The East Carolinian, September 18, 1980






�he lEaHt �aroltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 55 No. 8
10 Panes
Abortion
Camg ft 'A Type Of Murder
Students Plan Campus Petition
By IK.KRN GRA
Managing tliioi
"We're not a formal, organized
anti-abortion group. It's just thai
some oi us think it is wrong and we
want to do something
Mike Rogers, a lunior music ma-
joi at E( U, was speaking on behall
ol a small group that plans to cir-
culate a petition against SGA
funded abortions on campus begin-
ning next Monday.
The member- ol the group say
theii decision to petition the student
body foi support in opposing
student-funded abortionns arose
from their religious beliefs.
However, the petition will be bas-
ed on moral, not religious grounds.
Stating that "abortion is a type ol
murder the petition is addressed
to the Student Government Associa-
tion.
It asks "that the SGA pass a law
stating that no student fees will ever
fund an abortion
ECU is one of three universities in
the state that have medical loan
funds for students which can be us-
ed to fund abortions.
According to a recent SGA
change in the loan fund, the money
may be borrowed for any medical
reason. I he limit is $150, which
must be repaid.
SO President Charlie Sherrod
said Wednesday that "am time
students feel strongly tor or against
an issue, and bring it before the stu-
dent bod) in the form of a petition,
we're glad to have that kind ol in-
put
Although Sherrod said he en-
couraged the petition in principle,
he said he did not want to get per-
sonally involved with it in the SGA.
"This is something that the SGA
legislature will have to decide
Sherrod said.
Rogers said his group would can-
vass dormitories and students on
campus, and would bring the issue
before the legislature at its first
meeting scheduled for early
November.
Elections for 1980-81 legislature
members will be held November 1.
"Our mam contention is that the
fetus is an organism, a human being
a person Rogers said.
"We don't buy the argument thai
a fetus is a tumor or something
A Wild Rush Party?
No. Rush tek is still �" strong in Greenville, but no This house, which used
one has reported partying a house to the ground yet. has been demolished to
Pho'o bv JOHNJORDAN
to he 1ocatedonNinthStreet.
makeroomfornewparking
May
B Mlkr NOONAN
tanMaal St�� 1 diior
Several Greenville merchants may
e affected if a proposed Federal
ntiparaphernalia Act is approved
) the next session o the State's
General Assembly.
According to the wording of the
proposed Act, it was drafted at the
request o state authorities to enable
states and local jurisdictions to cope
with the paraphernalia problem.
Ms. Carol Martoccia. one ol
Greenville's leading merchant- ol
smoking accessories, has reason to
be concerned about the outcome oi
dislike that word because ol its
negative connotations
The proposed act would further
prohibit the sale o accessories to
minors, and include- an article
outlining the potential ottense- and
penalties, making the possession, or
use. ot any item listed as parapher-
nalia a crime, which may be
punishable bv hue. onment,
or both
Ol special significance concerning
the existing law is the intent in the
customers mind a- to what the ac
cessory is to be used for. On the en
trance to Ms. Martoccia's store is a
sign "Not intended tor illegal use
But. according to Ms. Mario,
eia the thing that bothers me is
that you can go into a hardware
-tore and buy a gun, and the
salesman isn't going to ask you who
you are going to shoot with it. 1
don't force people to come in here
and buy anything, and 1 don't ask
them what they're going to do with
it. It's simply a store, and 1 sell the
things that people request. None ol
it i- illegal
If the proposed Act is pased in the
next session ot the General
Assembly, it will be illegal for any
person to own or posse any drug
paraphernalia.
Mr. Irank Feree, owner ol ppie
Records in Greenville, another seller
ol paraphernalia, -aid "It wouldn't
bother me in the lea-t it they outlaw
ed it all. 1 really don't believe they
will be able to. It has always been a
sideline to us1
Ms. Donna 1 abai. ownei ol 1 he
Mushroom, said "1 was the first
person in town to sell accessories,
but 1 decided to discontinue it with
the exception ol paper- and screens.
1 needed the room in the store
oi
other thine
she added
Photo bv GARY BLEVINS
A $50 Bong
in the shadow of the law
the proposed Act.
"The state is going to have a hear-
ing on this in January, but in the
meantime, there are some test eases
going on right now which may well
determine that it will not go before
the General Assembly
Until the proposed Act becomes
law, it is legal to engage in the sell-
ing and buying of drug parapher-
nalia which is defined in the propos-
ed act as "all equipment, products,
and materials of any kind which are-
used, intended for use, or designed
for use, in planting, -toring,
containing, concealing, injecting,
ingesting, inhaling, or otherwise in-
troducing into the human body a
controlled substance in violation o
this Act
"This list includes just about
everything 1 have in the store Ms.
Martoccia added.
According to Ms. Martoccia,
"Most of my articles are what is
termed paraphernalia, although 1
Based On Grade Predictions
Admissions Requirements
Slowly Rising At ECU
By 1KRRYGRAY
Mnaniny r tfitOf
It's getting a little bit hauler each
vear to get into ECU.
The change, according to Ron
Brown, assistant director o admis-
sions, is "almost imperceptible" on
a year-to-year basis, But viewed
over the last five or six years. Brown
said, the statistics are steadily in-
ching up.
Brown emphasized that the
reason behind ECUs tougher en-
trance requirement- can easily be
misunderstood.
Somoza Killed
Sl NC ION, Paraguay (UPI)
former Nicaraguan President
Anastasio Somoza was assassinated
bv baooka fire yesterday as he rode
in his car in downtown Asuncion,
police said.
Police said Somoza, 53, who fled
Nicaragua in July 1979 and later
took up residence in exile in
Paraguay, was killed by three men
firing a bazooka at his white
Mercedes-Ben, hitting it with one
round.
Also killed in attack were
Somoza's driver and a bodyguard,
police said.
Assassins Used Bazooka
Three other men in a blue
Chevrolet wagon at the same time
sprayed Somoza's car with
submachine-gun fire, police said.
"The drivers's body was thrown
60 feet from the car one officer
said. "Somoza's body was all chop-
ped up by the explosion, but what
was left was stuck in the car
Police said the attackers had shot
more than 25 rounds of machine-
gun fire into Somoza's car.
The attackers, who struck at
10:20 a.m. EDT yesterday a short
distance from Somoza's home,
escaped in the blue Chevrolet used
in the attack but five blocks away
switched to a Volkswagen beetle,
police said.
The government immediately
closed Paraguay's border with
Argentina to prevent the killers
from leaving the country.
Somoza arrived in Paraguay, a
landlocked South American country
about the size o California, in
August 1979. about a month after
he left Nicaragua because his Na-
tional Guard lost ground in bloody
fighting with rebel forces led by the
Sandinista army.
Paraguayan President Alt redo
Stroessner, a -launch anti-
communist who has ruled Paraguay
with an iron fist for 25 years,
welcomed Somoza into Paraguay
despite strong objections from op-
position politicians.
'This is not a case where higher
entrance requirements are creating a
higher caliber student body. It's the
other way around: what is happen-
ing is that an increasing number of
the more promising students are
competing to be admitted here, and
this is forcing us to raise our stan-
dards he said.
Brown said that the university
must raise standards to prevent an
overflow of incoming students. The
standards are determined
mathematically by a "giaade
prediction formula" that is derived
from the records o each new stu-
dent.
"The grade prediction formula,
he explained, is a "tool used to
predict the academic success o an
incoming freshman, using the ex-
perience gained from freshmen with
similar qualifications the previous
year
Brown said the formula was bas-
ed on SAT scores and overall high
school records, and that it had an 85
percent success rate in predicting the
year-end grades of incoming in-
dividual students. If an applicant's
predicted grades fall below a certain
cut-off point, he or she will not be
admitted. Brown said.
"The cut-off point is raised or
lowered in accordance to the size o
freshman class we can ac-
comodate he added.
Dr. Thomas Brewer, a strong
vocate ol higher academic standing
for ECU since he became chancellor
three years ago, said, "1 was very
pleased to learn ol this. I think it
shows a recognition o the quality ol
the university.
"1 would like to see us have a goal
in our planninglookmg five or ten
years down the road that the
average SAT scores for students
would be up to 950 to 970 he add-
ed.
According to Ron Bru. n. the
average SAT scores for last year's
freshman class was about 866. "1
think that is a reasonable goal he-
said. "I'm very optimistic about the
future of this university, and 1 think
we could have that kind ol SAT
average in five to ten years Brown
said that the national average SAT
score was about 910.
Both Dr. Brewer and Brown
agreed that the SAT -core- were on-
ly a general gauge of a student
body's capability, and that they are
not the prime factoi used in con-
sidering students for admission.
"The best indication ol a stu-
dent potential Brown said, "is
the grade prediction, and the grade
prediction average tor the freshman
class is rising because ECV attrac-
ting a higher caliber student
Dodging The Enemy, Illusions Of Glory
(C PS)There will be people on
campus this fall - ordinary-looking
souls who fear they're being
hunted by assassins, challenged bv
dragons, and beguiled by magicians.
DaUv -living for them will be an exer-
cise in dodging the enemy and purs-
ing illusions of glory.
Hut the ostensible outbreak of
paranoid schizophrenia is really just
Parn peak popularity in the last
haff de" aPde the best known variety
olves around Dungeons A
revolves derivatives. The
Dragons
Dragons ju like "Assassin"
SFfitS An Organs
they're being Played everywhere
�nc & Dragons, which bor-
Dung iTavifv " �m the worn ot
rows heaviiy
J.R.R. Tolkein, is actually formally
organized on "at least 200 cam-
puses" by various kinds of
"Tolkein fellowships boasts Mar-
ta Crosby of the Tolkein League.
"Assassin" and its namesakes
boomed into prominence last
winter, when bizarre reports of
students hunting one another spread
from midwestern campuses to the
University of Florida, UCLA, and
points in between.
Most frequently called "Killing
As An Organized Sport it has its
roots in the sixties. It takes its
acronym, KAOS, from the "Get
Smart" spy spoof television series,
though the game's theme was
plagiarized from other media. �
It is roughly based on "The
Seventh Victim a 1953 science fic-
tion novel by Robert Sheckley that
evolved into a 1965 film called "The
Tenth Victim
As the story would have it, a
futuristic society eliminates war by
allowing its most aggressive citizens
to commit legalized murder. The
killer's goal is to down ten victims
before someone else kills him (or
her). If the killer succeeds, he or she
becomes a hero, is given luxuries
and wealth, and never has to work
again.
The story was translated into a
game played with toy weapons. It W
enjoyed a brief vogue at Oberlin SWK. a
College in the late sixties before it � jr
was replaced by other fads, and was !�$&&?.
largely forgotten.
See KILLING, Page 5, Col.l
New GI Bill Students May
Get Delay In VA Benefits
Man And Beast
WASHINGTON, DC (CPS) -
Unless Congress moves quickly to
pass a $40 million supplemental ap-
propriations bill, thousands of
veterans will not get their education
aid checks on time, Veterans Ad-
ministration officials warned recent-
ly-
Any delay in payment would at-
fect nearly 128,000 veterans who
registered for benefits under the GI
Bill since August 28. While those
who have been regularly receiving
payments should not experience any
delays, vets who have just registered
since August 28 and who expected
the usual month's advance pay-
ment, payment for classes already
taken, or money for work-study
programs may have to wait.
The reason is that the 1980 budget
ceiling has already been reached.
Unless Congress votes to fund the
program with an additional 140
million, many veterans could be
severelv affected.
"If vou extend the delay beyond a
month, it will take a major toll
warned Dallas Martin, executive
director of the National Association
of Student Financial Aid Ad-
ministrators.
"I suspect that a fair number will
have to drop out, at least for a short
time
On The Inside
Announcements 2
Civil War5
Classifieds9
Editorials4
Forecast10
Letters4
Nutrition5

f
F





1 HI I M i KOI IM
s 'l HU K 18, 1980
Announcements
STUDENT UNION
SOULS
COLLEGE BOWL
ACU 1
NCSL
�. � � � � � pa'e in
1980 ACU 1
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Regis'i ��
ml rma'i " � i
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enl all
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TRAVEL
YOUTHGRANTS
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. � . lory ot di
SOFTBALL
LEARNING
BILLIARDS
� � ��-
s 10 p m

.
� . ;
SNOW SKI
CHESSCLUB
SPECIAL EVENTS
JOB SEARCH
TUTORS WANTED
SWIMTEAM
i , � �
CATHOLIC NEWMAN
COMMUNITY
week I . � . . � � �
. ,S3 I �����
CPR
ANGEL FLIGHT


SOCIAL WORK
SNEA
UNIVERSITYCLUB
FREE WILL
ATTRACTIONS
REPUBLICANS
� UAGE
GAMMA BETA PHI
ARMY NAVY STOP. C
Backpacks, BIS, Bomber.
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SIMM. Combat Boots, Plus.
331 ARLINGTON BLVD.
10-6 MonSat. � 756-5844
TENNIS TEAM
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cli.ck�fila
f
v'
tJlali x'1p Si U si
ALL ii'OU GAu EAi
FGLSI.i'J EACH.
ii
� .
for nl -
vandvii I liui tin
a ii mi i �
' - i -I i-l i III- I � II IIM M
,i that's hard I i � it on thi
SAVE
CH!CK�FILA SANDWICH
SPECIAL COUPOfi-Sl.19 each
iu�
Wf I
lllf I ol
OtM' i 1U
Mill .I '
SAVE
i.
4 ��
�T��-
Otti
SAVi

THE TAS1t WORTH SHOPPING FOR
,V
"
iTe
ttling into campus
oesn't exactly
mean settling down.
AD ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised
ItBms Is required to be readi-
ly available for saie In each
Kroger Sav-on except as spe-
cifically noted In this ad If we
do run out of an Item we will
offer you your choice of a
comparable item when avail-
able, reflecting the same sav-
ngs. or a ralncheck which
will entitle you to purchase
the advertised item at the
advertised price within 30
days
COUNTRY OVEN
Potato Chips
THERE'S SOME PARTYING IN EVERY
STUDENT'S LIFE, AND WEEKENDS ARE
SHORT�SO WHY WASTE TIME JUST
GETTING READY FOR THE FUN? WE'VE GOT
EVERYTHING YOU NEED RIGHT HERE�FROM
COLD BEER TO THAT HOT NEW ALBUM!
DIET PEPSI, MT. DEW OR
8-Oz.
Twin
Pack
ON A FRESH BAKED BUN
Lunchmeat
Hoagie
$119
Records & Tapes
8
16-Oz.
Ret.
Btls.
Pepsi-Cola
$
149
H Pius
Deposit
FROZEN SAUSAGE. CHEESE
OR PEPPERONI
Fox Pizza
FOOD.DRUG.GEN
MDSE. STORES
NONE SOLD
TO
DEALERS
OPEN 7 AM TO MIDNIGHT
OPEN SUNOAV
9 AW TO 9 PM
600 Greenville Blvd. � Greenville
Phone 756-7031






I Ml hAST K)I ISI-XN si �� MW K I. lK"
OT
;0M
Students Serve As Ambassadors
B CHERYL FISHER
Stall vv mi, i
1 -is Carolina
I niversity is about
students rhe students
,ue out job. It we have
no students we have no
university stated Dan
I emish, Vice
C hancelloi oi nstitu-
nal dvancement
and Planning.
I emish is heading up
1I mbasssador
Program and he feels
program is needed
foi the external rela
' ionship ot the univei si
v
' A hat bettei way to
ojecl an image of the
unixeisits than through
the students? e have
the best students in
North Carolina so, let's
expose the best students
in North i arolina he
said.
c c o r d i ng t o
1 emish, the objective
of the Ambassador
Program is to "Create
a volunteei corp ot
students to serve the
university in public
relations, admissions
and fund raising ef-
forts
I hi oughout t he
per i 0 d l n w h l c h
students are involved in
the Ambassador Pro-
gram he feels they will
have the opportunity to
come in contact with
important people, mak-
ing an impression
which may be of great
influence to students
later in life.
The basic respon
sibilitv of an am-
bassador will be as
hosts and hostesses
during the various ac-
tivities oi the university
to entertain legislative
friends, corporations,
fund leaders and
donators.
Other duties ol an
ambassador will consist
of conducting tours.
telephoning student ap-
plicants and to help
with university funding
bv working on the
alumni phone-a-thon.
1 emish insisted the
tune element of the
program was strictly
according to individual
commitment. As an
organization plans dit-
fereni activities the am-
bassadors can schedule
their participation in
the activities according
to their availability.
Me said the Alumni
A s soc i a t i on h a s
budgeted $2,000 of in-
itial support to the Am
bassadoi Program tor
the purchase of blazers.
In the tuture students
should be able to work
on a point system to
earn a blazer through
their serx ice.
Rick Robins, Annual
Support Director, and
Maria Christopher, an
1 c l s dent are
organizing the pro-
gram.
According to ap-
plications the program
has atriacted the besi
students II has.
I he application
deadline to the pro-
g r a in w h i c h v a S
September 10 is now
open. A nyone in-
terested in the program
may apply at the
I aylorlaughtet Alumni
Office.
Some Students May Lose
Food Stamp Assistance
By M R( HAKNES
Mafl � nirr
� law concerning eligibili-
ty 1 d stamps will affecl as
many as 200 1I students, accor
dine to Edward Garrison, director
Pit! County Department of
Sov a s. � v ices,
"Approximately 75 percent ol
those students will no longer be
chgib'e Garrison said Wednesday
Vnd these are full-time students
However, students who are
. stamp aid under new
. delines may find some
the Financial Aid ol fice,
rding to Directoi Robert
Boudi eaux.
"11 they are students who may
� food stamps
: financial aid,
they ca apply foi assistance he
" 1 hei � et cally. anyone corn-
in demonstrating a financial
d max have his need met 100 per-
. to a I niied Press n-
nal (I Pi) release, the I S
V � . Department reports that
200,000 students nationwide were
. food stamp aid before the
euide ines went into et feel
i r
Amendments to the food stamp
laws, which took effect Sept. 1
should cut that figure to 150,000,
according to I PI.
In all, there is a list of situations
under which student recipients may
continue to qualiiv It includes
Those with low income and
disability;
-Heads ot households with
dependents;
-Students already participating in a
federal work-study program;
-Those already participating in a
tederal work incentive program.
Garrison added that students.
too, are caught in the trend toward
balancing the tederal budget.
"In the wisdom of Congress, it
was felt, apparently, that the college
student should not be supported by
taxpayer money in the form ot food
stamps 1 question the wisdom ol
Congress. 1 think the future ot oui
country depends on the education ol
voting people.
"I think its important that we
begin to do more to help ail
segments ot the population to
achieve as much education as possi-
ble. The world is verv complex to
dav but its nothing as complex as its
going to be in the near future.
ANNOUNCING
THE WINNERS
IN OUR STUDENT APPRECIATION DAYS'
EVENT IN DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
GRAND PRIZE
$50 GIFT CERTIFICATE-ann steele
Apple Records Rosemary Lucai
Art &amera Shop Rene Lawson
,� Store Roemar) Lucai
Katrina Retnpaon
Kl'iuni Harvey Ki.ihulayton
Boot Barn Susan Bacon
Brodv i Shelia Brick house
t ato i W end) B.is t:
( entral Newi Sharon Kinu
I ertain 1 hings Alne Bower
( offman s Joseph Ku hardson
I ollege "hop Kathv Garrow
� Floral Service William Ralph Bovd
rt s Auto Suppk - J B Hudson
. and Hiiik Man Brenda Cole
( urrv opv t enter Beverlv Dav
I) A Kelly's I anja Sewell
Diener's Bal-erv Angela Washington
( Heber Forties Alison Wainwriiht
- reddies Jill Kunnum
Friendly Wik shop Ann Neaton
(�azebo J j Mi Daniel
' Disi ount laretta hove
be Hardware Valerie iahron
H I. htodfes0 lania Sewell
Hollow ell's Drus Laure r aucette
Harvest Natural hoods - Jane Thompson
House f Hats Judv Kea
I Sue Jan Sarah Dickerson
Jason's Kimberlv Johnson
Jean's Clorv - Dara Godlev
J HernriK Mens Wear Vern Davenport
l.autares Jewelr Barbara Forehand
1 ord'l Jewelers Shiriev Williams
Marl-dv I andy Laura Harrison
V A Merritt & Sons Iammie Donahue
Morgan Printers Bonita Bullock
Mushroom - Beth Burnette
Kitty Cremms
Lisa Rowland
Mike Collura
Laurie Austen
Hart Iheatre Marv Lue Britt
Pr.� tors Ltd Irma I homas
Pu�h s hre Service Vicki Braddy
RiK�an Shoe Repair Jody Lantraiu hi
Robinson Jewelry Rohm Clayton
I he Shoe Room In. Jane Thompson &
Dan C arrijan
Smith EJectri Sandra Powell
1 he Snooty I ox Robin Clayton
Steinbeck s Chip Dickinson
latt ()ftne Equipment Janet Halhdav
I aft Furniture Mania Reed &
Keila Mc(jlohon
University Bool- Exchange Art Diehl
Western Auto Supplv Roger (rait
White's Store Hael Johnson
204 E. 5th St.
Across From
Newby's Sub Shop!
OpenTil 9:30 Nightly
THIS WEEK'S SALE
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SALE $5.77
Cars
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Layaways
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MM

We rejjet that each OJ sou who participated in the Downtown Greenville
Student Appreciation Dav s could not he a winner However. You can be a
winner when vou shop Downtown Greenville
DOW I OVV N GKhr.NV It IK ASSCK IA I ION l(
WNCT-TV
GREEiWILLfi
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9 ALIVE SPORT TEAM
Carlester Crumpler Jim Woods
t
r





QUf �g0t (Earolinian
Serving ihe campus community since 1V25.
Rk h-ri)Ciri t v
Terry Hi rndon,
Chris I i hok, u
Georgi Hettich, ,
Ami x I m m i h. -
I I KtO C i k "i . t i
1 ISA DKl W, , ,
Ch kl t s Chandi I K.
I)ll) NORR1S, i
Scptcmbei 18, lsKt
Opinion
I'juc 4
Rush Week
A Time For Decisions
Thank God it's Friday.
That's a feeling that will prevail
tomorrow when Rush finally winds
down, or culminates, with the clos-
ing ceremonies and celebrations.
For fraternities and sororities, the
week will have been a hectic one-
parties every night and classes the
next day. For potential pledges, the
week will have been a whirlwind o
new faces. But Friday will also be a
day when important decisions are
made.
The Greek segment 01 the ECU
student body is small compared to
many universities in the country,
but they do their share of partying
and their share of service for the
university and Greenville eom-
muniiies. The Greek life is one of
the many rewarding ways to enjoy
(or endure) college life at ECU.
As Harry Tumus, president of the
Interfraternity Council, said in an
open letter in this paper earlier in
the semester, a rushee should visit
all the houses, ask about all the dues
and other requirements, meet all the
members of each house�consider
everything. He was addressing men
interested in fraternities, but the ad-
vice also applies to women consider-
ing sororities.
Of course the Greek life isn't for
everybody, and if you have been at-
tending rush this week, you should
have a good idea if the Greek life is
for you and which chapter you hope
to join. It's an important decision,
one that will undoubtably affect
your life for years to come. So con-
sider all of your options carefully,
and think about how you want to
spend your college years. It can
make all the difference in the world.
Avoiding Traffic Jams
If you attend a class in Brewster,
you have probably noticed the terri-
ble student traffic jams on the stairs
near Memorial Gym. A trip to the
third floor can take as long as five
minutes. It's hard to say just wh
everyone wants to use that one
stairwell, but there is an answer to
standing in line.
Instead of fighting the masses,
being nudged and bumped to your
final destination, overheating
because the person behind you spill-
ed his drink down your leg or has
stopped to chat with someone, try
an alternative route. Just use one o'
the other three entrances to the
building.
Walk slowly and enjoy the
weather while it lasts. You'll get
where you're going in about the
same amount o' time, but at least
you will be in a better mood when
you get there.
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Campus Forum
DO
'Reserve' Seating Questioned
1 am writing this letter to address a
problem that was mentioned in Tues-
day's Easl Carolinian. The problem is
that some o our fraternal organizations
seem to think they are somehow better
than the rest of the student body. This
must be the case since they think they are
entitled to "reserve" seats on the 50
yard line tor their members.
I have just one question to ask them.
Just who in the Hell do they think they
are? Buster Brown? What makes them
special and allows them to come into the
game late and sit on the 50 yard line
while students like myself come earlier
and have to sit at the 10? I can answer
that question myself. Nothing' I hey are
no more entitled to those seats than
anyone else. The pledges in these I rats
had better wise up and disobey their
"masters" from now on, because now
that the student body know this practice
is going on, it will not be tolerated. So
meone could eventually get hurt trying
to "reserve" a seat. There are enough
tights in the stands as it is.
C ilenn Reaves
Junior. PT . Major
Forum Rules
The I us( Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points oj view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
I etters must include the name, mc
and classification, address, phom
number and signature oj the autho
letters should he limited to thret
typewritten pages, double-spaced, r
neatly printed. All letter an subject to
edilinn for brevity, obscenit and libel.
Spendings Cuts 'Take Time'
By DIANE CURTIS
I nited Prrs International
WASHINGTON ' Republican presiden-
tial candidate Ronald Reagan is patterning
his plan to cut federal spending by Si95
billion over five years on a money-saving
scheme that bombed when he tried it in
California.
Earlier this month in Chicago, Reagan
presented an ambitious program to
"balance the budget, reduce tax rates and
restore our defenses
The road to a balanced budget is to be
achieved partly with a 2 percent cut in
spending in 1981, increasing the slashes to
10 percent by 1985 for a total reduction in
projected federal spending of S195 billion
over five years.
The way Reagan plans to accomplish
this shearing, he said, is "through a com-
prehensive assault on waste and inefficien-
cy"
"The old phrase is to cut, squeeze and
trim explained one of Reagan's top
economic advisers during a not-for-
attribution briefing.
No specific programs are targeted for
extinction, the adviser added. Instead, the
bloodletting will simply eliminate S195
billion in "fraud, waste and ex-
travagance
He did not pinpoint the source of that
"fraud, waste and extravagance
But the "cut, squeeze and trim" ap-
proach failed when Reagan, as Califor-
nia's newly elected governor, tried it in
1967.
"We are going to squeeze and cut and
trim until we reduce the cost of govern-
ment he said in his January inaugural
address.
"It won't be easy nor will it be pleasant
and it will involve every department of
government, starting with the governor's
office Any major business can tighten
its belt by 10 percent and still maintain the
quality and quantity o! its operation. So
too can government
What Reagan optimistically proposed
was a 10 percent across-the-board cut in all
state departments and agencies. But as
lawmakers and constituents rallied against
the arbitrary slashes, especially in menial
health and higher education, the governor
backed off from his money-saving scheme
and his first budget was 10 pet cent higher
than the previous year's.
During recent stumping in a Polish
neighborhood of Milwaukee, Reagan
stressed his record as governor and said his
economic proposal would work "because
it did" in California.
He cited a freeze on government hiring
which he promises will be his first act as
president and formation oi task forces to
"go in and look at government agencies
and come back and tell us where the ex
travagance and the waste is and how w�
can cut it down
He said his policies restored C alifornia's
credit rating, eliminated the "deficit posi-
tion allowed the government toretun
billion to taxpayers and cut the a -
nual increase in spending in half.
He did not mention that he also in
two ol the largest tax increases in .
ma history.
But while Reagan does promise
balanced budget, reduced taxes and an in-
crease in military spending, the
nomination candidate has adopted a n
restrained tone in his economic promises.
During campaigning tor the primaries.
Reagan sold the Kemp-Roth three-yeai ;
percent tax cut bill as an economy
stimulant that would pa for itsell in add
ed government revenues.
Now. he warns that turning the economy
around is nor easy and "will take time
ErTHHvTHfc BOMBER'S MORE NHMH THAN THOUGHT OK WE'VE KEN SCREWED
To The Right
Carter Blunders This Week, Reagan Offers Advice
By STAN RIDGLEY
On his way in the back door of a
Corpus Christi high school gym-
nasium to speak to a group of Tex-
ans Monday. Jimmy Carter slipped
on a grassy bank and pitched for-
ward.
A secret service agent quickly
pulled the failed president to his
feet, but the stumble outside the lit-
tle gym portended ill for the Carter
Campaign. Indeed, it set off a series
of serious tactical blunders that has
put the Democrats on the defensive
from which Carter will be hard-
pressed to recover.
At the same time, his opponent
Ronald Reagan has spent a relative-
ly trouble-free week, meeting with
Republican congressional leaders in
Washington in a show of party uni-
jy, and moving in to Texas on a suc-
cessful campaign swing. The con-
trast with Carter's poor showing
this week is a comment on how fast
the political tide can turn.
Carter's trouble began Monday in
the sweltering high school gym when
he chastised Reagan for his in-
discreet remarks made two weeks
ago: "You've probably noticed that
the campaign staff of my
Republican opponent has put him
under wraps said Carter,
because when he's spoken on his
own the last few days he's gotten
himself into trouble
Fine. We've all heard this from
Carter before and recognize it as a
fundamental of his campaign: make
Reagan the issue and emphasize the
irresponsible nature of his offhand
remarks. But Carter wasn't
satisfied, and he continued: "Well,
the point is, when you're in the
White House, in the Oval Office as
president, that's where the most dif-
ficult questions come and you've
got to be able to respond accurately
in a way that doesn't embarrass you
personally and does not embarrass
our nation
Carter then proceeded to embar-
rass himself � not once, but twice.
At that same meeting in Corpus
Christi, Carter played heavily on a
statement by Iran's Ayatollah
Ruhollah Khomeini concerning the
fate of 52 American hostages, say-
ing: (They) are making
statements that might very well lead
to resolution of this problem in the
future
Carter was chagrined to find that
his Secretary of State, Edmund S.
Muskie, was simultaneously con-
tradicting him in Washington, D.C.
So the next day, Tuesday, Carter
found himself 'clarifying' his earlier
remarks, saying that there is 'no
prospect at this time" for a resolu-
tion of the hostage stalemate.
Carter's other mistake was
perhaps more serious because it
charged Reagan with stirring up
racial hatred in this country. He
made his remarks in Atlanta from
the pulpit of Ebenezer Baptist
Church, saying: "You've seen in
this campaign the stirrings of hate
and the rebirth of code words like
'states rights' in a speech in
Mississippi and a campaign
reference to the Ku Klux Klan in
relation to the South. Hatred has no
place in this country. Racism has no
place in this country
Predictably, Carter's remarks
drew strong approval from the
predominatly black audience � as
would any ipse dixit.
An ip.se dixit is any arbitrary
statement thai elicits positive
response, such as "We all love our
mothers" or "We need jobs tor
everyone All of us � including
Reagan � agree that hatred and
racism have no place in this country.
But Carter's unfortunate word
order suggested that Reagan
represents hatred and racism in this
country.
Now, it must be remembered that
Carter is counting on the black vote
in the south and that he might be a
bit overealous in his effort to win
the support of black leaders. In that
effort, however, Carter has exposed
himself as being susceptible to the
same kind of verbal slips of which
he accuses Reagan. And that makes
Carter's attacks on Reagan ring
hollow.
The troubles that Carter has had
this week come on the heels ol his
refusal to appear with the two other
major candidates in an televised
debate, but his position is bv no
means unsalvageablc. In fact, he
could take a bit of advice from
Ronald Reagan: whether we're
on the opposite sides of the fence or
not, we ought to be trying to pull the
country together and not tear it
apart
Are you listening Jimmy9
Stan Ridgley is a Political Science
major with a degree in journalism
from the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill.
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! Ml EAST( XKOi IM
Fe
si I' 11 MH1 k Ik. 1980
Page
w
I ice
Costa Rica
ECU Offers Courses In
Central American Paradise
"You cannot imagine what it's like to be dropped off at a strange home, in a
strange country, where nobody speaks English, It was the most difficult yet ex-
citing experience of my life. M
Jeanie Vasteek yets a bucket bath. Peurto dargas
Style, from l.otta. a park service ranger in Costa
Rica. I otta has studied at I-( hapel Hill and has
been on two voyages with Jacques Cousteau.
Killing As Organized Sport
Is Campus Fellowship Fantasy
Continued from page I
Game rules vary from campus to
Generally, players arc
� it list and are required to
a minimum number of peo-
on the list weekly to -tav in the
game. As they hunt, they arc being
hunted b others, but the players
n'l know who is out to get them.
1 hey can be �'killed" in the shower,
by best friends. Ml is fair, though
classrooms and crowds are con-
sidered ofl limits, the game con-
tinues until there is but one sur-
vive
Harold Clark, who takes his
he chiel on "G
Smart organized a giant KAOS
i "summer project" at the
,ersit oi Texas last June. He
ad in the local paper
25 players. He got 65.
The survivor eventually collected
u1 SI65 for his skill as tracking
id assassinating the other 64 con-
testants over almost three months ot
saky business.
Dungeons &. Dragons is the better
own and more complex role-
laying game, but can be just as
consuming as KAOS. There are
ties oi students flunking out o
hool because of D & D.
"It's fun explains ill Ni
a vice president with Tactical
die- Rules, a game production
company in Geneva, Wisconsin.
And profitable. Niebling says
the D &. D equipment his
duces and markets have
ubled annually each year since
1A, and have quadrupled in the
: 12 months.
"You see the field growing faster
and taster understated Jamey
Adams, an editor at Games
Magazine. "There are an number
ol imitators coming out with othei
role-playing games involving
gangsters, King Arthur, science fie
tion
1) & D, ol course, involves an ar-
ray ol unearthly characters, derived
from Tolkein books about Middle
Earth. Each player assumes the
identity ol one o the characters,
and takes direction from the
Dungeon Master, a combination o
a r e 1 e r e e a n d spontaneous
playwright. He creates fanciful,
demanding situations to which the
characters must respond.
He may sav. "You are crossing a
. . ovei the Valley of the Ser-
pants, when it suddenly collapses,
hurling you into a sea of reptilian
monsters
The reason for the campus in-
terest in role-playing fantasies is. ac
cording to University oi Minnesota
sociologist Gary Alan Fine, is a
desire "to move away from passive
intellectual acti ities,
sion
notabh telev
fine spent 18 months researching
D&D and foui othei fantasy games,
and found the appeal in the "science
fiction sub-culture" was the oppoi
tunity to live out fantasies they
would ordinarily experience passive-
ly.
I he people who participate in the
game he discovered, "tend not to
be the sorority oi fraternity types.
I hese are intense people
Nutrition
B KK HAKIH.RF.FN
(mi. ral Mansgri
Editor's Note: This article is reprinted from the Sept.
4, 1979, edition oi The East Carolinian. The costs and
courses ottered have been updated for the Spring 1981
( osta Rica Program.
I slipped the tape box onto the shelf, my ears were
still ashmg from wearing those cumbersome head
phones foi three houi s.
I was leaving the language lab when I saw a notice,
"ECl c osta Rica Program on the bulletin board. It
said to see Dr. Robert t ramer in the Brewstei Building,
room A 222, so I decided to drop by on ins way to
Spanish class and check u out. ! hat mined out to be the
best notice 1 evei read
Dr. c ramei is m interesting and friendly man with a
lot oi t list hand knowledge ol 1 at in merica. He and
his wife have traveled extensively and have been the
directors oi the C osta Rica Program for eight years. Be
ing an avid photographer, "Doc" showed me some
beautiful slides oi c osta Rica, and immediately I knew
that I had to visit this tropical wonderland
But what about the cost ol this exotic excursion? And
what kinds oi classes were offered? And ! don't even
speak Spanish!
He explained that the cost ol the trip was the same as
one semester at II in Greenville, plus a program fee
o $475, a round-trip plane ticket from Miami to San
lose (S2S2. Pan Am), necessary visas and spending
money I ach oi the 15 students in the program would
live with aosta Kuan family in Heredia, 11 kilometers
north oi San Jose, al a cost ol $125 month, which in
chide- loom and board, and laundry usually done once
a day
I wish 1 could live that cheaply in Greenville!
We would study at I niversidad Nacional in Heredia.
rhe courses offered this yeai include: "ropical Biology
(3 Ins.), Geography oi Middle America (2 hrs.), Beginn
ing and Advanced Spanish Conversation (3 hrs.)
Spanish C uliure (2 his). Field Studie
this one!), Anthropology (3 hrs.), and Intt
Relations ol (. entral America (3 his
pei classmen are also encouraged to .
study in then respective fields
Don't tret � all classes are taught in !
Spanish, ol course).
According to Dr.ramer, the 15 slots
trip are "tilling up last And this yeai like thi
years, more girls than boys have signed up " In
there weie 11 girls and 4 boys, and in 1979 I
5 boys.
rhis year the program begins Ian iv
16. I he program includes 21 held trip
eight one-day, and eight half-day I he
the field Studies course, and before I lei
had seen more oi the country than any
(my C osta Rican family, that is)
In this small country located betwe
Panama, the climate varies from eo
regions to tropical rain forests to a
beautiful beaches And we saw it all.
But the biggesi thrill was leaving the I i
almost iour months You cannot i
it like to be diopped oi I at a stranj
country, where nobody -peak- I nglish i
difficult yet exciting experience ol my lib
all ot us a new perspective on the good ol' I
I he only ieal problem that any ol .
"culture shock but theramers were al
help us solve whatever p r o b 1
I he WH1 program will be the last foi Di
Dr. John Bort oi Intercoastal Marine R
the assistant director this spring and will d
director of the program when C ramei It i In I
future, the directors will be from vari
and will change every few ear accordii
"We want to keep it going saidra
good program " Very few oi the students
beer, to (. o-ta Rica would argue with thai
Defeating Diet Dilemnas
t ;
tm
By LOU ANNE FORBES
Sl�fl N nln
Diets are like opinions
everybody has one Fortunately, all
diets hae one basic thmg in com-
mon: putting less food m youi
mouth than your stomach want- to
hold. Or. to put it another way,
eating food- lower in calories to
satisfy your hunger, lor example,
just one quartet-pounder with
cheese would have the same amount
of calories as a huge salad, especial-
ly it it had a low .alone dressing.
Cutting back on calories is a good
thing for you. but be careful not to
forget about good nutrition. Even
on a diet, you must take in enough
vitamins, minerals, tats, car-
bohydrates and protein to keep your
bodv functioning properly Your
new diet won't help you much if it
gives you anemia
The be-t way to lose weight is to
combine proper exercise with a
reduction in calorie intake. Exercise
can make you look and feel better.
help work ofl frustration, and. oc-
casionally, let you eat that tempting
ice cream cone or drink a cold bottle
ol beet without bothering your con-
science. The type ol exercise really
doesn't matter, as long as you co
something.
Trying to maintain a well-
balanced diet is harder here at
school than back home at Mom's
dinner table, but it is possible, with
a little effort.
A health book can help you find
your specific nutrient needs. Once
you've determined those need
stick to the diet chart, lor instance.
it you are allowed two piece- ot
bread a day, and you eat a piece of
toast for breaktast. then eat only the
bottom half of the bun on your
roast beet sandwich at lunch.
Beware of vending machines.
When you run out of groceries, the
Student Center is closed, and you
can't attord to go out, it's a great
temptation to hit the vending
machines. I his is often the downfall
o your dtet. Because oi the lack ot
low-calorie snacks, one tends to get
potato chips and candy bars. Skim
milk, tomato juice, dried fruits,
raisins, or yogurt bars would be tas-
ty substitutes, would ounce for
ounce be low in calories, and would
provide better nutrition.
Be careful about fast-food places,
too. It's helpful to keep one of those
little books that lists the calorie con-
tents oi different foods
ing to be eating out
To start your diet, d
number of calories von n i
sume every day. using a
chart from a health I
the amount o activity
the amount o calories �
Plan to eat, say, five h
calories a day less than �
This will enable you I
two pounds a week. Mosl
some weeks, you will 1(
(hooray!) and and some w�
will not lose a pound (oops!
most important thing
is DON! C.I I DISCOl R
If you go on an eating bit
make a resolution to d
mediately, and stick
gain doesn't have to be pern
if vou don't want it to bt
A Big
War
By ROBERT M. SWAIM
Contrary to the popular belie!
that slavery was the root and cause
the civil war, most educated
Americans today, from both the
uth and the North, realize that
this bloody conflict was over Jeffei
sonian principles of government.
We, as a nation, are beginning to see
that we have come lull circle in the
120 years since the civil war began
Today we are in the midst of a
great national debate in which we
are engaged in a battle and cause
akin to a holy war, to return to a
decentralized government where the
bulk of government powers are
reserved for the individual and
sovereign states.
It was this same crusade and
cause that led us into the civil war in
1861.
It was after the War ot 1812 that
the federal government became
blatantly nationalistic and broadly
constructionist in its policies.
Southern political leaders, fearing a
federal government with expanding
powers under the doctrines of im-
plied powers and broad construc-
tion of the Constitution, sought to
safeguard the interests of the
minoritv South by championing
state
government
rights and local self-
The South wanted a
weak central government in
Washington, with all powers not
specifically delegated to the federal
government being reserved for the
individual states, as the United
States Constitution had provided
tor. More than anything, they
wanted strict construction of the
Constitution.
After the Missouri Compromise
ot 1820. the South depended upon
its equal voting power in the Senate
to block any dangerous federal
legislation.
An impartial study of the early
history of the American Republic
from the period when a band of
patriots, following the wave of
Washington's sword, transferred
power from a king to the people,
will demonstrate that when Colonies
were transformed into States, the
latter delegated, in a written Con-
stitution, the powers to be conferred
on the federal government. But all
powers not so delegated were reserv-
ed to the states themselves because
thev had never parted from them.
Hence, sovereign power belonged to
a State, while only derivative, and
not primitive, power was possessed
by the federal government.
The slate did not confer upon the
federal government, that they were
then forming, a right to coerce one
of their number for any purpose;
for it is not natural that the creator
should create either executive,
judicial or legislative authority
anywhere in which it would be po-
tent enough to destroy or diminish
the power it had reserved for us own
purposes.
The Southern people were
educated in the belief that the
allegiance of the citizen was due first
to his state, and that in any conflict
between his native state and the
federal government, his place was
with his state � at her feet he
should kneel and at her foe his gun
should be pointed. This is the only
explanation of the great and en-
thusiastic responce by the masses of
our Southern ancestors to the call
for arms to defend their beloved
land and the great social order
which existed there.
It has been said that man is under
no circumstances so independent as
he is when the next step is for life or
death. The men who were to be
enrolled as the soldiers of a new
C onfederacy of states, to battle for
its existence, knew they were taking
a step which might bring to them a
hostile bullet and a soldier's grave.
The movement to change the map
of North America and make two
republics grow where only one grew
before, was enthusiastically received
by the great body of the Southern
people.
The Honorable Jefferson Davis
said in his inaugural address on the
steps of the state capitol at Mon-
tgomery, Alabama that
"government rests upon the consent
of the governed, and it is the
right of the people to alter or
abolish a government whenever it
becomes destructive of the ends for
which it was established When the
Southern states entered into the
Union of the United States in 1789,
it was with the undeniable recogni-
tion of the power of the people to
resume their authority delegated to
that government whenever, in their
opinion, its f unct i o n
perverted and it ends del
The declared purpose
union, from which the
withdrew, were to estab
insure domestic tranquility,
vide for the common def
promote the general welfare,
secure the blessing- oi
ourselves and our prosperity
It was the judgement
sovereign states that compi sed the
Confederacy that the federal
government had been ed
from the purpose- tor whic' it
ordained, and had ceased to answer
the ends for which it was establish-
ed.
The Southern legislatures
declared in their secession vote- that
as far as they were concerned, the
government created by the constitu-
tion should cease to exist when it
drifted beyond its constitutional
bounds.
In taking this action, our
ancestors merely asserted a right in
which the Declaration of In-
dependence of 1776 defined in-
alienable.
� W I
t
f
l





6 rHE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 18,191
bl Vtollp A)ori
Happenings
Campus Events:
Wednesday 17
� 4:00 P.M. Frisbec golf S. Ficklen I.M.
field
� 4:(M) P.M. Home economics intercouncil
picnic
� 7:00 P.M. Womens volleyball: N.C.
Slate Raleigh N.C.
Thursday 18
� 3:30 P.M. Soccer Catawba College
Home
� 8:00 P.M. Artists Series: EMPIRE
BR sS QUINTET Hendnx Theatre.
rickets: Students $2.00, Public $5.00.
� 8:00 P.M. ECU Poetr Forum meeting in
204 Austin.
Friday 19
� Sororit) Rush ends - Preferential Night.
� 12:00 Noon - 3:00 P.M. Family Fun l)a.
� 5:00, 7:00& 9:00 P.M. movie "10" Hen-
dnx Theatre.
Saturday 20
� 2:00 P.M. Womens volleyball: Ap-
palaichain State - Boone N.C.
� 5:00, 7:00&9:00 P.M. movie "10" Hen-
dnx Theatre.
� 7:30 P.M. Football: Florida State.
Tallahasee.
Sunda 21
� v - � El College I lot
� s� p i Faculty Recital: Otto Henry,
i t lei ' � R � I Hall.
i � ion. 21st - 29th
Metal smithing and jewelry making in the
Southeastern United States. Cray Art
; asl Carolina Museum o Art. Sun-
days 1 i) - 4:00 P.M weekdays 10:00 - 5:00
P.M.
Monday 22
� 3:30 Soccer Belmont Abbey College at
Belmont N.C.
Movies
Buccaneer:
"The Hunter" staring Steve McQueen.
Shows at 1:00, 3:10 & 7:10;
"Final Countdown" staring Kirk Douglas,
Martin Sheen & Katherine Ross. Shows at
1:15, 3:15, 5:15 7:15 & 9:15;
"1 he People Who Own the Dark" Shows at
1:00. 3:00, 5:00, 7:00 & 9:00.
Pitt Plaza:
"The Little Dragons" Shows at 3:30, 5:20.
7:10 & 9:00;
"Smokey and the Bandit Two" staring Burt
Reynolds, Jackie Gleason, Jerry Reed, Dom
DeLuise and Sally Field. Shows at 3:00,
5:00, 7:00 & 9:00;
"XANADU" staring Olivia Newton-John.
Shows at 3:30, 5:20. 7:00 & 9:00.
Park Theatre (Downtown)
"DYNAMO" Shows at 7:10 cV 9:00 MI.
3:30, 5:20 7:10 & 9:00 Saturday & Sunday.
Senior Show
Announced
i iai 1 reeman oi
(. rouse. N.C, a senior
student m the 1I
School of Art. is now
having a show ol art
works oi various
media, in the Kate
1 ewis Gallery in the
Whichard Building.
The show will continue
through Sept. 26
Freeman's exhibition
includes intaglio.
lithograph and
c o 1 oi and a rylic pain
tines and di twines in
B.S. degree in art
educ it ion with a minor
in pi i n t ma k i n g ,
Freeman plans to enter
the Ml-A Program in
printmaking at ECU,
and later plans to
teach, on either the col-
lege or high school
level. He is a member
o the ECU Print
Group, the North
Carolina Watercolor
Society, and the
Southeastern Center
foi Contemporary Art.
He is the son ol Mr.
and Mrs. Bill i iceman
o Crouse, N.C.
Seafood
Lovers
Fosdick's
"All You Can Eat"
Seafood Buffet
Every night from 5 till closinr. we will feature
our fabulous new Seafood Juffet - Delicious
Fried Shrimp, Golden Brown Oysters. Fish.
Deviled Crab, Shrimp Creole. Fried Chicken.
Clam Chowder, Slaw, Hush Puppies
S-WD'SSHOK
RbPAIR
Krawi. vr.
c7SJS-1 x
ATTIC
N.C �
No 1
NigMclub
THUR. IN
CONCERT
SUNDAY
8:00PM
All You Can Eat
Only
$6.99
FRl. SAT. SUN.
TAINT
FRl 3:30-7:00
AFTERNOON
DELIGHT
OLDE TIME SQUARE
DANCE
HOMETOWN BOYS
&
GREENGRASSCLOGGERS
&
CLOGGING CONTEST
Fosdick's
1890
Seafood
A Great Place for Seafood
Lunch Dinner Catering
All You Can Eat Special
To all students and faculty Sunday thur
Thursday 5:00pm. 'Til closing you may
purchase our Fried Fish Special for only
$2.50
Coming Soon:
Oyster Bar
Fresh Seafood Mkt
Party Room Available We'll
Furnish the Cake lor Birth-
day. Annlveraarlea, etc for
Parties of 8 or more. Call for
Reservation 7 56 2011
Hours.
Lunch
Sunday-Friday
11:30 A.M. 2.00P.M.
Dinner
Sunday-Thursday
5:00 P.M9:30 P.M.
Friday and Saturday
5:00 P.M -10.30 P.M.
2311 S. Evans Street
Greenville. N.C.
Back To School
Special
KOte, by Nature's Way
specializing in natural hair cuts for men A women
Present ECU Student I.D. Fot
20 Off Your Next Haircut
Offer good thru SEPT. 20, 1980
Downtown Mali
Greenrilie
�ppoi inentaonly
758-7841
Cut This Coupon
71
ui
tl
I
I
Tl
h�
'I
si
I
I
J.D. Dawson
2818 E. 10th Street
Come by and pick up
your
Complimentary Catalog
Exceptional
Values
Great
Gifts
V
WELCOME BACK STUDENTS
Get ready tor
fall with an exciting new Design Cut and
take advantage of fantastic savings.
Thru Sept. 30
00 OFF all Curly Perms or Body Waves
ree Shampoo Blowdry,or Shampoo Set
with All Haircuts.
Call today for appointment or consultation
7523419
2800 E 10th St.
What It Is Angel Flight is an honorary, professional,
service organization with the objectives of becoming in-
volved in the community. We help sponcor the Red
Cross Blood Drive, have a Halloween Carnival for Boys
Homes, and we also sponsor families during holidays.
Fun Activities we have Reg parties, dances, baPe
sales, cook outs, and a military ball. Our biggest joy is
being together. There is no Military Obligation
Dates To RememberSeptember
23(Tuesday); submarine party
24(Wednesday); a keg party
25(Thursdayk a popcorn party
Become an Angel
Empire Brass
Quintet
HENDREX THEATRE � EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
Thursday, September 18, 1980
Admission: E.C.U. Students � $2.00; Public $5.00
All Tickets at the Door $5.00
Tickets Available at Central Ticket Office
Mendenball Student Center
Sponsored by the Student Union Artists Series Committee
McMillian's Cafeteria
Under New Management
Open: Mon-Sat
A
C
0
u
p
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Cut This Coupon
"
�M;N!� Call us for ECU
31P Football Picnics
Great Chicken - Best Prices
Dine In Take Out
or DRIVE THRU
Call In Orders
752-1211 2415 E 10th
Sun
-11:30-2:00
-4:30-8:00
-11:30-2:00
Serving
8
15
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Different Meats
Different Vegetables
Different Salads
Different Deserts
Different Breads
Located in the Pitt Plaza
Bring your card and get a free drink
w.o1 �'��r�ttrri
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1





I HI t S!AROI SI PI i 1HI K l.v 1980
"ersity
5 Qfl
'H
Dama Season Ticket Sales Begin
Ike 1 asi � arolina Playhouse an-
y ires it's 1980 81 season ot plays
will tickle youi fancy, tap yoin
pes, tame youi wicked husband and
tie your tortured soul
I on the bill are the
t httul I930's musical corned)
Sea, Moliei e's mad. c ap
e he Doctor in Spitt '
David Rabe's powerful
ol im paratroopers
Getting Out, a hard-
drama about a young
light lot lite; and roun
i out the season, the Playhouse
Shakespeare's d namic
u .aesai
- will he a ven special yeai foi
�oiive because, with one c
each major production will
be presented in a different facility
on the ECU campus. Because ol the
renovations now being made in
McGinnis Auditorium, the
Playhouse is moving it's plays this
yeai to Fletcher Hall in the Musk
Department and to Mendenhall Stu
dent Center. The Playhouse hopes
to move into the all new McGinnis
Auditorium nest season
Dames at Sea the long-run, otl
Broadway musical opens the season
tor the Playhouse I his nostalgk
look at the era of the Hollywood
musical is tilled with tap dancing,
singing and wall-to-wall laughter.
I his fun-filled evening ol entertain
ment is suitable tor everyone's
tastes It will keep you smiling and
humming all the wa home. A reci
pient of the New York Outei irele
Critics Award as best musical of the
year, Dames at Sea will be presented
in V.I. Fletcher Hall. Octobet 9-15
at 8:15 p.m.
Next, a special added attraction
will be Moliei e's The Doctor In
Sf)ite of Himself, It you would like
to find out how a shrewish wile
tames her husband, don't miss this
zanny, farcical comedy. It will be
presented as a lull dinnei theatre
performance in Mendenhall Student
Center, October 30 through
November 1, at 6:30 p.m.
Streamers, the third production
ottered, will feature an all male
cast. It is a powerful drama named
tor the Armv Paratroopers who
stteak to their deaths trailing
unopened parachutes. The Drama
Department's Studio Theatre will be
the site for this unsettling drama. It
will run November 17-22 and 24-25
at K:15 p.m.
The major off-Broadway success
Getting Out will be the next produc-
tion. This moving and well written
play probes deeply into the past and
present of a young woman fighting
for her life against incredible odds.
I his hard-hitting drama is fast
becoming a big hit across the coun
try. It will run February 18-21 and
February 23-28 in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center at 8:15 p.m.
I he final ol the major produc-
tions offered this season will be the
powerful Shakespearean classic,
Julius Caesar. This drama will be a
political look at one of
Shakespeare's most moving and
powerful plays. It will be presented
in Mendenhall's Hendrix Tin
Foreign Newspapers Offer
Glimpses Of Other Lands
K l)A II) NORKIs
always been fascinated bv newspapers
es, and the further awa the place.
. mating the newspaper. Mv personal
action includes newspapers from New oik
in Chinese and Hebrew, and a copv
i iban Communist Part newspaper,
� sent week after week to this office, (it is
ta . thrown awa unopened week alter
newspapers are nice conversation
hut are difficult to read. A s II interesting,
readable paper is I he limes, a
i ondon newspapet which is available
1 i I library. I he paper is fairh small, as
� an overseas edition, (imagine the cost of
say, the Sundav edition ol I he New
ew.s section is interesting, because ol the
ml ol detailed foreign news, fhis is nature
� � paper, though. I he most fun parts
. some ol the ones you might not think
� rst, such, as the ads or the I section.
glimpse at the IV section ol the limes was
to dispel am notion that I nglish televi-
- all highh cultured and in good taste. Each
e three big networks there has its share ol
a- all ol us on this side ol the Atlantic i
liai with Foi instance, B1K -2 offers Dallas
c 5 on Mondays. It'sver) populai over there,
itl not with the chap who writes the
v His little note read. "Yet another
is seemingh endless series being
s supposedly innovative channel
annel also has Rhoda and 1 'he Dukes
ms ol Britian have then own special
erams I he Welsh branch ol BB
otters such varying fare as Welsh-language news
and I nghsh language High Chaparral. Happv
Daw is ottered on the I Istei station.
Another network, Thames Television, has such
famihai shows as 1 ittle House on the Prarie nd
Mork and Mind.
Besides other merican shows, such as Fantasy
Island, there are some British shows on, too,
mosl ol which are nor well-known over here.
I here are a few British game shows. I his con-
jures up an intriguing image of an Oxford-
accented Montv Hall type, saving things like.
"Do you wan: to keep the tour thousand pounds
you have just won, or do you want to exchange it
foi what's behind Portal Number One?"
Since the BBC is non-commercial, there are no
ads to contend with during the programs, one
trouble with this is that an hour-long American
show without commercials is onl 25 minutes
long. (Well, okay, Fifty or fifty-five minutes,
maybe i So, main shows start at odd times like
6:55 oi 7:05 oi 9:10. It sounds contusing, but 1
suppose one get� used to it.
I he advertisements arc interesting, too. Main
companies like to make a point o publicising the
faci that thev have done business with, the Royal
1 amilv. ()ne wondei s how much a firm's business
increases because ol being rhe Official Purveyoi
ol Flooi axes to Hei Majesty.
I he classified section has some surprises also.
One ad read. "Rooms . vailable to let in 17th cen-
tury priory, surrounded by fields in vale ol Berke-
ly, Gloucestershire It sounds much more in-
teresting than "One-bedroom apartment, two
blocks from campus. . only, no pets
Anot,her ad that caught my eye was in the help
wanted section. It wanted volunteers foi an ex-
� on e Roman r uins in i am
bridgeshire. You know, it I didn't have that exam
next week. . .
MM
April 7 at 8:15 p.m with a matinee
performance April 8 at 1:00 p.m
and April 9-11 at 8:15
Edgai Loessin, chairman ol the
1 astarolina Drama Department
will direct Dames at Sea and Julius
Caesar. Travis lock hart, member
of the directing faculty of the 1 C L
Drama Department will direct The
Doctor In Spue of Himself. Cedric
Winchell, also a member ol the
directing faculty of the E I Drama
Department will direct Streamers
and Getting Out.
Season tickets tor all tour produc-
tions Dames at Sew. Streamers.
Getting Out, and Juliusaesar - are
now available at 110.00. These
tickets can be purchased from 10-4
Monday through Friday in the
Playhouse Box Otl ice or by sailing
757-6390. The box otl ice is located
in room 108 ol the Drama Depart
ment on the E I campus.
Tickets for the special dim
theatre production of The Doctor In
Spite oj Himself will be $9.00 foi
the general public, and $7.00 for
ECU students. The perform;
will begin at 6:30 p.m. on Oct
30, 31 and November 1. The sp
dessert performance will only b
I CI students, faculty and si
The price ol admission will I
tor ECU students, and $4.50
faculty and staff. The des err
formance will begin at 7:15 p.m
October 27, IX and 29.1
can be purchased from 10 4 ii
Mendenhall Student entei 1
Office.
i uttnm Crafting
and Repair
Original Handcrafted Jewelry
in Silver and Gold
120 E. 5 it.
(.reenxiUe, .( . 27834
Buying and Selling
Gold and Silver and Coins
7582127
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pregnancy ttt, birtf con
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A M 5 P M weekday
ftaleiftt WeTtefi't
Health Organita,ion
? 17 Watt Morgan St.
Ralelgtt. N C 27MJ
Susan
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Ellen
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We are the women who make the Fleming
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personal. ocrn.fV1ent.lal oare at a reasonable
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Saturday abortion hours
Vsxyssxly
Sradng birth, ooatrol boors
Call 781-8680 In Ralel vxytima
The Flaming Oentsr .T613 HaworUi Drive Ralal�i,NC 8760G
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2818 E.lOth St. Greenville,N.C.
WE WANT YOUR GOLD RINGS,
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are Brody's mud mocs, $28.00; wide
wale corduroy cheeno's, $21.00; oxford
cloth shirts, $18.00 and women's
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Where Our Prices Are
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iffe Square
10-9Mon-Fr. -10-6 Sat -756-4001
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I
t





I HI I SI (. K( 'I IM VN
Sports
Pirates Take
With A-A Inman, Jones
On Bench, Out For Year
Bn M VK! I s( M) IK
� i i

.t!l team
l ,i,i State
�nally

Inman and
: Freddie lones
1
knee in the fall.
I he Hope Mills native was
operated on at 1 p.m. yesterday
(Wednesday) at I'm counts
Memorial Hospital and will miss the
entire season.
1 he injury ends Inman's eol-
legiete career, as he is ineligible tor
tor consideration as a hardship case
suffered because he is already in his fifth yeai
a ruesdav on tne squad alter being redshirted
foi the in 1976. rhe NCAA allows a playei
ind lones are lost onj five years to play foui seasons.
�� 1 he loss ot V ayne is a great
low not only to the club Emory
�But said, "but to the athletic depart
� a great ment here and to Wayne himself.
Out thoughts, prayers and feelings
go oui to him.
I rida "The bad thing is that we can still
go play Saturday. Wayne can't.
1 hat's sad because 1 know how he
was looking forward to playing a
losses said
1 moi at a
is
nou '
the Hot
. (. !
:s teUei team like 1 lorida State
. m
Ten Seminoles
Emory, Pirates Look
To 'Do Something Big
A
O
I I

IU II KI I n H M)I I K
I
"V
i
.
Replacing Inman at right guard
( i fo will be junior Bud Lacock, a
the 245-pound Wilmington native,
as the Backing up I acock will be freshman
�,
�HHmv
i
� try
- are
ates ha
N :man Quick of 1 aunnburg.
I he injury to Jones came in
Saturday's 2 2 1 loss to
Southwestern 1 ouisiana. He,
suffered a knee injury. Jones will be
.Kk redshirted, though, "and will have
w
ful

.
W ;
years o eligibility remaining.
1 mory said, will be sorely
d in the not-so-deep Pirate
sec �
�v, ou can't imagine how m .
i reddie could mean to us at 1 lorida
he said. "He is one ol the
� sopl on ensive backs in
country
Moving to Jones' weak side safety
. i position will be junior Smokey Noi
ris. Freshman C lint Harris, who
i " Emory is very high on, will be the
backup
Startii e in Myers' noseguard
� � th� second week in a
row will be fresl
1 en � 1 ong, a 2- poun
ECU OB Carlton Nelson pilches, will lead
Pirates against FSL Saturday

-
:

W

vs
ithout help from Wayne Inman (1 I and Freddie Jones R)
Wilh Two 1980 Shutouts
FSU Strong Defensively
the
"s t ,
: con-
� ing si: the
ighest

, - tenth in the
oil and
Press, bu
;on-
I � team in tfu
outing?
you
; r. tisiana Si ate on
�mg
. ago goes
ich Ed
Pirates
- ei mic team
in
" 'The NFL 1 oda' show on CBS
ranks i lorida State number one
said Emory, "and that's the way we
look at it. The Associated Press and
I PI rank them nine and ten, but
they are a much bettei team than
at.
"They are one oi the top defen
sive football teams in the country li
will be a great challenge to our of-
fense
rhe Seminoles defensive unit, led
by senior All-American candidate
Ron Simmons at noseguard, has
a wed their opponents only 13
firstdowns and just 295 total yardt
through the first two outings.
The Seminoles return eigl
starters from the 1979 defensive unit
which guided FSl to an undefeated
record in regular season action.
senior Mark Macek returns al
defensive tackle, but he is pushed b
rumor James Gilbert for the starting
berth Senior end Arthur Scott is the
only othei i
the 1 5 ridary rei irns
all si
Hunter from the team which as
nationally sixth (AIM ranked in-
cluding a 24-7 loss at the hand
Oklahoi the Orange Bowl
Offensively, the Seminoles have
also handled the opposing defense?
in equally mastei ful tyh Sei
tailback Sam Platt has rushed foi
186 yards a lone 1 SI rusl
touchdown, will junior I
MikeWl
104 yards.
Pass . the or.
Seminoles, I i beginn-
ing oi the season, i
coach Bobby Bow den and 1
were uncei I jumoi
Rick Stockstill.
The loss ol the two top
callers tor 1979 has thu
to be no problem, as Stockstil
( i a as
. . (979
I, 245)
step
r h e P
make theii marl
D � �
Stadium and con .
li �bb Bowde
1 SI
l u a v
all
gan Bow
Pirate have an
id the �
n Satui
, .
easy I us. 1 ast C arolina's ;
gram has bee on soli
stt ! �l p Itt
Stalking His Prey
Florida Male All-America noseguard Ron Simmons iOt and
learn in ale await opposing offense
WITN To Televise ECU-FSU
FSl Coach Bobb Bowden
Stockstill and Simmons
PIRAll NOTES:
It you can't make the trip to
Tallahassee this Saturday foi ECU'S
matchup with nationally-ranked
Florida tate. have no tear.
The game will be telecast live buck
to Greenville and surrounding areas
via W1TN-TV, Channel 7 in
w ashington.
Plav-bv-play and color commen-
tary will be provided by Hub Burton
and Mike Weaver, one-time Pirate
starting quarterback
The telecast will begin at 1 p.m.
with the kickofl coming minutes
later.
Most everyone knows that
Florida State is ranked among the
nation's top ten teams. There's
good reasons behind that too.
The Seminoles have won V) o
their last 18 games. The only loss
came at the hands of super-power
Oklahoma, 24-7, in the Orange
Bowl back in January.

Things went in different direc for 1 asiarolina and 1 ' rida State last week, rhe Seminoles cl bered Lou � tl 52-0 while Pirates c nmiti trier tumbles and lost t v ithwesternCharles Chandler �-
I ouisiana 2-2 1. 1 .e:s thmg seemeo to go right ! SI in it- home openei 1 hings
w ert �
start as an all-
time attendance n arl - 623 was
set.
Three Sen u quai terl i �
tossed a total oi six touchdown
passes in the win 1 out were
credited! to starter Rick
Stockstill, who replaces
stai limmy Jordon.
Defensively the Seminoles picked
up then second consecutive shutout
after downing 1 si 16 () one week
earlier. Both came without the ser-
vices of All-America nose guard
Ron Simmons
FSU held Louisville to mmu� five
- rushii rid 56
ten .
11 ' � i e s nake it
in a row they will have
breal HI - marl g in 100
straight games.
Speaking ol R the
6-1, 225-pounder has some incn
ble statistics Ml he does is bench
press 52 pounds and run a 4 6
ard dasl i a bad athlete,
huh'
1 si coach Bobby Bow den has
wat 0-11 ii 1975 H

the clul
. -
V. ith this �
Bow den is 36-12 il
i schoHeart's U
no progr at;
Ik 1i
Row ,�
� � ia
Wh1 We
()l NOTI Ol 1 kl 1
who was reportedly o
al 1 SI betore Bowden bi
down to stay

Remembei I
1 hough backs -
credit tor the success '
team, especially one that runs the
wishbone like 1 c I , there is no
more important person op, the sq
possib �
awarded a pai
Heat- i Delight.
isk
h s how :he w
. iae.





I HI t ASTCAROl INIAN
SfcPTLMBER 18, 1980
les
ook
� 4
is Big
stars,
i feai
imply
is Prey
ud Ron Simmons (50) and
Isc
su
Alabama Ranked First;
OSU Drops To Second
B DAVIDMQFFIT
I PI Sports Writer
ing
against
1 o
leWeel
psi Ht
tve
� oi men often
igh, as the
� . A local
nuch of
a local ice cream
gnize a "Lineman
following every Pirate
ten L;d Emory will
uck lineman is.
Alabama puts its
reclaimed No. 1 rank-
on in Saturday
what Bear
Brunt iWnks is the
best quarterback the
Crimson ride will face
this season-
phe ride will be in
a, ksoi � Miss to pla
theOleMiss Rebels and
thai means the highh
! a bam a
must contain
ircade who has
p righl where
! last season
the
istern Con-
total offense.
'We won't face a
ei one, that's for
Bryant said o
si i cade s ho is
a icing 206 yards per
game while getting the
Rebels ofi to a 1-1
start. 1 hat average is
m leading because Ole
gave Fourcade an
early rest last week
alter the Rebels jumped
into a big first-half lead
enroute to a 61-7 rout
of Memphis State.
Alabama hasn't
played since opening on
Sept. 6 with a 26-3 vic-
t( r over Georgia Tech
that indicated the
to.
del
Jo!
pi�.
he
!c I
S,
fere
bo
si
Crimson Tide defense
is just as fierce as it was
last season when
Alabama posted a
perfect record and won
the national champion-
ship but that the rebuilt
offense needed more
work.
"1 don't know if the
extra week helped us or
hurt us said Bryant,
"but 1 guess we'll find
that out Saturday
Alabama, boasting
the longest current win-
ning streak in the na-
tion, is a two-
touchdown favorite as
it goes after its 23rd
straight victory Satur-
day. The Crimson Tide
also will be seeking to
hand Bryant his 298th
career victory.
The only other con-
ference game in t he-
Sou t li eastern Con-
ference Saturday is
Mississippi State at
V 'underbill with State a
17-point favorite.
In SEC versus ACC
action, 91 h - r a n k e d
Georgia hosts Clem-
son, Auburn hosts
Duke and Florida visits
Georgia Tech. Also,
Kentucky hosts In-
diana, LSU hosts Col-
orado, Tennessee hosts
Washington State.
lOth-ranked Florida
State hosts hast
Carolina, 18th-ranked
South Carolina visits
4th-ranked Southern
C a I, Miami visits
Houston, Southern
Miss hosts Louisiana
Tech and Tulane hosts
Rice
Georgia, awesome in
last week's 42-0 win
over then 19th-ranked
Texas A"M, has no in-
tention of taking Clem-
son lightly not after the
Bulldogs, despite being
runnerup in the SEC,
lost to three ACC foes
last season, including
12-7 to Clemson.
"There was a time
when an SEC team
could let up against one
from the ACC and still
win said Georgia
coach Vince Dooley,
"but that day is over
Be that as it may,
Georgia, sparked by
freshman Herschel
Walker who rushed for
five touchdowns and
229 yards in his first
two college games, is a
10-point favorite.
Auburn, forced to go
all the way with third-
string quarterback Joe
Sullivan, younger
brother of 1971
Heisman Trophy win-
ner Pat Sullivan,
squeezed past TCU last
week, 10-7, and with
No. 1 quarterback
Charles Thomas (torn
thigh muscle) and No. 2
quarterback Randy-
Campbell (knee) still
questionable, Sullivan
may have to go the
route again this week.
"I'd like another
chance said Sullivan.
"1 was a little bit ner-
vous last week. 1 didn't
want to let everybody
down. I feel responsible
for all the turnovers
(Auburn fumbled seven
times and lost four of
them)
ran mm co upon
COLOR
PRINT FILM
� DEVELOPING
I & PRINTING
I
I
I
112 exposure roil
124 exposure roll
136 exposure roll
(C-41
process
only)
THURSDAY NIGHT -
JERRY THOMAS BAND
HAVE A HAPPY FRIDAY
Reduced Beverages & Most Imports
John Brannen Band Starts At 3:00
Sept. 19 & 20
JOHN BRANNEN BAND
$4.49
Limit one rou with mis coupon'OMer expires Sepi 79 t980
BISSfTTfS
On The Mall Downtown Greenville 752-3131
. . � Well, the winner
a rcai treat. Each
mouth down a sundae at
e shoppe.
it's not all. though. Each win-
, ll n to eat the treat as fasl as
ble. At the end of the ear the
with the fastest time will be
Jed a party for 15 people by
Icart's Delight.
Who says linemen don't get good
reatment? Just ask those Pirate
tacks how much they would like a
tice cold sundae.
CLASSIFIEDS
FOR SALE
PHOTOGRAPHY
B Y
f C -
6 S
Ca
Wf '
bt
O '�
5
FC-
m
ce
02
II
PO
v -
�t
P

be "
G �
FO
E PEARL Snaredrotn
5S new Best Otter
' s L a r qi hiqh neck
tacket S2S and medium
. � M S2S Tt, 882? after
n weekend
iLE One pair of new.
ed 6 � ' Jensen Triaxial
kers so watts of power 20
its v,it r an' included
T, . nmes SA S00 60
lull automatic
Hi E mpire 2000 EMI
ear speakers
im 'ennae Paid il '00
r Call 7S2 88�0 ask tor
JIE Mattress and Box
sr ,�3 ne ver �id .o cjii
PERSONAL
CUDv CRAFTING and repair
o' and silver. Buying and
sl -s of gold and silver by Les
Je- s 120 E 5th SI 7S8 212.7
ArVHING tOU CAN WRITE:
wt cs- write better Typing, pro
ott's: ng editing Write Right
75 ftia
SE 3R ENGLISH STUDENT
wil tutor English Literature
Co t.on and Grammar Call
7i 7 atrer s 00 p m
PODESZWA: Featuring color
Portraits, Resumes. Portfolios.
Weddings, Photo Restoration
BEST PRICES IN TOWN! Call
Peter Podesiwa 7S8 0962
POSITIONS OPEN for
waitresses Hours are flexible to
fit your schedule Apply 8 10 am
daily S & S Cafeteria. Carolina
East Mall
SUNSHINE STUDIOS offering
classes m Ballet, Jan Yoga and
Exercise Specials for students
Withm walking distance of cam
pus 7S6 7235
LOST: Set of keys between
Umstead and downtown 758 9873
if found
BETH Be sweet Hope you have
a nice day
GREENVILLE COLLECTORS
CLUBS: �tn Annual Ant.que Flea
Market Saturday. Sept 20 Evans
Mall Host Downtown Greenville
Association Info: 752 3456
FOR RENT
RESPONSIBLE FEMALE
ROOMMATE wanted to share a
two bedroom mobile home 5100
month plus half fuel oil m the
winter Other utilities included
Located 10 minutes Irom campus
must have your own transporta
tion Cheryle 752 8747
THE
FIT MESS'
CLUB' X1-
fcr men and womoo
tool ivANttrrxntT
OatlNVILLl "� c l�il�
Come by or tall
TODAY and set
up an appointment
for a tree workout.
Student Rates
Features Include:
Male & Female Instructers
Nautilus Machines
1 to 1 Supervision on Nautilus Workouts
� Olympic Barbells � Coed Hours � Dumbells
Showers, And Lockers -Sauna -Whirlpool
NKWI.Y KXPANDKi) WOKKOU1 ROOM
AT NAUTILUS FITNESS IS OUR SPECIALITY
7589584
Prompt Rrojessional
typing at Reasonable
Rates
(all:
'temporary Secretary
Services Wilson AC
291-0723
COLLEGE
STUDENTS
Improve your
grades!
Send $100 for your
306-page, research paper
catalog AM academic
subjects
Collegiate Research
PO Box25097H
Los Angeles Ca 90025
�-closedl$l 00
Please ruth the catalog
Nam
Address
City
Si aftZ'D
� LSS-� � � �
Don't Miss
The
Osborne
Brothers
Bluegrass
and Folk
Festival
9 hrs�Non-stop Music
Each Oay
SAT. & SUN.
SEPT. 20 & 21
Featuring
Student Union
Coffeehouse Committee
Presents:
Auditions
Thursday-Sept, is
9-llpm.
riday-Sept. 19 9-12pm
Room 15-Mendenhall
Free
Sign Up In Rm. 234
Mendenhall
mm
STUDENT UNION
ust cwtoutu uwivHwrn
Osborne Brothers
Sat. Sept. 20
NOW, FOR HEARTIER APPETITES
r; i i - pi o vr
f ,m "J
Alabama
Sun. Sept 21
Jim & Jessee
Sat. & Sun Sept. 20 ft. 21
PLUS
1 Slortemans � Sept 20
' Raymond FasrchiW & the Crowe
Bros �Sept 20 21
' Plus Other Groups
Ticket Prica
$12 � 2-Day Advance
$7 � 1-Day Advance
$8 per day at door
at the
Hugo Outdoor
Theatre
0rtr Ticutl NM
Mit Crc Mor. . -
OsScneB-os �t 8o� '69
GnttO N f �
SataMi
ll . ajt �eco'3-nsic- i Xt
� Kinstrjr ll$rir.gtor �pr If.O'ds � G �
GoiMri M :$ A.IS0 �� f-oc- ReccCS I I
t'MSu'f Crs' dMMI !IX 0�r. -G�3st
Mir.s '�, s 9�(- Mtringr s Mtn t I
3 bites, 4 biles, maybe even more bites more!
The King Is Waiting For You At Your Participating Neighborhood Arby's fljgs
Redeem These "King Size" Coupons Now!
ARBY'S KING $
SANDWICHES
ONLY
Giant savings on 2 Artsy' Roost B�t King Sandwiches!
Umft en coupon por customer
Not �alM wWt olhor coupon
Oood on) at oorttctpaNng Atry �roott boof rottouronta.
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1
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t





10
I Ml- 1-AST CAROLINIAN
SEPTl MBLR 18. 1980
The Fearless Football Forecast
ECU AT FLORIDA ST ATI:
DUKE AT AUBURN
CL.EMSON AT GEORGIA
IOWA AT NEBRASKA
MIAMI AT HOUSTON
MICHIGAN AT NOTRE DAME
PENN STATE AT TEXAS A&M
N.C. STATE AT VIRGINIA
PURDUE AT UCLA
RICHMOND AT WYOMING
SOUTH CAROLINA AT SOUTHERN CAL
ARKANSAS AT OKLAHOMA
CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
(19-5)
Florida State 27-14
Auburn
Georgia
Nebraska
Houston
Notre Dame
Penn State
Virginia
Purdue
Wyoming
Southern Cal
Arkansas
KEN SMITH
ECU SID
(17-7)
ECU 21-19
Auburn
Georgia
Nebraska
Houston
Notre Dame
Texas A&M
Virginia
UCLA
Wyoming
South Carolina
Arkansas
JIMMY DttPREE
Asst. Sports Editor
(16-8)
Florida State 35-10
Auburn
Georgia
Nebraska
Houston
Notre Dame
Texas A&M
N.C. State
UCLA
Wyoming
Southern Cal
Arkansas
TERRY HERNDOIN
Advertising Manager
(15-9)
Florida State 21-10
Auburn
Georgia
Nebraska
Houston
Notre Dame
Texas A&M
N.C. State
UCLA
Wyoming
Southern Cal
Arkansas
GUEST PICKER
WOODY PEEI E
The Iail Reflector
Florida State 28-10
Auburn
Georgia
Nebraska
Houston
Notre Dame
Penn Slate
N.C.State
UCLA
Wyoming
Southern Cal
Arkansas
FSU Not
Fond Of
Wishbone
( ontinut'd from p. 8
the have a coach who
is used to playing and
coaching in important
football games.
"Our defense against
the run will get a good
test he continues.
"East Carolina uses the
wishbone offense and
the last time we saw
that was New Year's
night against
Oklahoma. I don't
have to remind you of
that result (24-7 loss)
Emory coached at
Clem son in 1976;
How den's first year as
head coach of Florida
State. T he Tigers
traveled to Campbell
Stadium in the season
and Emory remembers
the results vividly.
"We played there in
lTrS when 1 was at
Clem son Emory
recalls, "and we beat
them 15-12. I'd be
might) happy to take
that again
Sell Fast
Thru
Classifieds
710 North Greene St.
Greenville, N.C.
5 Minutes From Campus
J ust Across The River Bridge
10 Off on any Meal
W ith This Coupon
and ECU I.D.
"I
Take Out Special Fri. & Sat.
SNACK PACK
2 Pieces Chicken
3 Hushpuppies
Only 99C
Reg. $1.25
No Extra Discount
WE CATER ALL EVENTS
Under Management And Ownership Of
JimTerrell And Dwight Garrett
752-0090
KING SANDWICH DELICATESSEN
OPEN DAILY 11 AM-9 PM MON-SAT
HAPPY HOUR MON. - THUR. 2 PM-6 PM
2711 K. I0TH (COLONIAL. MIGHTS SHOPPING CENTER) DAIL 752-4297 FOR ORDERS TO GO
HOUSE SPECIALS
SI LAK � Greenville's original steak sandwich � I hin Sliced steak cx)ked on the grill with onions
and served on a crusty Italian roll with our special tomato sauce. $2.50
Order a Cheese Steak and get Greenville's original with cheese melted all the way through. $2.65
HOAGIL � Hard salami, danish ham. Canadian bacon, and provolone cheese with all the trimmings.
Hor those with a hearty appetite or share it with a friend. $2.60
CHEESE HOAGIE � A delicious blend of Provolone, Mozzarella, Colby, American & Swiss
cheese, garnished with oil & viagar. Hot or Cold � Your choice. $1.95
CLUB � Combination turkey and ham or turkev and bacon � Your choice. Served with lettuce,
tomato and mayo. $1.95
KING CLUB � Combination turkev. ham and bacon. $2.60
KING BURGER � Quarter pounder � all meat with all the trimmings served to vour preference.
$.50 - With melted cheese. $1.70
KOSHER CLUB � Corned beef and pastrami piled high on rve bread � This triple decker comes
with a double laver of melted Swiss cheese, hot mustard and vour choice of either slaw or kraut.
$2.55
Attitude Adjustment Hour
MON-THURS 2-6PM
12oz. Mugs, only 35
Open 11 AM Til 9 PM MON-SAT
Qll 752-4297 For Take Outs
COASTAL BAIL BOND CO.
24 Hour Prompt Service
2721 E. 10th Street
Greenville, N.C.
758-0675 7584988 758-4959
"The Student's Friend
n
WILLIAMS AUTO
PARTS INC.
Complete Line Of Foreign &
Domestic Parts
WHOLESALE TO
EVERYONE
758 5507
8:00a.m. to6:00p.m.
Entrance On Myrtle Ave.
RESEARCH
PAPERS
10.278 on file � all subjects
Send $1 00 (refundable 'or your up-to-date
340 page, mail order catalog
We also provide researcr an fields
Thesis and dissertation assistance avai;abie
RESEARCH ASSISTANCE
��1322 Idaho Ave . 206
Los Angeles. Cahf 90025
(213)477 8226 or 477 8227
Sept.
17
thru
20
Arts
&
Crafts
will
be
featured
and
on
sale
at
"The
Place
to
Be
Carolina
East
Mall
264
Bypass
on
Highway 11
Greenville
1
Snip-A-Slip
And Save
Clip These Valuable
Coupons For A Total
Savings Of $20 On
Popular Prep Work
Pants, A Velour And
Shetland Sweater,
A Sporty Ski Jacket
Or Vest And A Free
Monogram On Your
Choice Of Classic Ox-
ford-Cloth Shirts.
Redeemable Today Thru SatSept. 20
FREE FREE
This Bonus Coupon
Entitles You To FREE
Monogramming On
Any Regular-Priced
Oxford-Cloth Shirt
In Stock.
Offer Expires SatSept.20
Present Coupon For Free Offer
Downtown
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Phone: 752 8965
Carolina-East Mall
Greenville
Phone 756 8242
JQ Prep Work Pants 00
Get $3 Off On Any
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Offer Expires SatSept.20 (DO
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$3
4. Velour Sweaters
$4
Get $4 Off On Any
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4 Offer Expires SatSept.20 $LA
Present Coupon For Purchase 1
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Nylon Ski Jackets
� Ski Vest
$4
Get $4 Off On Any Nylon
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J4 Offer Expires SatSept.20 1&A
� Present Coupon For PurchaseP X
$4 TiPPin& Shetlands Cji
Get $4 Off On Any Shetland
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Q4 Offer Exp.res SatSept.20 tt
Pre�ent Coupon For Purchase4
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pM9$99 999999m?

!






Title
The East Carolinian, September 18, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 18, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.77
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of ECU Libraries. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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