The East Carolinian, September 11, 1980






She lEast Carolinian
ol. 55 o.f
14 Pages
Serving (he East Carolina campus community since 125.
I hursdax. September 1 I, 1980
Greenville. N.C
Circulation 10,000
Rosalvnn Says Carter Unchanged About One-On-One Debate
9r , . i � � .i �� x;�� ho. o hrn� "I ran rpneal thosP lhmis todav
BIRMINGHAM, Ala tl I'll
Rosalynn Carter said Wednesday
hei husband was "sticking b his
guns" m insisting on a one on-one
debate with Republican Ronald
Reagan.
"I think tlte American people
e with out position the firsl
lad said dining a da ol campaign-
ing hi North v arolina and Alabama.
"We think the American people
deserve to have a one-on-one
debate
Mrs. tarter spoke to a lunch-
hour crowd ot 4.XX persons m In-
dependence Square in Charlotte,
N.C . and addressed the 79th annual
Women's uxilliarv to the black
National Baptistonvention in Bir-
mingham, Ala.
But she tan into repeated ques-
tions about the debates from
reporters at what her stall called
"news comments She backed up
President Carter's decision not to
participate in the 1 eague of Women
Voters' debate. I he league has also
united Reagan and independent
ohn B. Anderson to the debate
"He's sticking b his guns she
told reporters in Charlotte, N.C .
Mr (. artei was campaigning on
het own t�ii the tiisi time since her
husband won renomination at the
Democratu National Convention.
She did not make new- so much as
she reiterated the president's posi-
tions, often using his same phrasing.
1artei told Birmingham
reporters thai -he believed the presi-
dent would carry his native South in
Novembet.
don't agree we have slipped in
the Smith she said. "I don't have
anv doubt the South is going to stick
with Jimmyarter
Mrs. Carter also said she was not
upset bv polls showing that many
people do not prefer anv presiden-
tial candidates.
"Thai doesn't alarm me she
said in Charlotte, "because thai just
means people aren't thinking much
about the election right now. 1 think
they will get very serious about the
election before the time comes. I
think we're going to have a large
turnout"
flanked by North Carolina Gov.
James Hunt and Charlotte Mayor
Ed Knox, the first lads spoke in
strong terms about her husband's
character and accomplishments. She
said that during the 1976 campaign
she was asked repeatedly what kind
oi a person he was.
"1 said he cares about people,
he's truthful, he's reliable, he's in-
telligent, he's courageous she
said.
"I can repeal those things today.
Jimmy Carter has been tested and
these are the things the American
people have learned about him the
past four years
As the crowd burs! into applause,
she said:
"The American people have seen
thai he's calm, he's courageous,
he's reliable whether it's the
energy crisis, the economic crisis,
the Iranian crisis
Mendenhall To House
Faculty Dining Area
crowd gathered esterdav to watch the "chug-off
the Mellow Yellow Chugging Contest on the mall. Kevin
(lick managed to gulp (limn 16 ounces of the sot! drink
in onh 10.02 seconds to win the finals. Click won a case
Student life Chug-Off
of Mellow Yellow for his efforts. I he event was part ot
"Student lifeelebrates which vss sponsored bv the
Division of Student Life to aquainl students with its
various services.
Bv TERRY CRAY
s,�. I Ann
Although the details of the pro-
posal haven't been worked out yet,
it looks like the ECU faculty and
stall will soon have a dining area
"primarily" for then own use.
fhose who are involved in plann-
ing the new facility have stressed the
word "primarily because the din-
ing area will be located in
Mendenhall Student Center. The
center was paid lor bv bonds, which
are being paid tor most!) bv student
fees.
Dr. Elmei Meyer, vice chancellor
tor student lite, said Tuesday that
the current plans call tor a new din-
ing area to be located in
Mendenhall Multi-Purpose room,
where a limited lunchtimc menu
would be offered. According to
Careers
B IKKKV t.KAY
PKNN HARRIS
"We arc living to help people
make more informed choices said
i)i .lone Ryan ol the I niversit
c ounseling c enter.
According to l)r. Ryan, this is the
purpose of a two part mini-series,
"( arcei Bv Choice, Not Chance
Counseling Center Mini-Series Offers A Chance
To Make 'Informed Choices' About The Future
thai the counseling centei will i
iftei
within the nexl tew weeks.
v ill center around
i imbell ocational In-
� . a huh measures an
's interests and inclina-
i v ocation, Ryan explain-
studei
1 he mi
the �
teresi I
indiv idua
tions I
ed.
Dr. R id that the mini-series
is aimed "primarily, at freshmen and
sophomoresbut thai it is open to
anv'Mie who mav need help in
deciding what career fits them best,
based on the results ol the Strong-
Cambell Inventor)
1 he inventor) and a follow-up
,cssion will be offered twice in the
next few weeks. The first group will
meet Sept. 15 to take the inventory,
and will meet again on Oct. 1 to in-
terpret the results and receive fur-
ther guidance. The second group's
respective dates will be Sept.16 and
(tet.2, Rvan noted.
The sessions will noi replace in-
dividual counseling, Rvan em-
phasized. Students mav make ap-
pointments for guidance and
counseling year-round at no ex-
pense, she said.
"We will administer the test dur-
ing 'lie first session. In the second
session, we will take a look at the
results and help the participants get
more information about
careershe said.
Rvan explained that the guidance
o'Uc will have a list o people at the
university whom the participants
can contact to discuss the careers
the) might be interested in.
"It someone is interested in
iHome i conomics, lor example, we
can direct Lhertt to people in the area
or at the university who will be able
�ive them an idea ol the career
optio i how the) can
fui t hei e More i he
� Rvan -aid.
"Thi tor) can do four
things Di Rvan noted. "First, it
can coi I rm a -i udeni 's ow n ideas
ab � ' � have chosen oi
the career i pursue. Oi
i; can inform the ideas�in othei
woids. that what the)'ve
chosen ave anv thing to do
w n 11 the resu
"Oi
give someone ��
w hat cai cei mi
�V il
where h
pens'she said.
The inventory is a list ol choices
about ikes, dislikes, and indif-
ferences that one has. explained
he inventorv.
nd, it could al-o
- not sure about
e best for them,
leave the person
ha! rarelv hap
Rvan. and is based on the idea that
one will be honest about the
answei s.
According to Rvan. the inventory
dates have been timed to allow
students to take it before
preregistration dav.
"We feel that tin- is an efficient
wav for students to get some direc-
tion. It certainl) is not a panacea,
but it can give them some specific
ideas on paper on which they can
follow through she said.
Ryan said that the series would be
ottered once each semester, or
perhaps more if there were enough
interest.
I he I niversit) Counseling Center
also has live lull-time counselors
who give instruction in time
management, test-taking, overall
social skills and confidence-
building.
Interested students may call
757-6661 for further details.
Meyer, the faculty here has long
been interested in a faculty dining
room. "They've been raising the
question for years said Meyer,
whose responsibilities as the head of
Student Life include all campus din-
ing. According to Meyer, a recent
survey of faculty members indicated
that they would use such a dining
facility, although it is not centrally
located.
Meyer said that a lack of alter-
natives pointed to Mendenhall as
the location of any proposed faculty
dining area.
"Philosophically, it's noi only a
student center �� it's also a faculty
center, and a facility that exists to
serve the entire university communi-
ty Meyer said.
The proposed dining area will
continue to be used for other pur-
poses, such as the Madrigal Din-
ners. Meyer added, but other events
which are normally scheduled in the
Multi-Purpose room may have to be
scheduled, in other areas o the
center.
Meyer acknowledged that
students may resent The presence ot
a faculty dining area in a buliding
which has been financed through
student money, but emphasized that
students may also benefit from the
arrangement since the new equip-
ment that must be bought could also
be moved to provide extra services
io students when not in use by the
faculty.
Servomation Corp which has a
contract with ECU to handle food
services, is cooperating with Meyer
and others to get the dining room in
operation, said Sieve Kahler, food
service manager at Mendenhall and
a Servomation employee.
"The snack bar at Mendenhall
was built at a time when there was a
cafeteria on campus, and it was not
designed to provide cafeteria ser-
vices Kahler noted. Despite this,
he added, the student snack bar has
been able to offer cafeteria-type
meals for dinner.
"We're still trying to work this
out, but with the new equipment,
which will be totally mobile, we'd
like to enhance the facilites at
Mendenhall for the students he
said.
The new equipment will include a
salad bar and a hot well, which
keeps precooked foods warm.
Kahler said that it could also be used
to serve students an expanded menu
at dinner time.
The means of paying for the need-
See MENDENHALL, Page 3
Up To $150 Available
Health Center, SGA
Offer Medical Loans
Preliminary Evidence Shows
Safest Birth Control Pills
Have Lower Hormone Levels
M ()kk (l PI) Scientists 1 . Stone, immediate past president
say the safest birth control pills con- ol the American College of
tain low doses o estrogen and pro- Obstetricians and Gynecologists,
gestogen, but most of the 10 million said two other brands contain the
American women who use the pill preferred low-dose combination of
are prescribed the types thai contain hormones Brevicon and Modicon.
higher hormone doses.
Stone said about 20 percent ot
Preliminary evidence, presented birth control pills sold contain the
Tuesday, at a symposium for lowest doses possible. 60 percent
medical and science writers, shows contain high doses, and 20 percent
that birth control pills with a low great concentrations,
hormone dose appear to help The birth control pill market runs
women avoid side effects thai may ovcr $3(K) minion a year huI many
lead to possible strokes or heart at- w0uidb� users opt for other
tacks, methods rather than risk possible
side effects, including liver tumors.
The symposium was sponsored bv incrcased satetv re,ord ot
Mead Johnson Pharmaceutical knN.dose piUs ls becoming so strong
Division ol I vansv.lie, lnd which a therc ls a movcmcnl t0 have the
makes a birth control pill with the fQod and - Administration ban
lowest combination ot hormones birtn contro) pUis ul(h higher dose
Oveon-35. combinations of the hormones, par-
The panel moderator, Dr. Martin UcipaUng sClcnlisls said.
���������� Preliminary reports of small-scale
TTl lMeilA research released at the meeting
vlfl I liC I ilSIO" showed the pills with low-dose hor-
- mones provide contraceptive effects
without causing changes in the
Announcements ,�
, � i i i ai lenes.
C lassitieds4
Co-Ed Life8 Such changes are known to lead
Editorials 10 heart attacks and strokes, two of
Grants3 the more serious side effects noted
The Cajuns11 in susceptible users of the birth con-
USL Game11 trol pills.
By JEAN L.CAUTHEN
In the comfortable, grammar-
school green lobby, students chat id-
ly, lacking the tenseness you might
expect in most doctor's office.
As in the past, most students in
the ECU Health Center are only
seeking something-for-this-runny
nose, or a signed verification of
good health for an obligatory fitness
form.
However, a growing number ot
students are relying on the infirmary
for more complex problems. In par-
ticular, one new service is the
Emergency Medical Loan. Offered
bv the Student Health Services and
the SGA, and Financial Aid offices,
this loan enables students with an
immediate medical emergency to
receive up to $150.
Kay Van Nortwick, ad-
ministrative assistant of the Student
Health Service said the loan "is
available to pay for medical
assistance not provided by the Stu-
dent Health Service
She said the service, once used
solely for abortions or other
pregnancy related emergencies, in-
clude any emergency medical need.
One of the drawbacks of last
year's policy was the lack of con-
fidentiality for the patient. Anyone
seeking a loan for an abortion had
to apply through the Health Center,
the Counseling Center, and the stu-
dent government treasurer, explain-
ing to the respective offices the pur-
pose of the loan. Often, more than
one person in the department handl-
ed the case, further frustrating some
of the students seeking funds.
The decision to change the loan
last spring occurred as a result of a
meeting agreed by Kirk Little, SGA
treasurer. All those attending the
meeting agreed to the change, in-
cluding the president of SGA,
representatives from both the
Health Services and the Counseling
Center.
Little saideveryone recognized
the unfairness of treating only
pregnancy-related emergencies
See PURPOSES, Page 3
Museum Director Hurt
In Utah Auto Crash
Frisbee linger Poised
PHoto by JON JORDAN
Randolph Osman, 40, result of head injuries
director of East and received a lung
Carolina University's puncture wound and
Wellington B. Gray Art chest injuries.
Gallery and Museum,
suffered serious in- At present, he is an
juries when his intensive care patient at
automobile overturned McKaydee Hospital.
Utah, ,99 Harrison Blvd.
Ogden, Utah, and is
conscious but under
Osman was driving heavy sedation,
back to Greenville from
near Ogden,
Aug. 19.
ECU student and frisbee aficianado David Walter readies a nimble finger
for the catch. David was just having fun with the Student Life Celebrates'
crowd vesterday.
Portland Ore when
the one-car accident oc-
curred. He suffered
some nerve damage as a
According to of-
ficials of the ECU
School of Art, Osman's
physicians estimate that City, N.J.
he will not be able to
return to ECU until
January at the earliest,
or possibly not until the
end of the academic
year.
Osman joined the
ECU staff in 1979,
coming from Portland
Ore where he was
business and corporate
consultant to the Foun-
tain Gallery of Art. He
is a native of Atlantic
t
r
�'
. .
M � . . �&JJ1 .






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Announcements
O'BERRY
TOUR
Student Council tor Exceptional
Children will tour O'Berry Center
in Goldsboro on Sat Sept 20 at
1 30 All interested members and
rton members are Invited to at
tend The group will leave from
Speight at II 45 on Sat morning
Drivers are needed If you are In
teresfed call 758 9967 and attend
the SCEC meeting on Wed . Sept
17 at 4 pm in 179 Speight for
details Deadline to sign up tor trw
trio is Wed Sept 17
NCSL
The North Carolina Students
Legislature provides an effective
means for students to voice their
opinions In reference to the state
legislation which governs North
Carolina There remains much to
be accomplished in the upcoming
year Screening for membership
in NCSL will be held tonight
Thurs Sept 11 at 7 p m in Room
:� Mendenhail Student Center
Anyone Interested in membership
is encouraged to attend this
meeting
CAR
WASH
Tau Chapter of Phi Sigma Pi Na
tional Honor Fraternity will soon
sor a car wash Saturday at the Et
rta Service Station at Greenville
Blvd and Ufh Street The car
wash begins at 9 a m Tickets are
available trom fraternity
members for 11 The price for cars
w.thout tickets is SI 50
BKA
Beta kappa Alpha the Banking
and Finance fraternity will hold
its organizational meeting Thurs .
Sept 11 at 3 pm in room 103
Rawl The fraternity is open to all
business students Activities in
elude field trips speakers at mon
fhly meetings and a banquet All
interested persons art invited to
attend
PHI ALPHA
THETA
Phi Alpha Thefa, the honorary
society of the History Department
at ECU will hold its ititial meeting
on Tues . Sept 16 at 7 30 p m In
D wing of Brewster Topics of
discussion during the meeting will
include semester activities
SNEHA
There will be a meeting of the
Students National Environmental
Health Association Thurs , Sept
11 at 5 p m in the Allied Health
Auditorium
REGAN
VOLUNTEERS
There will be a meeting of all the
student volunteers for Reagan for
President Headquarters at 7 p m
Sept 16 The Headquarters art
located In the old U B E
1980-81 BMI
AWARDS OPEN
I he 19t0-l BMI Awards comm
petition is open to student com
posers who art citizens or perma
rtent residents of the Western
Hemisphere and art enrolled In
accredited secondary schools, col
'ages and conservatories, or
engaged in private study with
recognized and established
teachers anywhere in the world
Entrant study with recognized
and- established teachers
anywnere In the world Entrants
must be under 26 years of age on
December 31. 190 No limitations
are established as to instrumenta
tlon. stylistic considerations, or
length of works submitted
The 19t0 8l competition cioses
February 16, 1981 Official rules
and entry blanks are available
from James G Roy. Jr Director,
BMI Awards to Student Com
posers. Broadcast "music Inc 320
Wtit $7th Street. New York, N Y
10019
CAR
WASH
The Kappa Sigma fraternity will
hold a car wash Sat Sept 13 trom
9 am til 3 p m Clean it up before
the game I
STUDENT UNION COLLEGE BOWL
CHEMISTRY
SEMINAR
Dr limari Kurki Suonio of
Tampere Technical University in
Tampere. Finland will present a
seminar on "Peat" on Friday.
Sept 12 at 2 p m in room 201.
Flanagan building Refreshments
wilt be served in the conference
room following the seminar
AUDITIONS
The East Carolina Playhouse
will hold auditions for Moliere's
The Doctor in Spite Of Himself
a madcap farsicai comedy, on
Sept 15 and 16 at 7 � p m in the
Drama Departments Studio
Theatre
The cast for this hilarious com
edy will include six men and three
women Roles in the play are open
to students, faculty and staff
members of me university and to
citizens of Greenville and the sur
rounding area Everyone is
welcome and encouraged to audi
tlon
Travis Lockhart, a member of
the Directing Faculty in the
Drama and Speech Department
will direct this production
The play will be produced by the
East Carolina Playhouse as a din
ner theatre performance and will
run from Oct 27 through Nov 1
SKI GROUP
There win be an organizational
meeting for the ECU Ski group
(Christmas break trip to
Snowshoe, West Virginia) en Tues
day September 23. 19�. at 5 00
p m in Mlnges room 143 If you
have any questions please contact
Jo Saunders. Memorial gym 205.
7S7 60CO
SOCIOLOGY
ANTHROPOLOGY
CLUB
Interested in learning about
strange and exotic cultures of the
world and the US? The ECU
Sociology Anthropology Club pro
vides fascinating presentations by
experts on subiects from Folk
Meteorology to Sex & Violence in
the Media as well as a great at
mosphere for making new friends
This years first meeting will be
held on Wednesday Sept 17 in
Brewster, 3rd floor, D wing The
program will be art orientation
followed by demonstrationar
flcipatlon of folk dances from
around the world
A splendid time is garanteed tor
all! And anyone interested is riear
tiiy invited to attend
IVCF
inter varsity Christian
Fellowship meets every Thurs , at
7 30 p m in the Methodist Student
Center this Thurs Sept II Randy
Ellison will talk about new life
ministries
CHESS CLUB
The Greenville Chess Club
meets every Monday evening at
7 15 at the South Greenville
Recreation Center on Howeil St
Everyone is welcome Phone
752 M05 for further information
BILLIARDS
LEAGUE
interested in loining a billiards
league? All billiards players in
teresfed in forming a league to
meet weekly, sign up at the
Mendenhail Billiards Center An
organizational meeting will be
held Monday, Sept 22 at 6 p m in
the Billiards Center Trophies will
be awarded in several divisions
Applications are now being a
cepted for a Day Student
Representative position on the
Student Union Board of Directors
Anyone interested should apply at
the Information Desk in
Mendenhail Student Center
PHI BETA
LAMBDA
Phi Beta Lambda is a nationwide
business service fraternity that is
open to all business students The
only grade point average require
ment is that you meet those set by
the university for enrollment
Among other things, we sponsor a
symposium each year that brings
in speakers from various fields of
business If you're ready to
broaden your involvement beyond
the classroom then we're ready
for you Come to our next meeting
to see what we're about. Sept 8
Tuesday 4pm and Sept 16 in 103
Rawl
PHYSICS
The Society of Physics Students
will hold its organizational
meeting on Thurs . Sept 11 at 7 30
p m in room E303 of the Physics
Building Plans for the upcoming
year will be discussed All persons
interested in becoming members
are encouraged to attend
HOUSE COUNCIL
The filing dates will be Sept 8 10
Elections will be held Tues , Sept
16 from 9 a.m. to 4 p m The posi
tions open are President, Vice
President and Secretary
Treasurer See your Residence
Hall Director tor applications and
more information
YOUTHGRANTS
AVAILABLE
The Youthgrants program of the
National Endowment for the
Humanities will offer grants to in
dlviduals and groups between the
ages of 15 and 25 who have a ways
to go before completing academic
or professional training The pro
gram awards money directly to
young people for independent
work in the humanities The
humanities include such subject
areas as history, ethnic studies
folklore, anthropology linguistics
and the history of art
If you art interested in the pro
gram, a copy of the guidelines
should be on file at the campus
Placement Office or the Office of
Contracts and Grants It not.
please write before October isth
1980, if you wish to meet this
year's deadline, to Youthgrants
Guidelines, Mall Stop 103 C Na
tional Endowment lor the
Humanities, Washington D C
20506
CRAFTS
WORKSHOPS
Crafts workshops are now
available at the Crafts Center in
Mendenhail Stained Glass.
Quilting. Photography Beginning
Jewelry, Floor Loom Weaving,
and Macrame are the workshops
which are available
All ECU students, student
dependents and tacuity staff and
their dependents who are MSC
members, are eligible to par
ticipate Everyone must register
for workshops at the Cralts Center
no later than Saturday September
13. Crafts Center hours are 3 p.m.
until 10 p m , Monday through Frl
day. and 12 noon until 5p m Satur
day
Registration for ECU Intramural
competition College Bowl, the
competitive sport of the mind,
opens Sept 8 and extends through
Sept 30 College Bowl features
knowledgeable college students,
lour on a team, competing in
answering questions from all
academic areas Questions may
concern any of the liberal arts,
science, mathematics, sports, cur
rent events and innumerable other
areas Mendenhail Student Center
sponsor both our own intramural
competition and participation in
regional and national tour
naments If anyone has questions
concerning College Bowl, come by
the Program Office in Mendenhail
Student Center or (election"
757 6611. ext 113
TUTORS WANTED
The Center for Student Oppor
tunities (CSO) currently has open
ings for part time tutors in the
following subiei I areas
medicine, pre medicine, biology,
chemistry physics, and related
health professions You may earn
an income at standard campus
rates Contact Dr BndweM CSO.
216 Whichard Annex or call
757 6122 6081. or 6075 lor an n
pointment
SOCIAL WORK
September 22 is the deadline lor
Fall Admission to the Department
of Social Work and Correctional
Services Students who plan to ap
ply to maior must submit an ap
plication to the Department Chair
and complete two interviews prior
to the deadline Students within 10
hours Of completion ot general col
lege credits who have a minimum
2 5 grade point average are eligi
ble to apply Applications ami ad
ditional information may be
secured m the Department Office
Room 312, AIMed Health (Carol
Belkt Building Phone '57 6961
RUSH
The Kappa Sigma chapter of
Delta Sigma Thefa Sorority rl
sponsoring a Fail "ruafc"at the
Ledonia S. Wright Culture Center
Sept 12, 1980 at 6 p m All eligible
and ambitious young ladies hi
teresfed in pledging are encourag
ed to a-ttend
WELCOME BACK STUDENTS
Get ready for
tall with an exciting new Design Cut and
take advantage of fantastic savings.
tj8'
c
iP
o
Thru Sept. 30
00 OFF all Curly Perms or Body Waves
Shampoo Biowdry,or Shampoo Set
with Ail Haircuts.
ree
Coll today tor appointment or consultation
752 3419
2800 E 10th St.
J5l Timothy's Episcopal Church
3rd Annual
obiter
For
More Information or Tickets, CALL
Nancy Williams
758-1209
TICKETS ALSO AVAILABLE AT
The Book Barn & The Kitchen Cupboard
TICKET DEADLINE SEPTEMBER 18
Live Lobster-$7.00
Boiled Lobster-$8.00
The Place is St. Pauls Episcopal Church at E. 3rd
Street Entrance.
October 4,1980
Saturday IO-3
BOWLING
LEAGUES
Sign up for a MIXED DOUBLE5
bowling league for Fall Semester
at the Mendenhail Student Center
ground floor bulletin board The
league organizational meeting will
be held Monday Sept 15 at a p.m
Bring some friends and sign up to
day
SPECIAL
EVENTS
Applications are now
taKen for two vat anc ies on the Stu
dent Union Special Events Com
mittee Applications will ne 'aken
in Room 234 Mendenhail Student
Center until fh irs S�p1 IS
ECU
CLUB
ACTIVITIES
An informal coffee hour at the
ECU Chancellor's Residence has
been planned by the East Carolina
University Club for last year's
members and newcomers Sat .
Sept 13 at 10 a m
Newcomers are invited to join a
bus tour of the campus set for
Tues, Sept 23 at 6 15 pm Led by
Carolyn Fulghum. associate dean
tor residence life, the tour will
taKe participants around the main
campus with visits to the athletic
:omplex. the medical complex.
ihe student center and the Student
Supply Store
the University Club (formerly
Knows as the ECU Women's Club)
is open to staff or faculty members
and to spouses of faculty
members, upon payment of 15 an
nual dues its fund raising ac
tiviles are for the benefit of the
Lillian Jenkins Scholarship Fund
at ECU
Persons interested in attending
the coffee are asked to telephone
Penny Laing (756 3541) Sue
Lemish (75 7875) or May Kathryn
Thornton (7VS 1686)
Those who wish to join the bus
tour should reserve places with
Lynn Odom (756 6726) or Nancy
O'Brien (756 9129)
The University Club (formerly
knows as the ECU Women's Club)
is open to staff or faculty members
and to spouses ot faculty
members, upon payment of 5 an
nual dues lit fund raising ac
tivites are lor the benefit of the
Lillian Jenkins Scholarship Fund
at ecu
Persons interested in attending
the coffee ire asked to telephone
Pemmy Laing (756 3541). Sue
Lemish (756 7875) or May Kathryn
Thornton (756 1684)
Those who wish to loin the bus
'our should reserve places with
Lynn Odom 756 6726) or Nancy
'56 91291
The University Club (formerly
knows as the ECU Women's Club)
per to Staff or faculty members
and to spouses of faculty
members, upon payment of $5 an
nual dues its fund raising ac
i'v.tes are tor the benefit of the
Lillian Jenkins Scholarship Fund
ai fcu
Persons oterested In attending
the coffee are asked to telephone
Pemmy Laing (756 3541), Sue
Lemish (756 7875) or May Kathryn
Thornton (7 56 1686)
Those who wish to join the bus
should reserve places with
Lynn Odom 756 6726) or Nancy
O Bnen (756 9129)
RACQUETBALL
CLUB
The ECU Racquetball Club will
hold its first meeting of the year
T ues , Sept la at 5 p m in
Memorial Gym 104 Anyone In
teresfed in learning how to play,
finding some partners or playing
competition against other schools
In invited to attend The club of
fers activities for people at all
levels of ability Come to the
meeting or call 6193 for more in
formation
POETRY
CONTEST
American Collegiate Poets An
thology, International Publica
tions is sponsoring a national col
lege poetry contest Open to all
college and university students
desiring to have their poetry an
thologiied Cash prizes will go to
the top five poems $100 first
place. ISO second place, J25 third
place. JI5 fourth place. $10 fifth
place Awards of free printing for
all accepted manuscripts m our
popular handsomely bound and
copyrighted anthology, American
Collegiate Poets Deadline Oc
lober 31
REAGAN
FOR
PRESIDENT
The Reagan for President Head
quarters will host its Grand Open
ing on Sat . Sept 13 from 12 2
p m Guest speaker will be Dr
John East, candidate for u S
Senate The headquarters Is
located in the old University Book
Exchange 1526 S Cotanche St )
There will also be a pre game
Pig Picking in honor of Dr East at
4 p m at the home of Bill McCon
nell Tickets are available at the
Reagan tor President Mead
quarters Cost is $12 50 per person
UNIVERSITY
CHOIR
The University Choir still has
openings for three tenors and four
basses Choir is offered for one
hour of credit and meets on Mon
days and Wednesdays at 4 p m
The choir will travel on tour nent
sring to Washington and New York
and will also make local and
regional appearances interested
students should contact Dr Bret'
Watson In Fletcher Music Center
lor more information
TRAVEL
Feb
and
Armchair travelers can see
v.vid film presentations via the
19(0 11 Travel Adventure Film
Series of the East Carolina
Jniversity Student Union
This year's series Includes five
films, all scheduled for viewing at
( p m in Hendnx Theatre of
Mendenhail Student Center
They are "The New England of
Robert Frost, Nov 13.
"Germany Key to Europe Jan
20. I9tl. "China After Mao,
12. "Spam March 26
Puerto Rko. April �
Each film will be narrated by its
producer
Season tickets to the series art
available 'or $9 each at the ECU
Central Ticket Office Groups of
season tickets (20 or more) may
be purchased at a discount
SOULS.
There will be a SOULS
meeting tonight, Sepl 11 at 7 p m
at the Ledonia Wright Cultural
Center Meetings will be held on a
regular basis every second and
�ourth Thursday night a' 'he same
time and at the same location
Your presence will be greatly ap
precated
LEAGUE
OF
WOMEN
VOTERS
The current refugee situation
and the resulting issues the united
States Is facing will be presented
by Dr Hans indorf at en open
meeting of the League of Women
Voters on Mon , Sept 15 at � p m
at the First Presbyterian Church
of Greenville, corner of Elm and
Ufh Streets
Dr indorf. a lorrr- professor of
Political Science at ECU has been
m Washington. D C the past three
rears serving as Director of
Legislative Affairs for Senator
Robert Morgan (DNC) He will
examine the following points how
do we define WHO is a refugee, do
they hava rights to oar laws and
what are exceptions, do we have a
moral obligation to accept
refugees, what are the implies
tions for the future, is America
willing to absorb thajm. ana what
are the possible limitations o en
try
Dr indorf specializes in
southeast Asian affairs He has
'raveled throughout the world and
has resided with his family in
Malaysia
Em
In September 9, edition of the East
Carolinian, the phone number printed
in the Heart's Delight advertisement
was incorrect. The correct number is
752-5878. The East Carolinian
regrets any inconvenience caused
by this mistake
Susan
Mary Anne
Carroll
Ellen
Loretta
Pam
Melissa
Terry
Lynn
Denlse
We are the woman wno eqbjw the Flamu
Center a special place otTertr.nl MancDy
personal. oonrklenUaJ oare at a reaeonabi�
ooet and at Umee convenient to you.
Saturdery abortion boon
jFtm pregnancy tocta
Very &rly prffnamcy tMt
Mvwaing birth control hours
Call 781-5650 In Raleigh anytime
The Fleming Center 3613 HaworU. Drive Raleigh. N C 27806
P
�&BACK TO SCHOOLV
D
SPECIAL
scoui f i ECU Stu
UNITED FIGURE SALON
Call 756 2820 for app.
Red Oak Plaza
mile west of Carolina
East Mall on 264 By Pass
W"A"Sm '������ ABORTIONS UP TO lltf) WEEK OF PREONANCY
MWm1 'i 0C "all inclusive
ft Ipregnant test. B.rrj COn
W2Iroi. and prooiem pregnen
��tfCy rrxinsei ng For further
Jninformation can 112 0535
r-T1(ton fret number
2�0C n 1561: be'ween � A v 5 P V �yee�0yi ��leiat yv�Tien i Health Orfjannj'ioi Ml West Morgan St RaleigtV N C 2?�U
kU.
Settling into campus
life
mean
AD ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised
items is required to be read
ly available for sale in each
Kroger Savon except as spe
cihcally noted m this ad If we
do run out of an item we will
offer you your choice of a
comparable item when avail
able reflecting the same sav
ings. or a ramcheck which
will entitle you to purchase
the advertised item at the
advertised price within 30
days
COUNTRY OVEN
Potato Chips
exactly
ling down.
THERE'S SOME PARTYING IN EVERY
STUDENT'S LIFE, AND WEEKENDS ARE
SHORT�SO WHY WASTE TIME JUST
GETTING READY FOR THE FUN? WE'VE GOT
EVERYTHING YOU NEED RIGHT HERE�FROM
COLD BEER TO THAT HOT NEW ALBUM!
BEER
Budweiser
8-Oz.
Twin
Pack
DELI-SUBS
3 VARIETIES Of Ml AT
CHEESE,LEI TUCE
6
12-Oz.
Cans
Records & Tapes
fSsS�w2il2 51
REFRESHING
Coca-Cola
6
32-Oz.
Ret.
Btls.
$
199
Ws Plus
Deposit
HILLCREST DRY ROASTED
Peanuts
FOOD,DRUG.GEN
MDSE. STORES
NONE SOLD.
TO
DEALERS
OPEN 7 AM TO MIDNIGHT
OPEN SUNDAY
9 AM TO 9 PM
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
Phone 756-7031

I
I





I HI I -sl K IM-XN
SI I'll MHI K II. 19X0
Emphasis On Public Service
of
(tor
U
-
do
I
'�
Up'
ka
t�
f�t
I �"
n
jfcM
�X3
in
ECU Grant Requests Rise 25 Percent
� a u: ,u ,miI,( iick a iL . coirl On pvamnlp i
B MARC BARNES
Ml Nt�, Hun .in
Finding ways to improve life for
North Carolinians has heightened
interest in research b Easl Carolina
I niversity professors.
I C l counted a significant in-
crease in requests for outside funds
bv faculty members during the past
yeai 1 he requests, made b both in
dividuals and groups, to founda-
tions and other sources ol funding
increased from ls to 209, bringing
the total dollar amount sought to
nearly 11 million rhis amount con-
stitutes a 25 peicent increase ovei
last year's total ol 7 million, accor-
ding to Robei t H 1 ranke, ECU's
acting directoi ol Sponsored Pro-
grams.
1 t anke noted a trend tow aid
research intended to help find pi ac-
tual solutions to everyday pro
blems. He said thai such public ser
vice projects were nol intended to
protit I c I directly, but that they
came from a desire to "render ser-
vice to our eonsituents, the tax-
payers of the state of North
Carolina
"We're pretty well balanced in
research, training and public ser-
vice he said. "It's not all the so-
called hard academic research
Currently. ECU researchers are
working on fisheries marketing and
management. health care,
wastewater processing, and locating
new deposits of phosphorus.
Specific public service projects in-
clude:
Free advice -from marketing
students, who have helped local
businesses which were in financial
difficulty;
-Research on the effects ol
alcohol during pregnancy;
-A research station on the
Pamlico River near Aurora, which
helps monitor water quality;
-Finding ways to process peat to
use a a liquid fuel;
A project which would use a
statewide system of swimming pools
to treat arthritis victims;
-The design of a computer which
will allow blind students to take part
in chemistry lab experiments;
-Studies on the use of a new drug
to treat hypertension;
-A project to teach fishermen how
to catch eels and sell them to a
lucrative foreign market.
Professors are motivated in many
ways when they apply for a grant.
Franke said. "It comes from inside,
you want to expand your own
knowledge, or you see a need for a
particular course, or you are asked
by someone else for a service, tor
example. We are the regional
repository for expertise in many
fields
A part o the funds go to resear-
chers who work under contract,
usuallv with another state agency,
Franke said. One example o this is
the research on peat, which was con-
tracted for through the N.C. Energy
Institute, a division of the state
Department of Commerce.
Another factor influencing the in-
crease in research has been the
growth of the ECU Medical School.
"The substantial increase in the size
of the medical school faculty has
played a significant role in the in-
crease of research funds awarded to
the university franke said.
Faculty awareness ot the need to
develop expertise through research
and development is also a reason for
increased research activity. Franke
said. "The university administra-
tion is very supportive of research.
training and public service and that
attitude is reflected in the numbers.
ECU is taking a more active role
in providing leadership and exper-
tise in this region he added.
BLOUNT HARVEY
DOWNTOWN AND CAROUN A EAST MALL
tevis
LEVIS ON SALE
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
$12.80
Hours Downtown lOani 5:30pm
Carolina t-asl 1 (lain 9:00p,n
Medical
Continued from page 1
He also felt, that like
main other aspects
the Student Govern-
ment, the process ol a.
quiring a loan needed
be streamlined.
I ittle cited an exam-
ple ot an epileptic who
crushed a tooth as the
result ot a seisure. 1 ast time-consuming.
yeai. the patient would
not have been able to U took the lull Sum-
use the loan, since mer I egislature to get
funds were available the loan changed, but
toi only pregancy now. Little said, "The
related needs. Even if loan is as equitable and
the student had been efficient as possible and
able to use the fund, makes a more
the approval process beneficial situation tor
would have been too' students
Mendenhall Chosen As
Site For Faculty Dining
Continued from page 1
ed equipment has not been settled.
according to both Meyet and
Kahler. One altern ould be to
have Servomation buy it undei a
special cot tract that would compen-
sate the comp added
capital invest m case its con-
tract is terminated with lei, ex
plained Kahlei.
Di U. ,a d that a second
alternative wouid pay foi the
pment from the dining reserve
funds, which; ai ted from the
gross sales in the student snack bar
in Mendenhall.
Meyer did not put a date on the
facility's opening, since details on
financing, operation, menu, and
storage space have not been worked
out.
Presenl plans for the t acuity
menu include at least a salad bar,
hot sou p. sandwiches and
beveiaes. said Kahler.
"We're looking into the possibih-
tv ot having tire same items
available to students at lunch time
he added.
In order to be eligible
for the loan, a physi-
cian from the Student
Hralth Service must
establish, the student's
immediate need for
medical assistance out-
side the Student Health
Center.
Next, the student
must indicate the lack
of insurance coverage
and or available funds
to cover the cost of the
medical service re-
quired If there is ap-
parent f i n a n c i a I
assistance including
SCiA and or Student
Financial Offices.
The student must
then complete an ap-
plication form along
with the physician's
verification of medical
need.
Finally, assuming the
student is eligible, he is
approved by the agency
providing the loan. In
no instance does the
Health Center itself
grant the loan.
The payback period,
as stated on the loan
application is
"preferably three mon-
ths, six months man-
datory The loan in-
cludes only a $s sur.
charge. 1 ittle explained
that the surcharges on
the SO A loans help
defray the cost o loan
defaulting students.
The Health Services
role in the Medical
Emergency is one
reason Ms.Van Nort-
wick discourages the
use o the word
"Infirmary Increas-
ingly, the facility
answers to the more
sophistieated name of
Student Health Sei
v ices.
"We are trying to
change our image from
an Infirmary to a ser-
vice that will meet the
needs of the student
population she ex-
plaind. "We're not
just a place to go when
you catch a cold she
added. This was the
main impetus for wan-
ting to shed the confin-
ing label. Infirmary.
Along with this ef-
fort, the Health Ser-
vices are working with
the ECU Medical
School, using interns
anbd other students to
further improve the
Center. The program.
only two weeks old. has
so tar proved very suc-
cessful, said Ms. Van
Norwick.
Hearts
Delight
( K?l I lR
752-5878
OPEN TILLAAIDNIGHT
AND FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS
Next To Mike's Bikr Shop
In Archade
Our t ogurl Is In
Gntt Certificates
Are .Available
Allan Handelman Concert Billboard
SEPT.
11 RUSH (8.50 & 7.50 Reserve) Hampton, Va.
12 RUSH CHARLOTTE
12 BLACK SABBATH OMNI Atlanta
12 SAMMY HAGGAR AGORA Atlanta
15 PRETENDERS ($5.50&$6.50) AGORA
17 PRETENDERS EMPIRE Richmond
17 SOUTH S1DEJOHNNY MEMORIAL HALL UNC
18 ELTON JOHN CHARLOTTE COLISEUM
18 SOUTH SID JOHNNY (8Pm) WAKE CHAPEL
18 PRETENDERS PEABODYS VA. Beach
19 ELTON JOHN COLUMBIA SC
20 ELTON JOHN REYNOLDS COLISEUM Raleigh
21 RICK JAMES RICHMOND COLISEUM
21 PAPA JOHN CREACH P.B. SCOTTS BOON. NC
24 B-52's AGORA BALLROOM Atlanta
25 B-52's AGORA BALLROOM Atlanta
26 B-52's AGORA BALLROOM Atlanta
28 MARSHALL TUCKER (7.50)(8pm) HAMPTON
OCT.
3 OUTLAWS & FOGHAT GREENSBORO COL.
17 YES 8Pm GREENSBORO COL.
18 YES HAMPTON COL.
20 KINKS S9.75 FOX ATLANTA
31 DOUBIE BROTHERS GREENSBORO COL.
CALL 946-2162 ANYTIME
Concert Information Compiled for the exclusive use of
The East Carolinian by Allan Handelman
2TAVRORS OF THE CREAMIEST ICE CREAM THIS SIDE OF THE RAINBOW
MORE THAN 25 TERRIFIC TASTE TANTILIZING TOPPINGS
ALL NATURAL FROZEN YOGURT FROM CALIFORNIA
MADE WITH HONEY AT ALTADENA DARIES
CREAMY THICK MILK SHAKES, SODAS, FLOATS, FRESH FRUIT ADES
NAME YOUR HEART'S DELIGHT
SUNDAES YOUR ICE CREAM FANTASIES CAN COME TO LIPE
Now Under The Management and Ownership of
Jim Terrell and Dwight Garrett
SPECIAL ALL WEEK: BARBECUE DINNER
Barbeque, Brunswick Stew, Slaw. Potatoes -4 Q C
Includes Drink and Tax Regular $2.75 I i3v
Specials: Tuesday-Sunday
All Drinks Free With Each Lunch
FREE Dessert of Your Choice With
Each Supper Meal
lioi
II
II
II
TOWARD
ANY PURCHASE ii
One Per Visit
Good Until Oct.l ,i
IL
10t
TOWARD
ANY PURCHASE
One Per Visit
Good Until Oct.l
I
DAILY SPECIALS
MONDAY - Country Style Chicken
Cabbage, Dry Lima Beans, Yams, Slaw
TUESDAY - Backbone
Collards, Balckeye Peas, Squash
WEDNESDAY - Country Style Steak
Cabbage, Macaroni and Cheese, Garden
Peas, Slaw
THURSDAY - Backbone
Collards, Balckeye Peas, Yams
tffietiatibt in the
foadUiona clatok look
FRIDAY - Stew Beef
Stewed Apples, Turnip Greens, Dry
Lima Beans
CATERING SERVICE
n i
golden quLI
610 ARLINGTON BIVO
(near Kroner's)
$2.95
$2.95
$2.95
$2.95
$2.95
DAILY SPECIALS INCLUDE DRINK AND TAX
We Provide Catering Service To All Events
HOURS:
Monday-Thursday
11:00 A.M8:00 P.M.
710 North Greene Street
Greenville, N.C.
752-0090
Friday and Saturday
11:00 A.M -9:00 P.M.
Sunday
11:00 A.M8:00 P.M.
Just Across The River
J

� . -
. � j. , . t -
����
,� �
3 g J 3 VV 4
f 0 4





2U?t East Carolinian
Serving the campus community since 1925.
Richard Gri i n,
Tl-RIO HERNDON, ,� Wwtmm!
C'UKIS I.U HOK, Snwn MtaMn
Gl OKC.t Hi Flit H, unuiu Wmh,
Anna Lan sii r, ����� w�
Lisa Drew, , �,�
CHARI ISC HAN'Dll R. S, , ,
Ti rrv Gray. �
David Norris. ��
Sopieinhcr I i, lsXO
Opinion
Page 4
Alexander
Associate Dean 'Gags' Employees
There is absolutely no excuse for
a public official to "gag" his
employees and to withhold public
information from a journalist � or
anyone else � but that is exactly
what S. Rudolph Alexander,
associate dean and director of
Mcndenhall Student Center, has
done.
In the August 26 edition of The
East Carolinian, former editorial
page editor Charles Sune wrote a
column in which he criticized Alex-
ander as director of the "student"
center. Later, as an investigative
reporter for the paper, Sune re-
quested access to Alexander's public
records. The events that followed
are extremely suspicious, not to
mention against the law.
Shortly after Sune's official re-
quest, Alexander "gagged" all of
his employees in the student center,
specifically instructing them not to
answer any of Sune's questions
about the operation of the center.
He postponed Sune's access to
records, conferred with university
attorney Dr. David B. Stevens, and
informed Sune that five hours �
one hour each day for a week �
would be allowed for the investiga-
tion of 17 vears of records.
On June 30, 1976, the U.S.
Supreme Court ruled that
"gagging" people who might
release public information was un-
constitutional and a form of prior
restraint. Though it is against the
law to do so, Alexander has effec-
tively halted any information that
Sune might have received in conver-
sations with student center
employees. Alexander's actions also
amounted to a denial of Sune's right
under the Fourteenth Amendment
to equal protection under the law.
Under the Freedom of Informa-
tion Act, public institutions are re-
quired to provide public documents
for inspection during regular
business hours. The only restriction
is that documents concerning per-
sonnel matters may be withheld,
and that any inspection be supervis-
ed.
These legal matters will be resolv-
ed by attorneys, but the important
question is this: Why has Alexander
gone to all this trouble to prevent in-
spection of public documents and
conversation of his employees with
reporters?
The most obvious reason is that
Sune criticized Alexander on the
editorial page of this paper. Alex-
ander probably considers Sune a
hostile party who might uncover
and print something unfavorable
about Alexander's operations. If
anything libelous is printed, Alex-
ander does have the right to bring
charges against Sune and the paper.
So what is he worried about?
When an administrator refuses
public information to the students
of this university, one cannot help
but wonder what he has to hide.
Board Takes Secretary
Yesterday the Media Board voted
to remove its secretary from The
East Carolinian office. This move
was strongly opposed by the staff,
and we deeply regret that the pro-
posal passed.
We are now faced with a most
difficult situation: keeping the
newspaper office open 8-5,
Monday-Friday. It's hard to
operate a business when the office is
locked and there is no one to greet
customers and readers. To close our
doors during business hours would
be disastrous.
Fortunately, Dr. Elmer Meyer,
vice chancellor for Student Life,
recognized our problem and sug-
gested that the newspaper be allow-
ed to hire a receptionist for our of-
fice, and The East Carolinian made
the formal proposal. Although it
would be preferable to have the full-
time secretary, Dr. Meyer's sugges-
tion is the only alternative.
The need is critical for an ap-
propriation for additional wages,
which would only fund the position
until January when the newspaper
will be able to provide wages for the
rest of the fiscal year. But we will
have to make some cuts in labor and
other operating expenses to fund the
position from January-June.
It is our hope that the Media
Board will realize our needs and
follow Dr. Meyer's lead to solve this
problem by granting our requested
appropriation.
Preregistration Nearing
The next time you have to go
through drop-add, cussing, and try-
ing to figure out why you were clos-
ed out of a course, make sure you're
cussing at the right people.
The schedule of courses for
preregistration for the following
semester is usually compiled a
month after the preceding semester
begins, and preregistration takes
place a week or two later. It is dif-
ficult for many students to know
which courses they want or need for
the next semester so soon, and that
can cause problems.
You can cuss our prehistoric com-
puter system for that. But there's a
ray of hope: A new computer
system could push preregistration
back a month or two, and there is a
chance that we'll get a new system in
the future.
When you head for the long lines
at Wright Auditorium vvith your
preregistration schedule in hand and
wonder why the courses on the sheet
don't jive with the actual offerings,
you can cuss the individual depart-
ments. They had the registrar's of-
fice hopping for about 150
overtime-hours with course changes
during the first few weeks of class
this year. Why don't they get it
together earlier? Good question.
It seems that either not enough
courses of one subject are offered to
accommodate student demand. This
is usually a direct result of lack of
professors, or professors only
teaching one or two courses.
Even when you get a preregistra-
tion schedule in The East Caroli-
nian, there are many mistakes. But
this year we will be working with the
registrar's office to make correc-
tions as late as the night before that
issue goes to press.
Instead of receiving a two- or
three-week-old typewritten copy to
paste down, we will actually type
the information at the paper and
store it on computer disks. Then, as
the registrar receives course correc-
tions, we can delete, add or change
any course information until the
day prior to publication. That
should help a little.
Remember: Preregistration is on-
ly a month away.
Gilbert J. Moore, ECU registrar,
deserves a "thank you" for this new
system for the preregistration
schedule � it's his idea. Moore
hopes the plan will increase the
reliability of the schedule and make
preregistration a little easier. "After
all he says, "that's what the
schedule's for � to help the
students Amen.
L
3
It
� riD OF STUOBNT
J H ,��. issues &&,
1 c"t�'au. staff A
m.KKMi
To The Right
Anderson 'Proven9 Viable Bid
By STAN RIDGLEY
For those of you that missed Tuesday's
episode of the political soap opera current-
ly being hashed out fu Jimmy Carter and
Ronald Reagan, here's the gist:
After a week of watching Reagan repent
oi his verbal misdemeanors and go on the
offensive against the Carter Administra-
tion's economic policies, we now see
Carter shifting into the role oi the slightly
villainous protaganist. He rejected lues-
day the League oi Women Voters' invita-
tion to participate in its debate Sept. 21 in
Baltimore. In doing so, he is making a
serious mistake in terms of how the oters
perceive him.
The dispute over the proposed presiden-
tial debates hinges on whether independent
candidate John Anderson should be in-
cluded. The League's rules state that
before a candidate can be included in iis
debates, he must have ai least 15 percent ol
popular support as determined b several
major polls. The I eague united Anderson
Tuesda to participate m its first debate
with Reagan and Carter because of his
showing in three polls, indicating he had
the necessary percentage of support.
Anderson promptly accepted the invita-
tion, and Reagan welcomed the challenge,
saying: "The ladies decided Anderson is a
viable candidate He certainly should be
included, and I'll be there
But now that Anderson has been includ-
ed. Carter has decided he wants no part oi
the league's debate � unless provisions
are made for him to debate Reagan one-
on-one before the scheduled three-man
forum. His reasons, however, are suspect.
Carter's ostensible reason tor not wan-
ting Anderson in is that he's supposedlv
not a serious candidate. Said Carter's cam-
paign chairman Robert S. Strauss:
acceptance of this invitation would
preclude any chance oi a one-on-one
debate, and, therefore, we must respectful-
ly decline Strauss claimed Reagan is the
only other viable" candidate in the race
While the word "viable" is subject to
varying interpretation, the I eague of
Women Voters have defined it in such a
way as to include Anderson.
These are the same sponsored debates in
which Carter participated against Gerald
lord in 1976. Now. Carter shows he is not
willing to play alone when the rules don
suit him, and his refusal makes him appear
petulant and self serving. On the other
hand, Reagan's acceptance oi the 1 eague's
invitation, and his heart) welcome ot
Anderson's challenge, appears rather spor-
ting.
This could he the first major flaw in
Carter's campaign since labor Day. His
strategy since Sept. 1 has been to make
Reagan the issue. Carter has tried to ap-
pear level-headed and pragmatic while
painting Reagan as hot-headed and
capricious. In playing up Reagan's
bloopers on China and the ku Klux K
the Carter campaign has been relatively
successful in making Reagan the issue
in skirting anv close examination ol
( arier's record.
But Reagan has already recouped much
oi the ground lost because ot his gaffes
and has hammered away at Carter's ad-
ministration in vigorous campaigning dur
ing the last week-and-a-half. Already,
Reagan's blunders fade from memory, and
Carter's refusal to participate in this series
ot debates now makes him the iNsue.
From Reagan's point-of-view, Carte
refusal couldn't be more timely. It shuts
attention away from Reagan and calls
c arter's motives into question. Reagan has
already said he would debate nderson
alone, and sulIi an arrangement could only
hurt Carter. It is generally agreed tl
respectable Anderson sh ing o. 4
would siphon more votes from C arier than
Reagan, so C arter's rejection ol Anderson,
m a sense, proves Anderson's viability. It
also subtlv indicates a feat
( arter
camp that what Anderson has to say mi
sound more appealing than what the
Democrats have to oitci.
Their fears rnav be weff-founded
Stan Ridgky is a senior l
major with a degree in ;n" (he
University of Northarolina at hapei
Hill.
'Town Meeting' Not Working
By ARNOLD SAWISLAK
l mini lrrs Ink rnjtinnjl
A campaign device that seems to be
gaining popularity is the "town meeting
at which a candidate responds to questions
from plain citiens instead of from smart
aleek reporters.
Questions from salesmen and
housewives frequently are more to the
point than those propounded by profes-
sional journalists, who often seem to be
more intent on fine points than on central
issues. But blunt and pithy questions do
not necessarily elicit answers oi the same
sort from the candidates.
Herewith, a list oi questions that might
be asked by citiens with both the probably
answers and those most likely not to be
given by the candidates:
Question: Why don't we use nuclear
weapons to get our hostages out oi Iran?
Probably answer: We are exploring all
options in our effort to get our people
freed from their illegal imprisonment.
Unlikely answer: First, that probably
would kill the hostages as well as Iranians.
Second, that probably would start World
War III, which probably would kill
every body.
Question: Why can't we have a 50 per-
cent tax cut right now?
Probable answer: We will do
everythiong we can to relieve the burden oi
taxation without fueling the fires of infla
tion. By cutting wasted and bureaucratic
boondoggling, we should be ble to reduce
taxes.
Unlikely answer: We can have a big tax
cut. You can start bv naming a federal pro-
gram or subsidy that benefits you that you
are willing to see eliminated.
Question: How can we stop politicians
from taking bribes?
Probable answer: Political corruption is
a crime that eats at the vitals oi
democracy, but it should be remembered
that the overwhelming number oi people in
public life are scrupulously honest.
Unlikely answer: If you non-politicians
would stop offering bribes, the problems
would be solved.
Question: The newspapers are full of
help wanted ads. Why can't we make peo-
ple on welfare go to work?
Probably answer: Work is the answer to
welfare. With a healthy economy and as a
last resort with the government providing
jobs, vve will transform tax eaters into tax
pavers.
I nhkelv answer: Because we've done
such a lousy job oi education a lot oi peo
pie on welfare can't do the jobs that are
available. Some oi the others are just too
lav to go to work.
Question: It you are elected, what are
you going to do about crime in the streets?
Probable answer: The full resources o:
the government must be marshaled to fight
crime. Police must be permitted to enforce
the law and judges must not be soft on
criminals.
Unlikely answer: Nothing, street crime
is not my job. Your mayor and your police
chief are the ones who are responsible tor
that.
Question: Have you made anv cam-
paign promises you aren't able to keep'
Probable answer: My word is my bond.
If I do not keep my word. I cannot expect
your support in the future.
Unlikely answer: Some ot these things
are impossible, but if you don't promise to
do them, your opponent savs you are con
fessing incompetence.
s
t
r





Mil t ST k)l ll W
s ' I Mlil KM
t
A Brief Lesson In 'Pentagonese'
Kn DICK WIM
W SHlNGTON (I PI)
tdy who even casually
Itie arms iace was amazed to
i the Pentagon is working on an
airplane thai would be invisible to
S c mos
I to
that
one eomini
w eapon:
s on nt ei
a i e
ol hei
he development ol i adai
i s ago made in
c itablc the eventual development
surprising thing
about the new plane was its code
name, Stealth.
In Pentagonese, the basic word
form is the acronym. Defense of-
ficials ma occasionally use other
parts ot speech nouns, adverbs,
prepositions, etc. but essential!
they talk in acronyms.
hike the common, everyday
Manual Radai Reconnaissance 1
ploitation System. In Pentagonese,
that comes out as MARK! S. An
danced Strategic Ail I aunched
Missile is, ot course, an ASA I M.
Which is not to be contused with an
srs (Advanced Synthetic pei
tine Radai System). And so on foi
as far as the eve can see.
I he other day, while leafing
through a volume ot testimonv
published bv the House subcom-
mittee on defense appropriations, I
came across a genuine neological
ranlv a double acronym. Or,
more precisely, an acronym within
an acronym,
This unusual specimen was
rendered bv the Pentagon as
IONDS. At first glance, it seemed
lust another ordinary, run-of-the-
mill acronym. Hut as translated bv
the Pentagonese glossary, it assayed
out as "Integrated Operational
M 1)1 1 S Detection Svstem
W ell. it was nice to know the Pen
tagon has in operation an integrated
svstem tor detecting Nl 1)1 1 S.
Hut what the hell is a M 1)1 1 '
1v initial guess was that M 1)1 I
was a composite ol the words
"nude" and "cadet. "
West point is now co-
educational, you know. It wouldn't
do to have cadets running around
naked. That sort ot thing could easi-
ly lead to a nastv scandal.
It therefore would be reasonable
to assume the Pentagon has
developed a svstem ten detesting
nuditv among cadets.
It would be reasonable, but it Even radar itself started out as an
would be wrong. acronym RADAR stood foi Radio
Actually, according to the Detecting and Ranging,
aforementioned glossary, M 1)1 is
means "Nucleai Detonations Bui V the aim- race goes, the i.
don't be alarmed You won't be development is predictable
quizzed on this. device foi detesting airplanes
aie in isible !� radai . I he name is
I mention it only bv way ot pom less predictable,
ting up the peculiarity ot the code
name "Stealth In conventional Pen
rechnology aside, the thing that would be 1)1) MR Bui whei
makes Stealth so phenomenal is the news leak- out, it may emei
tact that it is not an acronym. I he
name apparently refers to nothing
save the an plane's furtive quality.
W hat a breakthoueh!
Gotcha!
'Average Ivan' And The Bomb
B ioiin Moony
S OW 11 I'h 1 ike most mete mortals,
shi ug and suggest an
mprobable position as the best pro
ar war.
H u
S
believe that their go ei n-
to defend them from the
tee! maps are mien
� e state secuiitv, the
i s� ' ici l rtion is ob
discussion.
in the press oei
Dii - e 59, outlining
has people
. said a candy store
uestion as she weighed
mieone would tell me
ind wrong.
i
. N' iei civil defense
the to! mative process
' ed emphasis fi om
to iti -s e acuation ol
. 'act that bomb
istructed beneath new
apartment buildings m Moscow.
Instead, experts think, the Soviet civil defense
plan calls tor the population to leave their homes
and places ot work and go to predetermined
points, where they would be collected bv buses
and shuttled to less densely populated areas w Inch
ate less hkelv targets.
The kev to this plan is the appointment ot cadre
leaders in factories, apartments and
neighborhoods, who would direct evacuation
operations.
( t a doen Muscovites questioned at random,
si had no idea who their leader was, but said they
were confident one existed. The other wary six
had tongues clearly under the control ot cats.
Children begin studying civil defense in the se-
cond grade, trying on gas masks and conducting
practice evacuations. During the summer at
Young Pioneeramps, pre teens are quizzed on
emergency procedures Winners receive pnes
and gam esteem.
1 he Bolshoi I ncyclopedia, a compendium ot
officially sanctioned Soviet wisdom, also stiesses
the duty ot individuals to know what to do "in
the event ot a nuclear attack bv the capitalist
countries
I he priorities ate: evacuation ot the popula
tion, individual measures tor protection, lite
saving and emergency measures, conservation ot
tood supplies.
"What it ciimes down to is being told to march
ott in that direction with X amount ot tood and
amount ot clothes says one Western
observer.
The most hkelv route foi this initial toot travel
is the labyrinthine Moscow subway svstem. which
curls tor nearly 12 miles beneath the city and
leads to the suburbs.
I here ate some who will not march ott.
because they cannot be spared.
Kev government leaders and directors ot vital
industries would stav on the job under the protec
tion ot superhardened shelteis. wInch are believed
to exist deep below ground level on Moscow's
outskirts.
Neither ot these measures is very comforting,
however. to Average Pan.
"We would all die sav s a Moscow man asked
what a nuclear war would mean "I ike that he
adds, snapping his lingers.
"Nobody believes thai a nucleat war would be
less than an unparalelled catastrophe foi the
Soviet Union savs a W estei n analyst.
But, he asks, what is an acceptable casualty
level tor a nation that losl 20 million people in
World War II f
I nfortunately, there may be only one way to
tnul out.
Let attic East (Carolinian
write home for you every
Tues. and Thurs.
j(Ztt?e iEaat (Earolinian!
j SUBSCRIPTION FORM
I
I
I
Name
� Address
I City
I
State
Zip
I
I
Telephone )
I
RATE: $25 per year.
I
DPWMOW
PITT PLAZA
WELCOME
BACK
ECU!
REGISTER
FOR THESE FREE GIFTS!

wo �juris
SEIIO QUARTZ $&
i A
DOWNTOI
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�r
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In Your Pocket.
w,
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VSEI
r
If you want to
BUY, SELL,
TRADE, or GIVE
anything away.
Classifieds will
get the job done!
For Your Convenience Classified Ads
Can Be Purchased At Three Convenient
Locations;
Student Organization Booth(Mendenhall)
MWF 3-4
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Classified Advertizing Rates:
1 to 3 Lines $1.00
Each Addition Line
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9 f






6 THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER II, 19t0
SORORITY RUSH
SEPTEMBER
15-19
DELTA ZETA
CHI OMEGA
SORORITY LIFE
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA
ALPHA XI DELTA
ALPHA PHI
g�

rflr
A-
- - & ��.
Sorority membership provides a unique
environment for campus involvement and
group living!
Sorority Members are interested and in
voived not only with Greek activities, but
also with numerous University and com
munity affairs. You will find sorority
members working and learning with Stu
dent Government, the Marching Pirates
Band, the East Carolinian newspaper, Stu
dent Union Board, women's athletic
teams, and many other student organiza
tions and honoraries.
A wide variety of social events is held
throughout the year by Greek organiza
tions such as Panhellenic, Interfraternity
Council, Co-Greek Committee, and the in
dividual sororities and fraternities. Ac
tivities range from informal mixers to
elaborate formal weekends. Most
sororities highlight their social schedule
with a "formal" dance.
Philanthropic or social service activities
have always been a major sorority effort.
Each chapter supports some local philan
thropy while supporting through its na
tional organization a particular charitable
cause.
Sorority members understand that
academic achievement is paramount im-
portance and have traditionally attained a
higher grade point average than non
sorority members. Every sorority has a
scholarship program to help both pledges
and active members with their studies.
Study buddy programs, course and in-
structor evaluations, study halls, and
award programs are commonly used.
ALPHA OMICRON PI
KAPPA DELTA
PHA DELTA PI
I

.� . ���-�
' I ����
'
" � Mi -1
.





I HI MAKOI INIAN SI PTI IHI K II. m
FRATERNITY RUSH
SEPTEMBER 15-18
r "icr;
m�mm wy
Delta Sigma Phi
Monday: Hairy Buffalo
8:00 Come Meet the Buffalo
Tues Rock n Roll Party
Wed : Mellow Formal
8.00 The Night To Get Your Answer to
Fraternity Life Questions.
Phone 756 4916 for rides and info.
Van for rides will be in front of Aycock
starting at 8:00 and will run all night
long! Every 1 2 hour.
Refreshments Every Night
CALL 752-437 PH.KAPPATAU �, EUZABETH ST.
Winner of East Carolina's
Most Outstanding Fraternity
1979-80
The Brothers and Little Sisters
Invite You to a Fantastic week.
Mon: 7:00pm. Until
"WILD SOUTH OF THE BOARDER NITE"
Free Tacos and Golden Beverages
Thanks to our good friends at Taco Cid's
for their Support.
Tues: 9:00pm Until
"Crazy Tuesday"
Come Party With Us! All Your
Favorite Beverages.
Wed: 9:00pm. Until
"SMOKER"
KAPPA SIGMA
Mon. "PIRATE GOLD RUSH" 8:30
TUES. HAWAIIAN NITE 8:30
WED. BUNNY NITE 8:30
THUR. FORMAL RUSH 8:30
Across from Umstead Dorm, next to
Darryl's Reataurant.
Call: 752 5543 for info.
TAU KAPPA EPSILON
KAPPAALPHAORDER
RUSH WEEK
MONDAY8:30 UNTIL PARTIES
TUESDAY8:30 UNTIL PARTIES
WEDNESDAY8:30 UNTIL PARTIES
RUSH
Rush begins Monday, Sept.15th. All East Carolina
Fraternities will be holding open houses in hopes of
finding men who have a genuine interest in the
Greek System. This is also a time for newcomers to
ECU to see what the Greeks have to offer.
The Greek System is not what is portrayed on TV,
wild men always partying and raising hell. ECU
fraternities are dedicated men striving for the bet
ferment of individuals and their school. Along with
this building of individual improvement, come
many enjoyable and rewarding experiences A
fraternity also builds a life long friendship.
The intramural system at ECU is in a large part
fraternity men competing among themselves, for
athletic recognition and enjoyment. The thrill of
winning and being a champion can be achieved by
joining a fraternity, not only in sports, but in other
areas as well
Fraternities can and will make a person more
knowledgable and active at East Carolina, and at
the same time build character and personal
satisfaction. But, choose your fraternity well Each
ECU fraternity has something to offer. See and
decide what YOU want, the benefits are amazing.
Sigma Tau Rush Activites
MondaySept 15 "Hawnan Party"
Jungle Juice Will Be Served.
TuesdaySept. 16 "Smoker"
Come smoke a cigar with the
Sig Tau brothers and meet the
Sig Tau Bunnies
Wednesday.Sept. 17 "Formal Night"
Dress to impress. Your favorite
beverage will be served
Call 758 4140 for rides or more info.
SIGMA PHI EPSILON
Mon. Tentative Hawaiian Party
Keg Beer
Tues. Keg Beer
Wed. Keg Beer
Fri. Happy Hour with New Pledges
PI KAPPA PHI
SIGMA NU
BETA THETA PI
ALPHA SIGMA PHI
(Not pictured)
1110-A Cotanch 752-1073
Mon Cookout Free Hot Dogs and Beverage.
Tues. Rush Party With Free Drinks and Munch.es
Wed. Pig Pickin and Cold Drinks
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA
Monday Brew Test
Tuesday Revolving Room Party
(Different Drink In Each Room)
Wednesday PJ PARTY
, . m
� h
t
0






Features
Tl MBt'K H "
IHI 1 ST CAROLINIAN
Pets In The Dorms:
Some Are Ordinary,
Others Are Strange
Recordi
i
Carolwe Mas Rocks At The Attic
,� .r�s, arol.nv M�, h:uk�l h .h, X-R.� ptaytd .� �� �� pcrfor.n.nc, uln�M mak.s ha,i�a . rvml secomtan
, m.1,1 10 a lull house. II" c�Itlll rrtw is "HoM On "A Ms. Mus ,s a ���� ol Ne� Wk .
she ays.
By DAVID NORMS
��Rules were made to be broken
goes an old cliche, and the rules
against keeping any pets in the
dorms except fot goldfish are no ex-
ception. Besides keeping non
goldfish types ol tropical fish,
students also enjoy the companion-
ship of dogs, cats, seagulls, snakes,
tarantulas, canaries, parrots, gei
bils, mice, othei assorted rodents
and cockroaches.
One wonders why goldfish are the
only acceptable pets tot dorm life.
A particularly vicious goldfish is
really much more trouble than a
doen neon tetras ot guppies.
It's too bad that dogs and cats are
discouraged from living in the
dorms, especially tor the dogs and
cats. Hundreds ol lonely students,
deprived of the life and companion
ship thai animals can give, would
tend to lavish lots ol kindness and
affection on these noble creatures
Perhaps more to the point, they
would lavish lots ol tood on these
animals. 1 ven the mosl decrepil and
scraggly ol dogs can gel himsell
half-a-dozen meals a day in a dorm;
cute, fluffy little puppies and kittens
can easily gel twenty oi thirty I"he
tood's usually pretty good, too
Most dorm residents don't keep pel
tood in their rooms, so these lucky
animals get b on milk, tuna, ham
burger, candy bars and all sorts ol
othei delicacies.
lt strange when vow stop and
ilimk aboui it. bui does realh love
junk food as much as people do In
canine circles, po ships.
pretels, and fritos in short, any
kind ot food thai is salty and stun
chy is a greal favorite hocolate is
anothei dog gourmet delight II you
think rats like cheese, jusi throw
some anywhere neat a dog. My dog
(who lives back home, since h
doesn't tike Greenville) really loves
bubble gum. I don'l think he's evei
figured oui why it's so haul to chew
up and swallow, bui at leasi ii gives
him a chance to make a big mess
C ats are noted fot just dropping
by at odd hours and making
themselves comfortable somewhere
in the room rhey have the subtlety
and finesse necessary to slip quietly
into a room and cuddle up in a nice,
comfortable drawei without being
seen. Dogs lack the quality ol
subtlety, rhey just bound into a
loom and leap onto youi favorite
chair ot the basket ol laundry
you've ins' cleaned and ill advisedly
placed within a dog's leaping range.
( onsequently, dogs find themselves
ejected violently fi ms more
often that cats.
()ne thing lo be said foi dogs is
thai they are affectionate, and open
about it. Ii the dog thinks you're
okay. he'll tell you bv you
hall to death and tearing .oui i
to shreds, or, it he's in a mellow
mood, bv cut ling up .
See (.1 I I V pag ' ul 5
Coed Dorms: Perfect For Students
Bv S. MAURICE JONES
1 ite in a co-ed dormitory is a uni-
que experience, and often much dif-
ferent than popular myths have
made it out to be.
�1 think number one you get a
different attitude on living with
other people said Doug Brannon,
Residence Director for Umstead and
slav dorms, Easl Carolina's only
coed facilities. "You develop dif-
ferent attitudes toward others
because you have to take into con-
sideration both males and females
Barnnon fell that life in the co-ed
dorms tended to make behavior in
the residences somewhat more
mature. "Your interpersonal rela-
tionship with the opposite sex have
belter opportunities to develop,
Brannon said.
"Some feel threatened Bran-
non said speaking about coed
residents who come from homes
where only one gender is present.
He fell that most adjust well and
stay, with only a few moving to the
comfortable environment of an only
one-sex dorm.
There have been some changes
made in coed life this year. Accor-
ding to Brannon and Jon Rogers.
Residence life coordinator for the
Central Campus, coed dorms have
been opened to freshmen for the
first time ever this year. Despite all
the talk and popular idea, there has
not been a dramatic change in coed
lifstyle due to the first year students.
"There has not been an impact
about freshman being in coed
Brannon said.
Both Brannon and Rogers were
optimistic over some aspects oi
freshmen being integrated into coed
dorms. "1 think this is going to be
the thing to come said Brannon.
He feels that eventuallv there will be
a larger mix ot freshmen with the
upperclassmen, graduate students,
and transfer students that primarily
compose coed dorms. There are on-
ly about six freshmen now,
however, which is hardly enough to
make a difference.
Brannon feels that integration ot
freshmen into coed dorms can be
beneficial but can also have it's
repercussions. The youger students
will develop attitudes front an up-
perclassman perspective. He
thought there would be less partying
with concentration being on
academic rather than social
behavior. As for the traditional high
number of dropouts from freshman
classes, "there might be less it all
drop-outs are grade related, but
there are so main variables. It
would be a good hypothesis Bran-
non said.
Some o the problems with
freshmen being in coed are the facts
thai they are away from their peer
group, they may feel threatened bv
upperclassmen, and they have dif-
ferent courses from upperclassmen
according to Brannon.
Brannon felt that people can
overreact to freshmen being in coed.
�� There are maybe one oi two 18
year old freshmen living in a coed
form. Most are 2! or older he
said.
'�Students see it as a special
privilege living in coed dorms
Rogers said. I here is more integra-
tion among the sexes, more pride,
and students feel verv comfortable.
There is an ownership to their com-
munities (sic) Brannon said.
Socials can be potentially better
beacuse a coed dorm doesn't have to
invite another dorm from way
across campus, and people in coed
dorms know each other so a social
has a better chance of being a suc-
cess. Brannon felt.
The history o coed at E( I dates
back to 1973-1974 according to lnex
Fridley, Area Coordinatoi tor c ol-
lege Hill Campus. Garret was the
first coed dorm and ii was coed bv
floor. Due 10 the fact thai ii was
made up mostly of graduating
seniors, it didn't till back up the
next yeai so it was made an all-
men's dorm the following yeai
Slav became coed in 1974 1975
Ms. Fridley said that all the rooms
were private lhe university didn't
have housing problems then like it
does now.
In 1975-1976, I mstead was con-
verted to coed and Slav was made
regular double occupancy and it has
been that way ever since, according
to Ms. I ridlev.
The future ol coed al this moment
seems uncertain. Ms Fridley believes
that additional coed housing will be
beneficial in thai n may balance the
segregated atmosphere. It is "a
more humane living condition" and
"an important component ol the
total living environment Ms.
I ridlev said.
"C oed will be looked si
reasonable si srnative Ms
said. "Any i idence
benefit from coed expei
One ol the mam problems with
adding coed housing is many people
don't wanl to move ot nake
room fot s meone ol
sex "People are terrii N1v
I ndlev said She thinks thai when a
student hves in � cujai room
tor so lone.
he or she view- thai
room as a personal beloi and
resents any intrusion Ms. 1 ndlev
also had some interesting -
on soed life According to studies
she has read. Ms Frindley said
students housed m a coed s
lend more to make lasting friend-
ships with members ol the opposite
sex. Fridley adds, however, that
(here have been 15 marriages
ween residents from Umstead dorm
ovet the past three oi years.
Bradley Moving To
60 Minutes, Takes
Over For Rather
M YORK (UP1) ' Ed Bradley
official) has been given the job
that's been his on the rumor mill for
months, replacing Dan Rather on 60
Minutes when Rather takes Walter
( ronkite's job.
No definite date has been set, but
it will be sometime next spring, pro-
bably in March.
"No one really knows for sure
when ill start working and doing
actual pieces for 60 Minutes,
Bradley said after accepting con-
gratulations on his new post.
"There's been no timetable set
up. It all starts with Walter and
when he will step down. The general
feeling is that Dan will be gone from
the show next season
Bradley, whose mother and father
both have been ill, has been too
distracted to make definite plans.
"I've filed away a couple of
things, good story ideas " which I
won't mention now because I'm not
going to start working tomorrow
and I wouldn't want someone else to
do them
Bradlev's career with CBS News
began in Saigon in 1972. He was
reassigned to Washington in June.
1974, served as CBS News White
House correspondent from
November 1976 through September
1978. when he was named a prin-
cipal correspondent for CBS
Reports.
He also anchors the CBS Sunday
Night News, and doesn't know if he
will continue in the job after he
begins work on 60 Minutes.
Bradley enjoys the traveling that
will be part of his new job and likes
the idea of "doing a little bit of
everything
"i'm not coming onto 60 Minutes
as a black specialist he said in
answer to a question, but added, "1
do have a different perspective
because 1 happen to be black
Meanwhile,
Over at NBC
Overall, the first week in
September was a good one for NBC.
The network came in second in the
Nielsen ratings for the week, with
ABC in first and CBS in last place.
Its broadcast of the Miss America
Pageant was the top-rated show for
the week ending Sept. 7. That was
the good news. The bad news was
the Emmy broadcast tied for 32nd
place because of the actors' boycott,
instead of landing among the top 10
where it usually resides.
America's First
Astronaut Ape To
Live In Asheboro
:��� i
-�
m
4
Rip Van Student
Alreadv exhausted b the strain of these first two weeks of classes? Thi.
student seems to have found a solution to the classroom hustle.
ASHEBORO, N.C. (TIM)
"Ham the first chimpanzee to
ride an American rocket into space.
will take up residence at the North
Carolina Zoological Park later this
month, zoo officials said Wednes-
day.
The 23-year-old male chimp s
historic flight in space on Jan. 31,
1961 cleared the way for the first
U.S. manned space flight by Alan
B. Shepard four months later. The
chimp, who weighs 190 pounds, will
be sent to North Carolina from the
National Zoo in Washington D.C.
under a breeding loan agreement.
The chimp will arrive Sept. 25 it
weather conditions and the chimp's
health permit. He will not be on
public display until end ol October
to give him time to adjust to sur-
roundings.
Les Schobert, general curator ol
the North Carolina zoo, said the
chimp is being sent to North
Carolina because the state's oo has
better accomodaiion. The National
Zoo has no other chimps and there
are no separate accomodations tor
him in the new ape house under con-
struction at the Washington oo.
Ham was obtained by the U.S.
Air force in 1958 when he was two
vears old and weighed 19 pounds.
1 he following year he beg
ing in simulated blast-ofl situations
at Wright Patterson ir I orce I
in Ohio. Ik was launched from
tape Canaveral on Mercury flighi
number MR 2 in a Redstone rocket
and the flight took him down the
Atlantic missile range. In l3, he
was retired as a "national hero"
who had done his job well.
Alter tests he was pronounced
" robust and not mal' and
transfered to national oo
Schobert said he does run know
how long the chimp will remain lit
North Carolina.
20UCICAL
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0M,AMIT UH
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� by ION JORDAN
Miller Keggers Capture Honors
ccordtng to Ms. Nanc Mit- ot Ihe i I Intramural office, Ihe mosl ihe team of Jefl Krielemeer, Rod no Pail, Boh Klmore and John Morit
popular even! of Ihe Student I ife Celebrates fest yesterdaj was ihe Miller won in onlj 4X seconds. Women's winners were Maureen Buck, Shirtej
Keg-Slackingon test. Ihe crowd watching the event saw two reams in Brown, Donna Kason and Stuart Brile.
the men's division tie tor tirst place with a 52-second time. In a run-off,
Senior Show
Is Announced
Ms. c alhoun, a can
dat the Ms
1(1 Si Run �
Mn
degree i
senioi student in ihe vvi(n a mjn0l concen
! aslaroltna Univet iration in drawing, will
'� School ol Art, vstll begin intern teaching in
have a show ol an ,ne Roci4 Mount
rk. in various media, schools next month.
1 �' � v Her future plans in
i: l8' elude teaching lot
Hei iMon in- severa years u!tmia!c
; ,n' K returning lo hei an
lc'l an charcoal siudies ai the graduate
drawings, a lithograph eve
print, a woodcut prim, she is ,hc daughiet
two bank pillows, an ol Douglas and Rub)
acrylic painting and Bullock ol Rowland.
several ceramic items.
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to
THhtASr CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 11,1980
Mechanical Bulls
Injuring Cowboys
New Orleans (UP1) -
Urban cowboys,
daredevils by night on
the popular bucking
mechanical broncos,
are turning up in
hospital emergency
rooms the
next day.
"They come in both
day and night,but
usually it's the day
after they've ridden the
mechanical bull said
Dr. Richard Y. Mc-
Connel, director of the
emergency room at
Ochsner Foundation
Hospital.
More than 20 people
with injuries from
mechanical bull riding
have shown up tor
treatment at Ochsner in
recent weeks, com-
plaining of everything
from bruised shoulders
to broken collar bones,
McConnell said.
"It seems like a lot
more to us he said,
"because before then
we weren't seeing
any
The mechanical bull
ride has become
popular in Western-
style nightclubs and
bars since the movie
Urban Cowboy was
released this summer.
McConnell said all
but one of thepatients
have been men. Most
of their injuries have
been minor, and treat-
ment is usually simple.
"We recommend
they do not get back
on McConnell said.
"Some are anxious to
know when they can get
back on
McConnell, who has
never ridden one of the
contraptions, said
bruised shoulders, back
strain,and wrist strains
are the most common
complaints of the
nightclub cowboys,
although some patients
fear they have broken a
rib or a collarbone.
He said he usually
prescribes a mild pam
reliever and a rest.
The mechanical bull
ride is, in fact, no more
dangerous than a foot-
ball game, the doctor
said. One of the pro-
blems is that the riders
don't know how to fall
off.
"Since there is a lot
of padding, they don't
have to worry about
bracing themselves with
an outstretched arm
McConnell said. "It's
better to just fall and
roll
The best way to keep
from being hurt is
simply to be careful.
"People should use
common sense
Taking The Igloo Plunge
Photo by R I CHARD GREEN
A surfer cools off with a drenchingly delicious took place at a surfing contest last weekend at
interlude on a scorching beach day. This scene Cape Hatteras, NC.
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Seafood
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M Re's ft mviv nu per aOj bc
Even Seagulls Are
Good Dorm Pets
Continued from page 8
day in the middle of the floor. Cats
will suddenly leleport themselves in-
to your lap or onto the book you're
reading and instead of an affec-
tionate slurp, they just give you a
funny look. Keep in mind the cat's
traditional aloofness and remember
that a funny look from a cat can
mean the same thing as a dog jump-
ing all over you.
A nice thing about both dogs and
cats is that they both like to snack
on stray cockroaches, and are more
reasonable and easy to get along
with than many o' the people that
you are likely to run into these days.
Sooner or later, one will run into
somebody who feels that cats and
dogs are just too ordinary to keep
around. These folks are the ones
who get the strange pets like boa
constrictors. Even relatively normal
snakes such as garter snakes can be
prctt shocking if the) arc placed in
your bed at eight a.m. or dropped in
the shower. I used to have a room-
mate who got up a 7:30 in the morn-
ing and opened the door to all kinds
of weird people, including those
who think putting snakes in people's
beds is funny.
Not all unusual pets are as unset-
tling as suddenly appearing snakes.
One friend of mine adopted a
seagull, found on the beach with a
broken wing. After a trip to the vet,
who set the wing and prescribed
some medicines, the gull took up
residence in his benefactor's dorm
room. The bird's home was a
makeshift pen under the sink and
beside the dresser. The pen was
tucked away so well that I visited the
room a couple of times before 1 hap-
pened to look over in the corner and
notice the new resident.
This bird was a fairly good room-
mate, except for his rooster-like
habit of crowing (or squawking)
about sunrise. The whole idea of a
seagull living in a college dorm
always seemed to me like a good
idea for a Walt Disney movie.
(Sammy, The Sophomore Seagull
might be an appropriate title.) And.
nisi as in all those Disney movies
about people with off-the-wal
animal pets, ihi- gull's wing finally
go! better, so he was set tree again.
At last report, (he isn't much for
writing letters) he is living in a dorm
at N.C. State, with a kid whose
father owns a seafood market, and
is now a junior majoring in
whatever seagulls major in.
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1





1111 I s I i Ki )1 ll W
Sports
I i "IMl K
Home Opener Is Saturday

l :
� M
Pirates Look To USL After Win
BvII KI -sc II M! IK
rhai sau's me I respect speed and
skill
! ing Ins team's 5 10 win lhe Cajuns have nol only more
ovei Duke last Saturday, 1 asi speed than the Devils, 1 mory says,
( arolina head football coach 1 d but also mans more ways to attack
ory has both happiness and offensively. "They will be much
wariness on his mind more challenging to out defense
I: ujs a rea learn victor al he said. "The nol onl have great
Duke he said al a Wednesda receivers like Duke, but the also
ss luncheon. "That game was hve great runners with speed.
imp is in so main ways. 1 "At Duke lmoi continued,
gut oved the credibility of the "we played the pass first and the
and me. One game run second because we tell the had
icsn't make me a good coach or us no backs thai could hurl us.
a earn, rhai we'll Southwestern is total! diferent.
. kVait and 1 he have both a good running and
y said he felt somewhat con passing attack. We'll have to be
j thai the club might feel a bil read foi both
following the game. I mor added Thai he planned to
"i mt because the team continue using the platooning
went through a great hurdle winning system so that his players will slay
D ike lie said "1 uisi fresh. "The wa we feel he said,
hope complacenl and "is that fresh players are ver im
look b Soutl west t ouisiana portant.
lhe Ragin' Cajuns come to "For example, if Anthony Collins
l-ickh Stadium on Saturda for a 7 (stai halfback), who runs a 4.6, is
p.m. kickoff and 1'mory is convinc- tired, then we're bettei ofi going
ed thai I si is superioi to Duke's with Harold Blue (reserve) even
jV, ,e Dl v ils. though he runs a 4.8. V e feel thai a
"Tl - r� a lot toughei than fresh Harold Blue is bettei than a
Duke. i claimed. "Theii team tired Anthony Collins
eed is a loi belter. I he arc sort ol lhe rookie coach went on to say
like 1 as! (. arolina in thai respect that his team would have to main-
rhe first-yeai coach said, though, tain the patience on ottense that it
that his worries about complacenc displayed at Duke.
were ' ed somewhat al a Mon "We didn't tr to go the eas
:e -essiou. route he said. "You can't do that
was worried about thai prac in the wishbone. Hming and execu-
tive 1' admitted. "But, as ii won are ver important. We iusl
t a. had a greal practice have to take things one pla at a
Monda ' 'he best and tune and nol rush
tic 1 have evei seen PIRATr NOTES Southwestern
follow ame 1 ouisiana is the lasi team to defeat
lhe Pirat nan said thai en- the Pirates in Ficklen Stadium, the
thusiasm would have to continue C ajuns taking a 9-7 defensive battle
thi eek and into the in 1977 Before thai contest the
aarnt , l alwyas have to be men- Pirates had an 11 game home winn-
ah play he said. "You ing streak. I his Saturda the club
, : did the week will be looking for its 11th straight
at Ficklen the Pirates rank fourth
� ngs that coneei is nationally among N( V Division 1
isi about lhe Cajuns is schools in the "most consecutive
ill team speed and ability, games scored in" category. FCl
ithwestern I ouisiana is a lot "has tallied points in 99 straight con
like un club he said. " lhcy have tests and will be going tor the centry
excellent speed and ski players, mark Saturday.
Forcing A Mistake
Duke tackle Tim Bumgarner (70) falls on a tumble com-
mitted b Blue Devil QB Ben Bennett (14) in Saturday's
35-10 loss to ECU. Pirate defenders on the scene are Doug
Smith (92), George (rump (91) and Wall Myers (57).
ECU coach Id Emory hopes the Pirates can create such
errors Saturday in the clubs home opener.
Cajuns Returning To Ficklen
LSI Defensive Tackle Jeff Holm
B WW DtiPKrl-
sii- i dn
1 he las; time the Ragin' . aju
ol Southwestern 1 ouisiana rolled
into Greenville, the Pirates ol 1 asi
Carolina Universit were riding an
11 game win streak in I ieklen
Stadium.
1 he Cajuns handed the Pirates a
9-7 loss Octobei 29, 1077 in a defen
sie struggle, but I C I has not lost a
contest on theii home turl since.
Sain Robertson guided the tough
Caiun defens that season, but now
he brings Southwestern 1 ouisiana to
Greenville as their first-year head
coach.
Robertson was successful in his
first outing as the C ajuns' mentoi. a
14-12 victor ovet New Mexico
State which most experts call an
upset.
"Am win foi us is a good win,
Robertson proclaims. "Mi's kind ol
like flying: am tune you land the
plane smoothl and don't crash, it s
a good landing
Robertson vividl recalls the 19
meeting ol the two teams, which the
p tes avenged the lollowing yeai
A -i; a ;s 9 u im m afayette, I a
"We were u' fortunate in thai
e goi a lot ol turnovers in thai
game admits Robertson. "We
nevei could gel a touchdown, bul
we managed : t in three field
goals.
"11 you look back al the statistics,
you can see that the moved the ball
pretty well. I he stopped
themselves more than anything
else
When comparing the sie ol the
Pirates to thai ol the Cajuns, it is
appareni thai 1 asi i arolina oui
weighs S I across both the offen-
sive and the defenseive lines. 1 he
Hue ot tensive front averages 15
pounds or more, while the delense
holds a ID pound ed
ECl head coach Id Emor re-
mains skeptical of the Ragin'a
uins under-rated defensive unit.
"Southwestern is much toughei
defensivel than Duke says
Emor. " lhe have more team
speed than Duke.
"Jell II i " ; : �� �
sive tackle is a definite pn
Rand 1 homas al defensive
top playei. I he return three in the
secondar (cornerba. k v illie
and safeties Ronnie Nunez and
1 ynn lenellt. which i ibly the
strength ol their team, the are
big and strong
I hough the Car.
the li !ir' unn
which posted a 4-7 n
on defense, Robertson
team will bring . end U
ol 99 conseeutiv c came � the Pii
ha e scoi ed in.
"Oui play acII awar
the abilit oi 1 asiarolii
the football Robertson states.
�� e know 1 asi arolii a has a
supei ot tense 1 o sel a goal ol
ing to shut oui a team with a p
ottense like I � d
ludicrous
lhe Pirates were successful on
delense at Duke, sacking freshman
quarterback Ben Benneti
umes foi minus-55 yai
ds. Bui
I mor must prepare his unit to
I a rushing team this week.
"We knew Duke was going to
pass a lot I mor sas, "so we
could il' n d to defend the pass I
and lhe i an second.
�� 1 hey've (Southwestei n I oui-
siana) gol fine runningbacks. I
defensive line will hvae to pla
run second. ()ui
defense will be more challen
because the �w the ball
both.
Rol � a prepared
r the I asiai olina deten
unit which allowed Blue
,1 Duke jusi two yards net
hing, bul remains cynical aboul
chances foi success.
"II 1 asiarolina plays defensive-
K the wa the did againsl Duke.
Robertson eluded, "we'll probably
punt on thud down a !r
I he Pirates will be lookng to -
"one up" on the C ajuns alter the
� 7 ihree-field goal loss, bul both
coaches will be looking to n
�'nH uik d lifetime status.
Steelers Eye Fifth Super Bowl Crown
DITt )R'S 'OTl I his is the se-
� ' : and fina a series oj articles
previewing (he National football
league season. The first, covering
earns oj the f( . appeared last
week. I his one strictly concerns
itselj with the rival f (
I he American football C on
ference has been dominated ovei the
past several years b the world
champion Pittsburgh Steelers.
( oachhuck Noll's club captured
the M title, and the Supei Bowl
championship, for foui ol the past
six yeais.
I times should not change much
this season, as the Steelers again will
be strong. Heavy challenges will be
mourned, though, bv a number ol
othei clubs mong those are the
Houston Oilers, members ol the
Steelers' ownentral Division.
A look at, all the AFC teams
follows.
M -
East Division
ENG1AND
Patriots have two capable quartet
backs in Steve Grogan and Matt
Cavanaugh. If Chuck Foreman, ac-
quired from the Minnesota Vikings,
can make a successful comeback,
the club will be very potent. A divi-
sion title looms.
NI HRk .11 IS With
Richard 1 odd at quarterback
heading a high-scoring ot tensive
machine, the .lets will go a long way.
I he defense is tough also. Jimmy
"The Creek" Snyder says the club
mav make the Supei Bowl. That's a
bit much, but look for the Jets to
give New England a strong
challenge for division crown.
BUFFALO � Coach Chuch
Knox has had several years with the
Bills now and should field his best
club there yet this season. QB joe
Ferguson is a good one.
MIAMI � The Dolphins need the
services of fullback 1 arrv Csonka to
offset their passing attack. It the
burly veteran does not return the
The season could be a long one. It may
Charles
Chandler
lie anyway unless the troublesome
quarterbacking situation improves.
BAl I IMORI As the old
adage goes, as goes QB Ben Jones
so go the Colts. It Jones stavs
healthy and has a good season the
club could move close to the tp.
Otherwise, troubles he ahead.
Central Division
PII rSBURGH - lhe champion
Steelers no doubt have the best
material in the M I , Both the of-
fense and defense are awesome. A
third straight Super Bowl title
should come in January
HOUSTON - Ihe Oilers could
be stronger than ever now that QB
Ken Stable! has arrived from
Oakland. 1 ail C ampbell is the best
back in the game today. 1 ook foi
this club to strongly challenge Pitt-
sburgh bv year's end. A title could
even result.
CLEVELAND 1 he Browns
are a strong club offensively wi h
QB Brian Sipe and backs like Mike
and Greg Pi nut along with 1980
Heisman "rophy winnei Charles
While. Still, the Steelers and Oilers
are too tough.
CINCINNATI I he Bengals
are young and on the rise. I his
could turn out to be a surprise slab.
West Division
SAN DIEGO I hehargers
have an awesome offensive unit
headed bv record-setting quarter-
back Dan louts and wide receivei
John Jefferson. A division title
looms with championship hopes a
tine reality.
DENV I R I he "Orange
c rush" defense will finally gel the
help it has long desired this yeai
I he offense will be much better now
thai formei lei Man. Robinson is ai
quarterback, He gives the club the
strong young arm it has been seai
ching for. Reaching the playoffs
should be no problem.
SI 1 1 I 1 I he Seahawks can
move thai football! QB Jim Zorn is
supei and should again lead this
club to a re pei fable yeai.
K NS VS C1T v oach Man
1 evy !ko the i hiefs on the i ise
1 his could be a realinderella team
m '80
OAK1 ND I he mam pi
blem the Raiders have is thai they
are m a tough division Dan
Pastorini came in the Stablei trade
with Houston and takes ovei al
quarterback. I he club will have its
good days but is still lacks much
compared to the greai Raidei teams
ol old
FINAL AMONM st S: Pitt-
sburgh will capture its third straiuhl
Super Bowl after sneaking h
Houston and San Diego in lough
conference play�ffs.
ECU Hooters
Lose Another,
Tourney Is Next
1 he I as:arolina sot
im dropped its tl
straight match ol the season
yesterday aftei noon, tailing
to Guilford, 2-1, on the
I (, I soccei field.
1 reshman Scott Mosier
goi 1 c I s only goal I he
n now has scored only
two goals in its first three
games.
Ihe Pirates now head to
I hapel Hill for the annual
Mayoi 's t up tourney where
they will be seeking their
first win ol the yeai and
first win evei in thai event
In the tourney's first
round on Saturday the
Pirates will lace host North
C arolina with Duke and
N. Mate playing in the
other contest.
t
� r
1
I





12
Ull t AM CARPI IN1AN
SEPTEMBER U, IW)
77e Fearless Football Forecast
SW I
NAV
IOW
KIN
11
UNC
SOU
HOI
SAN
COI
OR!
VMI
OllSIANA A'l ECl
1 VIRGINIA
AT INDIANA
TUCKY AT OKLAHOMA
S &M M GEORGIA
AT 1TXAS TECH
rHERNCAI AT TENNESSEE
ISTON M ARIZONA ST.
DIEGO ST. AT BRIGHAM YOUNG
ORADO AT UCI A
GON SI 1 WYOMING
1 Wll 1 1M AND MARY
CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports hditor
(10-2)
ECU 31-14
Virginia
Indiana
Oklahoma
Georgia
UNC
Southern Cal
Houston
Brigham Young
UCLA
Wyoming
VMI
JIMM1 DUPREE
ss1. Sporls hdilor
(9-3)
ECU 24-14
Navy
Indiana
Oklahoma
Georgia
UNC
Southern Cal
Houston
Brigham young
UCLA
. Oregon State
VMI
KEN SMITH
ECU SID
(9-3)
ECU 28-13
Virginia
loua
Oklahoma
Georgia
UNC
Tennessee
Houston
Brigham Young
UCLA
Oregon St.
VMI
TERRY HERNDON
Advertising Manayer
(8-4)
ECU 35-14
Virginia
Indiana
Oklahoma
Georgia
UNC
Southern C a!
Houston
Brigham Young
UCLA
Oregon St.
William and Mary
(.1 EST PICKER:
KEITH DRUM
Durham Morning Herald
II 2K-24
irginia
Indiana
Oklahoma
Texas VvM
V
rennessee
Arizona St
San Diego St.
C olorado
yoming
lie
F
B 1) W
l
Co,
Veteran Johnny Bench Charges
Soto 'Abused
Reds
Fearless Forecast Returns
For Third Football Season
. . � �� WKI It I ! Ml VV . l l
B MM!
B DAVID MOl I II
UP! Spoils Writer
MAN 1 A
(UPI) One has to
wonder what sort oi
reeord Cincinnati pit-
cher Mario Solo might
hae had this year it. as
:atchei Johnny Bench
charges, the Reds
hadn't abused him
h using liim in just
about every wa im-
aginable.
Soto. a 24-year-old
righthandei from the
Domincan Republic,
made one ot his infre-
quent starts Tuesdas
nigh! - onl his eighth
ihis season and his firsl
since Aug. 17 and
struck out !5, tying the
league high foi 1980,
while pitching the Reds
a 7-1 victor over the
Atlanta Braves
Tuesday's outing was
the 48th appearance
I his year for Soto and
although he has pitched
only 15" innings he
now has 154 strikeouts
65 more than he
chalked up over all
three of ins previous
major league seasons.
"We've used him
every way possible
said Bench. "As a
starter, for both long
and short relief. We've
almost abused him. It
seems like he's out
there every other day.
Sometimes 1 feel like
I'm catching him in my
sleep
"Mario is one of a
kind said fellow Reds
pitcher Frank Pastore.
"No one else could do
the things he does. I've
said all along he's the
Key to our pennant
ehan.es this year
Soto. improving his
record to 9-5, had the
Biases chasing his fast
ball Tuesday night �
striking out two in each
of the first tour innings
and again in the
seventh and closing
with a flourish when he
struck out Bob Horner,
Dale Murphy (for the
third time in the game)
and Chico Ruiz in the
ninth.
"They were all the
time looking for my
changeup and 1 kept
coming back with m
fast ball said Soto.
"The Braves are good
fasi ball hitters, but 1
didn't throw it down
the middle of the plate.
kept moving it
around
"He's got a fast ball
that's been clocked
around 95 miles per
hour said Bench.
"But, with that great
change, his fast ball
looks like its coming at
120. His changeup
makes it seem over-
powering
Murphy just shook
his head. "Those
strikeouts said the
Braves usually hard-
hitting outfielder,
��should tell you what
kind of stuff he had
Soto lost his
strikeout touch brief!)
in the middle innings
and credits Bench with
getting it back.
"It was a little bit hoi
out there said Soto.
"from the first to the
sixth, 1 threw a lot oi
pitches. Johnny came
out to the mound and
told me I wasn't pit-
ching, 1 was just throw-
ing the ball. 1 reached
back and decided to
give it all I've got
With second-place
Houston beating first-
place I os Angeles
Tuesday night, the
third-place Reds are
now only V games off
the lead in the National
League West.
"We're starting to
make our move said
Bench. "Our pitching
has been outstanding of
late and we're getting
the hitting to go with
it
If the Reds could
play the Braves the rest
of the season they'd be
a shoo-in. 1 hey've won
13 o 14 meetings and
close out the current
series tonight with Tom
Seaver on the mound.
Seaver, who has won
three straight, appears
fully recovered from
the back ailment that
sidelined him for a
quite a stretch. He
struck out 10 in his last
outing and is now only
36 away from becom-
ing the fifth pitcher in
history to reach 3,(XX).
Seaver has a 29-8 career
reeord against the
Braves, having beaten
them more than any
other team he has fac-
ed.
Braves righthander
lommy Boggs waged a
brilliant duel with Soto
through the first five
innings. He gave up a
leadoff double to Dave
Collins in the first, then
faced only the
minimum 15 batters for
the remainder of those
five frames.
But in the sixth, with
the score tied 1-1,
Boggs gave up a single
to Ron Oester. a walk
to Collins and a three-
run homer to Ken Grif-
fey .
THE $74.95
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It's a great way of saying you've earned it.
The Official
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COLLEGE RINGS
Symbolizing your ability to achieve.
Today and Tomorrow
Sept. 10,11,129:30-4:00
Students Supply Store Lobby
.Wright Bldg
Date
Location
lor the third consecutive year, The Easi Caroli-
nian is printing The Fearless Football Forecast
each Thursday.
The forecast, which includes picks by our panel
of "experts will appear weekly with 12 of the
area and country's top games included.
Each week a "guest picket" will assis the
regular foursome of Sports Editor Charles
Chandler, Assistant Sports Editor Jimmy
DuPree, Advertising Manager Terry Herndon
iand ECU Sports Information Director Ken
Smith.
The forecast began last week with the voice
of the Pirates WNCT-TV's Jim Woods, serving
as the guest. Woods picked seven ot the twelve
games correctly.
1 his week the guest forecaster is Durham Mor-
ning Herald Sports Editor Keith Drum Drum
replaced Art Chansky at the position this summer
and is considered one of the premier sports
writersin the area. He is especially well-known tor
his yearl coverage of Atlantic Coast C onto nee
basketball.
Each week an up-to-date listing ol how the
panel ol forecasters are taring will appear below
their respective names and above their picks.

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Apply on Tuesday Sept. 16. 7:30-8:30 p.m.
Deposit required Master Charger Visa accepted.
. 1KM) AitCarved College Rmn


I 1 '





I HI I AST CAROM NI AN
SEPTEMBI K II. 19X0
13
Fall Baseball Slate Opens With Heels
B 1).V. IIOVSKII
Mill Mnlrr
1 he last Carolina
baseball team will open
its Fall season at Harr-
ington Field (Friday) at
6 p.m. with a double
header against North
Carolina.
The Pirates, 2S-7 last
spring, will be looking
to t i n d suitable
replacements for five
depart e d sen i o r
regulars. The mam con-
cern is replacing the en-
lire outfield which last
year consisted of Butch
Davis, Billy Best and
Macon Moye. l)ais
and Best are now in the
farm system ol the
Kansas c it Royals.
The three top returning
outfielders are junior
John Hallow ,
soph mores Robert
Wells and let! Warren.
� replacement must
also be found for first
baseman Rick
Derechailo. During the
summer, this position
was divided between
senior Mike Sage and
junior Charlie Smith, a
transfer from Carolina.
nA critical assignment
is the replacement of
Ramie Styons (now
with San Diego) behind
the plate. Styons" bat
and his defensive pro-
wess and experience
will be ereatlv missed.
The job ot replacing
Syons seems to fall at
present to either junior
Jay Caraway, Styons'
backup for ttie last two
seasons or to sophmore
Mark Wakai. Both of
these players were given
an opportunity to play
during the summer,
and both did well.
Perhaps the strongest
asset to this year's team
will be the return ot
three o last year's star-
ting infielders. Junior
second baseman Mike
Sorrell made only three
errors in the spring and
came through with key
hits in several games.
Shortstop is held
down by capable
sophmore Kelly
Robinette, who im-
proved his hitting over
the summer and also is
expected to be a respec-
table defensive player
junior Todd Hendley
will get the not at third
base.
The Pirates return an
excellent corps of pit-
chers, led by senior
right h a n d e r Rick
Ramey and by juniors
Bob Patterson adn Bill
Wilder. Patterson was
the sole lefty on last
year's staff and will be
counted upon heavily.
Wilder was one of
the nation's top starters
last year with a record
of 10-2 and eleven com-
plete games in tweUe
starts. Wilder will pro-
bably see liimited ac-
tion during the fall
because of some arm
stiffness that flared up
near the end of the
summer season.
Coaches Seek 'Quarterback'
Lady Pirates Scrimmage Wolf pack
Lady Pirates
Get Assistant
By JIMFVH lnl�RKK
(�l Spi.rl- I itiliT
W ith the opening
match of the 1980
volleyball season less
than a week away, Easl
(. arolina head coach
Ahta Dillon and new
assistant 1 nn Da id
son still have to find a
'quarterback' to run
the Pirate offense.
ECU traveled to
N.C. State Monday foi
their first pre-season
scrimmage, and the
results turned out to be
less than the coaches
had hoped foi
'It was State's second
scrimmage and just our
first reasons David-
son, herself a former
�11-NC Al W per
former at State. "The
(Pirates) realK got a
taste of what big time
olle ha I
is
college
about.
"We didn't pick up
dinks very well, but
the didn't icK on thai
shot all the time. We
picked up some really
hard spikes, and that
was a good sign
I oi the past two
seasons, the Pirate set-
ter was I a onda Dun-
can. But Duncan is now

n
gone and the void has
vet to be filled.
"We have a couple
ot people we're work-
ing with at setter syas
Dillon. "But no one
has really been consis-
tent yet. It's a difficult
position, and one that
requires consistent per-
formance
Dillon cited State's
Susan Schaffer as a
steady setter, with
Davidson adding. "F or
this area, she's one ot
the best
"State has four
starters returning from
last year Dillon
states, "and so do we.
The difference is that
they have their setter
back
The Pirates hve
scrimmages against
1 ouisburg and North
Carolina W esleyan re-
maining before the
opener, but Dill ion
wishes that the order
could have been revers-
ed.
"1 would have rather
played State last she
admits, "so we could
work up to that level.
It's a shock treatment,
euess. But it really
hits home in black and
white what we need to
work on. Overall,
eerybod made their
share of mistakes.
"It just kind of
drove home the point
o how tast you have to
move from offense to
defense. We didn't hit
the ball as well as we
should and our block-
ing is not what it should
be.
" 1 hey were well
ahead of us in their per-
formance. We've got to
get our team offense
and team detense go-
ing.
Davidson cites only
two days work on the
defensive allignment
for the Pirate's low
rating on defense.
"That's under con-
trolled situations she
says. "It's much faster
in a game and you
don't have time to ex-
plain what to do or ex-
pect
I he pair cited senior
Sharon Perry for her
performance in the
scrimmage, but added
she played every game
and tired near the end.
"Some of them real-
ly got exhausted
(Monday) Dillon
said. "There are a lot
of teams that are that
good or better at the
tournaments we'll be
going to.
"It's a very challeng-
ing schedule
The Lady Pirates
open the schedule with
trips to N.C. State
September 17, Ap-
palachian State Sept.
20 and back to Raleigh
Sept. 26-27 for the
N.C. State Invitational
Tournament.
Lynn Davidson, an
all-state volleyball
player at North
C arolina State in 1979.
has been named assis
lant volleyball coach at
hast Carolina Universi-
ty
A recreational
resources graduate
from N.C. State the
23-year-old Statesville
native will assist coach
Alita Dillon who is ex-
pecting a child later this
month. She also let
tered in softball and
captained the Lady
vVolfpack junior varsi-
tv basketball team.
w Tyler
1
COLLEGE
STUDENTS
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Send $1 00 for your
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catalog All academic
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Phone 756-B-E-L-K(756-2355)
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i i � - ' '





14
I HI I-AST CAROLINIAN
SI I'll MB! R II. I WO
Recruits Aid Teams
Swimmers
B JIMMY DuPRKK
Wi Sports fr dttoi
When fc a s t
Carolina's swimming
teams open their 1980
season October 8 in the
Last Carolina Pen-
tathlon, they will be
without a number of
record holders and Ail-
Americans. But head
coach Ray Scharf
maintains optimism for
his youthful units.
"We lose (Bill) Fehl-
ing and (Ted) Nieman
from the mens team
and a number of girls
from their team
Scharf says. They
hold a lot of records
here, so they're
definitely going to be
hard to replace.
B I nited Press
International
Nl
Richaru
YORK
Rottkov, who
has worked in media
relations for the U.S.
Soccei 1 ederation the
last three years, was ap-
pointed as Director of
Public Relations, the
lea liuc announced
1uesda.
Rottkov is a former
sports writer for United
Press International and
the Associated Press.
rORONTO � NHL
President John Ziegler
Tuesda) named John
Gfeller the league's ex-
ecutive director of
public relations and
marketing.
Gfeller previously
worked tor the
Madison Square
Garden Corp. in New
York.
FOXBORO, Mass.
New England
Patriots' second-year
punter Eddie Hare has
been placed on waivers,
a team spokesman said
i uesda) and Mike
Rubach, an 1 Ith-round
draft pick, will assume
the punting chores.
Hare injured his
back Aug. 24 during
v a rm ups for a
preseason game with
the Philadelphia Eagles
at Schaeffer Stadium.
! wo days later he was
placed on the injured
reserve list.
the post's main combat
unit, the "Screaming
Eagles" o the 101st
Airborne Division. In
1958, Daw kins won
both the H e i s m a n
liophv and Maxwell
Trophy as the nation's
best football player.
PITTSBURGH -
Pittsburgh Pirate lef-
thander Jim Rooker
underwent surgery on
his left shoulder Tues-
day, the club announc-
ed'
Dr. Albert Ferguson
repaired a torn capsule
of R 0 o k e r' s left
shoulder joint at
Presbyterian-
University Hospital, a
team spokeswoman
said. Rooker, 37, was
injured May 2 while
pitching against the
Atlanta Braves. He was
placed on the disabled
list the next day and has
remained there all
season.
MOBILE, Ala.
C lift Ellis, the Univer-
sity of South Alabama
basketball coach who
led the Jaguars to their
first post-season tour-
nament last year, Tues-
day was named athletic
director of the school.
Fllis, 34, replaces Dr.
Ken Lucas, who an-
nounced his resignation
earlier this summer.
The announcement was
made following a
meeting of the school's
board of trustees.
"On the girls team
we lost Cindy Sailer,
Fllen Bond and Sharon
Bums. But we did pret-
ty well in recruiting and
we should have good
depth
Scharf adds junior
Karen Davidson, an
All-American in two
events last season, to
his list of losses. David-
son will be working in
the department of
Sports Medicine as part
of her curricular re-
quirement.
Freshmen like Scharf
needed for early
developement include
Sally Collins in the
distance events, and
Jennifer Jayes as the
top incoming
backstroker.
Sally Marburger,
Lori McQueston and
Moira McHugh are top
newcomers in the
freestyle events.
"They're really going
to help us says
Scharf.
Freshmen Tina Poole
and Ann Powell will
join top returning but-
terfly performers Lori
Ross and Paula
Schaefer on the Pirate
squad which posted a
3-5 mark last season
while competing in the
North Carolina
Association of Inter-
collegiate Athletics for
Women, Division II.
The Lady Pirates will
get a boost in January
when Norway native
Dordi Hcnriksen joins
the squad. "She could
be a real asset to us
says Scharf. "She has a
lot of potential to
develop into a top com-
petitor.
Sophomores Susan
Hanks, Tammi Putnam
and Carol Shacklett
return to the squad
after each received Ail-
American status during
the 1979-80 campaign.
"The girls should be
a whole lot stronger
than thev have been in
the past says Scharf.
"I hey have a tough
schedule, but I think
they should do very
well
The only senior on
the men's roster will be
Cherry Hill. NI.
native Jack Clowar, a
perrenial strong-point
for the Pirates, who
was hampered by il-
lness and injury last
season.
Clowar will be
Scharfs top individual
medley performer,
while juniors Doug
Nieman of Winter
Park. Fla. and John
Akright of Cherry Hill.
N.J. add depth and ex
perience to the event.
Juniors Mike Triau,
John Bennett and
Lance Timmons, and
sophomores Mark
Medei and Dan
Michalove lead the con-
tingent of freestyle
returnees.
Junior Scott Ross
and sophomores John
Kasi Carolina Swimming
a reputation of excellence
Richards and Andrew
Giovine return in the
backstroke, with
soph m ore Perry
New man t he onl)
veteran in the buttei fh
I he men posted a 4-3
mark in dual competi-
tion lasl season, bin
Scharf was till not
pleased with the pet tor
ii
e.
"Neitl
measured up
hopes tor them'
mits. "Maybe I
goals io
don't Hunk M.
outsidet looking
suppo -� looks
r
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Composition and Grammar Call
758 0735 alter 5 00 p m
LOST Gray Cat with white collar
last seen on campus Call
Methodist S'udent Center 758 20j0
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
PODESZWA Featuring color
Portraits Resumes Port
lolios Weddings Photo Restora
tion BEST PRICES IN TOWN'
Call Petet Podesiwa 758 0962
HELP NEEDED To take i year
old boy to ECU Preschool and taki
him home after school (12 00 at
nor-ni Please call 756 3993 atter
5 00
POSITIONS OPEN I o r
waitresses Hours are flexible to
tit your schedule Apply 8 !0am
daily S S Cafeteria Carolina
East Mall
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE WANTED lor tvwo
bedroom apartmi-nt at Carnaqr
House One third rent plus
Utilities Call 756 8922
ROOMMATE: NEEDED tor iu
bedroom Mubile Home four miles
from campus Halt e�pences
752 5259
ROOMMATE WANTEp For a
two bedroom apartment in
Eastbrook Apartments Can
758 J99 after 5 00 p m
HOURS fOR TAKING
CLASSIFIED ADS WILL BE Wf
2 00 3 00 MTTH 4 00 5 00 AT
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OF
F I C E
SAAD'SSHOI
REPAIR
I I Grand ��
7:) I22K
( )l,t. R �
any
n inv
he ad
sei i he
but I
I o ,n
in, 1
betiei
does to me.
"We have a good
group 'vi freshmen to
than ii
nil the gaps says
Scharf, who enters his
14th season as Pirate
head coach. '�Our
strength will still be the
medlev relays
Scharl praised the
work ti! strength coach
left Johnson for im-
proving the Pirate
training program.
Swimming
Program
Announced
A new masters pro
gram in swimming and
a physical fitness swim
ming program begin at
ihe Mmges Coliseum
this month, according
lo Rav Scharf, last
Carolina Lniversitv
swimming coach and
director of aquatics.
The programs are
designed to improve
techniques of ac-
complished swimmers,
to structure swimming
programs for in-
dividual fitness and
weight control, and lo
train persons interested
in masters competition.
Participation in the
programs is adjusted 10
individual needs and
desires.
During September,
reduced "charter
memberships" are be
ing offered. Semester
memberships are S60,
down from $70, and
yearly memberships are
SI 10, down from $140.
lor further details,
contact Rav Scharf at
Minces Coliseum.
buccaneer MOTHS i3
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ATTIC
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SOUTH'SA 44 6
ROCK CLUB
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STEVE
McQCJEEN
THE
HUNTER
THE FINAL
COUNTDOWN
MARTIN SHEEN
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PEOPLE WHO
OWN THE
DARK
115315515715915
ENDSTONIGHT
STEEL
ROADIE
WASHINGTON �
grievance seeking the
r e i n s t at e m e n t o f
Washington Redskins'
fullback John Riggins
from the "left camp-
retired" list and asking
to have the category
deleted from the NFL
constitution will be fil-
ed Wednesday by the
Nl 1 Players Associa-
tion, UP1 has learned.
Riggins left the Red-
skins' training camp at
Carlisle, Pa on July
27 seeking a guarantee
of $500,000 for the
final year of his con-
tract, worth a reported
$300,000 under his
original contract. The
club refused to (
negotiate and placed
Riggins on the "left
camp-retired" list on
Sept 1, making him in-
eligible to play in the
league this season.
PITTSBURGH �
The Pittsburgh Steelers
went through a light
workout running and
lifting weights Tuesday
in preparation for Sun-
da y' s game in
Baltimore against the
Colts.
Offensive tackle Jon
Kolb was listed as
doubtful for the Colts
game because of a
sprained ankle, and
free safety Mike
Wagner was listed as
questionable due to a
rib injury.
FORT CAMPBELL.
Ky. � Col. Pete
Daw kins, who won the
1958 Heisman trophy
as the nation's finest
college football player,
gave up his brigade
command Tuesday at
Fort Campbell where
he will become chief of
staff on Wednesday.
The 42-year-old West
Point graduate also will
serve as chief of staff of
NEW YORK � The
Major League Baseball
Players Association
Tuesday filed a labor
grievance demanding
pitcher Ferguson
Jenkins, who is charged
with three counts of
possession of narcotics,
be allowed to return to
the active lineup.
Donald Fehr,
counsel to the players
association, said the
decision was taken
after consultations
Tuesday morning with
player representative
Marvin Miller, Jenkins
and Jenkins' attorney
Eddie Greenspan of
Toronto. Baseball
Commissioner Bowie
1 Kuhn ordered Jenkins
out of active duty Mon-
day, citing the pitcher's
refusal to answer ques-
tions about his arrest in
Toronto two weeks
ago.
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 11, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 11, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.75
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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