The East Carolinian, September 4, 1980






QU?e lEaat (Earolt
Serving the Eastarolina campus community since 1925.
N ol. 55 No. 4
10 Pages Today
I hiirscta). September 4. iwo
Greenville, V( .
( irculation 10,000
Thunderstorm
Puts Damper
On Mall Fest
Bv Mlkl NOOVW

: uei s ho w ei
ile ol eveni - ai
�n
1a v day
H iwevet. nun
( ; enioved a
'
! torn
I
ssociate
and Rei i ea
� with
�ration
1(1
�ided b
I said
undei
tanies I
CCCsS ol
I e past
M M
contest, sponsored b the C .().
tankard Co. (Miller). Winners of
Mhn contest were awarded trophies
based on the shortest time needed to
stack empty beet kegs from one area
to anothei
I he Department of Health Ser-
vices sponsored a "guess your own
weight" contest, and checked stu-
dent's weight and blood pressure.
"plastic disc" throwing contest
was sponsored by the Coca Cola
Co. with winners receiving tree
plastic discs" as prizes.
I he entire afternoon's events
cr� cancelled due to the rain, and
M Mi a said no rain date had been
� heduled.
Othei departments ol the Divi-
sion ol Student I ife sponsoring
events in this year's celebration were
the Department of Dining Services,
Handicapped Student Services,
Hearing Impaired Student Pro-
gram, Orientation and Judiciary,
Residence Life, Security and 1 rat-
tic. Student financial Aid. Student
Housing Operations, and the
I niversitv I nion.
East Reissues Debate Challenge
Photo bv TE��t CHAT
Dr. John I ast. Republican candidate for (he 1 v Senate, announced lues-
day that he would modify his earlier challenge to debate his opponent, Sen.
Robert Morgan, last said the debate should be narrowed to the topic ol
agriculture in North (arolina. especially tobacco. Shown here in the
Republican campaign and elections headquarters, Kasl criticized
Democratic leadership in Washington, satiny their economic policies
responsible lor creating farming problems. East is an II professor
renlh on a leave ot absence trom the university.
the
were
cur-
Personnel Problem Surfaces
WZMB Adviser Resigns
t l V, oo-


k n i
L egislature
Election Day
Draws Near
regis t en ng
ii ' i elec
� i t ud
licers. ac
KirV I itK SO A
m to i uu in the
o by rotmii 22,s in
idem ' i
� v ii). lean-up
fee thai I led I h
aign materials
and posters) have
:
John Jeter (Fall semester, 1979)
Bv I I KK C.R A
, i i
Intel nal problems w ithin the stafl
.t i i s sunk in operated I "si
radio station surfaced at a meeting
of the Media Board Wednesday,
resulting in the resignation ol one ol
the station's ad isei s.
John Icter. until las ugust 1 the
general managet ol vMB. resign-
ed !ns job as advise! to the station
attei current general managei Olen
da Killingsworth told the Media
Board that she no longet wanted
him on the stal l.
rhe meeting was closed to the
public.
Killingsworth declined to discuss
the mattei on the record, but iwo
Media Board members, who asked
not to be identified, said that she
told the board thai Jetei was acting
bevond his authority as advisei
rhe Media Board was created in
1978 to govern all campus media.
Icier was a four-year veteran ol
I c I s student radio station, whose
call lettet s used to he v 1 c I .
1 C I . an M station, went ott
the air in April. 1978 following pei
sonnel disputes thai were hampei
the station's operation .Icier was
named general manager ot the prat
tically non-existent station, and
spent rhe next two years trying to get
an ICC license tor a new. I M stu-
dent station. I he license was
granted las! spring
Killingsworth became general
managei alter Jetei graduated trom
1 C I . but the Media Board appro
ed a request thai Jetei stay on in an
advisor) position until the station
could gel on the air. 1 he laic's;
estimate puts the firsl air date
sometime in October
Jeter admitted Wednesday that he-
had recently overstepped his bounds
as advisei when he signed a requisi-
tion - which he was noi authorized
to tor new equipment tor the
station.
"I was wrong, bui I lust didn't
think about il ai the time Ii wa
something thai needed to be done
he said
Killingsworth appeared hist
before the Media Board and asked
them to support her decision to
remove leti n his advisory role.
one source said. After hearing Kill-
ingsworth, the board heard Jeter,
who read a statement outlining his
work during the last rwo years for
the siation.
leter had recommended last May
that Killingsworth lake ovei the
general manager's job, bui said in
his st at erne ni t h e she w as
"inexperienced" and "incapable
Before becoming general manager,
Killingsworth worked tor two ears
as the station's business managet
"I don't think thai she can put
the station on the air b herself
Jeter said. He added that he had
been doing mosl ot the technical
Aork in setting up VWMB's new
stereo equipment.
Plans for the station's forn
have sailed tor an album rock orien-
on, with ja and classical shows
also on the schedule.
I he board said Icier could still
broadcast the station's firsl show.
bui only with Killingsworth's ap-
proval. Icier said, it was al this
pomi thai he resigned, he added
Plant Uses Uranium Waste To Make Cattle Feed
w

Aiilheheld
� c SOA
the elc -
be held
w ednesday in
Ail) be
Hall ol them
d a i
-en
;
nen. so � oi c. and
. den!
i he senior
dent, ice
a secretary ti easuret
is will also choose
cia
( � - � � rs w ci v c in me
i hey I i e also
conducted in the
lence halls, as well
as in Mendenhall Student c enter,
Minges c oliseum, the Student Sup
pl siore. the c. Health
Building and the c roatan Polling
hours will be from l 5 p m with
i exception ot the Student Supply
store. Mendenhall Student C entei
and the C roatan. At these locations,
pollute will end a' 7 p m
rhe SOA I egislature ap
propriates money trom student
funds, administers cei tain aspects ot
student affairs, such as the Medical
1 mergency I oan, enacts resolu-
tions, and passes laws governing the
SGA
Gore, (K 1 A. UP1) - In the
shadow ot one ot the country's only
iwo uranium conversion lants, cattle
munch grass fertilized with a
chemical byproduct from the plant.
Ken McGee Nuclear Corp
operator ot the Sequoyah facility,
has a problem � what to do wih the
7.2 million gallons of radioactive
waste generated at the plant each
�v eai '
I he solution being tested here
may result in more cattle teed tor
ranchers and put the company, a
subsidary ot Kerr-McGee Oil Co
in the fertilizer business
1 he Sequoyah Plant converts
refined uranium ore. delivered by an
underground pipeline in slurry form
trom mines m New Mexico, into
uranium hexaflouride lor process-
ing! as nuclear fuel. In the process,
large amounts of nitric acid are used
to dissolce the ore. known as
"yellow cake
I he residue from the process.
called rafftnate, is watery sludge An EC I student has been charg-
wnh a high nitrogen content . ed with larceny and brekaing and
entering an automobile m the firsl
������������� campus arrest of the semester.
Tll InClffO Mkhad Bryan. Is. of Belk dor-
�f s Itj Ilvlw mitory, was aprehended by campus
����i� secuity otters at 1:30 a.m. on Aug.
26 in the Belk pat king lot aftet
allegedly breaking i n I o a n
Announcements2 automobile and stealing a pair of
Classifieds10 roller skaies and a microphone trom
Doubts8 a (-b radio.
Editorials4
Letters According to C hiet I rancis I d-
Mas5 dings of the 1 CU Police, the park
Transportation3 ing lot was heme watched bv
Barium chlorid is added to the raf-
finate to reduce radioactivity bfore
it is stored in large concrete lined
holding ponds.
Kerr-McGee scienteists say the
banum chloride treatment redueces
the radioactivity ot the ultimate to
less than three picocuries per liter.
By comparision.the environmental
protection agency considers t is. c
picocuries per liter sate tor drinking
watei.
"Before 1973, we just neutralized
the rat (mate and sstored it in the
ponds Donna McFarland, Kerr-
McGee Public Relations Manager,
said. "It's about 75 percent liquid,
and it mounts up pretty quickly
Burnell Brown. Kerr-McGee
General Manager tor manufactur-
ing, said company scientists knew it
ammonia was added to the waste li-
quid, they could create ai'j
amounts ot the chemical fertilizer
ammonium nitrate.
In 1ST?. Kerr-Mcgee and
Oklahoma Si ale University
agriculture experts, with Nuclear
Regulatory Commission approval,
developed a pilot program ol applv
ing the ammonium nitrate produced
from the neutralized rattmate to
about 260 acres ot pasture land near
the plant.
Dr. I .1 .Stan , c hiel eterinary m
Stillwater, confirmed the tests.
Dr. Stair said tissue and blood
sample from the cattle and a com-
trol group near the plant showed all
levels oil heavy metals and radioac-
tive substances were normal
"I here was no difference in the
cattle raised on the raffinate fer-
tilized hay than cattle raised any
place else in the stale I)r.S!air
said.
Kerr-McGee, armed with she test
data, applied in mid-April to the
NKC for permission to expand the
res! area to s acres, William she!
iv, !he turn's Nucleat Regulation
and C ontrol Director. said.
"The expanded acreage would
allow us to disposal o! a lot ot the li-
quid waste Shelly said
"1 ventually, we'd like to be able to
market the fertilizer commercially
or leas! be able io sell the hay
Since the -pnl application,
however, the 1 PA has decided the
process will require an environmen-
tal impact statement and further
delays ate anticipated, Shelly said.
"Any marketing program would
lake some time to sel up and Id'
think we'd be looking !o corner the
fertilizer market he said bui add
ed that the plan! might be able Io
produce as much as 5.4 mill
gallons ot fertilize! a yeai
1 he fertilizer would no: be cheap
because ot the added ammonia
labor cost, "bui anything would be
betier than just storing ii (the ral
finatej and watching that nitrate
acid go to waste Shelly said
Student Charged In Auto Break-In
campus policemen wh n Bryan
broke into the car. 1 ddings said the
stakeout was pan ol an attempt to
"nip this type ol thing in the bud
and that police have randomly
siaked out problem .iia around
the university.
1 ddings said thai Bryan used a
coathanger to enter the car, a 1975
Maverick owned bv Ronv Stevens ot
rayetteville ccording to Eddings,
Bryan had the roller skates and the
C B microphone in his possession
when police apprehended him.
An I M connectoi ind Panasonic
lape deck were damaged atier
Bryan apparently tried unsuc-
cessfully to remove then trom the
vehicle, 1 ddings added
Generally, eais are no! hard to
brcal into 1 ddings said. "Don't
leave stufl OUl in ihe open where n
can be seen he advised
Eddings said thai the stakeouts ol
areas ai 'he university with high
rates Ol similar crimes will be con-
nnuedd as an ongoing program
"This is a felony, and these areas
will be under surveillance he said.
"Anybody apprehended will be ar-
rested 1 ddings added.
Registers
A vailable
1 he Who 81 freshmen
Registers are now available to
students who have ordered
them.
Ihe books contains infor-
mation about 1 C I , and
photographs of freshmen
students along with some in-
formation about their interests
and hobbies.
The registers may be picked
up in room 226 of Mendenhall
Student C enter between 9 p.m.
and 5 p.m. An ID with a
photograph and an ECU ac-
tivity card are required, and
only those students who have
already ordered the book may
have one.





I Ml I AS1 CAROI INI AN
sii'li MBER4, iwo
Announcements
HOLY TRINITY
it yoo are looking for a small
warn . ung and 'r iendI.
chore I H � . rrinity vjnitea
v- " i afed at 1400 Reo
ks Road s tht- place for you
begins at 9 4b a m
�day � wning worship
rvic begins at H am You are
ivited i attend a-a become an
� � . pan I the i riurch body
: � id � u did I you
to Hilly T rinity
, � wn as 'he pma
all 'SI 1326 W leave
the answering ser
t pe iple ai Holt
STUDENT UNION
The Stud! Va r A'trac
tions Committee vvi'i meet on
Mon Sept 8 at i 30 p m m Room
247 o Mendenhail Student Center
All members are urged to attend
STUDENT UNION
MINORITY ARTS
The student Union Minority Arts
I mittee will meet on Mon .
sept 8 at 3 30 p m in H n . 18 ol
Mendenhail Student Center All
members are uroeo It a'tend
cso
COBEY
didate tor Lt
i " � featured
� petting of
a take piact
� � �' . The hea
Haveloc
EASTTO SPEAK
� . ly GOP ha
� � � � - ida. iepi
i ' r- i i
- � -a :
i and
WAYNE COUNTY
GOP DINNER
�� ��. i �

�. �
i � ����
� � a be
i the Het k Center at
: r hen a � � � Press
dinner
��
th
tie lor Lt
Wash
� �
FOLK DANCE
� � �
�. � � � �
� �
COOP

� in ten I
� ��.�.
11
� ' A
II It. I I ��
� trVltll
� .
-
�' � ' ling of Spi
� . � . �

PHI BETA
LAMBDA
PHYSICS
The
' l" ft � s Stodnts
ai: � Id its organizational
meeting on Thurs Sept 11 at 30
p m m room E303 I the Phys S
Budding Plans I I tl � upcoming
��-iir a II ft s set Ml persons
interested in tx men hers
aiI i'ni oof aged lo attend
HOUSE COUNCIL
The filing dates aii be Sept 8 10
Elections will be held Tues Sept
16 f' ' 1 a ' to 4 p rn The posi
Iresident vu e
� �� ,ii � ' a "d Secretary
� �. i. � iee v)ur Res dt i
Ha Din tor foi applications and
PEP RALLY
' ere M tx a Pep Rally tonight
�� e step ' I � D rm at 7 30
Hi id Coach Ed Emory and his
Pirate the ECU Cheerleaders
and the Marching Pirates will be
� n ss 11'
NATIONAL
INSTITUTE OF
HEALTH
a r epr esen t a t i ve of N i h in
Hi�'� -esiia Maryland will be on
pus Oi ' t and interviewing
studen's interested in tak.ng part
Ihetr Normal Volunteer Pro
� Is rfr e pa.d a"d live
researcl hospital the
Clm i � lei m " "e. � � �
Itei -�' � ftrorking witl nih
- � � st! areer dew pm� I
it ynu have or intend to dec tan- a
maior m a science or health
related curriculum you may
quality for COST FREE services
made available through the
Center lor Student Opportunities
iCSO' CSO currently has Open
ings Hi Students Wishing to
receive tutorial servces There
are also openings tor students to
participate n individualized oi
ginup speedreacinig note'aking
and test taking technigues effec
five organization of lecture n v.
ad Active reading knowing
more about what ynu read in a
Shorter time Counseling services
include career planning
assistance academic p�-r rial
financial test anxiety antir gr.jup
counseling If you would like I
c ons'dered tor participation in an
of � � cost free services
lat � i)r Frye entei I i Studi I
Opportunities ;17 Wtucharo ��
nex or call fur ar appointment it
7S7 ol? 4075 or 6081
TUTORS WANTED
The Center fur Student Opp. i
tunities i CSO currently has open
� nqs for part lime tutors in the
1 wing subiee' areas
medic me pre medic me. biology
chemistry p'wsics anci relate
health professions You may earn
an income at standard campjs
rates Contact Of Bndwell CSO
216 Whichard Annex or call
7S7 61?; 6081 or 607S for an ap
SOCIAL WORK
September ?; is the deadline i
Fail Admission � n , Departn ent
of Social Work and Correctional
Services Students who plan to ap
ply to maior must submit an ap
plication tn the Department Chair
and complete two interviews prior
tn the deadline Students wit'
hours of completion ol general col
lege credits whi ha .�� a mil
2 5 grade pn.nt average are eligi
bie to app1 Applications and ad
ditiunai informal on may '�
secured in the Depart i � ' �� i
r m 31? Allied Healti i ��
:�� Ik Bu d � l' � ' ��
EPSILON PI TAU
E PT as pla ined its first bus
meeting i Mon sept
F laoaga" 102at p n � � ed an
us in plan a successful year'
PHI ETA SIGMA
The first meeting of f � � �� fthe
year of Pin Eta Sigma F ret
Honor Society will be held
Tues Sept v in lojc Brewstei
tx g nnmg at b i eral plans
lor the year will be diSl USSed ano
specific plans t,ir the fan p
will be made men i � � s ar
urged to attend
WZMB
Then ;�. i . i rat ,i
� .i' i . � i : v ;�. � i �
. ' please plan 1
� � � . . � . be held in
Old , � � �� �
' r at 7 p n
IVCF
� in us ' ' � �. i i � : � �
.� , .
� � . i �� . .�. � pal
l.st Studi
COFFEEHOUSE
rue student ��� �
� n � � i . ft neef
�. � i at � p n
. i , �
� ��'�
FREE WILL
rhe i et . Bat' si � :� �
�� .�� - p win meei ' i
pt i ii io i .��
Frei � 'i Baptist Churci
Greenville A v � �� e bus
' i " � � idenhaii par-
a' ' io p "� for thosi need
Iranspi � ' H
HOICE SAVINGS
MASCOT
WOMEN
Dwi
experu
COLLEGE BOWL
Registrat lor I Iran
n pe t i t � . � " .
���.� . I
� .
ept � �� .����
��� � egi �
ien irea - n � .
toni . � . � " � ' � �
scie' � �' .i" � �' �'
events and
�,�.�. � � ti �
� �
mpettt ind part a' �
it it tout
� � � , . � . ��� �
� e Pi -�
Student
t ryoutt ' sell tthel isi
Thursda � ei - me a
rev � ' " i ���� livid �
' as ,i pa � . ' a rendit
�� , p rate i � � " � real
.1 I I'A r nC ' S ' �
APPLICATIONS
Ai) par' �:� work in tx
iii. � 31 me .� " � �
enter. 5 � 51 Ireet ici
��� � . � .
I 9 30 to 3 3
. . A � ft ' � � � . ��
r Sept 8 � - (Ofor I
� . �
JEWISH
STUDENTS
� , u are i lei ested � I n
hospita 'y a I �� � � . for Ro(
�is' anal and � � .
Dr Resnik a' it S64 ' ' !
CHICK-FI LA.
Be ch(X)sey and save on this delicious treat from Cliick-fil-A.
With the coupon below you am get a Chick-fil-A America's
boneless breast of chicken sandwich. Plus you get your
choice of a regular rder f french fries or any i ur garden-
fresh-from-scratch silads,including carrot and raisin, potato and
cole slaw. For only $1.60
SAVE
GET A CHICK-FIL-A AND YOUR CHOICE OF ANY
REGULAR FRENCH FRIES OR GARDEN FRESH SALAD
ONLY SI.60
I'se this coupon to get a iiibiiiiii Offergoodat
Chick fi! -A sandwich and
your choice of regular french
fries or garden fresh
salad. For i inly S1.60 One
coupon per person per visit.
Offer expires:
Sept. 30
SAVE
THE TASTE WORTH SHOPPING FOR
� i i
the NAME
DROPPER Nc
I FAMOUS LABELS FOR LESS
Best
Dressed
i
SAVE
at least V3 on
Classic
Separates
TOP LABELS
it 1
DISCOUNT Pt �
r- - �
CLASS DOESN'T COST AT THE
NameDropper
Greenville Square
10-9 Moo Ft � 10 6 Sr � 7b( 4
;aO�
rt Bo neb)
OHice io rvAenaeni-ijiU
� � ipi ept'one
661 I
STUDENT UNION
S'uaeri' union Boar I ol
Anyone interested should apply a'
the information DesV
"hall Studen Ci" lei
ABORTIONS Uf� TO
llttlWICKOf
f�RtONANCY
Si76 00"aiiiiKiM�iv�
preynancy t�t blrff con
trot and problem presnan
cy covnaaiirtfl for fwrrher
information call 132 0535
(toll ' free number
IOC 111 MM) between t
AM 5 P.M. weekdays
RafaffK Waien't
Heatftl Orfanln'ton
?17 MfMtMfHWM St.
Rat�4�lt, N.C.DM)
o campus
Setflin
life doesn't exactly
mean sett
� .�� � �. � ��
� '
� �� . ' ' � � .
. ' . � � ' � . ' � ,
.���.�'�' men!
. � ��� ' . � ; � �
� . � .�.��
held
ready
�� . � : .�. � �
re ' � - �.
� - , next meei
�-� � � � ib ii ief -

8usaD
liaiyAnne
Carroll
men
Lrretta
Pam
Mellasa
Terry
Inn
Denlse
We are tbe worrjen wDoidaIcb xim lanuag
Oaoter a epealAl pOaoe cCta-tag fiiaDd)jr,
pencmAl, oon,fAagUA) oare at a reaacrnable
ooflt and at times conveiiiBnt to you
?cry early
Svenlflf birtlA control
Call 781-6860 In Raleigh anytime
The naming Oenter 3613 Haworth Drive Raiel. H.C. 87609
AD ITEM POLICY
Each of these sdvertised
items is required to be readi-
ly available for sale in each
Kroger Savon except as spe-
cifically noted in this ad If we
do run out of an item we will
offer you your choice of a
comparable item when avail-
able, reflecting the same sav
ings. or a raincheck which
will entitle you to purchase
the advertised item at the
advertised price within 30
days
CT"
3
LOOK AT THE THESE
SAVINGS
CLEAR-VUE OPTICIANS
MAY SPECIALS
5495 BIFOCAL
�WIDE CHOICE OF FRAMES
�GLASS OR PLASTIC LENSES �ANY TINT
4695 SINGLE VISION
�WIDE CHOICE OF FRAMES
�GLASS OR PLASTIC LENSES ANY TINT
(Sale Prices Good In Greenville Store Only
Power Range Up To Plus Or Minus 5 D.)
10�o Student Discount on all Frames not on Special
CLEAR-VUE OPTICIANS
GREENVILLE
Ptiyetclane Quadrangle BuHdlng A 17M W. �th St.
Adiacan? To Eaet Carolina Eye Clinic
752-1444 t A.M. TH 5 JO PH. Mon , Tuea . Thura a Fri.
tA.MTM1P.M Wed
COUNTRY OVEN
Potato Chips
down.
THERE'S SOME PARTYING IN EVERY
STUDENT'S LIFE, AND WEEKENDS ARE
SHORT�SO WHY WASTE TIME JUST
GETTING READY FOR THE FUN? WE'VE GOT
EVERYTHING YOU NEED RIGHT HERE�FROM
) COLD BEER TO THAT HOT NEW ALBUM!
STROH A PARTY
Stroh's Beer
8-Oz.
Twin
Pack
Bertley Mail
QoWeboro
114 E. Walnut
Downtown QoMabOfo
WITH LETTUCE & TOMATO
ASSORTED LUNCHMEAT
Sub Sandwich
Records & Tapes
Legg'
antvni
Pantyhose
ol
FOSTER GRANT OR BONNEAU
Sunglasses
FOOD.DRUG,GEN
MDSE. STORES
NONE SOLD
TO
DEALERS
OPEN 7 AM TO MIDNIGHT
OPEN SUNOAV
9 AM TO 9 PM
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
Phone 756-7031






HI i si Kt 1 IM W
s( I'I I !HI K 4. I4M)
Great, Bus Or Bike: Three Ways To Campus
' . . i . i u t hil, tviths Is PUlI
Getting around
Greenville ma not bo
quite as difficult 01 as
hectic as getting around
New 01 k 01 some
othei large citj, but oc
casionally, the world
wear) and auto-less
student finds himself at
a loss concerning how
to get across town in
nine to make it to class.
Before finally gi ing
in to despair, the
dilemma stricken stu-
dent should considei
.everal possible solu
tions 1 he Student
Government Kssocia
tion operates a student
v ei nment 1 ransit
sei v ice w ith two routes.
I he i outes are schedul
ed ith the primary ob
:tive ol getting the
student to and from
classes
1 he Purple i oute
serves students liing in
various a pa t t men t
complexes around
1 he areas served
are Village (teen,
I niversit Con
d o m i n i u m s .
1 astbrook, c her r v
( our i. River Bluff, and
Kings. Row . 1 he Purple
r oute i uns Monday
through Iriday from
V i a m. until 5
m.
1 he C iold route is the
smaliei ol the two
routes and il r tins from
Mendenhall, down loth
si reel, then up C oil
Hill Drive. 1 his route
also runs to t vs o shopp
ing centers: Pin Plaa
and (. ireenv ille Square
fhi Cold route
oper ates Monda
through I i idav from
7:30 a.m. until 8.30
p.m.
1 he St 11 is financed
through student tees
and is opeiated and
directed bv students
1 or furthei informa-
tion contact the SGA
1 ransit oftice, located
in
Mendenhall. room
I he city of Green-
v ille also operates a bus
s v stem c a lied
CKl M ! I here are
currently three city
ioutes. I he first route
goes north ol the river
to Greenfield let race
and west of Charles
B 0 u I e v a i d p a
I astbrook. 1 he second
route goes to the West
I nd shopping center
and along South Evans
street. The third route
goes out to Carolina
last Mall and along
West 14th Street.
All three routes run
past campus and the
1 he 1 ast Carolinian
Sell It Faster
Through
Classified Ads
Call 757-6366 for information
FAMOUS
PIZZA
Welcomes All ECU Students
If you like good pizza and hot oven
submarines at good low prices come to
Famous Pizza
Once you trv it you'll always eome back
FREE DELIVERY to your dorm
(all for take out orders
SPECIAL
Small Sub, Salad, and Tea
for $2.99
tare is 35 cents. 1 xacl
tare is required, but
transfers are tree. The
bus lines operate Mon-
da through I nda
from 6:15 a.m. until 7
p.m. and from 7:30
a.m. until 6:30 p.m. on
Saturdays.
Bus schedules can be
obtained from a bus
driver or at city hall.
lor furthei informa
tion call "52-4137.
It taking a bus is too
tame, then the studeni
has anothei alternative
available It he is for-
tunate enough to have a
bike on hand, and it he
has stamina enough,
then he might consider
ridine his hike to class.
Greenville
Bike ways System is cur
rentlv under develop-
ment. I he svstem ol
ike paths is pan ol a
lone ranee plan that
was approved bv the
c itv c ouncil in Jnlv ol
this year.
c en a in precautions
should be taken,
however, to ensure a
sale at rival. I or i iding
at night, ret lectors and
a light are recommend
ed AH t rat tic laws
should always be
obeyed
hen riding on cam
pus, the student is sub
jeci to campus regula
lions. 1 oi example, a
$5 fine i- levied tor
riding on campus
sidewalks oi foi riding
i he vv rone wav dow n a
one wav street
Hikes thai are parked
on campus must have a
reels! rat ion permit.
1 he cost ol the permit
is 50 cents and a permit
can be obtained at the
1 raffk Office.
And. ol course, it all
else fails, the intrepid
student can always
waik to class.
MALPASS
MUFFLER SHOP
2616 E. 110th St.
Greenville, N.C.
758-7676
Custom Exhaust Systems
Tune-ups, Brake Service
American and Foreign
Car Parts
WRITERS WANTED
Call 757-6366 On Monday
zmc i
N.C. � No. 1
IN CONCERT
MKRCURY
Nightclub
SEPT.5
RECORDING ARTIST
TO BE VIDEO-
TAPED FOR �
NAT. BROADCAS
WThe X RAVES
Ytardecj
THERE'S NO
BEATIN' FREE
BEST EATING
Buy a Ham and EggrUiscu it
I Get a Second One Free! �f
Please present this coupon before ord" ng jt, .
I
L
Please present this coupon before orderno
One coupon per customer please Thisofte
not good m combination vvith any other
offers Customer must pay any sales tax
Ofer good at participating Hardee s restau
rants
Coupon good September 4 trim Scptemocf 10
. Buy a Big Roast Beef,
I Get a Second One Free
i
i
Piease cese' tthn : on before let i
One coupon per customer please II ffei
not good m combination v � . thei
offers Customer must ;��� 'a
Offer good at parhcipH'� jHa lee re
� � �
Coupon oocl Stpttmtxt 4 moiStptemb'10 1980
OT
;OM
iville
� i
N I
Telrpnonp Til �3�t 616' 630�
10 off on your next
i 00"07uZ dine-in meal with
I
321 E. 10th St. �
ECU I.D.
Seafood
Lovers
Fosdick's
"All You Can Eat"
Seafood Buffet
Every night from 5 till closinr. we will feature
lour fabulous new Seafood Juffet - Delicious I
Fried Shrimp. Golden Brown Oysters. Fish
(Deviled Crab, Shrimp Creole. Fried Chicken
Iciam Chowder. Slaw. Hush Puppies
All You Can Eat
Only $7.99
Fosdick's
1890
Seafood
A Great Place for Seafood
Lunch Dinner Catering
All You Can Eat Special
To all students and faculty Sunday thur
Thursday 5:00pm. 'Til clos ng you may
purchase our Fried Fish Special for only
$2.50
Coming Soon:
Oyster Bar
Fresh Seafood Mkt
Party Room AvalUbt Wall
Jurntah th Cakt lot Birth
daya Annivaraarlaa ale lor
Parttoa oi 8 or mow Call for
Reservation. 7 S6-2011
Hours:
Lunch
Sunday-Friday
11:30 A.M. 2 OOP M
Dtnnar
Sunday-Thursday
5 OOP M -� 30 P M
Friday and Saluroay
5:00 PM -10 30 P M
2311 S t van. Street
Greenville. N.C.
FALL
SEMESTER
1980
SVN.
I MUG CLUB NIGHT
MON.
GAMMA DELTA IOTA
XTVE.
LADIES NIGHT
WED.
GREEK NIGHT
THVRS.
STUDENT NIGHT
FRL
AFTERNOON
BLOW OUT
BEGINNING AT 3:30
FOR THE LADIES
WHILE THEY LAST
FREE
JOLLY ROGER
PENDANT
TO TAKE TO
ECU BALL GAMES
ALLAN HANDELMANS SHOW

1

c
r
AL IS NOW
PART OF
THE GREAT
AMERICAN
RADIO
SHOW
NOW
s
t

a
NOW
HEARD
IN 5 STATES
k

THE NUMBER ONE RADIO SHOW IS NOW ON THE NUMBER 1 STATION
THE ALLAN HANDELMAN RADIO SHOW
SUNDAY NIGHTS AT 10pm TILL lam
This Sunday psychic Robert Petro will read your vibrations
over the phone. Just give your first name and where you are
calling from. 946-21162 or 946-11818
OTHER GUEST COMING UP
THAT YOU CAN TALK TO
David Letterman
Loni Anderson
Van Halen
Dr. Demento
Mike Harrison
Dick Clark
Don Rickles
Bill Cosby
David Brnnor
RUSH
B-52's
Pretenders
ROCK
N
ROLL
WILL
NEVER
DIE
WHILE MANY OF YOU WERE
GONE THIS SUMMER, SOME
OF ALS GUESTS HAVE BEEN
VAN HALEN
Ernest Borgnine
Vincent Price
Ed Mahann
Jim Backus
Pat Travers
Romantics
AC DC





3ty 3&0t (Earulittian
Serving the campus community since 1925.
Rl( H-KI)CiKI t N,
TlKKV Hi RNDON, i
Chris Lk hok, b�
C.t OK(,l Hi I IK H. ,
Ami I VNC AS I 1 H. r
Scpicmhc! 4. 14NO
I ISA l)KI VV. i
Chari I s Chandi 1 K.
Tl KRV CikW. v
DA ID NORRIS. i ,
Opinion
Page 4
Jeter Resigns
John Jeter, former advisor and
station manager of WZMB, submit-
ted his resignation yesterday to pre-
sent Station Manager Glenda Kill-
ingsworth. Jeter took the carcass of
WECU-AM in 1978 and almost
brought it to life as one of the most
promising FM radio stations in this
area. It is a sad day at ECU as Jeter
leaves before WZMB finally goes on
the air; it's truly his station. But the
reasons for his resignation are even
sadder.
Jeter took a job at WECU-AM
during his freshman year, and
before his sophomore year was
over, the station was suffering from
in-fighting and eventually fell on its
face. Everyone abandoned ship.
Not Jeter. He had the dream of
building an educational FM station
with an album-rock format to
replace the defunct AM station.
When it was created in 1978, the
Media Board heard Jeter's idea and
his request for a mere S700 to pay a
Massachusetts firm to conduct a
study for a campus FM station. The
board told Jeter that it had no funds
for him. so Fountainhead (now The
East Carolinian) donated the money
for the survey.
Jeter guesstimated that the sta-
tion would be on the air by
December 1978, but FCC regula-
tions and resistance on the Media
Board stalled the project for almost
two years. The red tape in
Washington was finally sliced in the
spring 1980 by Rep. Walter B.
Jones, with the aid of Sen. Jesse
Helms, and the construction permit
was issued.
But the Media Board did nothing
to help or to encourage Jeter's ef-
forts. He received only $100 a
month, when he was paid, for ser-
vices that would have cost con-
siderably more from an outside
source. The board refused to fund
any staff positions except Jeter's, so
he had little if any help. Chancellor
Brewer called a meeting with the
board and requested that the station
manager's position be filled by a
professional, state employee, thus
eliminating student control. For-
tunately, that idea has been canned,
so far. But it didn't help Jeter at the
time.
With his senior year almost over,
Jeter picked his successor, former
business manager of the station
Glenda killingsworth. Jeter knew
that she had little experience, but he
believed that, under his guidance.
she could be a good manager for the
infant station.
He wanted to remain as station
manager without pay, which he was
used to by this time. THF Bid
MI STARI� the board should have
kept Jeter on as station manager.
But the board agreed to retain his
services as an advisor, also without
pay, to see the station safely on the
air.
Problems soon arose between
Jeter and Killingsworth, and that's
quite understable. Certainly Kill-
ingsworth felt dwarfed by Jeter's
accomplishments, but the necessity
for them to work together was, and
still is, all important. Jeter had trou-
ble giving up control of the station
he loves and built from nothing, but
he should have understood Kill-
ingsworth's position. After all, she
is the station manager and is respon-
sible for its operation now. By the
same token, Killingsworth should
have realized Jeter's feelings and
worked out a way for him to stay,
so she could learn as much as possi-
ble from him. It didn't work.
The Media Board met in closed
session yesterday to hear both sides
of the story. Killingsworth wanted
Jeter out, but the board had put him
in. She wanted support and she got
it. Sitting as Pontious Pilate, the
board washed its hands of the
ordeal maintaining that Jeter was
not a Media Board employee and
that Killingsworth alone had the
authority to dismiss him. But
without verbal pressure from either
side, Jeter resigned. And why not?
Having been slapped � or rather
punched � in the face, what else
could he do? Killingsworth pro-
bably would have dismissed him
anyway.
Had Killingsworth been a better
manager, she could have solved the
problem without having to take it to
the Media Board, which never sup-
ported the manager in the past. But
now, in an about-face, the board
sided with Killingsworth.
So it comes to this: The fledgling
radio station will attempt to take to
the air with an inexperienced station
manager, and Jeter will sit idly by
and hope for the best. Had the
Media Board considered the situa-
tion more carefully, or had Kill-
ingsworth solved the problem
without its help, Jeter could have
seen his dream come true and spin
the first disk at WZMB.
Open Mouth, Insert Both Boots
Since it became evident that
Ronald Reagan would be the COP
presidential candidate in 1980, he
has consistently and controversially
shoved both of his cowboy boots in-
to his mouth.
At first it was only one boot, little
slips with facts like "80 percent of
all air pollution comes from plants
and trees Then it progressed to his
statements concerning separation of
church and state, wanting the
Panama Canal back and declaring
the Vietnam conflict "a noble
cause Now it's both boots, spurs
and all, with his statements about
Taiwan and most recently his slur of
the South, in reference to the Ku
Klux Klan, in Detroit on Labor
Day.
Of course Reaganites unite to say
that all of this is simply a result of
the press seizing on "slips of the
tongue "just for a story But
when a man is running for the
presidency of the United States, he
should know the facts about
whatever he chooses to speak of in
public.
The press is the "fourth estate
the watchdog of government. Its
job is to report the facts and to com-
ment on them in editorials and col-
umns. Politicians never complain
when the press prints their empty
campaign promises, this prov iding a
free publicity tool. But when a can-
didate confuses his facts and makes
dangerous statements, the press has
the OBLIGATION to print what
was said and to call for and print
that candidate's explanation.
But this isn't an apology for the
media's conduct. It is a call for
every voting reader to seriously
evaluate Ronald Reagan as a possi-
ble president. With his loosely flap-
ping tongue he has succeeded in
alienating China, our most impor-
tant new ally; Latin America, our
most important old ally; the South,
the heart of his campaign strategy;
minorities, both black and Spanish
Americans � almost everybody ex-
cept the Russians.
And if he cannot control his
statements as a candidate, how long
will it take him to learn to keep his
mouth shut when he doesn't know
something, or when there is really
no need to say anything. At the rate
he's going, it will take at least four
years. (God forbid!)
NO
MORE
POLISH
JOKBS
I HI I Xsl"KOI INIAN
r
Campus Forum
'Preppie' Column Rebutted
Editors' v 1 lie following is an open
letter to Robert Swaim, assistant to the
general manger of The East Carolinian.
In the Tuesday, August 26 edition of
The fcast Carolinian, your article was
published which you must have found
highly amusing. I was amaed to find
that the characteristic, what you called
"the looking-dow n-t he-nose
characteristic is evidently one that you
possess.
It is a grand generalization that
"preps" (as you so freely call them) love
to get sloshed. If a person wants to
loosen up a little and drinks a few beers,
1 believe that is better than smoking pot
andr taking pills. After all. alcohol is
flushed out o the human body faster
than cocaine.
As far as music in concerned, is
everyone not entitled to choose for
themselves the type of sounds they like
1 have met many people wearing kelly
green pants and pink oxford doth shirts
(not to mention Izods) in rock-and-roll,
western, and disco bars. And I am sure
that these "preps" also choose the music
that they like best as the type of music
they care to dance to. By the way, whai
is your objection to a Negro minstrel?
The line "1 went to a private school"
is not one to be frowned upon. Private
schools are institutions that allow the
student to further his academic career ai
a pace set for the individual, and at a
ranking that universities gladly accept.
In this day and age, an education is
needed for both social and personal
satisfaction.
It is the sincere hope and dream of
THIS writer, Mr. Swaim, that you will
think before you write next time. In the
future, do not feel the need to defend
yourself and your school againsi
"preps" and UNC. If one has con-
fidence in themselves and the I imersiiv
they attend, thev should not teel the
need to gain at the criticism o others.
HOP! V ROOT
General College, Freshman
Forum Rules
I he las! Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points ! view Mail or
drop lhem by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner I ihrar
I etiers musi include the name, ma in
and classification, address, pi
number and signature oj fn
letters should he limited
typewritten paves, double-spaa
neatly printed. -Ml letters arc sul
editing for brevity, obscenity and
I etiers h the same author u -
one eachda vs.
To The Right
Carter Plays Dangerous Game
By STAN R1DGLEY
While everyone concentrates on Ronald
Reagan's verbal gaffes � namely his
China and Ku Klux Klan comments �
Jimmy Carter just might get away with one
of the most hypocritical campaign stances
in recent memory.
Admittedly. Reagan has shown tactical
inexperience thus far in the young
presidential race and is obviously not ac-
customed to the press calling him in to ac-
count for every public word. But Reagan's
inexperience is to be expected, for the same
reason it was expected of Carter four years
ago. He is bound to step in to some of the
same oratorical potholes as did Carter;
and. in fact. Carter still trips up occa-
sionally � witness his acceptance speech
tribute to "Hubert Horatio Hornblower �
er � Humphrey
But these minor blunders are seied
upon by the press and given headline
priority, due probably to the dearth of
fresh campaign information available over
a long campaign trail. Hager reporters,
who have heard each candidate's speech
many times, will jump on a politician's
slip-of-the-tongue or unfortunate turn of
phrase. And who can blame them? It
makes for good reading.
But as Reagan assuages the South's ruf-
fled feathers, Jimmy Carter is trying to slip
something by the American public � a
nice little con job. Far from being a mere
faux pas to be tut-tutted by the press, it has
sobering overtones for anyone who takes
his vote seriously.
As everyone knows by now, part of
Carter's main campaign strategy is to
discredit Reagan as too irresponsible in the
area of defense, proffering a nuclear policy
Carter calls a threat to the nation's security
and world safety. Said Carter Tuesday in
Missouri: "He (Reagan) has announced
that if he is elected, he will initiate a
massive nuclear arms race against the
Soviet Union
So what is Carter;s stance on the qucs
tion of nuclear confrontation with the
Soviet Union? He made his position clear
in signing Presidential Directive 59 a little
over a month ago. Its ramifications are
ominous (See Sept. 2 issue, page 4).
Presidential Directive 59. simply put, is
a change in nuclear strategy. Instead o
targeting the United States' Minutemen
lCBM's and B-52 bombers solely at Soviet
cities, they will also be targeted at Soviet
military installations. This concept is
known as 'counterforce' and gives the U.S.
the capability to respond to a Russian
nuclear attack with other than a massive
retaliatory strike against Soviet cities.
Defense Secretary Harold Brown says of
the strategem, "It is designed (to make
clear) that we have both capabilities and
plans for use of our forces if deterrence
fails. That means that no plausible out-
come of such a war could be a victory for
the U.S.S.R however they define vic-
tory Fine. But here's the Catch-22.
While the concept of 'counterforce' is
supposed to be a further deterrent to a
Soviet first-strike, it paradoxically in-
creases the chances for nuclear conflict.
Brown and others believe that once a
nuclear exchange has begun, no matter
how limited, it might uncontrollably
escalate into full-blown nuclear war. Says
Herbert Scoville Jr former CIA deputy
director for research: "Anything that
makes it easier to fight nuclear war is a step
in the wrong direction A step Carter has
taken.
Carter signed PD 59 on July 25 and has
since signed two other Presidential Direc-
tives � 53 and 58. One orders the formula-
tion of plans for better wartime com-
munications and the other a plan for
emergency evacuation of Washington ot
top government and military officials in
the event of war. Needless to say, the
response to this from the Kremlin has been
incensed.
Mind you, this is Pentagon siraicg. .i
developed under Carter's aegis, no)
Reagan's. While Carter's campaign
straiegv is to paint Reagan as
dangerous to allow near the "button his
apparent presidential strategy is to make
muclear war more like!) arid to facilitate .i
quick getaway from Washington "jusi
case
Granted, this is an intentional!) cyn
way of looking at what probalby has been
a necessar and correct shift in Pei
defense policy. Bui to approve such po
make political hay ovei it, then accuse
political opponent o having what Carter
people call "the button problem is jusl
plain hypocritical.
It is widely accepted by sources close to
the While House that the signing ot PI) 59
was a political move, the proposal was
read tor Carter's signature in January,
but Time magazine sources sav c artei
delaved signing it so as to have some
political ammunition this tall lo countei
Reagan's charges that he is too con-
ciliatory to the Soviets. Formei Secretary
of State Henry Kissinger said ot the move
"I do not believe that the middle ol an
election campaign is the appropriate mo-
ment to announce a new strategy for con-
ducting nuclear operations "
It's a dangerous gamearier is playii
and it is just one instance ot the president's
widening credibility gap thai has been
made inevitable b his obvious di sat lee! ion
for his own party's platform Fhese self-
contradictions in the Democrats' position
should be the source ol public concern, not
the occasional verbal toiblcs ot the
Democrats' opponent.
Stan Ridley is a sentoi Political Science
major from Clinton, .( with a degree in
Journalism from the University oj Worth
Carolina at Chapel Hill.
.
Recon
ttiv
in a d
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and
singer
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and evi
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Pal
State!
-





I HI I SU RO! ll
Features
SI I'll MHI K 4. IVKO
Page
Situation Comedies:
Traditional Cliches
Recording artist Caroline Mas will perform at the
�ltic on Wednesday, Sept. 10. The show is the first
in a series of ttic concerts that will he videotaped
for national TV distribution, possihh for Home Box
Office.
New Rock Star Caroline Mas
Will Perform At The Attic
Carolyn Mas ma) be the rock
world's best kept secret. Hut to
those who have heard her albums
and especiall) those who have heard
and seen this female
singerongwriteruitarisl on stage, the
word is out � this lad is a star.
Who is Carolyne Mas.1 she has
been heralded as a female Bruce
Springsteen. Other comparisons
have been made with Jams Jopiin
and even 1 ou Reed. However, this
diminutive female rocker, with her
passionate energy and her street
elegant lyrics which depict life, love,
pain and humor, has a style all her
own.
I rue. like Springsteen, the sax
ophone plavs an important role in
her music. Her saxist, Crispin Cioe,
does deliver some Clarence
Clemmons-type riffs while Mas'
energetic vocals go trom octave to
octave, from delicate to gutsy. Her
songs are street-songs, which like
Springsteen, deal with real life
themes rather than fantasy. Hei
style can range trom rock bottom
rock to funkv C alypso to haunting
ballads.
Although Ms. Mas' first album
received onl) casual attention bv the
general populace in this country, the
music industr) was astounded. At a
time when the competition among
woman rockers was stiff and a
whole new crop ol female debut
albums was released, Mas received
rave reviews. Articles m Billboard.
Rolling Stone, Cash Box, and
Record World all put their monev
on Carolyne Mas. Time magazine
devoted an article in a January 1980
issue to women rockers and Mas
was favorabl) ranked as one of the
top tour.
Ahead) established in the Nor-
theast, this Bronxville, NY. native
completed a successful tour ol
Europe and Canada. Now alter the
release ol her second album on Mer-
cury � "Hold On Ms. Mas is
touting the country. This author
had the pleasure of catching Mas'
show at The Bayou, a showcase club
in Georgetown, D.C. and became
and immediate fan. Her songs are
written trom a female perspective
about the old familiar themes, but
in a freshl) delivered storv form.
Although physicail) small, her voice
See CONCERT, Page 6. Col. I
American television is a
fascinating medium, if one looks at
it in the right wav. Although specific
shows are not usually very in-
teresting, the general idea behind
them � the strangely warped wav in
which television producers think
Americans see themselves � is a
source of endless amusement for
anyone who knows anything about
what living in the United States is
really like.
Ihe good, old-fashioned situation
comedy with its idiotic idea o what
a typical American family is suppos-
ed to be like has long been a popular
genre on TV, even though these
video families have almost nothing
in common with any real-life
families.
1 grew up in a suburb, but the
resemblance with a television kid's
life ends right there. 1 didn't get
straight A's in school, run tor class
president and lose to my sister.
become captain of everv athletic
team at school, get a visit trom Joe
Namath, or have a lovable shaggy
dog or a wackv live-in housekeeper.
These were once inflexible prere-
quisites for a career in situation
comedies.
1-or the season premiere, most I V
families would get to go on a
Hawaiian vacation, or perhaps go to
Hollywood to appear in a movie or
cut an album. 1 don't want to give
the impression that being a TV
character is all tun and games and
Hawaiian vacations. It you lived in
a situation comedy, you'd have to
wear pajamas, a robe, and slippers
to bed. Speaking of bed, vou'd have
to be in it (alone) b) ten p.m. Worst
o all, you'd have to be handsome,
well-groomed and alert, even while
eating the mandatory nutritious
breakfast. Acne and tooth decay are
strictly forbidden and punishable by
having your show cancelled.
Although these TV characters
spend lots of time keeping up their
appearance, they can make up for it
with the time saved from having all
the possible television comedy plots
already written. It is a well-known
fact that all 15 plots were written in
1 S51. Here are a few of my favorite
plots, arranged in no particular
order.
The boy on the show turns sixteen
and buys a car for thirty dollars.
The car gets two and a half miles to
a gallon, and constantly sheds parts
all over the highway. It completely
breaks down just before the prom,
and the kid sells it.
The teenage girl gets braces and
cries for three days because she
thinks her prom date will dump her
and ruin her life.
The same teenage girl makes
friends with an ugly duckling girl.
The former duckling changes her
hairdo, gets contact lenses and pret-
ty clothes and becomes popular. She
gets so popular that she decides to
run for homecoming queen, against
the girl who helped her overcome
her shyness. After some childish
bickering, the two girls have a
maudlin set of campaign speeches in
which both try to drop out of the
race to let the other one win.
A variation of this plot, which I
have mentioned, has two brothers
or sisters running for class presi-
dent. This plot also has childish
bickering and maudlin scenes of
self-sacrifice.
One of the little kids on the show
does something stupid and runs
away from home, carrying a sand-
wich and a pet frog in a handker-
chief tied to a stick.
A little boy gets the lead role in a
hokey school play and has to do a
ballet dance or kiss a girl or
something else that will ruin his lite
at school. He tries to get out of it,
but a stern parental lecture about
reponsibility changes his mind
The family is v isited by some nice,
clean-cut teenybopper idol like Bob-
by Sherman. (These things happen
every day on TV.) The idol eats a
snack of milk and cookies, and
before leaving, kisses the teenybop-
per girl on the show. She says she'll
never wash that side of her face
again.
The husband and wife get into an
argument about men's work and
women's work, and trade jobs for a
day. The husband puts a whole box
of detergent in the washer and
Hoods the entire house with soap-
suds, puts five pounds of rice in a
pot and floods the stove with a cubic-
yard of sticky rice, burns holes in all
the clothes while ironing (TV people
always iron, since they never have
permanent press clothes), and hooks
up the vacuum cleaner backwards
and sprays dust all over the house.
A kid gets a paper route and the
measles, and the father or mother
has to deliver all the newspapers.
These shows usually have humorous
montages of newspapers flying onto
rooftops, through windows and into
goldfish ponds.
We've all seen each of these plots
dozens of times, but they somehow
manage to remain trite and boring.
I've thought of a few new plots that
would help shake the genre out ot its
doldrums.
Instead of a mundane paper
route, the little kid in the show
See CLICHES, Page 7, Col. 4
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Costa Rica
Student's Journey Continues
t
Third In A Series
On Aug. 4, Richard Green, general manager oj 1 he
I astarolinian, traveled to C Osta Rica for 19 days on a
short vacation and to complete a photographu essay he
began in the spring oj Vv The following article s the
third in a series oj his experiences inosta Rica
By RICHARDGREEN
I or most North Americans, time slow to an eternal
pace in C entral America. We had been inosta Rica on-
lv tune davs, but it seemed like nine months, c ombining
that with the low cost of living, we thought we were get-
ting our monev 's worth.
Our trip to Quepos (Aug. 28, Sept. 2 issues) was tun,
and we met some verv nice people. Hut we wanted
something more secluded and hopefull) with bettei
surt. We got both at Playa Naranjo.
Playa Naranjo is one of two Pacific beaches in the na-
tional park and wildlife preserve ot Santa Rosa, neat
the hontiet ot Nicaragua. Until the bordei commission
was established bv the Organization ot American states.
the Sandinistas organized their forces in the northern
section ot Santa Rosa during the Nicaraguan revolu-
tion. W e began organizing our own forces.
Ihe beach is 12 rugged miles ot lockv, mudd) road
trom the Pan American Highway. Mike and I had hiked
the entire distance both ways the last nine we were in
( osta Rica. It wasn't tun. Ihe nearest source ol fresh
water is eight miles trom the beach. W e decided to rent a
jeep.
After calling a tew rental services, we tound that the
prices were astronomical, especiall) on out budgets.
Papa Sanchez overheard our conversation and
generousl) offered to rent us his royota jeep tot a
nominal fee. We had a deal.
Papa and Mama Sanchez had plans to visit the I nited
States tor three weeks, beginning Aug. !X. to visit their
son and daughter-in-law, Juan and t isa. who live in
Elizabeth City. N.C. So we said our goodbyes and made
plans to visit them in the United States when we return-
ed.
Zona Restringida
We packed the jeep and started north at 5 a.m. on
Aug. 13. Two-hundred and thirty-three kilometers later,
we stopped in the town of 1 iberia to buy fruit and
vegetables and then continued to Santa Rosa. As wc
entered the park, the road seemed much less formidable
trom behind the wheel ol a four-wheel-drive jeep.
At the camping area tour miles into the park, we stop-
ped to get water. There we met a university professoi
from Iowa who told us the road to Playa Naranjo was
closed We sloshed water into our five-gallon container
and raced to the park rangers' quartets to check it out.
I he Wc. or the head ranger, explained that the road
had been closed two davs earlier after a jeepful ot
students got stuck in a large mudhole on their way back
from studying sea turtles. He said the only wav to reach
the ocean was on foot.
We pleaded for permission to drive as far as the first
impassable lagoon and walk trom there. We wanted to
reduce the walking distance as much as possible. He said
no.
We said "Thanks anyway" and parked the jeep in the
shade ot a tree to ponder our situation. Was the road
really that bad? Did those students know how to drive a
jeep? Was the ranger just pulling our legs'
We decided to walk a kilometer or so and make our
own evaluation.
As we passed the sign "ona Restringida'1 (Restricted
one), we noticed that the tirst part of the road was
new. About I(X) meters later, we saw the old road,
overgrown with weeds but passable. A kilometer's walk
revealed nothing hazardous, as tar as we could deter-
Richard (ireen's party surrounds their jeep in
Heredia, Costa Riea. They are embarking on a
journey to Santa Rosa, a national park and wildlife
mine. Our course of action was obvious � sneak
through the old entrance.
Ten minutes later we were cruising toward Plava
Naranjo, plowing easilv through mudholes and inching
down 1000 meters of steep, rocky mountains. No pro-
blems at all.
Piece Of The Rock
It was just as we remembered � the small, clean cam-
ping area shielded bv trees, overlooking a small estuary,
the beach, and finally the Pacific Ocean. And there, ris-
ing trom the ocean about 200 meters from shore, the
five-story obelisk of solid rock, like a stray piece of the
mountains behind us, comforting in its stature, almost
relieiouv
preserve, and to La Playa Naranjo. a beach on the
Nicaraguan border.
But for all its natural beauty, Playa Naranjo had a lit-
tle to offer in the way of surf. So we set up camp and of
course it started raining. We huddled in the jeep playing
C'razv bights until the sun finally dropped behind the
northern point of the beach. We crashed early hoping
for good surf in the morning, but we awoke to find it
about the same.
Thursday and briday seemed agonizingly long with
periodic rain each afternoon. But Saturday morning
finally brought good surf
On Saturday afternoon we had to meet our Dutch
friends in Liberia, about 45 minutes away. They weren't
in the market or the park or the bus station when we got
there. Not having tasted a beer in almost four days, I
suggested waiting in the nearest bar. At the first table in
See COSTA, Page 7, Col. 1





THE EAST C ARCH IS1W
SUM MM K 4 1980
1
Trevanian 's Novel Shibumi
Is A Disappointing Work
ByJOHNWALDEN
Sometimes when you are scanning the racks in
a book store, you come across a best-selling sp
thriller that looks good. Hmmm you wondei
to yourself, what are all the masses reading
nowadays? You pick it up, and read the first fe
pages. It begins to look interesting. Then, you
suddenly remember. No, I've got too main things
to do this week. You sigh and put the book back
on the raek. You walk out of the store regretting
what you might have missed.
It that certain spy novel went by the name ol
Shibumi, you can relax. You did not miss all that
much. Mr. Trevanian's new novel starts out well
enough, but ends somewhat disappointingly.
The book begins centered chief"ly around one
main character. His name is Nicholai Hel. Born
of Russian and German ancestry, Hel was raised
in the ruins of war-torn Shanghai V an early.
age, he mastered several languages in ordei to
survive the tough streets of China, and he grew up
last in this environment.
During the Japanese reign in Shanghai in 1937,
Hel befriends a Japanese General who plays the
ancient oriental game ol Go with him. General
Kishikawa is impressed with Hel's ability to play
this eastern game, and decides to send Hel to
Japan to study under a great Go master, "here,
Hel also wants to learn the great art of Shibumi, a
quality reached bv tew men where on: is at peace
with everything
While He! is doing his best to attain this certain
peace, the world around him is at war 1 he yeai is
now 1944, and the Japanese are lighting for their
very lives. Soon, Hel begins to witness the terroi
bombing ot the American planes. When he see-
the destruction of Hiroshima, he begins to hate
these American barbarians who kill innocent pco
Pie
Yet atter the war, he manages to put aside his
hatred; during the U.S. occupation, he puts his
special talent foi languages to use tot the
Americans as a cryptographer. At this point,
Hel's life begins to look up.
He is living well by Japan's post war standards
He even adopts a family to replace the one he lost
during the war.
Yet, trouble again finds it's way into his lite
Bv various means, he finds out that the Japanese
general he knew in the past is still alive. The
General is also scheduled to be put on trial as a
wai criminal by the Russians and Americans. Hel
finds the general in prison only to learn that he
has taken away the man's last reason for dying.
General Kishikawa must now undergo the
humiliation of a showcase trial in order to keep
the Russians from harming Hel.
Hel becomes angry tor letting himself fall into
the Russian's trap. He knows the old general
merely wants to die in an honored way. He
decides to release him from his suffering. During
a visit. Hel tells the general of his plan. At first,
the general refuses, but then reluctantly agrees
Bet ore the guards can move, the general is dead.
I he Americans beat Hel and throw him into
prison for his crime. When he emerges from his
cell years later. Hel becomes one of the world's
most dangerous assassins. Working tor any
government if the price is right, he will use his
deadly skills against anyone. He builds a reputa-
tion ovet the years that even the CM.A. fears. It is
inevitable that the corrupted powers of the world
should collide with this dangerous man sooner or
later. When a troubled American girl shows up at
his home in Spain, Hel is finally forced into ac-
tion against these vast powers.
It sounds good to begin with. Trevanian has m
fact made a very, interesting character in Nicholai
Hel. It is a shame that the plot of the novel does
not match up to the character. Although the story-
is exciting enough in places, it has none ot the
twists and turns of plot found in other good spy
novels 1 here are no double-crosses here or plans
thai go awrv to make the book more realistic.
I he whole novel adds up to a very unsatisfac-
tory wotk. While amusing in some parts, this
hook is strictlv mediocre. Don't waste your time
on it; sample the really good stuff from masters
like Grahame Greene or Adam Hall. After all,
you have too main things to do this week.
saausshol;
REPAIR
I J Grande -V
7SK-122H
QimI
THE OFFICIAL ECU
CLASSRINGS
Concert
( intinued from p 5
is big and distinctive.
She is in command on
stage And hei eves, big
and dark and round,
are innocent and wild,
and like her music, they
speak of determina-
tion, toughness, and
vulnerability. 1 am not
alone in my opinion
that Carolyne Mas has
that star quality and is
about to explode on the
�merican rock world.
And now for the best
news � C arolyn Mas
will be appearing at the
Attic in Greenville on
Wednesday, September
10 to participate in a
full-scale video produc-
tion for national broad-
cast. This will be the
only club date that Mas
and her band will do in
North Carolina.
k00t
t ,
DUf0MOTHff I
-r

.OlW
WELCOME BACK
STUDENTS
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THE
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WELCOME
BACK
STUDENTS
NIGHT
THRUSDAY SEPT. 11
8-10pm
FREE BEER & HOT DOGS
the disco
with a difference"
AT THE CORNER
OFTENTH & M
DICKENSON
Friday
and
Saturday
Only
Upon presentation
of your student I.D.
card you may buy
this shoe for $2! 88

A
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kllth ill.II
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Unique handsewn
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Carolina east mall
ShopMon. Sat
10 a.m. to 9 p.m
Ph. � 756 B E L K
(756 2355i
Next Week
Pick your favorite ArtOirvevl cl.iv nny n I
Keep it with you foi while i �ei . � �
like to own the nny that sav "I Ii ' '
Then next week, have the
by. the ArtCarveJ representative m- �
for three days you
of ring -r les t i i h -m troi ind i
who will make sure the hi is ; erteci
will he -mne mere hi le " ���� " '
ctst � �? voui c lass rini
Cl I
Cl I
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:

Am U
IRTQIRVED
� COLLEGE RINGS
Supply Store Lobby Sept. 10.1 1.12
9:30am-4:00pm
Wright Building
$10
Deposit rpquiml 1ist�'r( h.irvf or is ai I ��!���
JOBS AVAILABLE
�lje Eaat Carolinian
Needs one or two good
people from each dorm to
work in
sales for
the Circulation
Department.
Good pay, good work.
Only hard workingambitious people
need apply. Neat appearance
required.
Mfvi Be a part of something
Will great.�he �ast Carolinian
NEED
YOU!
Apply in person at the
East Carolinian Office on the
2nd floor of the Publications
Center across the sidewalk from the
Library. Apply on Monday Sept. 8.
7:30 8:30p.m.
A
SH
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Fr

quil
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Del
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and
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FAN
SCH
(pi
Dru
Rod
Becl





HI I M k� 'I IM
SI I'I I MIH K 4. sM)
i
-i
i
i
i

i
!
I
1
1
n
u
An American Lives 60 Years In China
Ml NGHAI, China (UPI) A
peppery, 81-year-old widow is
America's grand old lad) ot China.
Muriel Hopes "Call me Ms.
these days, young man she tells a
usitoi has lived in China 60
eai s
i has had homes shot from
under hei b the nationalists, the
lapanese and the communists.
she losi an infant sou.
Hei Chinese husband was im-
prisoned to; 4 1 years during the
cultural revolution, she suffered
nine months ot isolation
hei sell
I e- still twinkling and mind
�� sharp, the diminutive grand
mothei smiled and said. "It hasn't
peaceful, but it's been m-
"1 won't call it gratifying even
she said in an interview. "It certain
l wasn't that. But 1 don't realls
, anv regrets Vul 1 certainlv
arrying ahinese. He
:man
Hei c hina adventure began
with a ride on the New "iork sub
wa. where she met hei future hus-
band. I u Yuqing, then a student in
the United States.
I he were married alter a whirl-
wind courtship, much to the chagrin
ot her adoptive parents and the
secretary ot the church where the
took their vows.
"I had just walked down the aisle
and the secretarj told me, 'You'll
regrei marrying a Chinese Ms
Hopes laughed. "Can you imagine
that? lus! a couple of minutes alter
m marriage. I told her, 'I'll send
you a note it that happens I never
did but the old dear passed on to hei
ow n reward
1 rom her lust landing in c hina in
1920. lite was anything but easv, to;
the young lad) from Philadelphia.
She narrow!) escaped from hei
titst home in Nanking. As N.i
tionalists fought c ommunists
through the city, she tied in a horse
drawn hearse and lumped onto an
merican gunboat
Quaker friend ot mine latei
when the communists took ovei m
1949. In the interim she also lost an
infant son A surviving son now is
studying meiallurg) at the I niversi
t ot I tah I lnee daughters all are
doctot s.
Ms. Hopes is philosophical about
( hina's communist i egime.
" hen I tus! came here, un
"When we came back, the) had wanted daughters were still being
takes even the floors and doors in dropped down wells oi sold into
some rooms slavery. C ommunism is not one step
She lost hei home a thud time awav from Utopia bui ii has done a
was real mad at me tor taking that
gunboat she said. "I jusi told her
it was the gunboat oi death
When the Japanese occupied hei
nest home in Shanghai in 1939,
"The) came in the back dooi ot our
building and we went out the front,
m husband, myself, tour kids and
a suitcase.
lot foi . hina.
She also had a kuui woid foi Mao
1 se I unt
"I don'i denigrate him now like
so man oi hei s she said
Ms Hope- lead the book ol Ma
� I houghts' dui ing isolat ion Slu
showed a isiioi hei
pocket version, its long pay
carefull) underlined.
some ol this in still real
and some ol n should still be follow
ed she said, tapi e book
She is a c hinese citien who could
now reclaim hei merican bir-
thright .
But. she said. " I like the quiei life
here I'm used lo ii. M roois are
here and merica scared me a little.
"1 would probabl) go back it I
ild But foi thai sou need ihe
re mi. 1 don't wain to be a
beggai ihe I tiited Slates I
wouldn't be able 10 keep lace it thai
happened, w ould I?"
Television's Cliches Can Be Amusing
Continued from paye 5
could get a job as a drug dealer and
then get the measles.
How about a visit from led
Nugeni instead ol Bobb) Sherman?
Doens of rock'n'roll hellraisen
entire neighborhood.
What it the Partridge Famil) kids
all joined the Moonies?
Bettei yet, imagine the wack)
situations a I famil) could get into
it the bubonic plague swept through
could descend on the family's house then suburb.
for a three-da) parts and trash the Although these old situation com
edies are still seen frequentl) on 'be Brad) Bunch kids were cramm-
television, that way ol life has been ed three to a room, even though
disappearing in receni years. The the) lived in a Insurious split level
characters on such new show- a house in southern California. Mosl
1 averne and Shirlev cannot afford sI-i'N on today's corned) shows live
to have a wack) live-in maul, oi in cheap apartments. I he decline ot
even a big, shagg) dos Finances 'he standard ol living in situation
were often a little tight tor even comedies reminds one of the similar
popular I V families in the old days; plight ol the British aristocracy.
Costa Rica:
Free Snacks
Continued from page 5
aii bai sat Rita. I Is and I ex. sipping
and eating b(H as.
1 musi pause here to explain the wonderful
custom ol bocas. Boca is the Spanish word foi
mouth, and bocas (plural) are little snacks thai
you i-Idei a beer or a dunk. And
' Some bars only serve tortillas with
es ot meal, cheese or tomato, but a plate ol
ouallv comes with each round ol libations.
To School
Special
KlCllR. by Nature's Way
specializing in natural hair cuts tor men & women
Present ECU Student I.D. Fot
20 Off Your Next Haircut
Offer good thru Q.()-&()
Downtown Mall
Greenville
appointment only
758-7841
But
�me
nirs no
all out with boca In
Moravia, a small lown on the outskirts ol San
�wo oi three rounds ol beer can provide a
able meal's worth ol bocas. including tish
kled fish, soups, ribs, fruit, vegetables,
isage, chicken and nee and man) othei
acies I: you entei a bar and don't gel bocas
with the second round, leave you're in the
trip through the market provided us with all
�d we would need to last until the following
Ihursday, bui we couldn't leave town without
pa few bottles of Ron Rico. Having
ome lime in the tropics, we had discovered
�. the mosl effective pain reliever for mos
quito bites wk sunburn. The hangover remains
und cd.
I ucsday morning wouJd've been just anothei
day in paradise, bui during the night a wild dog
�.uned our water supply. Not that that
po I an) serious problem � we could always
. . up the mountain to get more water 1 he
ei pulled up m his jeep Hist a we were
� md the look on his face wasn't one
of ami � I le said we had to leave
�� packed up oui things, grabbed two more
. � � tt by now was ven good, and
;d for l.il We dropped Rita. 1 Is
: Pet ' ; � � where the) would
one n ' . r catching the bus into
k 1 he trip was onlv cut two days short,
. at the port city ol Pun-
N surl al Puntareans. Ihe drive to
Hei niehi in the ram was an anticlimax
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PLAYING THE BLUES
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MIKE �uSffrMRS' WELLS
DOORS OPEN AT 9:00
MIDDLE AGE
�CRAZY
� 0-5 '0 7 10 9 IC
�'���tmmmmm i�� ,
story of norural love
drooke TTHE BLUE
SHIELDS fcAGOON
3579
i CtaumtKi PxtlKt' Ret�a�
COMING 1-KIOA
5TEEI
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and KOADIK
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LATE SHOW
gee rvAictdU �
The Rose
5�6 I ' 30pm,
MON. AND TUES.
ALLAN HANDELMAN spins your favorite New
I Wave and Rock tunes with lots of prizes suprizes,
land Contest. Allen and JJ's invite you to 'Have a
I Happy' between 10:30-11:30 each nite.
I" WED. LADIES NITE WITH ALLAN
'elk Tyfer
ctrohns Mst m�0 kSgrfrwfr
wine and cheese shop
The
More-Than-Wine-and-
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Delicious imported and domestic
cheeses, tasty biscuits and crackers,
gourmet delicacies, candies, imported
and domestic wines or beer and party
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that has moral.
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Drummond Bros. Beer$2.19
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Rolling Rock
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Ask About Our Party Trays and
Cheese Balls
Shop Monday Through Saturday
10a.m. Until 9p.m.
Phone 756-B-E-L-K(756-2355)
Write them with no service charge when you have a student checking account at BB&l
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
i






THl EAS1 C AKOl IN1AN
Sports
SI I'l I MB! K 4 -
Doubts Remain
As Opener Nears
Vern Davenport and Pirates reach to kick-off another year
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Spnrlt 1 dttm
With onh a few days remaining
before his debut as East Carolina's
head football coach Ed Emory had
doubts concerning who would start
come 1:30 p.m. Saturday at a
Wednesday press luncheon.
"We're prepared for anything
he said of the rash of injuries and
wacky occurances that have dipped
into the Pirate depth chart.
The major area of concern for
Emory is the offensive backfield. an
area that was his pride and joy when
he arrived on the scene at ECU. In-
juries and controversey, though,
have changed that area from a
strong one to a questionable one for
Saturday's opener.
All-America candidate Anthony
Collins, a i,000-yard plus rusher a
year ago. injured his ribs in a scrim-
mage two weeks ago and has yet to
practice verv much since. Jogging
and sprints are the extent of his
work this week. His availability for
Duke was unknown at press time.
Also muddling the picture is the
question of Theodore Sutton's
eliigibility. The star fullback's right
to play in Saturday's contest has
been questioned by Duke and word
is beine awaited from a special
NCAA committee. Emory and his
staff have no way oi knowing
whether the Kinston native will be
able to suit up Saturday or not.
Not helping matters any was the
injury to Marvin Cobb, the Pirates'
top backfield reserve. He is ex-
pected to be on! foi ilie season as i
reserve fullback Willie Swinson.
"We don't know who will start in
our backfield Saturday Emory,
said. "I've told all oui players that
we are planning to go lo Duke and
play with .c c ollins and Sutton.
As of now, we plan to start Mike
Hawkins. Harold Blue and Rov
Wiley
The above statement i- definitely
one made lor psychological reasons.
You've got to be ready to play no
niattei what he said, "and be
ready tor anything. Menial prepara-
tion is vital
Emory added that all the question
marks definitely had to be on the
players' mind "It's goi to weigh
on you mentally tie said. "Jusl
think ol our offensive line. At one
time they knew they had some truly
grea! backs behind them. Now they
don't even know il those guv- will
play in our First game
Recuperating just in time foi the
Duke game are offensive linemen
Wayne Inman, rootie Robbuis and
Tony Hensley, all ol which have
missed considerable practice time
I he past two weeks.
Switching to Saturday's game
plan. Emory said that an efficient
pass rush would be vital against the
Blue DeviK. who ate expected to
throw a great deal this yeai undei
new offensive coordinatoi Steve
Spume
"Duke will be a great test foi oui
rush he said. "We'll have to have
it not only against them but in our
'79 Loss In Mind
Pirates To Seek Revenge
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Revenge.
Don't think for one second this
word is not in back of the minds oi
each and every returning member oi
the East Carolina football when
they think of Saturday's game with
Duke.
Why? team that went on to
finish its 1979 season at 7-3-1 with a
national rushing championship to
boast was embarassed in its opener
28-14 by the Blue Devils as fumbles
were critical.
"We fumbled three times last
year and that cost us the game
said returning All-American Wayne
Inman. "In no way do I believe
Duke was better than us last year
We just played terribly
Senior kicker and split end Vern
Davenport agrees. "That's the
worst game we've played since I've
been at East Carolina he said.
"We couldn't seem to do anything
right
Inman said thai pie-game over-
confidence could have been a factor
a year ago. "We went into last year
expecting so much he said. "We
were returning an experienced of-
fensive line, a great and exerienced
quarterback and a super backtield.
Plus our defense had been national
ly ranked the year before
Iheretore, Inman said, the club was
overconfident. "We didn't think
there was anv way we could lose to
Duke he contessed. "Everybody
was favoring us and I guess it went
to our heads
The entire situation is different
this year, Inman said, because the
Devils return a strong nucleus from
last year and the Pirates have any
number oi question marks.
"This year we're not supposed to
win he said. "That should make
a difference. Heck, I'd like to be
underdogs every time we go in a
stadium
The though; of Duke has been an
all summer thing, said Davenport.
"That's all I've thought about he
said. "1 don't even know who we
plav next. All 1 see is Duke. That's
one we've got to have
Davenport feels the team's per-
formance in the opener could dic-
tate the outcome of the entire
season. "It's like Duke is a wall we
have to get over he said. "If
we're impressive and gain con-
fidence we could go on to a fine
season. If don't we could be in for a
long season
I he Duke game presents an
unusual situation for Pirate
linebacker Jeffrey Warren. "1 was
in the infirmary when we played
them last year he said. "I was
about to burst while 1 was listening
to it on the radio because 1 wanted
Wilson Prepares Duke
For Pirate Offensive
B JIMMY DuPREiC
When Red Wilson came to Duke
a year ago, the Blue Devil program
was in a state of turmoil.
All announcements from the
Durham university talked of
positive change. "Red Means GO"
and other slogans flowed in hopes
of pepping up the disheartened
Devil following. When the season
ended, "wait till next year" was a
popular saying.
Duke finished with a diappointing
2-8-1 record, good for the cellar
position in the Atlantic Coast Con-
ference. But from that unit, Wilson
returns at least 14 and hopes the ex-
perience of a year ago has matured
the young Blue Devils.
"We were very young last year
admits Wilson. "This year we have
seven juniors, two sophomores and
two freshmen starting, so 1 guess
you could say we're still young.
We've been working on a lot of
things this fall.
"We've changed our offensive
format since last year. We left the
veer and switched to the Pro-I, and 1
think that will give us an exciting of-
fense
Wilson will go with either
sophomore Brent Clinkscale oi
freshman Ben Bennett at quarter-
back (decision to be made Thurs-
day), but conveys scepticism about
both.
"I'm just not sure at this point
he admits. "Bennett has picked up
our offense very well. Clinkscale
played last year when (Craig)
Browning and (Stanley) Driskell
were ailing. Otherwise we'd pro-
bably be going with someone with
no game experience at all
While ECU head coach Ld Emory
remains unsure of what to expect
from Duke offensively, W ilson has
little doubt of what the Pirates will
be up to. Especially since he has
former ECU quarterback Aaron
Stewart directing his scout squad.
"Stewart is running the wishbone
in practice for us as well as being the
number two comerback said
Wilson. "He's a very fine triple-
option quarterback
Duke upset Last Carolina 28-14 in
their first outing of the year, but
from there the season went pro-
gressively downhill.
"We went to South Carolina and
they were simply awesome Wilson
laments "Browning went out with
an injury and Driskell wasn't play-
ing well either
Former Last Carolina wide
receiver Ron Frederick returns for
his second year in the Duke blue,
and Wilson hopes the new Pro-I and
new signal-calling corps will get the
ball to the talented youngster more
often.
"We just didn't have a good
passer last year Wilson laments.
"Neither Driskell nor Browning
threw the ball very well. Most of the
time the quarterbacks would either
overthrow the ball or underthrow it,
or off to one side or the other.
"1 think either oi the qurterbacks
we have this year can throw the ball
adequately
1(1 has had to contend for the
past week with injuries to All-
American guard Wayne Inman,
leading rusher Anthony Collins and
top reserve back Marvin Cobb (out
for the season with a broken ankle),
as well as the possibility of fullback
Theodore Sutton being declared in-
eligible for the opener by the
NCAA. Wilson and his staff have
come under fire for alledgedly stirr-
ing up talk of Sutton's freshman
participation, but Wilson patiently
awaits the ruling.
"The only thing 1 know is what's
in the papers says Wilson.
"We've prepared for the game as if
he'll be playing.
"I will say that there's no way I
would ever play anyone who wasn't
100 percent eligible in all respects.
"There is no way 1 would jeopar-
dize the accomplishments of anyone
next two games (Southwestern I oui
.i and I lorida State) a- those
two teams also pass deal
Emory noted thai he f(
club's speed on the defensive front
would assure a I rush. "W
should be successful he claimed,
"because all ol oui tackles and ends
run 4.8 oi better. We should have a
much betlei pass rush than you saw
last v eai at W al t I
In thai contest w i) QB lay
enuto sei severa tlantiv oasi
marks Emory poii
to the fad thai ih Venuto
threw ii up 37 tunes, he wa
acked once " I hai mu
he said.
I he first-year Pirate head eoa
said-thai leader-hup would be need
ed from a numbei ol outstanding
seniors. We're awfully young
he said "We d have some seniors
mixed in, though. 1 jusl hope then
experience will oversee ihe youth
Due to ihe Pirates' youth, Emory
said thai the club had been drilled
extensively on whai to expeel in
season opener. "We've beei
all lie said "We've had to make
every situation 100 nine- tough(
practice than il will be in the game.
Still, those 40,000 tans will make a
difference
I he ex-Duke assistant coach add
ed thai he was pleased with his
club's preparations regardless ol
difficulties. "I feel today thai �
a- well-prepared and well-oiled as
any team could be considering the
losses we've suffered
to play so badly P
Warren said that an injury to star
halfback Anthony Collins and the
possibility oi fullback Theodore
Sutton being ruled ineligible for the
comes! gave him all the more reason
10 be fired up.
"It gives me and the the team a
lot o' incentive he said. "We
have to be prepared if they can't
play. We have to be careful,
though, not to get too involved and
become over-psyched
The fact that Duke has complain-
ed to the NCAA about ;he eligibility
of Sutton and cornerback Willie
Holley has the entire fired up, says
Inman. "That's pretty low he
said. "Yea, I'm all fired up about
the whole thing. 1 think everything
will backfire on Duke. We've got a
lot to be excited about
Yes, the smell of revenge is in the
air in Greenville.
LB Jeffrey Warren
missed last year's Duke game
New System Big Aid
Marvin Cobb (45)
To Miss Game
else on my team by playing someone
who could later be found ineligible
and cause the results of those games
to be reversed he added.
"Being in the ACC, we have to
report to the commissioner every
player who steps on the field, even if
for only one play all year. Any in-
juries must be reported immediately
with the time and circumstances of
the injury. That all has to be con-
firmed by the athletic director and
forwarded to the commissioner. So
there's no problem with thai here,
or any other conference school
Wilson must get his squad ready
for the demanding ACC opposition,
but that isn't his only worry.
"After we play Last Carolina
he laments, "we have to play
Auburn and South Carolina on top
of the conference games. We don't
have anyone on our schedule that is
not woefully tough
When changes are made it is
assured that other changes will
follow. Such is the case with the
East Carolina football program.
Ed Emory was named last spring
to replace Pat Dye as football coach
and one oi the big changes the
former ECU All-American made
will take effect sometime later this
week.
A computerized recruiting system
is being installed, thanks to a local
business. We're verv indebted
said Pirate recruiting coordinator
Bob Sanders, "to darner, Wynne
and Murrav (local wholesalers).
They've donated the use of their
computer terminals to aid our
recruiting. We hope to have it by
Sunday
Undei Dye. 1 Cl never put to use
the computerized system so Sanders
has hopes that even greater
recruiting success can be achieved.
"There's nothing wrong with the
old system he said. "It's just that
Coach Emory is familiar with this
system and it's like the one we used
last year at Georgia Tech. He's
(Emory) been recruiting a long time
and is respected as one of the best. 1
consider this a step in the right
direction for East Caroliona
Sanders said the new system
would speed up all facets of
recruiting. He explained that mail-
ing labels for the many prospects
could be obtained by the mere
touch of a button.
"We can get the labels in any
order also he said. "If I want to
send a letter to only kids in North
t arolina, I jus! tell the computei
that and automatically 1 have the
labels. I hat's a loi faster than doing
it by hand
The prospects are categorized in
anv number o! ways including bv
position and how thev stand with
the staff.
Sanders added that the compute!
banks would include the addresses
oi every high school in an eight state
radius. Mailing labels tor all of
them are easily accessible, he said.
He also noted that the computer
would serve as a second tile should
one of the assistants leave the staft
and take his records with him
Sanders also stated that each coach
would receive a printout that will in-
clude all the prospects in his par-
ticular area.
These and many other compute-
services should allow for more as
tual recruiting said the assistant
coach. "I hope it will allow us to
get closer to the prospects because
we're able to do so much more
through the mail plus we save
enough time so we can be on the
road more
Sanders said the ystem would br-
ing the Piratescloser to recruiting on
the level with ACC schools.
"Most and maybe all of the AC C
schools have asysiem similar to this
one he said. "We hope that we
can edge closer to them by having
this one. We're going for the best
and this system will help us. We're
not backing off anybody

Bi
I

r
T 1





I HI I sl i K()1 INIAN
SI I'll MBl K4. 198(1
S
VHB
r
The Fearless Football Forecast
1 si koi NA 1 IH kl
hURMAN AT UN(
W II I I l WD 1 R 1 si Ml
VA 1 1H 1 K1 FORES!
II 1 o 1 MARYI AND
PI RDl I 1 NO! Rl DAM1
1 I s &M 1 MISSISSIPPI
i.l RCil 1 1 1 1 ssi l
CiA III H 1 1 B1
()R1 CiAN s s ORD
BRIGHAM YOl NG 1 l MEXICO
FLORIDA ST ATI W I si
( HARLFS CHANDLER
Sports Editor
ECU 27 17
UNC
NCSU
Va. lech
Maryland
Purdue
rexas A&M
Georgia
Alabama
Stanford
Brigham Young
Florida State
JIMVn Dl PRE!
Asst. Sports I ditor
1(1 14-13
UNC
( SI
ake 1 oresi
Maryland
Notre Dame
Mississippi
c ieorgia
Manama
Stanford
Bi igham N oung
1 lot ida Slate
liKR HERN DON
dvertising Manager
1I 24-21
I i
N sl
ake 1 oresi
Mai land
Notre Dame
rexas &M
1 ennessee
Mabama
Stanford
Hi igham N oui
I l
KEN SMITH
EC I SID
I c I 28-21
I NC
NC SI
Wake 1 oresi
Maryland
Noire Dame
rexas cv1
I ennessee
Alabama
Stanford
Brigham oung
Honda State
C.l ESI PICKER:
JIM WOODS
A oice of the Pirates'
II 21-17
I NC
NC SL
Wake Forest
Maryland
Purdue
Texas A&M
Georgia
Alabama
Oregan
Brigham Young
1 SI
Smith Pleased With Scrimmage
Soccer Season Opens
l C I. .
Baker Named To Post
. 1 asl (. arolina booted in both Purple and And) Roman were
team opens its goals and Stan Grifl impressive at midfield.
Frida at George tallied for the Gold. "We'll have to see
Mason and fourth yeai Smith was pleased with what we're like against
Had Smith feels the wa his squad mov- someone else, now
dent ol a good ed the ball on offense Smith said. "I think
rhurs- and with the play at we'll be capable of
s Purple and Gold midfield. Steve Brodv scoring on anyone if we
keep out concentra- p.m. Saturday game
tion altei visiting George
1 he Pirate booters Mason. I he host
move on to St. Mary's Guilford Wednesda in
ol Maryland for a 1 then lome opener
Craig Baker has been I he 22-year-old graduate assistant and in physical educatioi
named assistant direc- Knightdale, N.C trainer after graduating Baker is certified by the
tor of East arolina native served as a from East Carolina National Athletic
University's Sports graduate assistant in with a B.S. in school Trainers Association
Medicine Division. He sports medicine from and community health along with sports
will serve also as an ad- January through June, in 1979. medicine director R
junct instructor within He worked a year at He is currently work- Compton and assistant
the division.
West Virginia as a ing toward a master's director I i White
Sports Information
Positions Available
cjifJ�0
"1 vvas ver pleased
oui scrimmage.
k eepeis
t eept' s Brian
idl and Sieve
A' '� played ver student workers are to set up an appoint
" s ;i �id ol the needed in
1; 'The Sports Information Of-
id to pla well fjce
� ould have cu pirate SID Ken high school, college or
Smith said that in- community newspapet
det terested persons should would be an asset.
her. Brad V inchell contact him at 757-6491 Smith said.
he ECU ment.
Previous work on a
tir iias
arc oresen
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�.





10
I HI I AM I AROl INIAN
SI I'll MBI K4, WKO
Odom Takes A Lap
ECU Goes To Germany
B JIMMY DuPREE
Somewhere in distant
Wiesbaden, Germany,
there are a number of
children attending class
wearing Easl Carolina
University tee-shirts or
carrying banners uith
Pirate slogans, courtesy
oi head basketball
coach Dave Odom.
During the month of
August Odom par
ticipated in a sports
clinic sponsored by the
Dependent Youth Ac-
tivities Organization oi
Europe; an armed
forces program design-
ed to benifil sons and
daughters ol military
personnel and civilian
employees abroad.
� � l he kids were anx-
ious to heat any news
from the stales
Odom remembers.
" I hey wanted anything
they could gel with 1 ast
c arolina written on it.
ny thing from the
states is neu to them;
they're 5,000 miles
away
Programs ol the
week-long program
covered tackle football
officiating and
coaching, touch foot
ball officiating, basket-
ball coac hing and
sports medicine.
" I lie ability level ol
the players is not what
we're accustomed to
seeing here in the
states sas Odom.
"Bui I heir willingness
to learn is unsurpassed.
I hey 're like bab birds
with then mouthes
open jusi waiting to
learn. Ihe ills! aren't
exposed to it everyday
the way kids here are
I he basketball seg
menl ol the clinic began
in the morning with the
counselors insti ucting
the coaches ol fun-
damentals of the game.
how to teach fun-
damentals and
organization ol prac-
tice- fternoon ses
sions were conducted in
the gm with players,
ages 10 ihroueh hum
sc hool
use
to
was
demonstrate what
taught earlier.
"We did thai Mon-
day through 1 iiday and
they gave us from
Saturday lo rhursday
to write our sum-
maries he explained.
"After that we were
tree to travel and sight
see, and that's when I
had what has to be the
most unique experience
ol my life.
"1 go! (O Mslt two
Olympic iltages in the
same da Odom
recalls. "We wen: to
Innsbrook, Austria,
where the had the
winter games in 1972
and I now have a new
appreciation ol land-
scape and mountains.1
1 he ski jump where
the tamed "agony ot
del eat" film clip for
the opening ol B("s
Wide World oj Sports
originated was one ol
the more memorable
stops while at the Inn
sbrook village.
"forget what you've
seen on T u s
Odom. "You have !o
see this thine to believe
it
Odont's group decid-
ed to travel the remain
ing distance lo the sighi
of the 1972 Summei
Olympics thai same
dav.
"It was really a gieai
thrill to go to Munich
he states. "We went to
the auditorium first
where the swimming
events were held. It's
open to the Germans
and there must have
been a thousand in
there. V e were too high
up and they all have to
w eat caps, so w e
couldn't tell how main
were men or women.
' 1 hen we went ovei
to the Ol v m pie
Stadium he added.
IIWIIIMIMIIll
"You're not supposed
lo go down on the track
or on the gi ass, but you
gel caughi up in the ex-
citement ol the mo-
ment. ! here wasn't a
guard on duty, so I just
slipped down the stands
and ran out on the held
-o the guv I was with
could take my picture.
"1 guess the same im-
pulse overcame him
too. so there we both
weie on this held ol the
greenest grass you can
imagine. e were both
in oui street clothes,
but we decided to take
a lap on the track
anyway.
"We came around
the cornet and saw
where Jim Ryun tell in
19" 2 when he was
about lo set a vorld
record. ! could just
visualie what it was
like.
" e passed the tun
nel I tank Shortei ran
through to finish the
marathon foi a world
record You can fan-
tasize whal it's like with
70,000 people scream-
ing ()dom sas.
"We had just finish-
ed vv hen we heard yell-
ing from up in the
stadium he grins. "It
was in German, bui we
knew it was a guard
and thai he wasn't
pleased I was glad then
that 1 didn't unders-
tand then language
Odom stated he gain-
ed valuable insighl
while abi oad. but
stresses the publicity
gained by Easl
C arolina as a kev
motivation as well.
"It was an honor foi
mysell. but particularly
tor t ast Carolina
said ()dom. "Publicity
cannot be measured in
dollars and cents.
w hethei national oi in
ternalionc.l ,
I
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Apartment Aiitiin �altmtq
distance ol campus Call ?S8 3076
ROOMMATE WANTED lor two
bedroom apartment a Carraqt
House One third reni plus
u'liities Call 756 8�?6
FOR SALE
FOR SALE Weiqhtlilt.nq Bench
lor sale' J18 00 E nctllent Condi
tioni II interested call VmceMet
call Room 354 Umstead
Dorm 7S8 9S73
FOR SALE Premin Parade
Drum Excellent Condition Costs
i350 new will sell lor V?00 Call
7S8 3076
HOURS FOR TAKING
CLASSIFIED ADS WILL BE
MWF 00 3 00 TTH 4 00 5 00
AT THE EAST CAROL INIAN OF
F I C F
m
204 E. 5th St.
Across From
Newby's Sub Shop
Open 'Til 9:30 Nightly
THIS WEEK'S SALE
ALBUMS
$8.98-LIST-$5.77
Commodores-X - Cars-Panarama
McCartney III - Firefall-Undertoe
Poco-Under The Gun
George Benson-Give Me The Night
Teddy Pendergrass-T.P.
Ojays-The Year 2000
Heart-Bebe Le Strange
Charlie Daniels Band-Full Moon
Blues Brothers Soundtrack
$13.98-LIST-$9,98
Eric Clapton-Just One Night
Honeysuckle Rose
$9.98-LIST-$6.99
Carlos Santana-The Swing of Delight
$7.98-LIST-$4.99
Maze-Joy of Pain - Dynasty-Adventures
Manhattans-After Midnight
New Nantucket-$3.99 LP and Tape
MON. AND TUES.
ALLAN HANDELMAN spins your favorite New
Wave and Rock tunes with lots of prizes suprizes,
and Contest. Allen and JJ's invite you to 'Have a
Happy between 10:30-11:30 each nite.
WED. LADIES NITE WITH ALLAN
NOW,FOR HEARTIER APPETITES
run rrp n 11 f
K


,
�W


WEDNESDAY IS NOW
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TACOS
29

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25 DRAFT ALL DAY THURSDAY
3 bites, 4 bites, maybe even more bites more!
c
The King Is Wailing For You At Your Participating Neighborhood Arby's gj
Redeem These "King Size" Coupons Now!
Located at f 12 W. Greenville Blvd.
(next to Tarheel Toyota)
7S6-2072
Come In and Enjoy!
ARBY'S KING $,
SANDWICHES
ONLY
ARBY'S KING $i
SANDWICHES
ONLY
J oiantsavingson2Arby'sRoastBe��KlngSandwtch��! j Giant savings on 2 Arby's Roast Beof King Sanartchos!
Limn ono coupon por cuHorr
No! valid wtl otti' coupon
Oood only f portiopoting tv'� rootl boo n��latwonH
on Offer Expires Sept 10
Urn ooo coupon pn cut�m�f
Ho� vatio: with ofnm coupon
Oood only oi pocipan5 rt� v rood bo( rotlouronH
��"� otter Expires Sept 10
. i?





Title
The East Carolinian, September 4, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 04, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.73
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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