten other North Carolina surfers
placed m the annual contest
organized bv the 1-astern Surfing
Association (ISA).
Surfers from Florida to New
Jerse) gathered on the beach at the
toot of the lighthouse during the
five-da) waiting period. 1 lie con-
testants participate in 20 separate
distucts throughout the vear at-
tempting to earn enough points to
receive an invitation to the amateur
championships
Colin "Doc" t outure. director
ot the ISA. said he was pleased with
the event this vear. "Suit. o(
course, is the most important
elements he said. "But there are
other vaiiables
"1 thing there was a nice spirit o
enthusiasm this vear. Everybod)
had an especiall) good tune. Hat
teras is a magnet, you know. Foi
man) people and families, the trip
to Hat teras is a real tradition
Couture said the surf wasn't great
during the preliminary heats, onlv
2-3 feet and choppy. But during the
"critical phases" (finals), the waves
picked up to about 4-5 feet and were
"quite rideable The swells
originated from a tropical storm
that was located about 300 miles
southeast o Cape Hatteras.
The final results were only recent-
ly released and are listed below.
19B0 East Coast Surtmq Championships Results
MENEHUNES under t2)
N


d� �"
Rick Anson. from Ihe S.C. Ga.
seventh in the men's division in the
division, placed Surfing Championships. In this photograph, he
I'M!) Eastoust cranks off the lip backside, as the) sa in surfing.
Coed's Playboy Pose
Causes Controversy

. . �
Trip Fr
5 Janas Farrii �
BOYS i 12 14)
�� Br.ll
7 C!a Grr'
- . .
Va OB
Va OB
SCFIa
CNC
NCFIa
SC &a
CNC
SC GA
CFIa
See CONTEST, p. 7, Col. 1
WACO, TX (( PS) Jud)
Wardlaw, a theater major at Baylor
University, got her diploma last
month, but was told not to attend
the graduation ceremonies.
She was being punished.
Well-liked and an excellent stu-
dent, Wardlaw did not violate any
official universit) laws. She was not
caught with any illegal drugs, or
found cheating on an exam; nothing
that serious. Her onlv sin was to
agree to have her picture taken � in
the nude.
Her appearance in Playboy's
Chaplin and Keaton
Movies At Hendrix
ChaHie Chaplin stars in The Gold Rush, perhaps the best film he ever
made This classic silent film is being shown with buster Keaton's
movie The General. Wednesday night in the Hendrix Iheatre
B DAVID NORMS
tralurfi l.dilor
The Student Union Films Com-
mittee is presenting a silent movie
double feature on Wednesday,
September 24, in the Hendrix
Theatre in Mendenhall Student
Center. Charlie Chaplin's The Gold
Rush will be shown at 7 p.m
followed by Buster Keaton's film
The General, at 9 p.m.
The Gold Rush, filmed in 1925, is
considered by many to be Chaplin's
finest film, and perhaps the best
silent screen comedy. Chaplin
himself said it was the film he
wanted to be remembered by. In this
movie, Chaplin's character, the Lit-
tle Tramp, is in the Klondike Gold
Rush of 1898. The bittersweet tale
of his love for a dancehall girl is
punctuated by some very clever and
hilarious comedy scenes. The scene
in which the starving Chaplin boils
and eats his shoe as meticulously as
if it were a gourmet dinner is one of
the silent film era's most memorable
images.
The General, a film ol 126. is
perhaps Keaton's most famous
work, and is also one of the best
silent movie comedies. In this story,
set during the Civil War, Keaton
plays a Confederate engineer whose
train is stolen by a Union raiding
party. Undaunted, he takes another
train, and sets off alone in pursuit.
Keaton was a master oi comic tim-
ing, and the film moves quickly with
some of the most brilliant slapstick
comedv of the 1920's.
Following the double feature, the
Films Committee is planning a
short, informal discussion group for
those students interested in explor-
ing these films further; coffee and
doughnuts will be served.
The Films Committee plans to
make these discussion groups a
regular part of the special films
series. Times and room numbers of
the meetings will be printed on the
hand-outs which will be distributed
before each film. All interested
students are welcome to attend.
September issue feature on women
from southwestern universities was
lust the most recent chapter ol a
controversial drama played out at
Baylor, a strict, Baptisi academic in-
stitution.
When the anger and publicity
finally cleared, left in the rubble was
the resignation ol half the student
newspaper staff and a well-
respected journalism professor, a
majoi shake-up oi scholarship
distribution bv the journalism
department, and the prolonged har-
rassment of Jud) Wardlaw and a
slew ol student journalists. The
school also endured the embarrass-
ment ol its disgruntled students
transferring to the Universit) of
Texas. And it all started because
Playboy decided to take a tew pic-
tures.
Though Wardlaw was unable to
give her parents the satisfaction ol
seeing her with the rest of the-
graduates at commencement in
August, she was probabl) more for-
tunate than the other key actors in
the story After a disciplinar) heat
mg, Wardlaw was onlv nuldlv scold-
ed as school officials belatedl) tried
to burv the story, as well as its bad
publicity for the university.
"It was obvious the) didn't like
the publicity the storv got
Wardlaw observes. "It had become
Judv Wardlaw
a national thing and the) didn't
want to do something bad to me.
and thus bring the whole thing up
again
The controvers) first arose when
Baylor President Abner Met all
sternlv warned last January that an)
universit) student who posed nude
tor Playboy, then trolling the cam-
pus foi models, would be expelled.
In response, the Baylor lariat.
the student paper, published
editorials condeming McCall's
policy, and supporting the right of
women to decide for themselves
whether to appear in the magazine.
Infuriated bv the paper's boldness
in opposing the administration,
which is technical!) the paper's
publisher, and its interpretation
Christian principles. Mst all
ordered Board o Publications
Director Ralph Strother to tire the
Lariat's three senior editors � Jeff
Barton, Barrv Kolar, and Cindv
Slovak. The entire Board reaffirmed
that decision unanimously, despite
Barton's last-minute appeal.
At issue was not cnlv the right oi
Bavlor women to appear nude in a
national magazine, but the editorial
freedom of the student newspaper.
Met all insisted that as president he
was the paper's publisher, and had
the final say over the content ol its
editorials. The paper's editors
argued Met all's intervention
violated their right to free expres-
sion In the end. Met all won.
Even after thev were removed
from the Lariat, the three former
editors encountered a series of ad-
ministration pressure tactics to force
them out of Waco.
Journalism Department
Chariman Loyal Gould "told us we
should look for other schools for
the next semester former editor
Slovak recalls.
Though they were never formally
asked to leave, Slovak says the ad-
ministration repeatedly argued they
would be much happier on another
campus.
See POST, page 8. col. 1
T
1st
,nt
3rd!
KE






I 1
( ampus Events:
� 4:00 P.M. W� Wake
NN ednesda 24
v � N V1 M
!
( 1 � � '
� :15 P.M 1 aculn R
�, AJ. I
I hursdat 25
� 4:00 P.M !��
i
10 (' i

& 27 V
J ruhn 2(
'MM
� 2h 2h Intramural Raquetball singles,
Minges c ourts.
Saturday 27
� 5 00, 7:00& 9:00 P M Movie "Mich"
Hendi ix 1 heat re.
� '(Hi P 1 Football: Southern Mississip
pi, Home, Ficklen Stadium.
� 2n 28 UN Charlotte Invitational
1 ournamenl (UNC . ECU, I (. I . rBA)
( harlotte, N.C.
Sept. 2(� -Oct 5
� r Show b Mike Lederstedt,
Mendenhall I Ippei l iallei . pi ints and di aw
ings Reception Octobei 4 ai 8:00 I' M
Now Sepl 28
� Senioi An Show In Ronnie Noles, poi
tery, drawings, painting, jewelry, .tin!
mac ramae wea ings
Movies
Buccaneer:
� l Hods Guard" Shows ai 1:00,IX),
K) 7 iKi & V (HI,
� 2 "Holy Mom Shows ai 1:15, ' 15
5:15, 7:15 and v 15;
� 3 � I he Huntei" Shows ai I 10, 3 10,
5 10, 7:10, & 9 Hi
Pill I'laa:
� i "XANADl " Shows ai 3 JO, 5 20,
7 10, & 9:00;
� 2 "Smokey and the Bandii I up'
shows ai 'x). 5 00, 7:00, & l 00;
� i "Don'l go in he House" Shows ai
5 JO, 5 20, 7 10, and 9:00
Park I heatre (Dow mown)
� 'The 1 og" and 1 antasm" Show al
H) Mondav I riday; and 2 00, 5 I 5 7:10,
6 9:0 i:d,i & Sunday
, VAR1ATK N B NL
VAR1A1 ION B
I u( �!� I I I I K)UK
W dn day SI PER GRI1
rhursda SI PI K GR1 I
riday l V. WAV 2 I'
Saturday I Hi PI 1)1 I Kl
Sunday I HI PI DI SIR V
"uesda hi Mill Bl I I
IS Musk Hall
Wednt day I ad
I hursday I I K I t � �A I N
REVOLVER
Fi lay I l KI OWEN!
REVOLVER
Sal H )ln Ci V.


Nightlife
arolina M'r House:
� i ue da: I k(;
� Wednesday I RG
� I hurday I R �
v

� hii
'�� DSSHOI
PAIR
Contest Results
ntinued I rom Page (
:�:��
A
u.
t jms?
llY
Kl (Kappa Sigma)
2nd Annual Women's
Championship
Mud Wrestling
n
Tuesday Nite, Sept. 23rd
Jst Place Si00.00 &. Championship Belt
2nd Place 550.00 & Consolation Belt
3rd Place
SlO.OO & Consolation Prizes
PLUS
KEG FOR THE CLUB OR ORGANIZATION
Sponsoring the Winning Entry
FOR REGISTRATION INFORMATION CALL
758 4591
1
r
710 North Greene St.
Greenville, N.C.
5 Minutes From Campus
Just Across The River Bridge
10 Off on any Meal
With This Coupon
and ECU I.D.
Take Out Special Fri. & Sat.
SNACK PACK
�"i
2 Pieces Chicken
3 Hushpuppies
Only99C
Reg. $1 25
No Extra Discount
WE CATER ALL EVENTS
Under Mar I Ownership Of
Jim Terrell And Dwight Garrett
752-0090
ATTIC
FRIDAY
2PM-2AM
ATTIC
1 - THE PEDESTRIANS
2 - THE X-RAVES
3 - THE FABULOUS KNOBS
4 - BUTCHWAX
5 - THE TOUR
WED. & THURS.
SAT. & SUN.
THE
faniifiV PEDESTR1ANS
ITEM
POLICY
ch of thaaa adva1iaad
t�ma it rquir�d to b� readily
available to t� � In aach Kroga Sa�-on
a�cept � tpacitically noteO in thia ad If we do
ur osit of an '�rr mi �i; oflar you your choice of a
comparable te whan available reflecting tha aeme aavmgs ck a
amenack which will entitle you to purcheae tha advertiaed itam at tha
advenec price within 30 day�
items and Prices
Effective Tues Sept 23
thru Sat Sept 27. 1980
Copyright
Krogei Sav
� �. R '
V
tf-
Before, During &
After the Game
Kroger Sav-on
has everything
you need!
COUNTRY OVEN
Potato Chips
PABST
Red, White & Blue
8-Oz.
Twin Pak
AVONDALE
Macaroni &
Cheese
HILLCREST
DIET PEPSI. MOUNTAIN DEW OR
Pepsi-Cola
8
16-Oz
Ret.
Btls.
Plus Deposit
KRAFT SINGLES
American Cheese
NONE SOLD
TO
DEALERS
OPEN 7 AM TO MIDNIGHT
OPEN SUNDAY
9 AM TO 9 PM
600 GreenviMe Blvd. - Greenville
Phone 756-7031





1111 I- -
I � BOO!
Customs Help Us f
,�x ty ju, a �y
Southern Funeral
f � �
( ontinued I nun Payc o
handle all asp
� ' i ratioi he sa s
nk now ihe " e gone i nil .
yo :
'

He hi

!
' I '

Controversy Over Pose
,
( KiiliiHud r rom Page f
J.D. DAWSGN C
ANGEL FLIGHT RUSH
TWO RUSHES MUST BE ATTENDED"
What It Is Angel Might is an honorary, professional,
service organization with the objectives oi becoming in-
volved in the community. We help sponsor the Red
Cross Blood Drive, have a Halloween Carnival for Boys
Homes, and we also sponsor families during holidays.
Fun Activities we have R�-g parties, dances, bake
sales, cook outs, and a military ball. Our biggest joy is
being together. There is no Military Obligation
Dates To RememberSeptember
23(Tuesday); submarine party -5:30
24(Wednesday); a keg party -5:30 In Wright Annex
25(Thursday); a popcorn party -6:00 Room 201
Become an Anirel
V.
y
Evening A ding Classes Offered
An i . tnd those with
In
1 u amateui
theal i ns
I i u ipants will
N he ba lun
I imentals ol i he .k ;
ass,
with no . � ni iheati �. and
two tiiu , la
Ins phei
Mill'

i (
SPORTS WORLD
COLLEGE NIGHT
Tuesday Night
Tvv
6:30-10:00
Bring 1.1), and
GetlnForOnh 31.25
r
AT OUR
�Sack To Seliool
special
rQQlR, by Nature's Way
specializing in natural hah cuts tor men women
Present ECU Student I.D. Fot
�ur Npxt Haircut
OffeooodmruSept. 27, 1980
Downtown Mali
Green rille
I
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I

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I
FOUNTAIN GRILL
1

&MFAsr
�BACON
�EGG
�GRITS
�TOAST
�JELLY
�COFFEE
$139
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1
Seafood
Lovers
Fosdick's
"All You Can Eat"
Seafood Buffet
Every night from 5 till closmr we will feature
our fabulous now V ous
Fried Shrimp, Golden Brown Oysters. Fish
Deviled Crab Shrimp Fried Chicken
Clam Chowdei aw Puppies
All You Can Eat
Only
s6.99
Fosdick s
1800
Seafood
A Great Place for Seafood
Lunch Dinner Catering
AM You Can Eat Soecial
To a . Sunday thur
Thursda mg you may
pure Special for only
$2.50
appoi nenftonly
758 7841
I -
SERVED 8 A V ' I AM
BISSfTTfS
emaal?s DISCOUNT CENTER 152-3131
I
ON THE MALL - DOWN AS
-i-S. ' - A N N
H
J
day JJll
P�r1i.
H.
Coming Soon:
ySter Bar
F'esh Seafood Mm
i a y
am; pm
-
s y
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� - iturdcy
M
erf
.
Take
your
pick
of the
crispest,
freshest salad
fixin's ever
We take the choicest greens and fixin's and
ice em down fresh every day. So you can take your
pick then top it ail oft with your favorite dressing Pick
the salad bar alone. Or make it a meal with one of our juicy
roast beef sandwiches Come on down to Arby's today for the
best salad pickin' salad bar in town
The Roast Beef
People.
14 Arby's
Roast Beef
A -H
HIS COUPON
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1 Sandwich & Salad
for $O00:
IONLY �
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THIS COUPON
xArby's Roast
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with the purchase of salad at
regular price
N
FOR
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79
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t
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m BASK AKOI INIAN
Sports
A I'll MHI k
.
W7??r Ft Was Won
ECU'S Rokv
jitiard David F
the Seminoles
Aft
Butler is forced back b FSU
His in Saturday's 63-7 loss to
FSU completely dominated
the line of scrimmage all night, winning
both the "battle of the trenches" and the
Same. (Photo b Pete Podes7wa)
Emory Vows Comeback
By JIMM DuPRKK
uulanl SpnrK I dilor
I i I -H SS1 l A. - I
ne thing, we're going
I
I
mor
a a
by last c arolina
Id I mory summarize
I the entire Pirate foot-
rig the 63-7 poun-
ttcred Saturday at the
itionally ninth ranked
�ngratulate Coach
ng a great football
coaching staff
ry are ranked with
i he score does not in-
tvpe of program we have
It: mi coach Bobby
n) will have the compassion
up and play us again
1 tated. "1 would be happy to
ind pla 1 londa State next
We want to play the best
Many Pirate supporters expressed
surprise that Bowden left his star-
lineup in the game into the
fourth quarter, allowing the
�Ies to "run up" the score
ns! the foundling Pirates.
in the day, Ohio State had
knocked off Minnesota 47-0 in a
illy televised game and the
' ornhuskers had briskly
eliminated their opposition, leading
ilation that Bowden needed
to pad the score to impress pollsters.
itarting quarterback Rick
Stockstill guided the Seminoles to
their sixth touchdown of the day
with 11:26 remaining in the game.
but the Seminoles would continue
their offensive until only 34 seconds
remained on the clock when
fullback Larrv Harris stormed seven
yards tor the final TD.
Placekicker Bill Capece's
precision-accurate leg added the ex-
tra point for the final 56 point
margin; the worst non-shutout
defeat in the history of Pirate foot-
ball.
"There were just too main things
going for us tonight said Bowden.
"The heal, the troops; we jus! out
manned them. They were just dead
at the end. On the last drive you
could tell they couldn't even stand
up.
"Our plan was to wear them
down
Injuries early in the contest to
defensive tackle Doug Smith
(bruised knee) and noseguard I errv
Long (ankle), along with the loss ol
secondary expert Freddie Jones in
the Southwestern Louisiana game
and All-American Wayne Innian in
practice Tuesday put the Pirates at a
loss for depth.
"The injuries certainly didn't
help us any said Emory. "We
didn't have much depth to start
with. We played everybody we took
"We probably could have kept
the score down by playing Smith
and Long, they would have played
on pain, but we decided to play our
young players so they could get ex-
perience.
"They got experience, all right,
but it was all bad
Only a 101 yard kickoft return bv
senior Anthony Collins in the se-
cond quarter saved the Pirates from
their first shutout since the 45-0
romp by Toledo in 1971. Collins
was aided with key blocks by Oscar
Tyson and Mike Hawkins en route
to his record-setting jaunt.
"We never had a chance to
establish our running game said
Emory. "Defensively, we didn't get
off our blocks and pursue the wav
we should have We didn'i play like
we practiced all week. Somewhere
from Thursday to Saturday we lost
our intensity.
"We didn't get to the quarterback
as much as we wanted to, but we got
to him more than anybody else who
has played them
Youth and 1980 Fast (arolina
football can be used interchangably.
but Emory has faith in the ability of
Ins players.
"We have only si seniors out of
144 players right now savs
Emory.
"We wanted to play on en-
thusiasm and pride. We're disap-
pointed, we're embarassed I he last
thing we needed was to end the
game thai wav .
"We should be a team of the
future l;mor continues, "a team
with a future.
"Football means so much to
Florida State University, from the
top man down. Frankly, I've been
here with other teams (as an assis-
tant coach) when it wasn't so impor-
tant
Perhaps Bowden himself revealed
the true tale of the tape in his post-
game comments.
"I would have hated to play ECU
up there Bowden admitted. "It
would have been a little different
ball game
ECU Falls 63-7
FSU Routs Pirates
By JIMMY DuPRKK
Att�ni Spurts Idiior
TALLAHASSEE, Fla - The na
tionally ninth-ranked Seminoles ol
Florida State ground out a
devastating 559 yards total offense
including 36 first downs in route to
a 63-7 trashing of the Pirates of East
Carolina.
ECU appeared to be setting the
momentum for an upset on their
first possession of the contest, as the
Pirates' Anthony Collins sprinted
right on second and nine for a
15-yard gain. Sophomore quarter-
back C arlton Nelson added an 11
yard run and Mike Hawkins four
for naother Pirate first down.
On third-and-four, however,
fullback Theodore Sutton was stop
ped a yard short. Punter Rodney
Allen took the field for the first of
his nine appearances of the night
and the Seminoles took over on
'their 13 yard line.
Runs of 15 and 13 yards by junior
Mike Whiting along with steady yar-
dage by Sam Platt led to the
Seminoles' first points of the game;
a nine yard run hv Platt behind the
strong FSU iron! line. Senior Bill
Capece added the extra point.
Nelson failed to connect with
wide receiver Vern Davenport on
third down, so again the Pirates
gave up the football; this time on
the FSU 43.
.1 u n i o r quarterback R u k
Stockstill took to the air as the first
quarter drew to a close, connecting
with Kurt Unglaub tor 16 yards and
later to Sam Childers tor nine. I he
poised Stockstill connected on 10 ol
1 1 attempts on the night, including a
five-yard pass to Whiting who was
stopped just one yard short ol the
goal at the end of the quarter.
Whiting bolted over from the one
jOn the next plav and the Bucs were
quickly behind by two touchdowns.
Kicking into the breee at Doak
Campbell Stadium, Capece's kick to
Collins fell one yard into the end
one. The elusive Collins darted
past a trio of Seminoie defenders
and picked up kev blocks from
Oscar Tyson and Mike Hawkins and
sprinted the distance with an escort
bv Theodore Sutton and I arry
O'Roark.
Florida State marched to the ECU
11 before gathering a i 5 yard
holding penalty (theii only ol the
game), bin an interference call in the
end zone on Pirati � ty Sm �
Norris set up a one
W hiting.
Ricky W illiams tallied 5 3 ya
the Seminoles' final drive ol the
opening half, which was capped bv
a one yard dive b Ken Burnett.
The Pirate defense opened the se
cond hall by holding the 1 si ol
fense for the first nine ol the game,
but the ECU offei d to
sustain a drive aftet three pi i
Florida State took over on tl
forty yard line, but Stock still com
pleted passes tohilders foi seven
and Whiting foi 43 to set up a tour
vard run bv Burm
Again EC I taiied to drive the
distance, but the Pirate defense .
their first real break of the ga
when Platt tumbled alter a 13 vard
gain and Buc linebackei let!rev
Warren recovered Warren also led
the Pirates with 26 � s including
10 solo grabs.
Sutton gamed three
down, but Nelson tumbled
five vaT and the 1 M iefense
pounced on yet anothei Pii
portunity.
K 1
fsl
l-l Pli .
I � I w .
I i I I - .
I -1 W h i! �, .
1 S H
I M �. i , ,
I si Han
(si i .V
(s i k .
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I'u n 1.

I'riulli , �ril.
.

IMIV 11)1 l II MHK
Ku�hin� �( I H � 1 �,n,
HM-kin. '� IM Ptatl Mttll
Williamx " 61 Burn, tl 10-5"
l'sinK HI s. , .
StocluliH 1 i 10 0 I.U. 8 Will
k Ml Hiolui I II ; m,�
l M. Kinnn : �� n .
j i:
I K
�Y the fourth quarter began.
� iil had the Noles dri �
the EC1 tin; thi with
� 1 arrv Harris boltin
from the one.
With sophomore Blaii W ill a
calling the signals, Fl i la
scored again with 7 09 remaininj
the game on an 1 i yai Phil
W illiams making tl re 49-7
H Williams again guided
Seminoles to the end one with I
the clock with 15 vard scoring
� -� to Dennis McKinn
1 SI closed out the th a
seven vard run bv Harris with
:34 to pi
1 here were too many thii
ing tor tonight said 1 l
coach Bobby Bowden "We
outmanned them. Thev w
I at the end. On that las! di
you could tell thev
stand up.
"Our plan w
down he admitted. "1 wi iuld
hated to play ECl up there. It
would have been a ht
ball game.
"W e tried to plav .
tonight and run. run. run
Pirate coach Id 1 n
his entire 56 man trav
with injuries coming
tackle Doug Smith (knee)
lard lorry Long lank-
'The injuries certainly di
help us any said Emory W
just waiting to see if they'll be re;
to plav ag �
P�.
"I want ' . �
Bowden and his very I
team Emory added "I
le. I just hope he
�mpassioi ne up and :
us again. 1 promise you the -a
no indication of the type
we ha � C arolina.
"I'd line up and p i
next week it thev want and
rantee you the outcome would
be d
1 he Seminoles hope the impn
on their nationally ninth rank
(Associated Press) while thev
proved their re i 3-0, while the
Pirates will have to regroup bel
attempting to improve on their 1-2
mai !� dependent pc
Southern Mississippi Saturday at
Ficklen Stadium.
Slip, Slidin' A way
FSU fullback Mike Whiting (27) breaks
loose from ECU'S Jeffre Warren while
Pirate IB Chuck Jackson (40) is taken out
of the play. (Photo bv Pete Podeswa)
Sims Rejuvinates Lions
After three weeks of play in the
National Football League there are
two words that everyone interested
in the game has become very
familiar with: Billy Sims.
The ex-Oklahoma running back
has captured the fancy of fans in
Detroit as his play has helped lead
the I ions to a 3-0 mark. The three
wins are one more than the club
gained all of last season.
Sims' six touchdowns are also one
more than any one Lion scored dur-
ing the entire '79 season. In short,
what the former Heisman Trophy
winner has done is transform the
Lions into a very excited, and very
improved, football team.
Granted, the comeback of
quarterback Garv Danielson to the
team following an injury last year
has helped also. But it is the young
rookie back that has made the dif
ference.
What Sims does is give the Lions
an offensive threat at all times. He
can burn you with the long run,
through the middle or around the
end, and he is also very dangerous
catching the football in the open
field.
Sims has the knack for avoiding
tacklers, whether it be by breaking
away with his strong legs or faking a
defender out. A look at a highlight
film of his three pro games thus far
would surely leave the viewer
breathless.
Such a film of his first two games
appeared on CBS-TV's NFL Todav
Charles
Chandler
1 he c BS
Sims to
Simpson,
Campbell
Show this past Sunday
announcers compared
greats such as Savers.
Payton, Brown and
What thev realized and what is true
is that the Detroit rookie mav turn
out to be better than any ol the
forementioned.
In a recent interview Sims claimed
his low center of gravity had a lot to
do with his success. "I run very low
to the ground said the budding
superstar. "That makes it very hard
tor defensive players to give me a
solid hit. In my college days at
Oklahoma and my time in the NF1 ,
I can only remember being hit solid
two or three times
Bringing Sims down is not going
to get easier, either. He seems head-
ed for superstardom in a manner
that may have never been reached
betote Those in Detroh are verv,
very luck to have him there and
would be wise to order season
tickets to Lions' gamesfor the
next ten years or so. They'll pro-
bably get to see some records
broken and some titles won.
r





10
THE I ASrc AROl INI N
M I'll MBER23, 1980
Whitney Inks Pact;
Area Players Cut
hSPN aKo will carry
PALM SPRINGS, select home games with
Ca. (UPI) The defen- Buffalo. Minnesota,
dmg NBA champion
Los Angeles Lakers
Tuesday a q c u i r e d
guard Delmer Beshore
on waiers from the
Chicago Bulls.
Beshore. 5-11 and
75 pounds, appeared
in fS games for the
Bulls last season,
averaging 12 minutes
and 3.5 points per
game.
HOUSTON (UPI)
For m e r Dallas
Cowboys' star Roger
Staubach spent Tues-
Pittsburgh,
Angeles and St.
Los
ouis.
CHICAGO (UPI)
former University o
Iowa guard Ronnie
I ester, the Chicago
Bulls No. 1 draft
choice, ended his brief
holdout 1 uesdav by
signing a five-year con-
tract with the team.
Terms o the pact were
not released.
I ester was to report
to the Bulls training
camp, which opened
last Friday for both
day on a campaign tour rookies and veterans.
with Republican Sam Worthen, the
elub. College. "That doesn't
The announcement mean that four will
was made at a news have to go by Sunday,
conference by John But that's generally my
Begos. executive vice goal
president and general
manager of the Kings. PHILADELPHIA
The Kings reportedly (UPI) National League
expect to use Whitney President Chub Feenev
at both guard and for-
ward.
LANCASTER, Pa.
has permitted the
Philadelphia Phillies to
activate rookie pitcher
Marty Bystrom for the
(UPI) The Philadelphia league playoffs if the
76ers Tuesday cut four
r o o k i e s. including
guard Clyde Austin of
North Carolina State,
their second-round pick
in the 1980 NBA draft.
The Sixers also cut a
team places a pitcher
on the disabled list.
Vice President William
Giles said Tuesday.
The Phillies have
been short one starting
pitcher since Larrv
pair o' fourth-round Christenson reinjured a
presidential hopeful
Ronald Reagan but
considering the cheers
the retired quarterback
received, he could have
been mistaken for the
candidate.
In his four-minute
talk, Staubach said he
was concerned with the
"instability and lack of
leadership you know
we all suffer" and
predicted Reagan "a
good man, solid" could
restore them. Staubach
said he did not know
how much campaigning
he would do in the
future.
NEW YORK (UPI)
Thirty-live regular
season National
former Marquette
g u a r d w h o w a s
Chicago's No. 2 draft
choice, still has not
come to terms with the
Bulls.
ANAHEIM, Calif.
(UPI) The Los Angeles
Ranis, losers of their
first two games of the
1980 season. Tuesday
placed starting tight
end Terry Nelson on
the injured reserved list
with a severe groin
muscle injury.
Nelson will be lost
for at least tour weeks,
team ol ficials said. His
starting slot will be
taken bv Victor Hicks.
a second-year playei
from the University of
picks, guard Billy
Bryant of Western Ken-
tucky and forward
Harold Hubbard of
Savannah State, plus
free-agent guard Dave
Colescott of North
Carolina. The cuts
reduced the 76er roster
to 16. Five more
players must be cut by
Oct. 10, when the Six-
ers open their season
against the Milwaukee
Bucks.
B R ()() K 1 INI.
Mass. (UPI) Boston
Celtics1 Coach Bill
Fitch hopes to cut tout
players this week, but
he wouldn't mind if he
had to add two more to
the list.
The Celtics worked
Hockey League games Oklahoma. The Rams out again Tuesday
will be carried live this ais0 re-signed backup without backcourt
season by Entertain- quarterback Bob lee. quarterback Nate Ar-
ment Sports Program- wno was released Sept. chibald and No. 1 draft
ming Network, the l. choice Kevin McHale.
severe groin pull on
Sept. 6. Bystrom,
recalled from
Oklahoma City Sept. 1,
has replaced Christen-
son in the starting rota-
tion.
HOUSTON (UPI)
Guard Mike Dunleavv
returned to training
camp with the Houston
Rockets Tuesday after
missing Monday'
workout to be with hi
wife in Fort Worth
where she gave birth to
their first child.
The Dunleavys nam
e d the -p o u n d
2-on nee ben Michae
Joseph.
NFW
I he New
Iuesdav
cable service announc-
ed Tuesday.
This year the
schedule will include all
Canadian teams,
featuring Montreal.
Toronto, Edmonton,
Quebec and Calgary.
ST. JOSEPH, Mo.
(UPI) Charles
"Hawkeye" Whitney,
the Kansas City Kings'
top dratt choice, Tues-
day signed a multi-year
Both players have
refused to report to
camp due to contract
problems. "1 aim tor
16 players, generally,
when 1 start an exhibi-
tion season Fitch said
YORK (UPI)
York Yankees
recalled in
fielder Roger Holt and
catcher Brad Gulden
from the mi n o r
leagues.
Holt hit .213 in 121
games for Columbus of
the International
League. Gulden hit
.239 with six homers
and 44 runs batted in at
Nashville in t h
contract with the NBA at a practice at Hellenic Southern league.
F Mill Outlet
LadieS Denim By-
Wrap and Button Front XAr-arifllpr
Ladies Plush Velour Tops.
V-Neck
$14.98
$12.99
Men's Lee Jeans
Sizes 26-42
Men's Flannel Shirts
Wrangler
$17.50 to 20.50
$8.98
Hearts
Delight
A('Rilft.R
752-5878
OPEN TILLMIDNIGHT
AND FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS
Next To Mike's Bike Shop
In Archade
Our Yogurt Is In
Grift Certificates
Are Available
FEATURING:
20 FLAVORS OF THE CREAMIEST ICE CREAM THIS SIDE OF THE RAINBOW
MORE THAN 25TERRIFIC TASTE TANTILIZING TOPPINGS
ALL NATURAL FROZEN YOGURT FROM CALIFORNIA
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SUNDAES YOUR ICE CREAM FANTASIES CAN COME TO LIFE
Result of First Leg Of Lineman of The Week compition with Hal Stephan Finishing First With A
Time Of 6 :58, Ree Griffin With A Time Of 7:15
This Weeks Lineman Of The Week And Winner Of A "PIRATES TREASURE CHEST"
RON REID
Corvino,
Tripled
Honored
CiRFFNSBORO,
N.C. (UPI) Paul Cor-
vmo of Maryland and
Joel Triplett ol Wake
Forest were selected
defensive players of the
week in the Atlantic
Coast Conference
Monday.
It was the second
time this season Cor-
vino has been selected
tor the honor by a com-
mittee of the Atlantic
Coast Sports Writers
Association. He led a
Terrapin defense thai
limited West Virginia
to only 107 yards
rushing.
Corvino had 13
tackles. He also caused
a West Virginia fum-
ble, stopping a drive at
the Maryland 29-yard
line.
Triplett had IS
tackles in the Wake
I orest victory over The
Citadel. He also in-
tercepted a Citadel pass
and returned it 16 yards
to the Citadel 12-yard
line, setting up the se-
cond Wake Forest
touchdown.
ARMY NAVYSTOftC
Backpacks. B IJ. lomhtr.
Fiatd. D�ck, Flight. Snorkel
. Jackets, PtacoaH, Parkas
Shoes, Combat Boots, Plus.
(MIS. Evans Sir I
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ABORTIONS UP TO
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prognancy lost. b4rtf con
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AMI P M weekdey
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WEDNESDAY
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WITH
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COLLEGE
STUDENTS
Improve your
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306 page research paper
catalog ah academic
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PO Box 25097H
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Enclosed'5 Ii 00
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TUESDAY SPECIAL
Beef Tips with Onions and Peppers
Baked Potato or French Fries
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reg. $3.09 now$1.99
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12
I HI EAS1 CAROLINIAN
SM'll MHt R23, IWO
Brown
Paces
Booters
l ast Carolina goaho
Steve Brown continued
his amaing play last
weekend in leading the
Pirate soccer team to
two wins.
ECU'S first win of
the season came Thurs-
day when the club roll-
ed to a 4-0 win over
Catawba. Brown got
hi second consecutive
shut out on Saturday
against 1 Ion b a 1-0
count in overtime.
Hiown had set a
.school record with 34
saes in one game in the
club's consolation mat-
chup with N.C. State a
week and a half ago m
the Mayor's Cup Tour
-namem in Chapel Hill.
1 he Pii ates, 2-5
following the wins, will
compete in the UNC-
Charlotte Invitational
I our nament this
weekend.
FSU Scoreboard
FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY
234 ns. mm
I-H� OUTS LEFT 3 yB$ BUSHING
CAPfmLl
Ar GROUP
Imestor?
Realty
BUSCH
fwVr
SEMINOLE TERRITORY
Tells The Nightmarish
Story Of ECU'S Big Loss
U.B.E.
THAN
YOU,
Lady Bucs Open Field
Hockey Slate At WFU
By MIRK NOON AN
Milt Wnlrt
ECU Field Hockey Action
The ECU Field
Hockey team will pla
at Wake Forest today
(Tuesday) at 4 p.m. in
the teams' first of five
regular season games.
Head Coach 1 auric
Arrants, is looking to
improve on last year's
record of 2-6.
"Wake lorest is sup-
posed to be alot better
than they were last
year, hut our girls look
prett) good this year so
far Arrants said.
1 tie first two home
games will be played
Saturday October 11 at
1 p.m. with the second
following the same day
at 4 p.m. The games are
played in the center of
Hunting Track Field.
"I he games are an
hours worth o i
everybody moving all
the time. It's a very fast
paced game, and very
much a game of en-
durance Arrants add-
ed.
1 he team will play at
Pfeiffer College Sun-
day, October 13 at 4
p.m and in the Deep
South Tournament at
Duke Oct. 30 - Nov. 1.
U.B.Ei
516S. COTANCHE
GREENVILLE, N.C.
The Students of ECU, for!
making this our best fall
ever.
To Show Our Appreciation
We Are Reducing Our
Sportswear Prices
Drastically!
Clip These Coupons And
Come On Down To UBE
And
SAVE SAVE
The final games of
the year will be played
at the Southern Region
II Tournament at High
Point, Nov . 7-8.
Pass Defense
Needs Work,
Says Kiffin
ECU Golfers Third
After First Round
RALEIGH (UPl)
North Carolina State
coach Monte Kiffin
said Monday the
Wolfpack needs to
shore up its pass
defense before Sun-
day' game with Wake
Forest.
The Wolfpack.
undefeated in two
games, has gien up
509 yards passing to
William Mary and
Virginia. The two
teams completed a
combined 43 of 79 pass
attempts.
A weak secondary
could be fatal against
the Deacsona and
Atlantic Coast Con-
ference player of the
;
year Jay Venuto, who
threw for 2,432 yards
and 16 touchdowns in
1979.
"We've got a lot of
work to do in the
secondary Kiffin said
at his weekly news con-
ference. "We're going
to have to change our
game plan to stop the
pass
"Wake Forest has a
pretty good and balanc-
ed atttack, but they'll
probably pass more
he said.
Venuto has hit 28 of
58 passes for 289 yards
and three touchdowns
in the Deacons' first
two games. Wake
Forest is 1-1 so far this
vear.
After one day ol pla
in the Methodist Col-
lege Invitational the
East Carolinian golf
team is in third place
heading into Tuesday's
second and final round.
The Pirates posted a
306 team total, which
trails only North
Carolina (293) and
Campbell (301) in the
22-team field.
Steve Jones posted a
"4 to pace the Pirates.
The other three ECU
scores were Don
Sweeting's 76, Mike
Move's 78 and the 79
carded by Mike Helms.
Three golfers lead
the individual honors in
the tourney, each car-
dine a 72 Monday on
the Cypress Lakes Golf
Course.
ECU coach Bob
Helmick cited the hot.
muggy conditions of
the day for the
somewhat high scores
and said he had hopes
that his club could at
least challenge Camp-
bell for the second spot
with Tuesday's round.
The Marines Are Coming!
CLASSIFIEDS
Platoon
Leaders
Class
PERSONAL
CUSTOM CRAFTING and repair
of gold and silver Buying and
selling of gold and silver by Les
Jewelers 120 E 5th St 758 2127
ANYTHING YOU CAN WRITE
we can write better Typing, pro
ofreading. editing Write Right
7 5 ��4
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
PODESZWA Featuring color
Portraits Resumes, Portfolios.
Weddings. Photo Restoration
BEST PRICES IN TOWN! Call
Peter Podesiwa 754 0467
SUNSHINE STUDIOS offering
classes in Ballet, Jan, Yoga, and
Exercise Specials for students
W.thm walking distance of cam
pus 75 7235
FOR SALE
FOR SALE PEARL Snare drum
5 k 14 in M35 new Best Offer
Call 75 3076
FOR SALE Technics SA S00 0
watts SL 230 fully automatic
turntable with Empire 2000 ElII
Phase Linear speakers
Aluminum antennae Paid si 100
best otter Call 752 MAO ask for
Graham
CARPET FOR SALE Cut to fit A
& B rooms in Scott Light Blue S40
or reasonable offer Call 752 1504
FOR SALE: 1973 Honda CL 3S0
Asking $475 Call 7Si 407
FOR SALE Pioneer Stereo
Amplifier SA8500 II. 40WPC J.200
Call 758 i�0 after 00 p m
FOR SALE Sturdy, home made
water bed frame Oueen sue S50
752 57�
FOR SALE Mini Tape
Recorder 125 2 Calculators S
each. Telephone �0. 35mm
Camera 125 Guitar SIS 757 183
FOR RENT
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED: $75 plus half expenses
S2 183 ask for Audi y
HOURS FOR TAKING
CLASSIFIED ADS WILL BE WF
2 00 3 00. MTTH 4 00 S 00 AT
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OF
F I C E
Officers
Candidate
Class
Air
Ground Law
THE PLATOON LEADERS CLASS PROGRAM (PLC) 0FEERS A COMMISSION AS A 2ND
LIEUTENAN I U. S. MARINE CORPS AFTER GRADUATION FROM COLLEGE
FRESHMEN THROUGH GRADUATES INCLUDING LAW STUDENTS ARE ELIGIBLE TO JOIN
HERE ARE A FEW OF THE PROGRAM FEATURES AVAILABLE TO MEN WHO CAN QUALIFY:
1. Summer Training - Good Salary.(NC ON CAMPUS REQUIREMENTS)
2. Aviation, Ground and Law options available.
3. $100.00 a month during school year.
4. Challenging career with competitive salary and benefits
after college.
5. Option to drop from program up to graduation from college.
CAPTAIN JACK MOORE WILL BE AT THE BOOK STORE THE 23, 24, 25TH OF
SEPTEMBER 1980 TO INTERVIEW THOSE INTERESTED. "COME AS YOU ARE. NO
RESUME REQUIRED
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION. CALL CAPTAIN MOORE'
IS 1-800-662-7312).
OFFICE (TOLL FREE NUMBER
SAVE
$ 1.00 OFF
TENNIS SHORTS
Reg. 7.95-8.95
$ 1.00 OFF
GYM SHORTS
Reg. 3.49-5.99
$ 1.00 OFF
JERSEYS
PLAIN & PRINTED
Reg. 5.95-6.95
$1.00 OFF
1 Group
Sportshirts
Reg. 5.95-7.95
$ 1.00 OFF
Baseball
Shirts
Reg. 4.95-6.95
$2.00 OFF
Hooded Zippered
Sweatshirts
Reg. 10.95-19.95
$1.00 OFF
T-SHIRTS
Reg. 3.50-4.95
$2.00 OFF
Ladies V-Neck
Sportshirts
Reg. 9.95
$2.00 OFF
Hooded Pullover
Sweatshirs
Reg. 8.95-9.95
WILD Coupon
20 Off
Any Sportswear
Item
SALE ENDS SAT. 27TH
f
I





Title
The East Carolinian, September 23, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 23, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.78
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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