The East Carolinian, September 16, 1980






(Bhe �aHt (Earnlmtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 55 No. 7
10 Pages
Tuesday, September 16. 1980
Greenville, V(
Circulation IO.ooh
Ficklen Seating Violations Draw Criticism
B MIKE NOON AN
1 very student with a valid I � I in and
vity card should be assured oi equal
opportunities in 1 icklin Stadium.
In the past, however, some campus
amations have sought to "tope off"
treas ot seals in the student section ot
stadium But, according to Di Kenneth
kati. Directoi ot thletics, "Out existing
policy regarding student seating is that all
lents will be seated on a first come first
e basis
" t this point m tune, the only area that
is set aside tor a particulai group will be
those seats necessary to seat members ot the
Marching Pirates that assist us in our pre-
game and hall tune production Kan add-
ed.
At Saturday's game, howevei many
students were discouraged from sitting in a
tour to si row area in the students' section
directly up from the 50-yard line. Ihis sec-
tion had been "roped off" in persons
wishing to reserve the seats tor friends.
ccording to Dean .lames Mallory, Ad-
ministrative disoi in charge of frater-
nities, "Most of the groups in the past to
ask permission to do this were fraternities.
But my office has never given anybody pet
mission to do this
Mallory added, "I am against reserving
seats. This is a first come first serve proposi-
tion. It they are reserving seats, they are do-
ing it unbeknownst to me
"It they want to sit together, they ought
to come together early. Then they can sit
together if they want to. We want all the
support and spirit we can get, but vou can
not reserve a section when everybody pays
the same tees Mallory added.
An unidentified student who is a member
of a E( U fraternity said. "Sure the frater-
nities try to reset ve seats at the football
games
"We send our pledges ovei to the stadium
about three or tour hours bet ore the game
so they can save some ot us seats We do it
every year he added.
Ihe practice ot saving a large number ot
seats has caused friction between those
students who want to sit, and those who
want lo save seats foi their friends.
At tunes, when students chose to sit m the
"reserved" seats anyway, tights or verbal
exchanges followed.
According i Intra Fraternity president.
Harry rumus, the II has nothing to do
with reserving seats "Hach individual
fraternity does it. nybody with any sense
knows you ie not allowed lo reserve -a ,
tie said
A November 4 Prediction
Election To Feature
Presidential Choice
.v B�
Faculty Dining To Occupy Mendenhall
It ma soon become a rarity to find the Multi-Purpose faculty and staff. Ihe proposed menu includes hot
Room in Mendenhall Student Center so empty and soups, fresh salad from a salad bar. sandwiches and
quiet. Plans are now in the works to convert the laruc beverages, dministralors hae suggested that the new
tirst floor meeting room into a dininy area for K I facility may have positive effects on student meals.
By DEBBIE HOT A LING
On Wednesday, Oct. I, students
will not only be able to vote for class
officers, day and dorm represen
tatives they will also get to vote
on then choice for the president ot
the United States. Sort ot.
Charlie Sherrod, Student Govern-
ment president, explained. "I think
the students at ECU would really
like to get to vote tor Reagan,
Carter, or nderson We're going
to give them a chance to do that a.
month bet ore the real election
When students go to vote tor the
class officers, day and dorm
representatives, they will also be
able to pick up a seperate, color-
coded sheet ot paper which is a
mock presidential ballot. Since
3.5(H) students usually vote on an
Iraqi Fighting Threatens Hostage Debate
. Hrrmnji
1 � iffairs committee ot'
meni Sunday recom
mend . pen discussion on the
2 American hostages
I" fighting with Iraq
ii (. iiiit port could delay
moniti �red by the
BB( in I . ,a d 'he Majlisask-
il r, yatollah Hashemi
.to put the, issue ot the
ages, kvho spent then 316th day
iptivity, on the agenda ot an
unspecified future session 1 he nexl
full meeting of parliament was
eduled for 1 uesday .
But the intesified border lighting
with Iraq, including the tirst naval
battle oi the recent clashes, could
fort .1 postponement of the long-
Border Clash May Force Delay
awaited debate
1 ehiah Radio reported that tout
Iraqis were killed when two Iranian
naval vessels returned fire on two
Iraqi frigates in lighting neat the
port oi badan in southern Iran. 30
miles from the Persian Gulf.
"Ihe Iraqi forces are massed
along the border. 1 hey are ready
and have deployed their entire
capability Gen. Failahi, acting
chairman of Iran's joint chiefs ol
stat t. said on the radio.
Failahi said Iraq, "the agent ot
the woi ld-dev outer (the United
States) was playing out a "sinister
and coherent plan" to tighten the
political and economic blockade ot
Iran and had moved its lull force
from its western and northern
borders to Iran's borders.
In Baghdad, an Iraqi defense
ministry spokesman quoted by the
Iraqi news agency reported Iranian
artillery tired on military barracks
at Ash-Shahla and Al-Bawarm in
the Basra strip in southern Iraq.
lehran Radio said si Iraqis were
killed and live injured Saturday in
clashes with guards in several
villages near Sonqor in Kerman-
shahan province in northwest Iran.
One Iranian guard was also killed in
addition to six soldiers and revolu-
tionary guards who reportedly died
in scattered confrontations in the
western border ones ol Mahshahl
and lumar.
Parliament, foi the second time.
asked the foreign affairs committee
to "take into account suggestions by
Majlis deputies" and draft a reply
to a letter from a group ot U.S. con-
gressmen sent in July appealing tor
the release of the hostages, lehran
Radio said.
Ihe Majlis' open debate recom
mendation comes two days alter
Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini said
the hostages could be released it the
deposed shah's wealth is returned.
U.S. claims against Iran are cancell-
ed, Washington guarantees no I S.
intervention in Iran and releases
froen Iranian funds.
Bowl Attracts Mind-Gamers
Bv DANA sun
1 ail means tootball to many peo-
ple with all the festivities and
lights surrounding the game.
But to a smaller section of the ECU
campus fall means College Bowl �
a sport whose tans and players await
the start ot each new season with
it same anticipated excitement.
( an a game structured around the
academics be tun' Ihe players find
it addictive and "Once they have the
tever they are hard to stop or so
savs Wanda Yuhas, the College
Bowl Coordinator.
Ms. Yuhas is an enthusiast oi
( ollege Bowl. In tact, she met her
husband at E( IPs tirst intramural
competition in 1977. College Bowl,
however, goes much further bak.
Dr. Hough, coach of last year's win-
ning team, says he can remember
when evrvbodv would drop what
thev were doing on Sunday after-
noons in order to watch the battle
royal on the tube. That ended when
commercial sponsors dropped it.
Today il can be heard on Public
Radio
College bowl is not a complicated
game. It consists of 2 teams. 4
players each, competing to answer
questions correctly. The questions,
written by College Bowl and authen-
ticated by the Readers Digest
Association, cover all academic
areas, (i.e arts, science, literature,
history, music, current events,
sports) The idea is to be quick on
the buzer and score the most points
tor your team.
Intellectual snobs and eggheads
are two stereotypes often assigned
to College Bowl players, in actuali-
ty, says Ms. 'yuhas. the best players
are well rounded individuals with
avid interests in a variety ot areas.
Bowl participants range from rugby
players to me d ical si u d e n t
graduates. Anybody can play. Ihe
only requirement is that you be a
full time enrolled student ot the
I Iniversity.
Adam Smith, a technician at
Mendenhall. attests to that tact. He
and his co-workers did the set-up
work tor the Bowl in '78. While
working, thev listened to the ques-
tions being tired at the teams. lo
their amazement they found that
they were able to answer a majority
of them, which lead to the develop-
ment oi their own team in '79.
Adam Smith was chosen tor the all-
star team that same year.
'79 proved successful foi ECU. it
began at the campus intramural
tournament of approximately 20
teams. Rodino's Raiders added real
spice to the event.
The team looks to Peter Rodino,
a New .lersev congressman involved
in the Watergate hearings, as their
"cult hero That's how John
Yuhas and fellow team members
became Rodino's Raiders, "hey,
came to all then matches decked in
tee shins with skull and cross bones
and hung Rodino's portrait and let-
ter of well wishing behind them.
This intimidation and psych worked
well with their high IQ's and they
finished fust in the ECU finals.
I he all stat team chosen from the
tournament last year consisted ot
Raider's Captain and only female
Stacy Worthington, Raiders John
Yuhas and Doug Queen, and super
star freshman lorn Chenier, with
Adam Smith as alternate. I his team
went to the Regionals to place thud.
defeated by Chapel Hill and
Vanderbilt. Competition runs up to
the national and international level.
See BOWL Page 3, Col. 1
average in campus elections, this
presidential poll will give IC I
students a general idea ot where
students stand ov. the preside!
election.
"One thing the poll could in
dicate Sherrod said, "is are I asi
c arolina students holding true i
what othei campuses are doing? In
othei words, are thev bai
Reagan or sticking with Cartel oi
ue thev gomg to Anderson as an
alternative We'll be giving the
results ot this poll to I PI,
ssociated Press, and ot coursi
the 1 asi Carolinian
Hansen Matthews, recently ap
pointed elections chairman, will be
responsible for the running ot the
polls, "It's my job to coordinate the
ettorts ot everyone else. I'll be mak
ing sure that the groups who will be
running the polls will
precincts on time to run 'lieu shifts.
We'll also be double-checking the
counting procedure. I verything will
be done ver v carefully
S.O.U.L.Sampus c i usade tor
( hrisl and Gamma Sigma Sigma
will be working at the voting
precincts, fhey will be checking ID
Petition Crows To 2600
cards and activitv varjs and making
sure the cor rest voting procedure is
followed
( ampus elections will begin a' 9
am. ()ct 1 and students may vote in
then dorms, the student store, the
r oatan snack bar . 'he Allied
II alth bldg . and Mendenhall S
dent C enter I iling tor oliices
begins Sept 12 acontinues
through Sept 22. I herewill be a
datory meeting torall
didates on Sept. 22 alp.m. in
m 221. MendenhallSi idem
( entet.
"We encourage peoplelo. gel m
� ed Sherrod -aid.)
do: m i epi eseni at i v eswill be
membei - ol the legislatuiA Will
able to pas- bills. C lass officers
will be members ol theexecutive
council and legislatureIhe vice
presidents will not be members ot
'��sai ure
"In (tie past, void turnout tuts
been pretty low I think it's mainlv
due to the fact that no one really
knew ihe candidates. Some never
even knew it was election day
sherrod said. "I'd like to see tiki!
.hange
Four Greenville Area Men
Arrested On ECU Campus
In Two Weekend Incidents
An 18-year-old Greenville man
was arrested at 11:55 p.m. Saturday
alter I C I campus police spoiled
the suspect allegedly looking into a
girl's room on the south side ot �1
ten Dormitory"s lust flooi
Jerry Reid Williams, an employee
ot National Spinwine, was charged
with Peeping lom.and transported
to the Pitt County's magistrates ot
fice. He was latei confined at Pitt
C ounty jail under a SUM) seemed
bond.
c ourt date is set tor ()ct. 15 in
Put County District Court.
In an unrelated incident 1 hut sdav
night, three non-students were ar-
rested and charged with larceny
aftei allegedly stealing three mirrors
11om cats m the pai king lot between
lame- Street and C otanche
(. linton Harrell I angley. 20;
Mark I phriatn Gorham, Jh .24, and
Don 1 a v on Harris. 23, ail
employees ol American lobacco
Company in Greenville, were ap
prehended bv HI police in the
parking at the corner ol I hud Street
and Reade.
Ml three suspects were charged
with two counts ol misdemeanor
larceny and jailed at Pitt County
Jail under a $300 bond.
I he value ol the three mil rot s
was estimated at $90 c ourt date is
set for Sept. IS. All three suspects
were banned from the 1I campus.
East Carolina's Med
School Numbers Up
tf Y BLEV'NS
According to Van Brown, a friend and supporter of ex-WZMB general
manager John Jeter, the petition to reinstate Jeter as the head of ECU'S
dormant FM radio station, has now drawn about 2600 signatures. Brown is
pictured here (sitting) in front of the Student Supply Store.
13,161 students comprise the on
campus em oilmen! tor the fall
semester, according to Registrai I.
Gilbert Moore 1 his total, an in-
crease ol nearly 500 over last fall,
includes 14. students now in the
School oi Medicine, Moore said.
40 of the 14 medical students will
be freshmen.
One-fifth ol the freshmen are
women, and nine ol them are I C U
alumni.
Since opening in August, 1977 as
a tour-year medical school, the
school has increased the number ol
new students from 2S in 1977, to 36
in 1978 and to 40 in 1979.
The 1086 applications received
for this year's freshman class repre-
sent more than 25 applications tor
each ol the 40 available positions.
Although the school does not
graduate its charter class ol physi-
cians until May. the school has pass-
ed one major milestone this sum-
mer. In June, the school honored
the first residents lo complete all
then postgraduate training here.
Dr. Edwin w . Monroe, associate
dean tor external at tans said
"Despite the fact that fc( I will not
graduate its first medical students
until 1981, the School ot Medicine
has met the goal ol training its I
phy sicians
All ol the residents chose to re
mam m Northarolina to practice.
Regarding this. Dean William 1
Laupus said. "We're very proud
that the first residents to complete
their graduate training here are in
family pi act ice and that they are
staying in the state to serve out peo-
ple
On The Inside
Announcements 2
Classifieds9
Editorials 4
I umbles Costly S
Grants3
I etters4
I ocal View:ECU5
Psychic5

1





rm sinn w
M PI! MHI R lf 14sn
Announcements
TUTORS WANTED
NCSL
SOCANTH CLUB

POETRY
fONTi SI

pi gran
SPECIAL
EVENTS
pq
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SNOW SKI
MSC COURSES
� � � � � present
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EPISCOPAL
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SIGN LANGUAGE
CLUB
INDEPENDENTS
FOR ANDERSON
PHI ALPHA
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COMMITTEE
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Ri
For Carefree Hair
Carefree Cuts
Carefree Perms
Call "The Friendly"
758-3181
Our stylist are trained by today's top
For free consultation call us today!
Walking Distance from Campus
10 Discount with ECU l.D.
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the student . teersfoi Reasai
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p n sep' if ' t � ea I i lai t � �
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PHI ALPHA
Ph, �-�ip a Tnea ' � rtorarv
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FRESHMEN
The F rest n an R g stet s ' bvi
arrived and an Fres��
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tables set '� ' I Ay
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GAMMA BETA PHI
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LEADERSHIP
lTc mee's every
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Settling into cam
life doesn't exactly
mean settling down.
i

AD ITEM POLICY
Each of these advartlaed
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?
I






I
T
Grantsmanship In Humanities
LISA JO SPIVF Main young people philsophj ol this pro rhere are two ol am eligible group.
-unvknif, are mislead b this gram is to gel young categories ol awards; However, it is expected
I M I grant project and othei people who are not ex- those for $2,500 or less, thai main projects in-
tre Derhan th MeS financial programs, posed to humanities in- and those for more volving participants oi
obstacles t h 8reateSl Ck" Ski Ml Rv" vo'ved; mostly outside than $2,500. Because high school age 01
.�I , . l aming a H. Franke, acting young people, or young the competition foi below will be budgeted
, eauca,on Foi directoi ol the Spon folks not attending col- largei awards is in at $1,000 or less, rhese
a there are sored Programs at East lege oi high school, tense, applicants are project may last a
which Carolina University Most ECl students are urged to budget then minimum ol three and
am ielp; eithei Vou do not have to be a required to take a projects for $2,500 oi a maximum of six mon-
inrougn financial aid oi college student to app humanities course, and less is possible ,ns,
� su. grants y Basically, this gram unless they plan a ma- I he maximum gram
�out" ll,a,ls Is intended primarily joi in one ol these amount is $10,000, ex Interested persons
'ram ibe Endow for young people out ol areas, this giant is cepl foi certain media should till out an ap
the Human high school and at col useless to them projects Becauseofthe plication, which can be
�ne way in which lege age, but junior Mr. Franke does not high production costs obtained by writing:
�pie can be high school students, work directly with involved, up to $15,0(K1 Mail Stop l03-( . Na
�: u money to fui graduate students, out students, but would be may be awarded foi dowment foi
hen education in ol school youth, and glad to give out any in media projects showing i Humanities,
employed persons are formation available, exceptional promise Wasl trton !).(
Diplomas oi Mis office is located on
It I s I i k )l IM W MI'I I MBI �� '

Sell It Faster
&
a
V Through Classifieds
. n help pe
ndel stand the n
eligible
degrees
I u i r e
H
luu a i
aspira . and with a Ph I) ma
- nents thai apply
oui culture Irani i I, "
Applications from 20506 Information is
the First floor ol the both individuals and also available at the
Rawl Annex Business groups of young people Placement Office or the
Building across from may be considered I he Ofl of Contracts and
the Student Suppl) projeci directoi may be Grants at 1c I .
e
Bo wl A ttracts Brains
( ontmiH'd from Pace 1
�w n ollege Bow1 isn't all
serious; players like to
� on ion is run Ms. pushes have fun, too. I he
111 tournament finishes
ivaied 1-d lol oi A �' match againsi
204 E. 5th St.
Across From
Newby's Sub Shopl
iite
. e. I ).�. �
i
Ms
idds that
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ion "Dai
the winners and
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ni- nii'L in' Im
Open'Ti) 9:30 Nightly
with a pii
all pai
A So' save loom on
vou! calendai tor CX
llth and I2tl
pplications foi teams
It art beinu excepted in
: Pi .� Offict I
Acvei M ihas h Si ud
Is sma 11 C enter. 1 oi mote in
ill 56
a have been Oked et. 213.
j. D. Dawson
2818 E.IOth St. Greenville, N.C
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�&

Class Rings
Necklaces
Wedding bands
Watches
Ear Rings
I
pv
Tuesday Sept. 16-Saturday Sept.20
Bill Lyerly Band
Tuesday and Wednesday
Ladies Free
Men $2.00
Thursday Ladies $1.00
Doors open 9:00pm
Music starts9:30pm
A
1 THIS WEEKS SALE i
1 LIST $8.98ALBUMS!
1 SALE $5.77
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WE Bl l Y USE1) AL HUMS
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"V
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GREENVILLE
9 ALIVE SPORT TEAM
Carlester Crumpler Jim Woods
r





?
1
uHje Etfat Carolinian
Serving (he campus community since 1925.
Rk HARDGRI 1 N.
1 t Rk1 Hi KIX, n
Chris lie hok, �,
Gl okc.t Hi i i k H, i
Al 1 I (. S1 1 K.
embei 16. 1980
. fumnr'
I ISA DRl W, i .
Ti rrv Gray, v, i
CHARl 1 s CHANDI 1 K. v
David Norris. . ,
Opinion
Page 4
ID, Activity Cards
Students Harassed At Game
I he defeat o the Pirates by Ca-
ins Saturday night wasn't the only
ns in Ficklen Stadium. Security
was cracking at the student en-
irances, and hoards of people were
turned away from the gates for fail-
ing to have both their student I.Ds
and activity cards.
1 here's a good reason for check-
students' identification at the
ite: It makes sure that non-
udents are not allowed into the
ime for free. But the conduct oi
many gate officials was unfair and
� urd. and it cost students money
d unnecessary hassles.
Students are required to have a
alid 1.1). and activity card to get in
Me gate. 1 he activity card shows
thai a student lias paid his fees for
the semester and is eligible for free
idmission to football games and
other activities. The I.D. only mat-
ches a student's name with his face.
If the names match on the I.D. and
the activity, card, the student is
ed into the game. That's sim-
enough.
Many students, however, didn't
mIsci to carry an I.D. card to the
game, only an activity card. They
presented their activity cards and
their drivers' licenses at the gates
and were turned away for not hav-
ing proper identification. A few
students tried other entrances in
search o' more lenient gate atten-
dants, but most were forced to buy
a ticket to a game that was paid for
with their activity fees.
The only function oi a student
I.D. card is to prove that the person
in the picture is in fact who they say
they are, nothing else. Doesn't a
drivers' license do the same thing?
What happened at the game was
an overzealous application of the
axiom "Don't go anywhere without
your I.D. and activity card This
rule was made to protect students
from the misuse of identification,
not to give university officials an ex-
cuse to hassle a student.
This neanderthal practice is
senseless and inconvenient, and it
must cease immediately. The
university is here to serve the
students, not to harass them for
minor technicalities.
STUDENTS MUST
PRESENT I.DACTIVITY
CARD, DRIVER'S
LICENSE ,Z MAJOR
CREDIT CARDS,
BIRTH CERTIFICATE
r- Campus Forum
1 lappiness Is A Warm Bun
1 he proposed faculty dining area
in Mendenhall may require a small
allotment of space, but the benefits
to students might be well worth it.
Of the two alternatives offered to
finance the purchase of new equip-
ment, the one suggested by Steve
Kahler, food service manager at
Mendenhall and a Servomation
employee, is in the best interests o'
the students. Under this proposal.
Servomation would buy the equip-
ment under a special contract that
would compensate the company for
the added capital investment in case
the contract is terminated.
Faculty members do deserve some
type oi cafeteria service on campus.
Most other universities offer this
service to its employees, and the
proposed facility in Mendenhall is
considerably smaller than many in
universities the size of ECU. Dr.
Elmer Meyer, vice chancellor for
Student Life, explained that the new
equipment that must be purchased
for the facility could also be moved
to provide extra services to students
when not in use by the faculty.
Students shouldn't complain if a
cafeteria is built in the "student"
center because the benefits will be
felt by students as well as faculty.
Consider this: Have you ever pur-
chased any meal in the snack bar
that was truly hot? The "hot dogs"
are miserably cold, not to mention
hamburgers, subs, etc.
With the addition of the
cafeteria, perhaps we can at last en-
joy a "hot" dog with a warm bun.
'Roarke, Figurines, Chrysler'
Well. I suppose it's thai time again
when we drag out mom, apple pie, and
hot dogs for laek (or fear) of anything
more controversial in voicing support o
that as yet unclear phenomenon known
as "the American Way
After all, can anyone who believes in
the three aforementioned items (no. I
can't define what "believing" in them
means) have the soundness ol his
character doubted
1 feel compelled, however, lo suggest
thai we. in the "spun oi change"
(again, defiant of explanation) tor which
this countrv is known, should retire
these symbols and replace (hem with
more appropriate ones.
After withstanding a determined
challenge b Chevrolet a tew years ago,
mom has finally given up her hallowed
spot willingly. Realistically, how can we
even expect mom to prepare dinner
anymore when she's out campaigning
for John Anderson ("He has nice
hair) and Irving to think o! ways to
undermine Phyllis Schlafly ?
Apple pie is much easier to dismiss
because, quite simply, it isn't what it us-
ed to be. lirsi o' all, mom doesn't take
the tune to make it anymore; and the
people who do use so main chemicals
that we feel like experiments rather than
self-indulgent eaters. Oh' rhose poor
rats who give their lives for us! 1 expect
to see a label in the near future thai
reads: "Contains 7 percent real apples
Hot dogs have been, in fact, relegated
to a position ot decreasing prominence
ever since Adolph made ii possible for us
to chew cheap steaks. Never mind the
monosodium glutamate. Everything ex-
cept tree bark has that anyway.
Well, we can'l let these three items, in
then preoccupied, altered, and sorry
siaies, respectively, represeni u and our
"way Bui. I jusi happen to have some
nominations tor their replacements. I he
most appropriate replacemeni tor mom.
1 believe, would be Mr. Roarke (Fantasy
Island). After all, who devotes a greater
percentage ot his nine to making other
people happy, and subtly promotes
capitalism at the same tune' Who is
nune understanding and perceptive than
Mr Roarke? And best ol all, when you
wain io get rid ot him. you nisi push a
button. Ah, the meriean Way!
pple pie is a tough item to replace,
especially since we no longei have the
guiding hand ot Euell Gibbons. I nevei
could find any tree bark thai lasted
good, anyway. Even though you pro-
bably won't find my replacemeni sug
gestion as tasty as apple pie tor even as
lasiy as tree bark). I believe vou will
agree thai it is suitable: Figurines. I hat's
right. We're all tat' We can'l afford to
let Doyle, Dane, and Bernbach think
thev're losing then grip on us' Also,
what better way do we have ot showing
support for our President's "new
austere" movementSo lei us banish ap-
ple pie from our minds and mouths
forever. Figurines are more merican.
Sorrv. Chevrolet, but even mediocrity
gets vou nowhere anymore. I tie perfect
successor to the hot dog is the Chrysler.
For fear o angering both people who
bought Chryslers last year I won')
elaborate. But you've all heard the
stories about how hot dogs are made,
haven't you? Chrysler has introduced a
new concept to our great American in-
dustrial community, though a
method in production it's been practic-
ing tor veais: unplanned obsolescence
Nov it they an jusi figure out a way
profit bv h How American can vou
gel!
w . knowing thai ii lakes time to ad
just io change. 1 don expeel these
things to be on everyone's lips im-
mediately. I'm jusi humbly sugj
that they are now perhaps
"American" than their outdated
d eces s m
b . Roa? ke, I igurines, and C hi v slei.
Noi ihe mosi euphonic phrase I've ever
heard. I suppose i I will take some time to
gel used io it.
Now, it we could just gel Ricardo
Montalban io munch a cruncy vanilla
while he lools around in hisordoba
STEVI KIM i
.Sophomore. Business
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes tetters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in (he Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
I eiters must include the name, map"
and classification, address, photu
number and signature oj the auilu
Letters should he limited to three
typewritten pages, double-spaced, oi
neatly printed. All tetters are subject to
editing for brevity, obscenity and libel.
I eiters by the same author are limned i
one each 30 da) s.
To The Left
Reagan: 'Quick Fixes9
To The Right
West To Aid Poland
By MARK CULBRETH
Can there be simple answers to
America's complex problems?
Ronald Reagan, the embodiment
of a mossback conservative, is play-
ing upon America's ill-informed
and troubled masses with a platform
ol simple answers in his attempt to
win the November election.
In the case o Soviet-American
relations, Reagan does not favor
detente via the Salt II treaty. He in-
stead proposes an all out arms race
which would bring the United Slates
respect through dominance. This
policy has found disfavor not only
among the Democrats but among
Reagan's constituents as well. "Big
Stick" diplomacy may have worked
for I eddy Roosevelt many years
ago. but in our modern world where
even I hird World nations have
nuclear capabilities it is a cretinous
blunder.
To solve the nation's economic
problems, Reagan has a very simple
solution. He does not propose to cut
federal spending, or balance the
federal budget, or even limit the
monstrous federal bueracracv. He
simply promises a 30 percent federal
tax cut over the next three years.
Such a cut would only serve to
heighten the federal deficit.
In an address to the United States
Conference o Mayors, President
Carter responded to Reagan's tax
cut proposal by saying: "1 reject the
easy promise that massive tax cuts
and arbitrary rollbacks of govern-
ment programs are the answer. Such
facile, quick fixes should be
recognized as political doubletalk
and ideological nonsense
Yet even more irrational than
Reagan's foreign and economic
policies are his proposals for solving
the ever-worsening energy crisis.
Reagan once stated that Alaskan
reserves were sufficient to supply
the United States, and that they
were greater than Saudi Arabian
reserves. What he was referring to
was the suspected but presently un-
discovered Alaskan reserves as com-
pared to Saudi Arabian known
reserves. Even in this case Reagan
was incredibly overzealous, for even
if the Alaskan reserves do exist and
can be made available to the
American public, it would neither
V

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j Th�$t S�ATSj )
j hKt .VWlP I
equal that oi the Saudi Arabians,
who far exceed it by over UK) billion
barrels per year, nor support this
country's ever-increasing energy
needs.
Reagan also calls for the
deregulation oi oil monopolies to
allow "free enterprise" to solve this
nation's problems. Speaking of
agriculture and energy, Reagan in-
sists that: if we turn them loose
in the marketplace, they will pro-
duce the food and fuel we need. We
are energy rich
Is Reagan correct in assuming
that the American public has forgot-
ten the overpricing suits brought
against all the major oil companies
as a result of the 1974-75 gas shor-
tage. In 1978 the Energy Depart-
ment filed suits against Exxon for
the overpricing of natural gas and
oil amounting to over S546.6
million. Exxon now reports profits
that make it more powerful than 65
percent of all the nations businesses
combined. Now Reagan expects the
American public to believe thai this
economic superpower would act in
this nation's best irterest should the
deterrent of federal regulation be
removed.
Is it possible that Reagan and the
Republican party believe that these
"quick fixes" will solve this na-
tion's problems, or is he hoping vou
will?
Mark Culbreth is a sophomore
English major from Favetteville,
AC.
By STAN R1DGLEY
No one wants to see Soviet tanks
running down civilians in the streets
of Poland.
That, apparently, is the consensus
of the major Western powers. So we
have a situation in which a major
communist country (Poland) is in
deep financial trouble with a S20
billion national debt and has the
threat of armed intervention hang-
ing over it from an "ally" if it does
anything to improve the situation.
We have a strained silence from
the West as little Poland's workers
lake on the juggernaut of the East
for what scraps of human freedom
the Soviets will allow them.
If the situation deteriorates much
more, or unless the West helps out
financially, Soviet tanks will move
in. Reduced to its simplest terms.
what we have is blackmail.
By now, everyone knows that the
Polish disturbance is over high
prices, censorship, the right to form
free trade unions, and the right to
strike. It's just one of a long series
of uprisings in the Eastern bloc
countries that goes back to 1956.
Similar protests took place in
Poland in 1970 and 1976 � both of
them over fundamental economic
issues.
This tradition of protest Hies in
the face of the communist system,
which forbids even the right to
strike. The Soviets have been forced
to prop up their puppets time and
again, each time with aid from the
West. The message is obvious, and
perhaps because it is so, it has been
ignored: Ihe communist govern-
ments ol Eastern Europe and the
Soviet Union cannot exist without
the capitalist West.
This truism, manifest though it
may be, does not seem to have
penetrated the consciousness ot the
peoples o the West. Ihe myth oi
communist economic prowess has
been so pervasive thai tew realize
the extent to which the I ast depends
on the West for even ihe basic
amenities. Savs former U.S.
Treasury Secretary William Simon.
the communist rulers, in
despair, turn eternally to the
capitalist world for their economic
fix
The biting reality is this lor
years, the communist economies of
Eastern Europe and the Soviet
Union have been tottering on the
brink of collapse. Time and again.
the West, primarily the U.S has
bailed the communists out of the
stew oi their own making. And
now, the West is preparing to help
prop up the communist regime in
Poland with loans from a consor-
tium o' international banks totaling
$325 million. Twenty-five West Ger-
man banks are adding to that
another S672 million. The Soviets
themselves are loaning only SKK)
million to their socialist brethren.
What will be the result of this aid?
One has only to look to the past, to
1956, the U.S. sent financial aid to
the W ladyslaw Gomulka govern-
ment in Poland when there was an
apparent rift between Poland and
the Kremlin. The result: a) our
monev made it easier for Gomulka's
regime io deal with iis economic
problems hi Gomulka moved into
an even closer relationship with the
Soviet governement.
While the price ot resistance io
Soviet aegis is probably a Budapest-
style bloodbath, it musl be
remembered that should the Soviets
become complacent at home. (i.e
Poland) it becomes much easier to
mount expansionist forays in new
directions � such as Afghanistan.
The Russia army is stretched
thin with 90.000 troops in
Atghanistan, 35 divisions in Eastern
Europe, 66 in western I S.S.R
and 46 along the Chinese border.
Noting the Russian disinclination to
become engaged in more than one
military venture at a time, I submit
that had the Polish disturbance
come last November instead ot this
summer, there would have been no
December invasion ot Atghanistan
Ihe Russians would have been busv
quelling trouble at their doorstep,
trouble that the West should do
nothing to aggravate � or alleviate.
Left to themselves, the com-
munist countries of Eastern Europe
and the Soviet Union would either
collapse economically or make
capitalistic adjustments. And rather
than invest large amounts ot its
GNP in building a mighty arsenal,
the Soviet Union might jusi devote
more resources to improving the lot
of its people.
Stan Ridgley is a senior Political
Science major with a degree in jour-
nalism from the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill.
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I HI 1 M KO IM
Features
si I' I I MHI K 16. lls" Pag
I
ECU Seen From A
Local's Point Of View
KRIC" HAl SE
stjlt V riWr
hen someone talks about
Greenville, what's the first thing
that comes to mindWhy. ECU,
you moron. What else True,
Cireenville is a college town, and it
i C l wasn't here, this town would
nothing more than a wide space
in the road. Hut there is lite outside
lies lit I ast Carolina.
shimmering strange world
you see across I ttih Street is chock-
ed lull ot alien lite Not everyone in
enville is a student, and as hard
as it may be to believe, the universi-
ty hasn't always been around to
make this place what it is today.
1 here was a tune when the attic was
a storage space on the top floor ot
one's house, and people even spent
� weekends, God forbid, totally
Ml 'hat has changed since ECU
become the third largest college
North Carolina, and you can't
help wondering what the permanent
dents of the Green City think of
? �ni college kids commandeering
�own from August until May.
Having been one ot those perma
net � dents o, these past fifteen
ears, I do know that the
ens ci Cireenville are proud ot
the tact that their town is the home
of such a prestigious (????) school.
A friend of mine who is attending
Pitt Community College this tall
told me that the bookstore on that
campus sells ECU notebooks, Ti-
Shirts, and other such trivialities,
which just goes to show you that
even the competition loves us.
But what, you may ask, does the
average Joe on the street who is not
connected with the university think
about lite in a college town? Well,
I'm glad you asked that. Recently I
hit the streets of this fair town in an
effort to discover what the public's
opinion o Past Carolina is.
I he first person I cam across,
who wished to remain anonymous,
was very complimentary o the
university. He has been a resident ot
Cireenville since 1957, and in all
those years, he says he has never had
any problem with the students.
So what, you might ask. Well,
this particular person lives less than
two blocks from the ECU campus
between two fraternities. He reveal-
ed to me the tact that in his younger
davs he would "stay up all night
drinking with them (the frat boys.)"
Of course, there must've been a
tew times when the parlies got a lit-
tle too wild, but this person denied
it. and when I asked him it he
thought ECU was an asset to the
Greenville area, he replied with an
emphatic "darn tootin
I also visited the Cireenville Police
Department it was the first unof-
ficial visit I've ever made there
and talked with Police Chief Glenn
Cannon, who has been head ot the
Greenville P.O. for 10 years. Well,
even though I'm near the top o his
Black 1 ist, he was very cooperative
(see? The cops can be nice it you
give them a chance). Chief C annon
said that due to the tact that there
are "far more citizens than
students" in Cireenville, "there are
not as many complaints regarding
students" as there are concerning
Greenville citizens. He also at-
tributed this to the tact that Campus
Security handles all problems con-
cerning students, and the Cireenville
Campus Security handles all pro-
blems concerning students, and the
Other people I questioned pro-
fessed the same sentiments, and in a
whole afternoon of interviewing. 1
never once received a negative
temark about ECU.
Okay, so now we know how the
civilians feel about ECU, but what
about those "higher up?" I was
afraid that was coming.
Cireenville is home not only to East Carolina I niver-
sity student, hut to thousands of year-round
residents as well. Our reporter, himself a native of
Cireenville, talked to a number of local residents and
found that at least most of the time. the were proud
of the uniersi( and students.
Cireenville police becomes involved
only when thev are specifically call-
ed.
doesn't thai make you teel all warm
inside?
Okav. you sav. but what about
He aUo pointed out that when a
complaint is received having to do
with us college kids, we are "most
definitely cooperative One other
thing I feel worthy ol mention is sense
thai just inside the police station in thrive on student patronage
the waiting area is a purple and gold especially the malls and downtown
"Welcome Students" poster. Now It you've ever had to wan in line at
business How does II affect the
merchants ol Cireenville' Well, I
wish you'd stop asking such stupid
questions. It is a fact ol common
that C.reenville
businesses
Daryl'l foi an hour, you know what
I mean.
I have no own theory about the
money obsession students have.
Since very few ol us have h.d to
work out way through school, we
have no respect tot saving (what's
that), and since mom and d.id
usual supply all the irec - need,
all Ihat"s lett for us to do- spend,
See LOCAL Pane 7, C ol. 1
Football Weekends:
Time For Parties,
Pomp And Splendor
Metalsmith's Art At Gray Gallery
I his piece, entitled Sled V, was constructed out of ash, steel, and
fiberglass by artist Jim Wallace. It is among a selection of works of
art soon to be on view at East Carolina University's Wellington B.
Gray Gallery. The exhibition of various works on southeastern
IS. metalsmiths opens Sept. 21 and will run through Oct. 29.
Psychic Ability
Reporter
Man
B CHRIS GEORGE
sijll Wnlrr
I isionary power attends the mo-
tions of the viewless winds.
Wordsworth
C ould someone read your
thoughts' (Not my thoughts you
say.) C ould someone look into your
future and tell you about it? Gould
the mind atone be used as a
weapon? Step into the realm o the
psychic as we examine these and
other psychic phenomena.
Sunday night. August 7th, tolks
in the WIIN (FM) listening area
had a chance to hear a most amaz-
ing demonstration of psychic
phenomenon. Oh. no, you say. is
this article about that fuzzy
metaphysical mumbo-jumbo they
made all those movies about'1
Wrong. 1 he gift o psychic ability
has received little enlightned treat-
ment from the media.
I he word psychic was derived
from the Greek word psyche which
means soul. It is defined as pertain-
ing to extraordinary, especially ex
as Self, seemingly inex-
is characterized as divine
infinity
plicable.
or psychic.
Hopefully, you had a chance to
listen to the Allan Handelman
Show, airing Sunday nights at
10:30. Allan always has interesting,
thought provoking guests.
Allan's guest last week was
Robert Petro, a psychic from New
York. Allan had a direct line from
WITN's Washington studio to
Petro's residence in N.Y. Callers
from the listening audience were
connected to this direct line and
were able to talk directly to Robert.
W hen calling, one told Robert his or
her name and where he was calling
from. Erom this short introduction
Robert would receive your
"vibrations" and expound on them.
A sample call:
"Hello, this is Chris. I'm calling
from Greenville, N.C
"Ok, now, as soon as you came
in what you are going to have to
watch is anything to do with drink-
ing. Now it's not that you're a
drinker, or that it will ever be a pro-
your heart set on doing something
and someone else said you would
not. You tend to be a private per-
son, sometimes very secretive. 1 see
you working in the field o nutri-
tion, inside the medical profession
in the future, and living on a rocky
seacoast. "By the way. 1 teach
homeopathy, herbal medicine and
kinesiology; subjects in which 1 feel
you hold an intense interest. 1 would
like to come to your state and spend
a whole day teaching and helping
you guys
"Robert, this has been an ex-
traordinary conversation for me.
How you can peg me so correctly
over an N00 mile phone cable is real-
ly quite a miraculous gift. It con-
firms for me the existence of psychic
power, thanks
"God bless
1 talked to Allan earlier today
about Robert. He was just as im-
pressed with Robert's psychic abili-
ty. He told me to "articulate the
feeling you got when speaking with
him Chris. Help people to unders-
tand the reality ol this
phenomenon
It's hard to be empirical about
feelings, but here goes. When talk-
See PSYCHIC, pajje 6, col. 1
LCfaLNlvG i&OOT Collc'G� fk' HifvP lAJVf
B DAVID MKRI�
Ot all the rituals and traditions
associated with college life, none
contain the magnificent grandeur
and panoramic scope ol the home
football game. The gigantic
stadium, crowded with thousands ol
people (dressed in authentic
costumes) reminds one ol the sets
for Griffith's Intolerance or some
other large-scale Hollywood epic.
I enjoy many of the customs and
traditions surrounding the football
games, even though I am not much
ol a tootball fan. In fact, I didn't
know there was a game last Satur-
day until 1 dropped in on some
friends who were getting ready to go
to the stadium. I hat's how I usually
find out about games.
I his particular bunch ol friends
was doing what countless other bun-
ches ol friends all over town were
doing getting ready to go to the
liquor store tot some rum. Since
alcoholic beverages are prohibited
at the games, thev must be consum-
ed bet ore the game or smuggled in.
Smuggling a pint ol rum into the
stadium is a little more subtle than
smuggling in a case ot beet. 1 don't
have any statistics on the economic
impact ol ECU tootball games on
the liquor industry, but it must be
substantial.
The pre-game parties are a fun
part of college life. 1 "hey provide an
excuse for socializing at a good
time, since the games bring people
from out ol town, including alumni
and friends from other schools.
The bunches ol out-of-town
friends create alot ol scurrying
around by then hosts, trying to find
11) and activity cards ol students
who aren't going to the game.
Togethei with the scurrying to ABC
stores all afternoon, this makes for
a lot of scurrying.
After a few more drinks, it is
about tune to get ready and head for
the stadium. I'm surprised at the
number ot people who. get really
dressed up foi the tootball games,
dressing up too much takes a good
bit ol the fun out ol going to a
game. Ot course, so does getting
stuff spilled on your suit, or having
a hole butned in a new dress by a
diunkenly guided cigarette.
cres ol cars surround the
stadium bet ore the game: one would
never know thre was an energy crisis
going on. Crowds ol students
patade up College Hili Drive, cross
14th Street and stumble over the
railroad tracks on the way to the
game. 1 like finding a good vantage
point and watching the people go
bv. and the pre-game procession is a
good time tot doing thai.
1 he variety ol costumes at a to.
ball game rivals even the greatest
wardrobe departments o
Hollywood's film studios. I here are
couples who look like thev stepped
out ol a high, school prom, and
other couples who look like they
stepped out ol a high school riot
Scores ol uniforms ol plavers.
cheerleaders, marching bands and
majorettes add to the spectacle ol
the event.
After slowly filing into the
stadium and finding seats, the im-
portant part of the game begins
the socializing, and watching and
enjoying the crowd. I don't know
why sitting out m the open air on a
beautiful day with good friends wat-
ching people in the stands passing
out from too much liquor at 7 p.m.
is'tun. but it is. One also gets to
meet new people from tar oft places
like Raleigh who one will never meet
again.
Despite the fun and atmosphere
ot the game, some people always
start trickling out before it ends. It
out team is losing, these people sav.
"Ah, we're gonna lose. I'm getting
outta here But, it our team is win-
ning, they'll sav. "Well, we're gon
na win, anyway, let's get outta
here Maybe it it looks like a tie.
thev'II stav tor the whole game
M GOT A CM��TTtr "ym
trasensory and non-physical, mental blem. but when you get in that little
processes, such as extrasensory
perception and mental telepathy.
The Rosicrucians. (an altruistic-
group ol psychics with headquarters
in San Jose. California), have a very
concise definition of psychic. To
them what lies beyond the range ot
our phvsical senses and extends into
rut of yours you will tend to run for
it, so you need to keep balanced
there. Also I see writing
something to do with writing. So-
meone is waiting to hear from you
and you're not doing it. 1 feel that
you have just suffered some sort of
disappointment where you have
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I HI I S 1 c K01 INIAN
SI I'll MM K 16. 1980
This Psychic Can Profile
Callers Over Telephone
Continued From Page 5
talking with Robert
Pcuo one gets the feel-
ing that anothei
presence is very near.
Have ou ever been in a
crowd and fell as
though someone was
looking at you or con-
centrating on you, and
upon turning see so-
meone looking directly
a! you? It you have had
such an experience you
have received another's
psychic emanations.
Allan had a tremen-
dous amount of teed
back on his psychic
guest. One gu! said she
vsa impressed bv Ins
gifts but they could on-
ly have come from the
devil. Another caller
stressed hov vulnerable
and intimidated she felt
when Robert told her
some of her most per-
sonal secrets.
Both ol these rcac
tions bring up signiti
cant points, first ol all
there is the question ol
good versus evil in the
use of psychic gitts.
The Soviet Union has
done much research in
i o p s y c h i c
P h e n o m e n o n T h e
Soviets have gone so
tar as to recruit
psychics who can use
their powers to affect
their physical environ-
ment. They are, acor-
dmg to a recent C . I A
report, experimenting
with psychics who can
cause strokes in other
human beings. I p to
Empire Brass
At Hendrix
the present in the U.S
psvehic phenomena has
been mostly scoffed at
and ridiculed. 1 here
are many cases though,
where modern science
in this country has
"discovered" a psychic
phenomena and at-
tempted to empiriclizc
u Color therapy is a
good example. For
years psychic's have
claimed success in
treating e m 01 ion al
disorders with color
theapv. Recent medical
studies give firm
evidence of behavional
modification thru color
therapy.
Ok so you're an em-
piricist, give me prool
� you scream! 1 hese
answers by these so
called psychics are am-
biguous. For example.
everyone needs to write
someone, you em-
phatically state. Never-
theless you must admit
there were many
specifics in my conver-
sation with Petro.
When you check the
statistics of who in
Greenville would meet
the criterion of tacts
Robert said, only about
1 to 3 percent of the
population would fit
the bill. That would
make for 32 to 1 odds
o guessing right. Slim
odds eliminate chance
from this event. Robert
Petro was not guessing
� he knew these facts
from a very arcane
psychic process.
How could he do it?
The process can be ex-
p 1 a i n e d v e r y
simplistically though
somewhat inadequate-
ly. Every living being
radiates or sends out
emanations that can be
recieved on many sen-
sory or exoteric and
esoteric levels. On the
sensual level you can
see, smell, and feel
emanations. On the
esoteric level, though
much more subtlv. one
can receive emanations
from the realm oi the
spiritual. Man has foi
centuries divided ex-
perience into physical
and spiritual realms.
Psychic powei
resides in the spiritual
realm. To some the veil
of the spirit will be an
impenetrable barrier
only opened by death.
Io others it will be a
portal through which
their psychic powers
will operate for
whatever good or evil.
Do you pick up vibes
from people? Ever get
intuitive feelings about
people or places'
Maybe you have a shine
to you. I earn to
develop these powers.
The final frontier is the
space between your
ears
I lie Student Union
Artists Series Commit-
tee inaugurates its
1980-81 season with
Naumburg Chamber
Music Award winner
the Empire Brass
Quintet. Empire Brass
will perform in Hendrix
lheatre on September
18 1980 at 8:00 p.m.
1 he components ot
1 mpire Brass are Rolt
Smedvig, trumpet
c harles A. 1 ewis, Jr
impet; David Oha-
nian, French horn;
Norman Bolter, trom-
bone; and Samuel Pila-
fian, tuba. Smedvig.
Ohanian, and Bolter
arc members of the
Boston Symphony Or-
chestra, fhe five are
presently Quintet-in-
Residence at Boston
I niversity The Quintet
is tcanned in three
ecasts ol Arthur
Fiedler's New Year's
Eve at Pops
In addition to annual
tours oi the United
States, the Quintel has
made three extremely
successful European
tOUts.
The blend ol the
group is as striking as
its superb control. Em-
pire Brass has a
remarkable rapport
with its audience. I he
players dedication is
felt instantly: these are
serious musicians who
can have fun. but who
want to assert
themselves as a
chamber ensemble, not
just a brass sideshow.
Theirs is exciting, arttul
chamber music that
may make string
quartets sound insipid
to some.
rickets may be put
chased at the Central
Ticket 011" ice i n
Mendenhall Student
Center. They are priced
at S2.(X) for E.( l
students and S5.00 for
the public. For further
information, telephone
757-6611. ext. 266.
Sell It Faster
Through
Classified Ads
Call 757-6366 for information
Happenings
Campus Events:
Wed. 17
� 4iM) P.M. Frisbee golf S. Ficklen l.M. field
� 4:(H) P.M. Home economics intercouncil pic-
nic
� 7:00 P.M. Womens volleyball: N.C, State
Raleigh N.C.
Thurs. 18
� 3:30 P.M. Soccer Caiawba College Home
� 8:00 P.M. Artists Series: EMPIRE BRASS
QUINTET Hendrix Theatre
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The Final Countdown: Unusual
Science Fiction Adventure Film
I HI I AMAKOI ll N
SI I'll 1MI K 16, 4mi
B JOHN AI )KS
Mad �. iri
What would happen
it you took the nuclear
powered aircraft carrier
I s s Nimitz, and
then threw it into a
strange Pacific storm.
Next, you roll it
through a time warp
letting it come out say
Dec. 6. isMl. The
day is right before the
attack on Pearl Har-
bor Win you might
tune the makings oi a
fine flick.
I ruled rtists' new
release "Final Count-
down" is just such a
picture. It combines
good qualities to pro-
duce one of the better
science fiction pictures
this year.
When the crew of the
Nimit finally recover
from their trip through
time, they learn to their
puzzlement that no one
answers their distress
signals. At first, they
think that they have ex-
perienced a nuclear
strike of some kind.
Gradually though, they
begin to figure things
out when they heat the
voices of Jack Benny
and FDR come over
their radios.
It becomes all too
clear when the captain
(Kirk Douglas) orders a
flight reconnaissance
over Pear! Harbor and
finds old stvle bat-
tlewagons lined up in
rows The Nimit now
finds itself faced by a
dangerous dilemma.
Should they go after
the Japanese fleet that
is heading towards the
American battle fleet at
Pearl Harbor
As pointed out bv
their civilian advisor
(Martin Sheen), the
situation presents many
paradoxes. It they
destroy the antiquated
Japanese fleet with
I heir modern jets, the
future may look quite
different 40 years
hence. Vet if they sit
by, the Japanes zeros
will bomb Pearl Har-
bor all over again tak-
ing many hundreds o
lives.
I lie predicament is
further complicated for
the crew when they pick
up two survivors from
a wrecked yacht that
was strafed by zeros.
At once, they find out
that one of these sur-
vivors is (or was) U.S.
( ontim.eci from naop s 'east the one 1 talked Senator Frank Chap-
( ontmued from pae 5 man who had vamshed
spend, and spend some ve�. 0j asl Carolina, mysteriously one week
more' Never is this Greenville has no before the attack on
Pearl. As the hour
tiv than during the
Local's View
Of University
proven more onger been in lhc pits
(the seat ot Pitt Coun-
long, dull summers in (v) We mavbe � was
Greenville. With no never that bad. . .
one around to buy
stuff, business takes on
a rather anemic pace.
In other words,
everything dies.
Regardless, business
in Greenville caters
primarily to the
students, and it ECU
was suddenly wiped off
face of the earth,
n aioi of nightclubs,
cord stores, and drug
i Iers would go
broke.
s m e might trash
town every
and then, and even
brc I i ' �'�� windows,
the ifi-
le good, Jean
� v. . pie
seem to realize this (at
draws near, the crew
now plans how to deal
with their problems.
I in I aslarolinian
jt6 6367 630?
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At this point in the
movie, director Don
I aylor might have done
a little more to add to
the suspense ot the
story. Yet at least, he
can he praised for not
making the fatal
mistake of some of his
other colleagues. He
does not drown out his
movie ith special ef-
fects as seems to he the
I rend nowadays in
science fiction flicks.
Unfortunately. Stai
Trek is all too good an
example of this type ot
abuse. Taylor
remembers that plot
still counts for much in
any tpe ol mo ic.
Still, a plot too is not
m u c h g o o d e i t h e r
without decent acting.
Kirk Douglas and Mat
tin Sheen, of course,
put in I heir usual good
performances in this
motion picture.
(Catherine Ross also
does well in her suppor-
ting role along with
Charles Durning.
However, the real
star of this movie ma
not have been am of
these actors hut the
ATTIC
N.C � No. 1 1 Nightclub
TUES.
Nimitz itsell . I he men
ahoard hei performing
their roles m action are
interesting enough to
watch, hut ihc I 14
Tomcat jet fighters are
especially tun to see in
combat. Indeed, when
you look ai them dodg-
ing and turning with
zeros. the) make some
of the space ships in
Star Wars look like
junk heaps in com-
parison.
finally, although this
picture may end to
some a bit too predic-
table, n has more than
enough redeeming
values to pull it
through. I oi action
and suspense, "final
Countdown" might he
one ot the besl movies
that you will see this
fall.
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I





I HI I s K l ll V
Sports
SI PTI MM K I' "
ECU Fumble-Fingered
USL Wins 27-21
CHARI ESCHAND1 KR
t.in
Southwestern 1 ouisiana capitaliz-
ed on three crucial third quartet
tumbles b Hast Carolina to down
the Pirates 2 21 Saturday in
1 icklen Stadium.
I he ios spoiled the home debut
oi new ! c I head coach 1 d 1 mory,
ceded Pat Dye las!
1 he loss aUo was the
j ames at home foi the
ties.
nically, the last time the
- lost at home was in 1977 to
Ragin'ajuns by a 9
1 he first halt was a defensive
struggle with I( I up 7-3 at inner
missii
�it the scoreboard
. opening period as the
ed on an interception b
C'k ; rump that gave them the
ba he I si 14 said line.
ree plays latei halfback Mike
Hawkins went over from the four.
Bill 1 amm's kick made n 7 0 at the
6 ;s mark ol the !iisi quaiter.
rheajuns struck back in the se-
, iai lei w hen 1 am I russell
d a $9-yard field goal to nai
mai gin to 7-3 with just ovei
minutes left in the half.
1 ollowing the contest, 1 c U
1 moiy said his team had
plans i ore aggressiv e in
iai! xggi essive oi no,
not execute well early
all away on
possessions in
I hall i vl hii ned three
dowi
:ame with just 47
�ne in I third quartei
quarterback
Nelson to fullback
Su 11 on failed to
I SI defensive tackle Kent Head
recovered the football on the 1I
35.
n 11-yard pass from QB Phillip
Reynolds to wide receiver Kevin
Sigue was the first play oi a six play
drive which culminated in a 12-yard
scoring strike from Reynolds to
tight end Brent Anderson.
With I SI up 10-7, the Pirates
wasted little tune in coughing the
ball up again. Quarterback Nelson's
tumble on his team's thud pla
following Reynolds' ID pass gave
theajuns the ball on the ECU 42.
lour plays later Reynolds hit
Bans Hei bett with a 5 sard pass to
put I SI up 17-7.
On the ensuing possession the
Pirates did little better, turning the
football over to the Cajuns follow-
ing another Nelson tumble on then
ow n 41.
M
ii :i i�-n
- n ii u :i
I l tljwkin- � iun i I dmm kuki
I si -Irovirll ii M.
1 SI tadrrsna 12 ia� ham Kr�nld- llrassril Uuk
t s Hrrhrrl 5 pj Iroin HrinuliK I I tunm-II kk'kl
I s hjllum III i.l � r r Ill Rini.lit- I fniisrll kuk'
I Si ni"il! Z5 K.
Ml inn- 7 tun iku k failed I
I I SiU.il 14 run i ulllB lias- Irmn mKii tor l�.
r i r I dux as
RaMw unl-
ljNint -ji.i-
Ktlurn iard�
Pmo
Puofe
iimhl.
Prnallic .itil
I iMal tit mm
M I
Nil JSt
Ml
121
m:m
4 �- K
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V 126
ir
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III 24 2
7-34.1
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5 2s
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Ml llll MM 1I K�
Raskin I i Prison W Hawkins M -
U (Ili.i- III I I -I hjlhjm " � V jii.ui1j1! I �-
HIjih' II W I '� !� 2
'jnt M I N.li' 12 21 i I1 slj.l M-l-3
1 s Kinlil- in 24 2 12"
��� Ml (llm- 4 1" Djm.iiI �
saaadrn 2-27. �R�arkc I-l�. Hawkias IP I -I ��
il.ll fc mlirH 2 31 � hjlhjm 2 -25
Theajuns tailed to capitalize
this time, though, as the ECU
defense held light and forced the
isitors to punt.
following a I russell punt the
Pirates could get off only two plays
before another tumble, this one by
Mike Hawkins, which gave the (a-
juns the ball back on the ECU 21
Reynolds struck quickly this tune
around, going to sophomore runn-
ing back David Chatham on a
21-yard scoring strike that put the
( ajuns ahead 24
I he final Pirate tumble oi the
quartei followed aajun punt when
1 CU returnei Willie Holies mis-
judged a kick and coughed the ball
up following a hard hit.
I SI capitalized on this error
also, getting a I russell field goal
with just under a minute gone in the
fourth quarter to go ahead 27-7.
1 he Pirates battled back in the
final period, going 57 and 68 sards
on their final two diises foi
touchdowns to narrow the margin
to 2 21.
Sharp passing by Nelson
highlighted both drives. It was via
the ground attack, though, that the
Pirates managed to reach pas din on
both dnses. Anthony Collins got
the first 11) on a "sard run while
Nelson got the second with 1:21 lett
in the contest on a 14-yard scamper.
I he Pirates then attempted an on-
side kick that tailed, giving the Ca
tuns possession on then own 34.
I wo successive running plass
gained no yardage at all. 1 he Pirates
used then final two timeouts ol the
game, one coming aftei each ol the
tsso forementioned plass.
1 acing a thud and ten situation
with about 50 seconds remaining,
the C ajuns called on Chatham on a
draw plas, who came through on an
1 1 -yard scamper that tor all prac
ECU LB Glenn Morris (53)
Stops I'SIs David Chatham
tical purposes ended the game. blems. thou- he continue
I oilowmg the contest E I coach "We had a cei
Ed I mory could only shake his head change foi ure. Wt
in praise oi his defense and in that look like openim
disbelief oi the tumbles by the of- "Well I
fense. ' moi ha
"I've never seen a football team his life easy. I've
play such hard defense and get 2" too sweel and too easy I
points scored on them he said. "I a'u beal Duke la I week and
thought the defense played with back a id ssin
gieat charactei. was nisi loo
"We had some offensive p guess
ECU Booters
Finish Last
In Tournament
1 he I .i ' Caroli
dropped ii - foui th and I
oi the season this we �
lo Northarol I s Si
the annual M
mein. played it H
In its tourney open
das ,1(1 went up a
improved and experienced l N
club rhe Iai H.
dominated play. tal
il en roui
.ed onl
goal in the ma I
I he pei foi mance l � H
ssa- vei s impressive to I 1
Brad Smith. ' 1 I
( ai olina team I've e ei
said. " I hey sht �
cellcni season
1 he H
me, gettinj
pei iod to sc! i le I
consol �
day, the Pirates fell I N.i
booters by a 3-0 margin 1 I
loss left 1(1 at 0-5
the Pirates base new hop I
a fine perforn
Brow n
I: iva
� �
loss to I Nt ai '
brilliantly, sen ing
$2 sax
"We're very y
I il ' x"
"St
oui probl
Si
"B si
"()u
w hat
t V
Fumbles Were Costly
C ajuns Pounce On Fumble B ECU's Mike Hawkins (34)
B jiin DuPREI
rhere can be hide doubt thai
tumbles cost I ast Carolina then
first loss oi the 1980 football
season, bul with less than five days
until the Pirates travel to
rallahassee to face national
poweihouse I londa State the Pirate
coaches and players are si ill battled
about then 27-21 defeat at the hands
oi Southwestei n 1 ouisiana.
I he Pirates were guilts oi leaving
the ball on the ground eight tunes,
with all but three recovered by the
Ragin' Cajuns.
1 he ECl defensive unit set up the
lust Pirate touchdown in the open
ing quartei on an interception by
George Crump at the Southwestern
I ouisiana 2. and ran it back to the
13. Mike Hawkins carried the ball in
three plass later from the tour, but
the Pirate offense would remain
silent until a final flurry in the
fourth quartei.
I he Pirates led 7-3 at halftime,
but shortly thereafter, the
' 'nightmare' , as 1 :
I mory describes ii. began
i �ung II squad .
(m the first posseti n f tl c �-�
cond half, fullback i lore Su
ton tumbled for the first lime ol the
night on second down at the Pirate's
55 yard line, rhe miscarry occurcd
ssith less than one minute elapse
the thud quartei. and six pla
theajuns had th( IN'
mglit.
1 c l - the ball again on
kickofl with 11:18 remaining ii
quarter, but just over a minute !
quarterbackarlton Nelson bobbl
ed the centei exchange foi the se-
cond oi the tour tumbles which
would lead to points bs theajuns
"I've nevei seen a loot ball team
play such haul defense and gel 2
points scored on them said
Emory. "We didn't control the line
oi scrimmage in the third quartei
We had a center-quarterback ex-
change problem "
1 mots stated that throughout the
Pirates' fall practice, centei fony
H e i
exs H I

"Hensley is
i
ked
wishbone gives a
. w hich we in
P i r a tt Ifei
V - sht ndei
blem to the begini
lice, also, I
planation foi the i I tui novers.
"I've never bee: am
with a problem like tins on the e
nge said nderson " I he �
taken extra snaps before and aftei
pi a- lice sometimes I wondei
on ii so much just crc
negative things.
"They (centers) base had pro-
blems ssith sometimes swinging the
ball up instead oi pulling it back like
they're taught to. I ha' has a lot to
do with being ovei anxious
Young Pirates Puzzling; As Expected
Young football teams are puzzl-
ing to watel . sou never know what
to expect from them East
olina's performance in the firsi
tsso weeks of this season is a pertect
example.
Week One: I he Pirates trasel to
�(country to face favored Duke
I nisersits. rhe young offensive line
is awesome and the backs are supei
as the Pirates destros the Blue
Desils 35-10. Optimism is keen in
Greenville and the surrounding
area. 1 he arrival of Coach Ed
1 mory is a successful one.
Week Iwo: The Pirates return
home to the friendly confines ot
I icklen Stadium to take on
Southwestern I ouisiana, a team
they deteaicd 38-9 just two years
fer
USL's Anderson Dives For TD Catch
ago. A ten game home winning
streak is on the line, forecasters
fas or the Pirate wishbone bs as
mans as 19 points.
Something ssent svrong in the se-
cond sseek, though, as the Pirates
committed five crucial third quarter
turnovers and lost to the Cajuns
27-21. The home winning streak ssas
ended. Funny thing, the last time
the Pirates lost at 1 icklen ssas at the
hands of the same USL club in 1977.
Hmm.
What ssent wrong in that thud
quarter? Everything when sou get
right down to it. Quarterback
Carlton Nelson had problems with
his exchange from centers Tony
Hensley and Bills Parker. The
sophmore QB also had a number ot
difficulties in handing the ball off to
the multi-talented backs behind
him.
Down 2-21 with less than a
quarter remaining, the Pirates battl-
ed back and asoided the third
quarter problems, narrowing the
score to 221 before the gun sound-
ed.
ECU actually had a chance to win
the ballgame had a crucial third and
10 situation not been successful by
the Cajuns svith just under a minute
left in the game and the ball resting
Charles
Chandler

on the US1 4.
There you base it. I he Pirates
plas great at Duke, steads in the
first halt Saturday, sunk it up in the
thud quarter and show class in com
ing back hard in the final period
against LSI . .
Confusing1 Sort ot, but not real-
Is. Young football teams are known
for providing the unexpectd. One
must remember that the Pirates are
indeed young after having lost mans
a starter from the 199 club to
graduation.
I he situation Ed I mors tmds
himself in is similar to the one that
formei ECU coach Pat Dye faced in
19"s. Remembei 1978? I hat was
the year the Pirates captured the In-
dependence Bowl trophy.
Well, things didn't go so well ear-
ls in that year. The club was playing
with an offensive hue that featured
onlv one senior, tackle Mitchell
Smith. Quarterback Leandei Gn
ssas a iunioi bul was entering his
first season as 1I "s numbei one
signal caller. In previous sears, he
had spin tune with the graduated
Jimmy Southerland.
In its '78 openei lei doss ned
Western Carolina 14 6 despite los-
ing tour oi seven tumbles. 1 he
following week the Pirates were kill-
ed bs N. Sta'e and its kicker
Nathan Ritter. Ihiee I c I fumbles
did not help matters.
It ssas the following w :ek at
Northarolina, though, thai the
Pirates' tumbling problems were
most evident. 1 he club lost six ot
seven tumbles in a 14-10 loss. One
of the tumbles came late in the game
as EC I was dnsiue towards a winn-
ing ID. Green lost the handle,
though, and the Pirates losi the
game.
E I eventually overcame its i :
start and the tumbling, bumbl:
problems to go on to the In-
dependence Bowl thai seai 1 he fad
is, the ot tense was no! used to plas
ingtogethei a; season's start. Youth
and lavk ot togetherness was the
problem
The same is true with the 1980
Pirates. New faces do; the entire
lineup. especialK on offense. Fhese
nesv faces will hase sime ea
and dossn 1 hes already I avc Pa
tience will be necessary bs
players themselves, coachc
tans until things aie ironed o
I mil they are. 1(1 will I
talented yei y ak confu
football team, v, ou Lan expei i
unexpected, both good ai d no
good.
Ms I)
B
C
:
� rm.
w
A Sad Ed Emor
L






I HI I SlM! IM W
SI PI I 1HI K 16. I WO
ers
nietit
d
Pirates Split Fall Baseball Opener
b D.W. HOWELL
Staff VSrilrr
1 he Easi c arolina
-ball team opened
its fall season last Fri-
day night with a split in
a doubleheader against
arch-rival North
( arolina. 1 he Pirates
won the first game by a
6 2 score behind im-
ssive pitching per-
formances b Kirk Pai
sons, Rick Rame and
Hob Krai
I he P11 ates opened
scoring with a foui -
thud inning. C at
chei Jay C arraw ay
opened the inning with
a single and moved to
second on a ild pitch.
Kftei Mike Wells
k out, Kelly
Robinette singled to
put runners at firsi and
thud John Hallow
popped up, and Mike
e walked.
1 resh man I odd
1 ans gi ounded to
sh 1 N 's Chris
Pittaro hobbled the ball
C ai rawa scored.
Robinette scored on the
-tond wild piich ol the
and I odd
Hendle) tripled into
right-centei field
i.1 score Sage and
1 . .
lina scored
i runs in innings
md five; and the
' nails put the
; a a w nil a tw0
mninn.
JouPleu
to third
on an infield hit by
Hendley.
Mike Sorrell also got
an infield hit, but
designated hitter Fran
Fitgerald hit into a
third-catcher-first dou-
ble play. Car. away
punched his second hit
o the game; a two-run
single which scored
Hendle) and Sorrell.
Parsons. Ramey and
Krai all looked sharp in
their stints on the
mound. Parsons allow-
ed only one hit and
struck out two in his
three innings of work.
Ramey allowed both
I NC runs but only one
was considered an earn-
ed run, while giving up
two hits and struck out
two. Krai pitched the
seventh inning and
allowed Carolina
nothing but three
ground ball outs.
I he second game was
not what one might call
an artistic success.
Carolina scored single
runs m the second and
third innings and two in
the fourth inning and
then held on to win 4-2.
1 he 1 ar Heels began
their assault on Pirate
starter Mike Williams
in the second inning.
Designated hitter Pete
Kumuega doubled and
later scored on a single
b c a I c h e r Mike
Wilkinson.
Had the Pirates been
able to pla some good
defense in the third inn-
ing, Williams would
base gone through his
three innings having
allowed only one run.
INC's Byron
Spooner hit a high, cat-
chable fly ball deep to
lett field but freshman
left fielder Mike
1 ushansky dropped the
ball for a two-base er-
ror. After a ground ball
moved Spooner to
third. Scon Biadle
sent the runner home
on a sacrifice fly to
right field.
Carolina scored their
Buc Wrestling
Coach Named
final two runs in the
fourth inning off lef-
thander Bob Patterson.
Kumuega lined a shot
off Patterson's right leg
to start the inning.
This caused grave
concern to Pirate sup
porters, as Patterson
has just returned from
a broken right ankle
which kept him out o
action the entire sum-
mer, lot innately Pat-
terson was not injured
but the barrage con-
tinued.
Greg Muench singled
to left and put runners
at first and second with
no outs. Kumuega at-
tempted to steal third,
and scored when Mark
Wakai's throw skipped
by third baseman Pete
Persico into the left
field corner. Muench
took second and scored
on a hit by Wilkinson.
I ast Carolina made a
run at tying the game
when they scored two
runs in the sixth inning.
Robert Wells walked
and was forced at se-
cond by Robinette.
John Hallow then
singled to score the first
run, taking second on
the relay to home plate.
After Wakai struck
out. Todd 1 ans singl-
ed to score Hallow
Take the
Challenge
TKE
Frompt Professional
I y ping at Reasonable
Rates
( all:
Temporary Secretary
Services Wilson N.C.
291-0723
Back To School
Special
fadfR, by Nature's Way
specializing In natural hair cuts tor men & women
Present ECU Student I.D. Fot
20 Off Your Next Haircut
Offer good thru SEPT 20, 1980
Downtown Mall
Greenville
�ppot intrtt�onl
758-784F
THE ARVU RESERVE, A VETERAN S BENEFIT
You can join the V Reserve with more benefit than
must new Reservist iince you have military experii
f the A ���� I F01 en
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extra luxuries F01 example j an 14 with threi pears ol
servici i an at n ovei 5! 100 .1 y eai
I � . . - :� md eart training givi you a
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it's a good way 1 is I ontacts. as
Check it it
SPORTSWOKLD
COLLEGE NIGHT
Tuesday Night
- I by Jon Jordan
Vern Davenport (5) fights for yardage after reception
6:30-10:00
Bring 1. D. and
Get In For Only $1.25
CLASSIFIEDS
� . tnrec
' I tilted
.haul-
er ol
�� � ' : a nese
am, has
wrestling
Hastai olina
I he former
ilina State
�land State
begins his
ediatel).
ipanese native
t titles in
-77, and 1SS
sa a member ol
I 97 2 .1 apanese
I )!�mpie tgeam. He
twice was Japan Na
tional Vhietic Meet
champion. He also
holds a third degree
black belt in karate.
1 he 31 -year-old men-
t o i received a
. heloi 's degree from
Nippon Physical
Educationollege and
a master's degree in
physical ed ucat i on
from Cortland State
ic Northrup, who
served as a student
assistant under former
wrestling coach L-d
Steers, has been named
as assistant wrestling
coach. The 24-year-old
Waverly. N1! , native
holds a business degree
from 1 ast Carolina and
wrestled here from
1977-79.
PERSONAL
CUSTOM CRAFT ING and repair
ol gold and silver Buying and
selling of gold and silver bv Les
Jewelers W0 E 5th St 758 2'2?
ANYTHING YOU CAN WRITE
we can write better Typing pro
olreakmg editmq Wnie Right
7 56 9946
SENIOR ENGLISH STUDENT
will tutor English Literature
Composition and Grammar Call
758 0735 after 5 00 p m
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
PODESZWA Featuring color
Portraits Resumes Portlolios
Weddings Photo Restoration
BEST PRICES IN TOWN' Call
Peter Podesiwa 758 096?
POSITIONS OPEN for
waitresses Hours are fit � ibic to
fit your schedule Apply E 'Cam
daily S & S Cafetena Carolina
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SUNSHONE STUDIOS offering
classes m Ballet ja Yoga and
Exercise Specials for students
Within walking dis'ance of cam
pus 7S6 7235
LOST Set of keys between
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if found
CAROLYNE I Roses are red
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necessary K U
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE NEEDED Dunn
Apartments 100 yds Irom Ar t
Building Contact Herb Parker
129 Jenkins
FOR SALE
-ORSALF PEARL Snari drum
,ii u in S235 new BSt 0�ei
Call 758 3076
WETSUITS Large high neck
beavertail jacket s:i and medium
O Neil sleeves S?5 756 8822 after
5 00 or on weekend
FOR SALE One pair ol new
never used 6 � 1 Jensen TnaKi.il
car speakers 50 watts of power 20
oi magnets Warranty included
S70 Call 758 935?
FOR SALE Technics SA 500 60
watts SL 230 fully automatic
turntable with Empire 2000 Elll
Phase Linear speakers
Aluminum antennae Paid SHOO
best offer Call 75? 8860 ask tor
Graham
FOR SALE Mattress and Bo�
Spring one year old S-J0 Call
758 3753
FOR SALE I97t Honda XL 250
S750 Call 758 5?25 after 5 30
CLASSIFIEDS
They're Like
&
F
TKE
Nation's 1
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Fraternity 1
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Backpacks. �-�. ��miter,
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SUM. Combat Boots, Plus.
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SAAD-SSHOt
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In Your Pocket.
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If you want to
BUY, SELL,
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anything away.
Classifieds will
get the job done!
Wed
Km on
P8 Mill Outlet
LadiesDenim By
Wrap and Button Front Wrapa pf-
Ladies Plush Velour Tops
V-Neck
$14.98
$12.99
L
Men's Lee Jeans
Sizes 26-42
Men's Flannel Shirts
Wrangler
$17.50 to 20.50
$8.98
For Your Convenience Classified Ads
Can Be Purchased At Three Convenient
Locations;
Student Organization Booth(Mendenhall)
MWF 3-4
Student Supplv Store Lobby MWF 10-11
TTH11-2
East Carolinian Office MTTH 4-5 VVF2-3
Classified Advertizing Rates:
1 to 3 Lines $1.00
Each Addition Line
$.25






T �
10
I 111 I SI Kt i ll W
s !� i Mill K Ife IVHI
Lady Pirates Ready For Road Opener
K JIMMN Dul'KI I
betier said Dillon, strong as State,
��(Hi! passes seemed to Davidson states.
1 l,c atN b good, but not all the '�When State is running
I astarolina op-u K offense, it's quick
I98t) vollevball � "�' was a totalh dit and explosive.
e lerent match because ol Louisburg , no, a .hey needed to work akmg w,
N( the level ol play, strong serving team, so on. Mitzi Davis, as pro
x , louisburg offensively you have more time to "That play is like a
lanl as read and we got more touch down pa
Wednesda
W o I f p a I
State, I
Dillon an
(ECU) know what a the momentum the Davidson hopes hei the Pirates to improve
middle attack play real- longest experience with the on then 20-22 re,
y looked like, rheygot I he coaches cited program a, NX. State from a yeat ag
to play the game back seniors Sharon Pern and hei knowledge ol
on tape and see whal and Loretta Holden, the player
sophomore
m the
iei
rh( I :
iri ol thing she 'pi 'h i
ou "I've play Octobei 1 in Minge
players tips on whal the players we'll be
C AIWA will enable type ot pla � to expei
uiist up until this
I nivei
1 iiii Da
I c I
1 � t v
ha
"We realh have pio

State, but left the re-
tnce to try di Davidson continued, maining slots up for
�s offense is ferenl things. "� can really change grabs.
bane 1 hex "When you're play- the momentum ol the
really hard ing a scrimmage, it's game. Winning in blems
owe could tell not quite the same as a volleyball depends on depth. Dillon admits,
defense wasn't game which counts in which team can hold We only have
up the spikes, fhe standings, rhere's the momentum of the players and two ot the
get people not a lot of pressure in- game. Wimming in four reserves are set-
defense, volved in a scrimmage, vollevball depends on ters, so we can t attord
io know "1 don't think they which team can hold am injuries
l and be
WESTERN SIZZLIN
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tble covei and
, a lormei
�� erl irmei at
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1 tense they
will be
I iuisbui g is no
where neat as tasl n
Tallo Named
A cademic
Coordinator
RUSH
Phi Kappa Tau
19'
COLLEGE
STUDENTS
irades!
$1 00 tor your
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It You Need A Ride
Call 752-4379 or 752-0469
Winner of East Carolina's
Most Outstanding Fraternity
1979-1980
The Brothers And Little Sisters Invite YOU To
A Fantastic Week!
Tues. 9:00pm until
"Crazy Tuesday
Come party with us! All oi your favorite beverages
Wed. 9:00pm until
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END UP A GREAT WEEK WITH A GREAT FRATERNITY
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I
r





Title
The East Carolinian, September 16, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 16, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.76
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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