The East Carolinian, August 28, 1980






taw
Math
As a mathematics teacher,
Dr. William Nibbelink has
come a long way over the past
19 years.
After advancing from in-
struction at the hagh school
level to teaching the intricacies
of calculus and differe ntial
equations in college, he has
"graduated" all the way back
to the kindergarten level.
Story on page 2.
Hollywood Reep
An art professor at East
Carolina for the last ten years,
Edward Reep has a past filled
with unusual events ranging
from the vision of Mussolini,
dead, hanging by his heels, to
an introduction with a Pope.
See page 8 for the whole
story.
Collins Injured
East Carolina star running
back Anthony Collins, the
team's leading rusher last
season with 1,130 yards, is
suffering from bruised ribs
sustained in last Saturday's
scrimmage and has yet to
return to practice.
For full details, see page 13.
She lEaat Carolinian
Vol. 55 No. 2
16 Panes
August 28, 1980
(ireenville. V(
( initiation III.(MM)

UNC Case Resumes Soon,
Black Enrollment Up Slightly
Look Familiar?
io�o bv CHAP GUDIEV
An unidentified student does what hundreds of other Msiinl �:�. have
been doing this week � lugging those SiA rental refrigerators into their
dormitory rooms � but unlike most, takes the task on h himself.
B II RR CRAY
Nexi week in Washington, DC,
lawyers tor the federal government
will resume their argument that the
University of North Carolina has
not moved swiftly enough to
dsegregate its 16-campus system.
The hearing, which began in July,
was recessed on Aug. 15 for a two-
week break. When it resumes on
Sept. 3, the governmenl will begin
presenting testimony from the first
of 30 witnesses it plans to put on the
stand bet ore it rests the prosecution.
Although IC I docs not play a
major role in the case, the verdict
could have a financial impact on the
university.
At stake in the case is the aid �
amounting to $89 million last year
� that the UNC system receives
every year from the federal govern-
ment. I he governmenl is seeking to
cut off thai aid it the court rules
against the I Nc system.
It is not clear exactly how the
cutoff would afeel ECU, according
to comments from various sources,
ll the lederal government cuts aid
across the board, all 16 UNC cam-
puses will feel the effects � in-
cluding the predominantly black
campuses which the governmenl
says it is trying to help through the
suit. But according to one source at
ECU, "The cutoff may be directed
only at the school that have been
specifically accused in the case
So far. the government lawyers
have presented 10 witnesses, most ot
whom have been educators or
statisticians. The most recent
witness was Donald 1 Reisler.
president oi a computer consulting
firm which conducted a study of
UNC's funding, enrollment and hir-
ing patterns for the government.
Reisler said that 60 percent oi the
blacks who apply for admission to
the UNC system apply to the five
traditionally black campuses. The
other 40 percent apply to the 11
traditionally black campuses, he
said.
In order to balance the quahtv ot
education on the various UNC cam-
puses, the government has proposed
that the UNC system shift attractive
programs to the predominantlv
black schools and end duplication
oi programs through consolidation.
UNC ha. stronglv opposed such
moves.
The most prominent of the
government's witnesses to date has
been Harold Howe II, a former
Chapel Hill resident and former
U.S. Commissioner ot Education,
now a vice president tor education
in the Ford Foundation.
Howe testified on Aug. 14 that
UNC should make program shuts
and consolidations, but UNC
lawyers attempted to show incon-
sistencies m Howe's position.
They produced a 1978 report that
Howe had written to New Noik
mayor 1 d Koch on the subject oi
the future oi c it University ot New
York. In the report. Howe said it
was "simplistic" thinking to pro
pose that all or part oi the Medgar
Ivans campus, which was over-
crowded, be moved to nearby
Brooklyn College, which is mostly
white.
�lost ot these suggestions can be
characterized as arbitrary and
simplistic Howe wrote. 'They
have not considered problems ot
program quality, student choice.
faculty interests and institutional
loyalty he wrote.
UNC lawyers also asked lb;we to
point to a single instance where such
program shitts had led to successful
desegregation. Howe said he could
not. but added that this type of pro-
blem was a new field and new
strategies had to be tried.
Meanwhile, the numbet oi black
freshmen at hum I NC campuses is
expected to be slightly higher this
year. ECU officials expect a 1.5 per-
cent rise in blak enrollment. At
I Nc hapel Hill, officials estimate
See UNC, Page 3. col. 4
Half Of Students
Get Financial Help
Film Series Highlights Travel, Adventure
Season tickets are now on sale for
the 1980-81 Mendenhall Student
Centei I ravel-Adventure film
Series 1 he series, which consists ot
five films, will be presented in Hen-
dn Theatre with each program
beginning at 8:00 p.m.
The series opens on November 13
when Dewitt Jones presents his
award winning film "The New
England of Robert Frost This
film combines Robert Frosts's
poetry with the lives of others living
in Siew England today. New
England is a patchwork of
American life sewn together bv the
deep vision oi her most famous
poet.
Germany will be the subject o'
Ken Richter's film on January 20.
Richter, who has travelled and film-
ed extensively in Germany, will br-
ing to the platform special insight
and a warm affection that will make
this program a highlight of the
series.
The series continues on Febrary
12 when Jens Bjerre returns to cam-
pus to present his film "China-After
Mao The film explores and ex-
plains the many drastic changes
In Tuesday's issue of
he East Carolina, we
mistakenly reported that
the Greenville Chamber
of Commerce voted
down a request for a
liquor-by-the-drink
referendum in Greenville
in early July. (See
"Liquor Petition Runs
Dry, page 10)
Actually, it was the
Greenville City Council
that voted against the
referendum. The Green-
ville Chamber of Com-
merce was the group
which had submitted the
request to the city council
to call for the leferen-
dum.
We apologise for the
prior
Food Stamps
New Restrictions On Eligibility May
Cut Food Aid To 150,000 Students
which have taken place in China
since the death of Mao Tse Tung:
changes which have deeply affected
every individual with new freedom
in education, science, art, and
economics.
Thayer Soule will present his film
"Spain" on March 26. Spain is the
third largest country in Europe. Old
and new at the same fime, it lives
very close to it's glorious past, yet
reaches eagerly for the future. Soule
has made three major trips to Spain.
He will help you understand this
land where history is the key to
everything and which after centuries
of slumbering, is now awakening.
The series concludes on April 8
when John Roberts presents his film
"Puerto Rico The film presents a
detailed look at both the land and
the people. A tropical island in the
Caribbean, Puerto Rico is an attrac-
tive and often overlooked region
which is part of the American fami-
ly of peoples.
Season tickets are on sale at the
Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall
Student Center. Individual season
tickets are priced at $9 each, groups
of twenty or more tickets purchased
together are $7.50 each.
By LISA DREW
Because of the rising cost ot an
education, about 50 percent o all
students attending E( I this vear
will receive some type of financial
aid. Three tvpes ot assistance are of-
fered here to eligible students who
wish to obtain financial aid: gift-
aid, the Educational 1 oan Program,
and student employment.
Gift-aid consists oi grants and
scholarships Although these two
terms are often used inter-
changeably . they differ in that a
grant is based on need, while a
scholarship is based on merit or
ability as well as need recipient of
gift-aid is not undei an obligation to
repay the money, and an) student
who warrants aid mav receive it.
Mr. Robert M. Boudreaux, oi the
I C l financial aid office, stresses
that although a student mav receive
money through gift-aid, a satisfac-
tory academic record must be mam
tained. If, at the end of a semester a
student receives an academic warn-
ing, money for following semesters
may be withheld until the student
improves his or her grades and reap-
plies for aid.
The most widelv distributed grant
is the Basic Educational Opportuni-
ty Grant. Boudreaux explained that
a certain amount of money is
allocated each vear from the federal
government for BEOG. (1 his year
the amount was about S2. million)
If the university must exceed that,
the extra monev will be given upon
request. Boudreaux added, "We
don't run out of money for basic
grants
I he Educational loan Program
provides temporary funding that
must be repaid after the borrower
finishes school. Since some loan
programs have become more lenient
and some do not have an income
cutoff point, Boudreaux points out
that the applications for this year
have tripled over last year.
Some loan programs have
cancellation clauses which, under
special circumstances, allow certain
percentages of loans to be forgiven.
The National Direct Student
1 oan has an exception for bor-
rowers who become teachers of low
income or handicapped students in
primary or secondary schools. If
this is the case and the institution is
non-profit, NDSL will allow as
much as 1(K) percent of the loan to
be forgiven.
Student 1 mployment is another
tvpe of financial aid offered to
students, which is available in
several forms at ECU.
The largest program is the College
Work-Study Program, which allows
students to work within the universi-
ty or at recognied jobs outside of
the university. Participants receive
pay according to minimum wage
guidelines. CWS is funded 80 per-
cent by the federal government so
that only 20 percent of a students
earnings are paid by ECU.
See AID, Page 7, col. 5
On The Inside
(UPl) � New curbs imposed by
C ongress may stop the issuance of
food stamps to three fourths of the
college students receiving such aid.
The department oi agriculture
says there are 200,000 students on
food stamps. It says amendments to
the food stamp laws which were
passed in May will cut 150,000 oi
them from the program.
Carol McLaughlin, spokeswoman
for the Food and Nutrition Service
a U.S. Agriculture Department
division that administers the food
stamp program said this should
result in a S60 million annual sav-
ings.
However, a UPI spot check ot
colleges and agencies concerned
with the program indicates the
estimate oi the nubmer oi students
on food stamps may be low since
recipients sometimes conceal or fail
Announcements2
College Notes2 to mention their student status.
Collins Injured13
Costa Rica
Also, the number to be eliminated
The Agriculture Department says
needy, low income students will not
be cut. Determination of those in-
eligible would depend on the extent
oi welfare fraud detection,
notoriously lax in some
metropolitan areas.
Some indication may come this
fall when authorities say they get a
rush of student applications as
young people return to college after
work at summer jobs.
The issue of food stamps for col-
lege students has been volatile.
Ms. McLaughlin maintains, "1
couldn't really say whether the point
of the procedure as Congress sees
it - is a cost savings, or whether it
resulted from constituent pressure
But congressional action came
after expressions of outrage by some
congressmen following constituent
complaints about stories of
students, said to be from middle in-
come and well-to-do families, who
- �, j r; i i x

M�J
GnEAl
Carolina Fever Gets Treatment
PhotebvTMBY OHAY
Ed t l 4 from the Pr�gram would depend on received food stamp aid by claiming someOverzeaJous Pirate fans treated a local outbreak of 'Carolina Feer with � d
Hollywood Reep 8 the income of those students who See STUDENT, Page 3, ccl. 1 Unconfirmed reports indicate that the billboard, shivering in fear during the attack.
dose of paint and paper,
shattered most of its message.
apply.
- -
- s .
��





1 HI I AS I I AROl INI AN
AUGUST 28, 1980
Announcements
CO OP
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ilumns ; The Eas' Carolinian
Regisei '� : i
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!� 'U foi s'uni ' ' pai
in ; .� n individualized i
spa � � . '� ' �� g a'ifi es
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organization ot lee ure nntps ano
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� Fai' Carolina Gay Co-r.
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quainted ee'g Tuescj,
II i' E CGC " � I '
ever, esday a' S 00 p m at S
E ' " ' rt�e purpose of the
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Mathematics Teacher Tries Novel Approach To Arithmetic
si M I I 1 (I I'll
� a mathematics
teacher. Dr. William
ihbelink has come a
long sa ovei the past
19 years.
tt ei ad v anc i n g
from instruction at the
high school level to
teaching the intricacies
ol calculus and dif-
ferential equation- in
college, he has
'graduated" all the
v. a hack to h e
kindergarten level.
"1 guess u's because
the wa little kids
think, and the i the
od' think is erv ap-
ailing to me Nib
belink said in an intei
view while attending a
national conference o(
math teachers in Seat
tie. "I'm enjoying m
work mote t han
anything I've ever
done
Nibbelink, professoi
ol Earl) Childhood and
Element ray Education
at the University oi
Iowa believes children
are read) to be
challenged with basic
mathematical concepts
at the preschool and
kindergarten level.
"I'm finding out that
little kids in
kindergarten can learn
a whole lot more than
textbooks give them
credit for. prov ided it's
put to them in a wav
the) can understand
he said. "Most tex
(books lend to bahv
I hem, causing them to
lose interest
Nibbelink said he has
tound the stor) hue ap-
proach "lernticallv el
tective" in teaching
math concepts.
1 he) remembei
what the) learn from
the stor) because it cap
tures the imagination.
We tell a low kev stoiv
that has a hero who is
in deep trouble. I Hiring
the story, the hero
solves the problem and
the kids, instead ol
squi r m in g around.
listen closel) because
they are worried about
the hero
Nibbelink said
leaching pre-school
childi en t o eou n i
doesn't mean much
unless the) leai n lo ap-
pl the counting abilit)
to such concepts as
lineai measurement,
laliei and shorter.
'Learing to m
numbers in ordei. 1
through 10, can start
when a child is 2 or 3,
but il doesn't mean a
dai ned thing. 1 he) do
it mostl) to get smiles
from adults
()ne stoi v Nibbelink
helped develop foi a
textbook foi use bv
kindergarten teachei s
("Mathematics round
Us Scoti. Foresman
and C o.) deals w uh i he
zero concepl.
1 he stoi v "I lo
man) is not anv ;
deals with a couple ol
crows who have a
cookie jar in their
treehouse. The) keep
track ol how main
cookies they have in the
tat with tall) marks on
a small chalkboard.
()ne dav the jai is emp-
tv and t h e c r o w
brothers are puzzled as
to what kind of mark
the) should use.
wise old owl who
lives in the same tree
College Notes
From The National On Campus Report
llll COUNTRY SWING will be the next big
dance craze, a Hollywood music columnist said
recently, rhe dance, performed b John "ravolta
he current movie. "Urban Cowboy is done
to soft count! v -rock music.
1 HI i I N I KC,1 SI 1NS1 llll IONS bv
rollment didn't change from 1978 to 1979. 1 he
Stale I ol Nev York, C itv I . ol New York and
I oi Wisconsin system still lead that list, accor-
ding to the National Association of State Univer-
sities and 1 and Grant Colleges. 1 he W" list ol
esl campuses did change slight 1, ah hough the
I ol Minnesota-Twin Cities, Ohio State U. and
Michigan State I . still head that list. The U. of Il-
linois, I rbana C hampaign replaced i'enn Stale
I . as tiie 10th largest campus.
l.LASING -N ENT1R1 DORM to Saudi-
vrabian students will apparentl) help Memphis
Stae I . make a profit on all student housing, but
tngered current residents o the dormitory. 1 he
dorm in question is a former f rat emit) house that
has proven too expensive to operate as a dorm.
I he Saudi group will run it year-round as a
eign student residence. Its current occupants
are angn the) weren't consulted before the deal
was made with the Saudis.
1 Hi FOURTH "HAIR" SI K I at Winona
(Minn I State I . shows that a slightl) higher
ige (5 ; to 49 percent) ot male graduates
shaven in WK0 than in 1979. About 35
perceni ol the men had a mustache while 12 per-
had both mustache and beard, an increase of
percent since the first survey was taken bv Dr.
i H I oegen m 19" rhis year, Foegen's gradua-
tion ceremon) observations also included female
shoe styles bou1 40 pet cent of the women wore
heeK ol three inches or mine while 41 percent
wote heels ol less than three inches and onlv 19
percent wore flat shoes.
New In Greenville
George's Coiffure
European Trained Hair Stylist
Free Hair Consultation
Pitt Plaza 7 5 6-6200
Wanted:
Writers
for our News, Sports and
Features columns.
Experience is desired,
but we will train applicants with
strong basic language skills.
Apply at our offices
in the Publications Building.
The
East Carolinian
FAMOUS
PIZZA
Welcomes All ECU Students
If you like good pizza and hot oven
submarines at good low prices come to
Famous Pizza
Once van try it you'll always come back
FREE DELIVERY to your dorm
Call for take out orders
758-5982
i
321 E. 10th St.
110� off on your nextl
dine-in meal with
ECU I.D.
solves t tie problem bv
drawing a round, emp-
ty loking symbol he
calls "zero sav mi; it's
a special number - "it
tells how many when
there aren't anv
in a d d i t i o n I o
stories. Nibbelink in-
terests children in
measuring tilings whith
toothpicks, placing
ihcm end to-end along
a said and ma; king ott
1, 2, 3, etc.
Y hen the
toothpicks fall off, thev
have a ruler
Nibbelink said it was
too early for him to tell
how much his methods
will help pre-schoolers
when thev advance to
later grades.
"Hut according to
learning theory, it's got
to be the right wav to
do it he said. "Bv
making math concepts
interesting and tun. 1
believe we can do much
to eliminate teai ot
math that otherwise
could develop later
on
Nibbelink said
kindergarten teachers
seemed to come from
two schools ol thought
one that concentrate-
on learning to socialize
and one that focuses
more on learnu j
putting children in
trame ol mind to leal
"Ah contention is
thai von can ha
best ol both
more math than
tionall) has been done
and ai the same time lei
the children intei
and learn how to get
alone with other peo-
pie
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UINO
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Student Stamp Aid Focuses Pro- Con Debate
I Hi AS C AKOt ISI 1,1 SI 28, I WO
ontinued from paRe 1
e were self-supporting and in-
digent
raxpayers, confronted with a
mounting tax burden, questioned
why they should pas for food foi a
allege student, such as the student
from Ohio who gets more than $250
onh from a part-time job and
iree loan oi grants and complains
nei tood stamp assistance is "hardly
rtn the bother
Parents, hard pressed to finance
then children's education, ask,
"why not nn child, too "What
their parents domt to help
them?"
(Ipponents oi student stamp aid
argue that those who attend college
rathe? than work should not he sub
sidized with food stamps, regardles
their financial conditions Pro
ponents say students who earn
degiees and become professionals
will some day pa back in taxes
more than they take in food.
Some social workers, welfare of-
ficials and minority group leaders
vigorously defend the right of
students to government help with
the groceries
Thelma rumer, job placement
specialist tor the welfare rights
organization m Pittsburgh, put it
this wa:
"An awful lot of times (the stu-
dent receiving food stamps) is a
female with a child. Many of the
poor go to college because they
figure it is the only shot they hae.
And they need the food stamps to
make it
In a world that has grown increas-
ingly more tense in recent months, a
classic guns-versus-butter argument
seems to have resurfaced, she said.
As a result, there are "too main
atacks on the poor now. And I do
not want to see anything more
heaped on out heads she said.
Whatever the arguments, the advent
of the student stamp controversy
has been cited repeatedly as an ex-
ample of why the program's price
tag has multiplied in 9 vears from
S610 million to an expected Sl.
billion in fiscal !9S.
An emergency S2 billion was
pumped into the inflation wracked
program in late May when
agriculture secretary Bob Her gland
reported benefits to 21.7 million
participants would cease May 30
because of a shortage of funds.
Authorities at all levels insist the
number of students on food stamps
is most likely a very small percen-
tage of the 21.7 million americans
receiving such aid.
During interviews, one who asked
not to be quoted urged that no story
be written because it would inflame
an issue he called insignificant in
comparison with aid to the mdigtent
provided by the overall program.
On the record, it was repeatedlv
pointed out that many students
receive such aid because they qualify
as self-supporting persons with
povei t leel incomes.
Some school readily promote the
use ot food stamps but others, like
Harvard, said they avoid encourag-
ing it among students.
Ms. Mel aughlin explained one ot
the new curbs, a "new assets limit
effective Oct. 1 It reduces current
net assets of "households" receiv-
ing aid to Si.NX) from Si ,750 except
those with two or more members, at
least one of which is an elderly per-
Infirmary Provides 24-Hour
Health Care For Emergencies
Black Enrollment Rises
B IM- U STIN
S,���, I ,(,
i eavine
horn i
doesn t always mean
giving up all ol the
comtorts ol home.
Whilc a college student
maysometimes have to
tend for himself in mat-
terssuch as procuring
toodand getting up in
timefor class, he is not
; vn hen it comes to
cart ol his
heallh
: III students
have pau! health
feesarc eligible to
i e c eve health care
i the Student
Healh Center, accor-
dingto Kav an Nort-
�administrative
assistant tor the cam-
Infirmary
1 1e 1 n f i r m a r v ,
w hidi is located on the
d ol the mall
loy rier 1 ibrai �
andt h e 11a n a g a n
Buildis open 24
hour� a 1a and 7 days
a week during the
i' academic term.
e Infirmary pro-
both out-patient
health
.Van Nortwick
said. Services available
through the Infirmary
include Prevention and
Health Maintenance,
immunization, Veneral
Disease Surveillance.
and care ol acute illness
and injury, she said.
an Sort wick added
that Psychiatric ser-
v ices are available on a
part time basis as well
as rou t i ne
gy necological sen ices.
I he Infirmary in-
cludes a statt of a
ph v sician-direct or,
tour full-time phvsi
cians, two family nurse
practitioners, a part-
time physician who is a
psychiatrist, fourteen
registered nurses, three
medical technologists,
and a nurse's aid, she
said.
I he out-patient clinic
has limited hours. Van
Nortwick said. They
are as follows: Monday
through Friday 8 a.m.
to 4:45 p.m Saturday
9 a.m. to 10 a.m. and 5
p.m. to 6 p.m and
Sunday s a.m. to 9:30
a.m. However, she ad-
ded thai emergencies
can be handled a! any
hour since a physician
is always on call during
the remaining hours.
Van Nortwick also
said that a group health
and accident insurance
plafi has been selected
bv the Student Health
Advisory Committee
and is available to all
ECl students.
CLASSIFIEDS
FOR SALE Wt'iqhtliHmq Bi'Uh
lor salt' SIB 00 E ncellent Condi
iiorv if interested call tfinceMet
(an Room 3S4 UmsUad
Dorm 7S8 9S73
REFRIGERATOR FOR SALE
Eiqht months old Free standing
3 fee' hiqh perfec t for dorm t oom
195 or best offer 1106 E 0'h S'
FOR SALE New Parade Dium
Can 7S8 306
CUSTOM CRAFTING and repair
of qold and silvei Buynq and
selling of qold and silver t l.s
Jewelers 120 E s'h st 75s J?7
PARKING SPACE S
AVAILABLE adiacent to cam
pus Sifj per montn Pa�able 6
months in advance Call Home
Savinqs 758 3JJI
COME BV PIPE DREAMS for
Oqarettes Smoking Accessories
Keys and Tec Smrts JI8E 5th st
STUDENTS earn money from
your creative talent Le' Pipe
Dreams feature your work Call
752 ��8'i or come by 38 E 5th S'
MOUSE MATE NEEDED To
share two bedroom house on 14th
for summer Central air
carpetinq SSC plus utilities and
phone Can before 3 00 p m or
�ftei . C p m 758 8637
Continued from page 1
that 13.3 percent oi the 1980
freshman class oi 3,2X) will be
black, compared to 11.8 percent last
ea r.
At N.C . Stale I niversity, of-
ficials said that applications from 'hen. most oi us will have
blacks was up about 7.5 percent graduated, oi have died, and the
over last vear. rest of us won't give a damn
It is likely that the case will be in
the courts tor years. As one ECU
administrator said, "To be quite
frank. 1 don't doubt that this thing
will be contested for a lone time. Bv
Sell
with classified advertiser�
Call 757-6366 for information
BLOUNT HARVEY
DOWNTOWN AND CAROUNA EAST MALL
ievrs
LEVIS ON SALE
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
$12.80
Hours Downtown IOam-5:30pm
Carolina east 10am-9:00pm

AKAI CS-M02 $199-95
Slereo Cassette Deck
Dolby Noise Reduction System Multiplex Filter
Sendust Record Playback Head with High Current
Erase Head for Metal Tape. Bar Meters. Timer REcord
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convenience with great sound. It features an automatic
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suspension speakers.
maxell
219.95
I
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CL-30 acoustic- suspension speakers.
FREE
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WITH 3 TAPES
219.95
son, in which case the assets limit re-
mains at 13,000.
In all. she said, there is a list of
situations under which student reci-
pients mav continue to qualitv. It
includes.
� those with low income and
disability;
� Those who work more than 20
hours a week;
� Heads ot households with
dependents;
� Students alreadv participating
in a tederal work-stud) program;
� And those enrolled in a work
incentive program.
In each ol the areas checked, of-
ficials called student stamp aid vcrv
limited. "Negligible" around lexas
lech in I ubbock, 1,000 oi 1,200
recipients m Pittsburgh. 1.650
student hov- holds in
Massachusetts, 400 or 5(K� students
at the Universit) oi Wisconsin.
I he Universit) ot Massachusets
helps student participation in the
tood stamp program b posting
bulletin board posters on how to get
them and arrangements to provide
them direct through its campus
residential complex. I he I niversit)
ol Wisconsin has a student hotline
telephone which includes a ta
message on how to applv tor food
stamps.
Schools such as Harvard and the
I niversit) ol Pittsburgh avoid such
"outreach" programs when
comes to tood stamps.
in political!) conservative an
ot the country, the interviews in-
dicated approval ol student tood
stamp appi is has been more
II ugal than eie ne'e.
'
?? V.
1
i arotma east mall C 'qreenvlie
HEAD SPINNING
HAIRCUT SALE
Reg S13.00.
Now With This Ad
$7.50
Offer in effect MonTuesWed
For 2 Weeks, Includes cut,shampoo,
and styling.
Bring In This Ad!
SALON PERM ON SALE
Reg S36 50r-
Includes Shampoo,Cut,Perm,Styling. $25
FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT
CALL THE HAIR SALON
Open Monday-Friday 10am til 8pm 756-2355
Saturday 10am until 6pm
STEREO
CENTER
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Head phones
$29.95 to $68.95
BPlfE
200-E
$19.95
SUPER
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WHERE YOU CAM BUY MORE STEREO FOR LESS HOMEY EVERY DAY
HOURS:
8:30-5:30 W F
8:30-12:30 Sat.
PHONE.
7362293
- - -
- -�� �� y .





t
Stye �aot (Earolfnfan
Serving the campus community since 1925.
Rk hardGri I V i
CH kl l sSi m . , ,
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Chris 1 i hok, �.
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CHARI I s CHANDI I k. y
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Sii i Ba hni k. �i
Opinion
Page J
Privacy
-4 Student's Right
I tic right to privacy: Everyone released without his permission.
has ihe right to privac and students However, the university is authoriz-
are no exception. Students have un-
til ruesday, Sept. 2. to assure
themselves ol almost total privacy
tor the next semester.
On the bottom ol every ECU
C ashier's Statement is a special
notice that's worth noting. The
notice refers to the Family Educa-
tional Rights and Privacy Act of
1974. In short, the act assures each
student to almost total privacy with
regard to academic records and the
right of students to request that they
not be listed in any campus direc-
tories.
It a student wishes to assure that
his academic information will not
be released without his permission,
he need not do anything. The
privacy act already guarantees that
no academic information will be
ed to release directory information
unless the student instructs the
registrar's office otherwise within
the first seven days of each
semester.
I he registrar's office has special
forms for any student who wishes to
assure himself of privacy. The
forms must be completed no later
than Tuesday, Sept. 2 to prevent the
university from releasing the direc-
tory information.
College life rarely allows a stu-
dent privacy. Anyone who has lived
in a dormatory or in an apartment
knows how important privacy is. At
a time when many are critical of
federal government regulations, it's
nice to see a regulation that truly
safeguards a student's academic and
personal privacy.
Student Trustees Barred?
"Students and faculty members
should not serve as trustees of their
own institutions, a national panel
said last week. "
The C 'hronue of Higher
Education
The national Commission of Col-
lege and University Trustee Selec-
tion recently released a report sug-
gesting that students and professors
be barred as trustees of their own
universities. The panel also said that
trustees o public institutions should
be appointed "by the governor, or
other established authority, from a
list o nominees who have been
carefully screened by a special com-
mittee
The Carnegie Corporation o
New York supported the commis-
sion with a $154,905 grant after a
survey by the Association of Gover-
ning Boards of Universities and
Colleges revealed "an urgent need
for guidelines to assist authorities in
identifying and placing the most
able people on boards of trustees
That's alot o' bunk!
rhis commission is composed of
four businessmen, four educators
and four politicians, all
bureaucrats. It is quite obvious
what this commission wants -
greater control o' boards of trustees
bv state governments.
I wo o' the four politicians on the
panel are governors, one is a former
governor. Certainly they would like
to choose board members. Having
the authority to choose members
would greatly increase a governor's
power over all public institutions of
higher education, where there is lit-
tle need for more government
bureaucracy.
And this panel of pompous do-
gooders has the gall to claim that
their proposal would "insulate
governing boards from excessive
political interference It would
create exactly the opposite the
choice of boards would be moved to
the smoke-filled rooms with the
politicians.
The commission also believes that
"extensive student participation on
board committees is desirable, but
that (the presence of) students as
full voting members of the board
creates a conflict of interest
Here's the conflict o' interest: a
governor or other legislative com-
mittee hand-picking boards that
operate on state budgets.
This proposal is a blatant attempt
by state governments to step further
into university operations at the ex-
pense of students and faculty
members. The association of Gover-
ning Boards of Universities and
Colleges should carefully consider
this proposal and put it where it
belongs - in the trash can.
And here's an interesting tidbit:
The chairman of the committee was
Robert W. Scott, former governor
of North Carolina.

I SUEAK,
DROP-ADD GETS
UO&SE EVEfY
TIME I
fi
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i iVt-s ��� .� . . V . 5-vX
'Rest Of America9 Votes Carter
By RICHARD GREEN
itwrftl Msnagff
Now thai both primaries arc over, it's
only a matter of months until we make the
final choice, Reagan or Carter. Present
polls show Reagan a slight favorite, but
Carter still has the power o incumbency.
It will definitely he a close election, so
close that many believe neither candidate
will achieve a plurality.
While most U.S. citizens are keen on the
issues of this election, man) of them
haven't decided who they will vote for. But
the rest of America, our neighbors south
o the Rio Grande, have a very definite
favorite in November, and for very
definite reasons.
The 1 atin Americans overwhelmingly
favor Jimmy Carter because of his record
o helping those countries economically
and politically. On the other hand, they
fear Roan id Reagan's reactionary tone,
and that a conservative in the V hite House
will encourage the right throughout C en-
tral and South America. As several Central
American businessmen told me recently.
"The future of Central America will dc
pend on this election
Although moderate 1 atin Americans
complain oi Carter's ineptness, they praise
his policy of mutual respect. Speaking to
Newsweek, one Venezuelan official said,
"lor years, the United Staes saw
Moscow's hand behind every effort to
overthrow dictatorial regimes. Carter was
the first American president to admit that
events in El Salvador and Nicaragua have
domestic causes independent ol the con-
frontation between the Superpowers. With
Reagan, it's back to square one
Whether or not Reagan and the
Republicans believe it, Nicaragua is still
closer to the United Slates than to Russia
or Cuba. In the battle over the U.S. aid
package tor Nicaragua. Republicans label-
ed the Sandinistas as anti-United States
and dangerous. The revolution in
Nicaragua is supported by all o the United
Stales' most important 1 atin American
allies, and slapping the Sandinista govern-
ment in the face has been fell throughout
1 atin America.
In addition to the possible alienation ol
our allies, a Reagan presidency would pro-
bably encourage dictatorships. "The elec-
tion o Mr. Reagan would be a clear signal
to every general in Latin America says a
Bolivian diplomat. "It would mean a green
light tor militarv coups
Reagan also has reservations about the
Panama Canal treaties, which gained high
praise for Carter. But Reaganites aren't
worried about either ot these issues in the
election. Maybe they should be.
Spanish Americans, the second largest
minority in the United Stales, have long
contended that I atin America is the most
important ally we can have, and many
black and white North Americans are
beginning to accept that idea rhis factor
has been totallv overlooked by Reaganites
and most election forecasters.
Richard Wirthlin, Reagan's campaign
manager, contends that Reagan need only
concentrate on key states to win the elec
tion. Wirthlin seems to be counting his
votes before they hatch, especially in
Arizona. New Mexico, rexas and Florida,
where the Spanish American vote plays a
major role.
Black Americans have always been a
powerful voting bloc and C arter will pro
bably carry the black vote again in 1980
But Spanish Americans will turn out m
droves for Jimmy Carter, and that could
have a powerful effect on Reagan's
strategy.
&
11 'J ,iWi ,ci ,rM -Mum); i �' -
pS. ! 14 0
A. s K ' 1 U
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ta�
Of t -�
ECU: A Student - Faculty Partnership?
"zg
B Jon Yuhas
East Carolina University is final-
ly, after O years, preparing to enter
the world of the major universities.
After groping for a medical school
to the detriment of the
undergraduate and graduate pro-
grams, the university, under the
guidance of a new chancellor and an
almost entirely new administration,
can now turn its attention back to its
original goal.
Perhaps that purpose should be
examined in order to refresh our
memories as to why we are here. In
his first speech to the faculty con-
vocation of his first year as
chancellor. Dr. Brewer gave one
idea o just what the role of a
university is. A university can exist
without students, administrators, or
buildings; the only thing that is
necessary for the existence of a
university is its community of
scholars, its faculty. A university
then is a research institution, and
IC U is placing more and more em-
phasis on research done by its facul-
ty. "Publish or perish" is rearing its
ugly head at 'Ole 1 ZU and sud-
denly members oi the (acuity that
have not been too concerned with
research are swarming to our inade-
quate library. Journals that have
gone untouched for years are sud-
denly seeing the light of day. As a
result, more money is to be spent on
the library, to make it more useful
as a research tool. When the library
is improved it will be a recruitment
device for new faculty members who
will do their research here and bring
honor to this university. The
students can benefit from this role
change for the faculty. They will be
taught by the leaders o research in
various fields, instead of mere
observers whose knowledge of a
given subject could be as old as their
degree.
Some would say that a great
researcher is not necessarily a great
teacher and that the new emphasis
on research will be detrimental to
the students because their teacher
will be spending his time on his own
projects and let his students come
second or even last. There are many
examples on campus of the right
blend of researcher and teacher;
both research and instruction can be
done by the same person. If given a
choice between the great teacher
whose knowledge is dated and se-
cond hand and the great researcher
whose knowledge may not be so ac-
cessible, only a fool would elect for
a great understanding of obsolete
information.
If indeed a university is its facul-
ty, then the ability to teach is secon-
dary to the amount and quality of
actual knowledge that a faculty
member possesses. This knowledge
is shown, of course, in the number
and quality of publications or other
'creative activities' that a faculty
member produces.
The question then is, "What is
the role of the student at a universi-
ty?" If a university is the great
storehouse of truth guarded and
nurtured by the faculty, what is its
point of existence without those
young and eager minds that journey
there to learn of these esoteric
truths. Students are the reason that
scholars are subsidized by society. If
there were no practical value in
research, then only the idle rich
could engage in it. The answer to the
question "what is the 'Idea of a
University?1 was answered by
John Henry Cardinal Newman
almost 130 years ago
A university training is the great
ordinary means to a great but or-
dinary end; it aims at raising the
intellectual tone of society, at
cultivating the public mind, at
purifying the national taste, at
supplying true principles to
popular enthusiasm and fixed
aims to popular aspiration, at
giving enlargement and sobriety
to the ideas of the age, at
facilitating the exercise of
political power, and refining the
intercourse of private life.
A university is a partnership bet-
ween a faculty that possesses
knowledge and a group of students
that needs that knowledge in order
to accomplish that "great but or-
dinary end With some patience
and time, perhaps Dr. Brewer and
his staff can accomplish that part-
nership here in Greenville.
"�?. 4 - � �
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I
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Ihat part
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Op-Ed
Other Opinion
Augusi 28, 1980 5
r.
Campus Forum
IFC President Urges
Greek Involvement
Rush at E a s t
. arolina i an oppor-
unn tor interested
people to meet and
mingle with fraternity
members. Rush is a
week ot open house at
all l Cl fraternities,
consisting of partying,
meeting new people,
and becoming familial
with the Greek system.
Before going through
rush, a person should
be familial with some
oi i he ways ot the
Greek system as well as
the do's and don't.
li is ise to visit and
meet members of all
fraternities. lash
fraternity is different
and each lias something
unique to offei.
You need nol be shy
around new faces.
Mans fraternities have
established themselves
a; 1 c I by continuing
success in sports,
academia and social
events. n member
would be glad to
answei all questions ot
rested rushee.
1 here are main
things thai an in-
terested person should
k n o b e t o r e h e
dedicates the rest ot his
school lite to one
fraternity.
Don't lei yoursell be
railroaded, t onsider
everything. rushee
has only one week to
learn all he can, so he
needs to use (us time
wisely and not stick to
the tnst house with an
open bar. Aftei you've
seen all the fraternities,
it's usually a good idea
to trequent the ones
you like best in ordei to
increase your chances
ot receh ing a bid.
Don'l leave a house
you like without firsl
m eet i n g all t h e
brothers. A fraternity is
made up ot men with a
common goal, but
there is always in-
di iduality. 11 you
don't meet all the
brothers of a house.
you can't get a true pic-
ture of the fraternity as
a whole. It also in
The Storm Over Women's Rights
you can.
Other than meeting
the fraternities and tak-
ing time to consider the
best men, you have no
other worries during
rush week. So rush,
and eiljoy a week with
the Greeks.
HARRY UAH s
IIC President
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian
welcomes letters ex-
pressing all points of
view. Mail or drop
them by our office in
the Old South Building,
a oss from Joyner
I ihrary.
I criers must include
the name, major and
i (ossification, address,
phone number and
signature of the
auihorfsj. Letters
should he limited to
three typewritten
pages, double-spaced,
or neatly printed. All
letters are subject to
editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel.
1 hi M V ikk I Oil s
One of the slicker
performances at the
Democraiic Conven-
tion was provided by a
well-organied group
ot women who rewrote
the party platform
despite strenuous ob-
jections from the White
House and without
much help from the
preoccupied Senator
from Massachusetts.
As a result. Democratic
candidates are running
on a platform totally
opposed to the
Reublicans on the two
big political issues fac-
ing women today, the
Equal Rights Amend-
ment and abortion
rights. Republicans are
pledged to do away
with both. Democrats
w holeheartedly support
both.
What's most notable
here is not the sudden
potential for a referen-
dum on so-called
women's issues this
fall, but the very fact
that they have now
achieved paramount
political importance.
There have been na-
tional battles in the past
over abortion and
equal rights, like the
"three A's" charge in
1972 that Senator
McGovern favored
"acid, amnesty and
abortion But they
were peripheral com-
pared with the current
debate. Not since
women won the vote
have their concerns
raised such a political
storm.
At the Democratic
convention, women tor
the first time were en-
titled by formal rule to
half the delgaie seats.
There were far less at
the Republican conven-
tion. The issues were
vehemently debated at
both. In Detroit, the
student Republican
stand against what a
majority of American
women favor caused
soul-searching among
the delegates. In New
York, the Democrat's
stan d o n w o m en's
issues was one of the
few sources o real en-
thusiasm. Probably no
m o m e n t won s u c h
cheers as when Senator
Kennedy said that on
E.R.A "We will not
yield, we will not
equivocate, we will not
rationalize, explain or
excuse
The Republicans
clearly seem to be on
the losing side. Their
positions represent a
step backward at a time
that women generally
are moving forward,
into the work force and
into political con-
sciousness. In tact, the
eall tor a constitutional
ban on abortion is so
extreme that Ronald
Reagan seems quickly
to have muted his sup-
port tor it. The morn-
ing after the rtomina
lion, he downplayed his
opposition to abortion.
And he observed thai
the G.O.P. favors
equal lights f oi
women. opposing
f.R.A. only as the best
or onlv was to reach
that objective.
Alter years ot being
regarded as extremists
and troublemakers,
women proved at the
Democratic convention
that they can be a
serious, effeci i e
political force Presi-
dent c artei tried to ap
pease them by sending
out senioi antes to ex-
plain his commitment
and to tell how mam
women he has an
pointed to high office.
But even he, once his
r e nom ination w ,i $
secure beyond doubt.
grudgingly endorsed
the platform planks
they has! forced upon
I i m
1 he battle foi
women's rights, jn
short, i no longei lone-
ly not peiipheial. It has
mo ed w here it
belongs: to the centei
an politics
j W r 1
, The North Star Band
IVff
HICK-ASS COUNTRY
rushee should ask creases your chances ol letters by the same
questions about cost receiving a bid to meet author are limited to
and about pledging. as many brothers as one each 30 days.
'Myth
Spare That Tree
"Preposterous'
; med about right tor
. statement that Sen.
Kennedy attributed to
Ronald Reagan in his
speech I"uesday: "80
percent ol air pollution
comes from plants and
trees Bui immediate-
ly from Reagan head-
quarters in California
came word that the
senator had misquoted
the former governor.
What Mr. Reagan had
fa' iaid, his deputy
. � informed the
jss, was thai "80 per-
cent ol nitrogen oxide
pollutants in the air
come from plants and
trees, not HO percent of
ail air polllution Oh.
It something tells
,i that still sounds
hy, you're right.
1 ike so main other
campaign clarifica-
tions, this one only
make- matters worse.
So here, for the record,
is more that you will
ever again want to
know about nitrogen
oxides. If it begins to
sound too much like
high school chemistry
das- for comfort, beat
with us: there will be no
quiz at the end.
I here are three types
ol nitrogen oxides in
the atmosphere. Their
imes sound alike but
they aren't- two of
them are pollutants and
one ol them isn't 1 he
one that isn't nitrous
oxide. NO. amounts to
more than 90 percent ol
the total. It he was talk
ing about anything, this
is the one Mr. Reagan
was probably talking
about. It is given off by
a relatively small class
of bacteria known as
denitrifying bacteria.
Plants and trees do not
e m it any gas e o u s
nitrogen ox i des �i n
fact, they spend most
o' their time and energy
taking in nitrogen from
the soil. Nitrous oxide
(which you might also
recognize as laughing
gas, although this is a
serious matter) is a
biologically natural and
benign gas. Its chiel
role is to control the-
ebbs and flows of the
ozone layer in the
stratosphere.
T h e o t h e r I w o
nitrogen oxides, nitric
oxide. NO. and
nitrogen dioxide. NO .
are the pollutants. Both
are principally the pro-
ducts ol combus-
tion- the burning ot
coal in a power plant or
gasoli n c i n a n
automobile engine.
Nitric oxide is a col-
orless gas that in itselt
is not particularly tox-
ic. However, it reacts
with hydrocarbons and
sunlight to produce
smog that can harm or
kill plants and animals.
It is aKo oxidized in the
air t o form ihe
orangish-brown
nitrogen dioxide, which
is quite toxic. It in-
terferes with the
blood's ability to carry
oxygen and can pro-
duce various types ot
lung damage. Nitrogen
dioxide also reacts with
water vapor to form
nitric acid, which gives
us acid rain.
e like to be helpful,
so here is what Mr.
R e a gan can say
if- though it seems
unlikely�he should
ever again wish to com-
ment on the nitrogen
cycle: "90 percent of all
nitrogen oxides come
from denitrifying
bacteria It hardly
seems a slogan to cam-
paign on, but it has the
advantage o' being
right. For those of you
who were wondering if
you should pae over
your back yards in the
interest of cleaner air,
forgel it �plants and
trees are innocent of
polluting the air. Man-
made air pollution, Mr.
Reagan notwithstan-
ding, is still the pro-
blem.
I he story about driv-
ing a Cadillac to pick
up a welfare check is a
myth, according the the
N.C. Department of
Human Resources, li
would be difficult, in
this state, to defraud
the g o v e r n me n t o t
enough welfare money
to buy one of the lux-
ury automobiles.
I he average welfare
r eci pien i in Nor t h
Carolina is expected to
receive 14,548 this ear
in case payments, food
stamps and medical
benefits, the depart-
ment says. This is well
below the nation's
poverty level income of
$7,450 in urban areas
and $6,340 on farms.
Only eight states have
lower payments in Aid
to families with Depen-
dent Children: a max-
lnnin of $210 per
month for a mother
with three children to
support.
Welfare recipients
are encouraged to
work, according to
state Human Resources
officials. W elfai e
payments are adjusted
or terminated accor-
ding to the amount ot
money earned. County
departments ot Social
Services check Social
Security and state
Employment Security
records to determine in-
come beyond welt are.
and they have been
fairly active and suc-
cessful in charging
fraud when welfare
cheating occurs, the
department says.
It efforts to
discourage chearting
and encourage working
are as effective as
claimed, the stqate
might be justified in
raising I DC
payments to help the
pooi survivie in an
inflation-ridd e n
economy. 1 he max-
imum aid figure ap
pears to support the
contention ot Human
Resources officials that
most welfare recipients
don't have a driver's
license, much less a car.
1 he rumor about
driving a luxutv cai
need not be discounted
entirely however. On
the used car market
nowadays, the biggei
an old machine the
more affordable its
purchase price.
v
S&S
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Doors open at 9:00
Music starts at 9.30
Coming Tue. Sept. 2 Bill Lyerly Band
Wed. Sept. 3 Snuff - Ladies Free
AT FIRST STATE BANK YOU'RE
MORE THAN "JUST A FACE
IN A CROWD
m
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Standing in line is part of every student's life. Just like
makiny new friends, going new plat es. getting used lo
your new hometown! At First State Bank you're more
than just a face in a line. . . and we want vu to know if
FIRST STATE BANK HAS A BETTER
WAY OF BANKING. . . JUST FOR YOU
SI
LUU'S
TRADING CO.
Welcomes Back ECU Students
Featuring:
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OPEN NOW
i-
Rlvergate Shopping Center
E. 10th Street
Greenville, N.C.
752-1750
There are a lot of reasons to c hoose a bank
. . . bank locations. . . special services. free checking
and of course. First State Bank offers all of this to
you.
THERE IS A BETTER WAY OF BANKING
FIRST STATE CLUB
Better than free checking!
Our club account is a special package of banking services
designed just for you. For one low monthly fee you get
such services as no minimum balance checking. . at-
tractive club checks. . . accidental death insurance. . .
special discount coupons (good at local merchants and
theatres) and 24 hour BankAround!
YOU MAY NEVER HAVE TO STAND IN LINE AGAIN!
Now you can handle your banking 24 hours a day, every
day with a First State BankAround card. You can use
your card at both BankAround locations in Greenville or
at any BankAround interchange location in North or
South Carolina. All at no charge to you!
PLUS WE HAVE SATURDAY MORNING
BANKING AT OUR WINTERVILLE OFFICE.
No other bank in town offers a better banking bargain or
lower costs. The hometown bank wants you to feel right
at home. . . friendly service. . . lower costs. . . better
banking.
It's worth changing banks for.
THE HOMETOWN BANK INVITES YOU TO
ITS DOWNTOWN OFFICE ON THE MALL
FOR REFRESHMENTS AND AN OPPORTUNI-
TY TO VISIT YOUR HOMETOWN BANKER
No matter which banking plan you choose. student
checking. . . or our regular club account. . . you won't
find a better way of banking!
First State Bank
�THE HOMETOWN BANK" 756-2427
Downtown branch: Corner of
3rd and Evans. 3 blocks from
campus.
Northwest branch: Memorial
Drive, across from hospital
complex.
Greenville branc h: Memorial
Drive, beside Parkers
Barbecue.
Winferville office: Main St.
Winterville.
Member FDIC
� . � -
.





6 THE EASl CAROL INI AN MJGUST 28, IMP
t
Work Experience
Through Co-Op
B PENN1 AIMIV
While a c ol le g e
degree is certainl)
valuable, man)
graduates arc often fav
ed with the tact that
tiie have no real work
experience to accom
p a n y i h a t d e g r e e
1 (l! Cooperative
1 ducat ion Program ol
s an interesting solu
lion to this dilemma.
Harrizene Keyes
c ooperative 1 ducation
explained thai the pro
gi am offers the student
the opportunity to
work and to
on-the-job training as
well as college credit
1 he ; am
operates in con juru I
with various federal
agencies and
businesses, she said.
1 ach sem estei .
presentatives from
these agencies and
businesses come
campus to recruit new
applicants.
fhi
Coopei ativc
1 d u cation o It i c e
receives job Jescrip
tions and requirements
tor the position that
will be available foi the
next semester, Keyes
said. An student is
eligible and nia fill out
an application it he is
interested. It' the job
within a federal agenc.
.�n the student must
till out additional
forms.
Applicants are then
inters iewed. Ottei
mterv iew take
paper, she said
dent mav met
to send in a resume, she
added.
I he program is set
up on a three semester
basis. student works
the firsl semester, takes
courses the second,
then returns lo work
foi the thud semester,
according to Keyes,
A student mav, it tie
wishes, do course work
at anothei universit)
and have the credits
transfeired, she said.
1 he Department of
the avv will send
recruiters to campus
during October. Other
agencies and businesses
that cooperate with the
program include the
Smithsonian Institute
(D.C.), the En-
ironmental Protection
genc. the Center foi
I) i s e a s e t on! r o 1
(Atlant a I. the U.S.
Park Sevice, and the
Research Triangle Park
in Raleigh, Keyes said.
Cooperative 1 duca-
tion has another pro-
e i a ni that places
students in jobs. This
program, called the
Parallel Program, does
not olfei college credit,
however. 1 he Parallel
Program works with
various businesses in
Greenville and locallv
in eastern North
c arolina.
Both programs
togethei place at least
200 students each
semester, Keyes saiei.
lanv ol these teni-
p o t a r v positions
become permanent
ones alter the student
ha .� aduated, -he add-
ed
ECl Cheerleaders
perform at the down town mall hist week
Hunt Appoints Da Vanzo
Go lames B. Hunt
Jr. has named Dr. John
P. DaVanzo, an Easi
Carolina U n i ver s i t
pharmacologist, to
serve as vice chairman
ol the N.( . Board oi
Science and
Technology.
Hunt is chairman of
the Is-member board,
established in 1963 to
accelerate the state's
economic growth bv us
ing available scientific
and technological
resources.
DaVanzo, profcssoi
ol pharmacology at the
1(1 School ol
Medicine, has served as
a member ol the board
since September. 1979.
He has considerable ex-
perience organizing
academic and industrial
research groups.
Prioi to joining the
medical school faculty
in 1976, DaVanzo was
vice president o'
research and develop-
ment for a major inter-
national phar-
maceutical company.
SO YOU WANT TO BE A
PHOTOGRAPHER
-
i
jf 0S.
r
H
The LCU Photo Lab is now hiring newspaper and
yearbook photographers for the 1980-81 school
year. See the Media Board secretary for an application
in the Last Carolinian office, second floor of the
Old South Building, across from the library.
Let �he lEaat (Earoltman
write home for you every
Tues. and Thurs.
Every Tuesday and Thursday you can read the most
informative stories about the news events of the day
at ECU and in Greenville the best sports coverage,
and interesting features about the people, places and
things surrounding yousocan your parents. For $25
your parents can get a one year mail subscription to
the East Carolinian.
Serving the campus community since 1925, the East
Carolinian provides valuable insights into student
life at East Carolinia University for your parents.
Twice weekly, we can tell your family about the
most current campus and local news. Student free
flicks, concerts and sports events are all covered in
the pages of the East Carolinian, as well as state and
local news that affects the lives of ECU students.
Our experienced, award winning news staff can br
ing your parents the news wherever it is happening
in eastern North Carolina, plus the most dynamic
behind-the-scenes investigative reporting.
Our features section will bring them fascinating and
often humorous human interest stories about the peo
pie of the university and the surrounding area. It also
covers the cultural events that enrich student life, as
well as presenting interesting slices of area flavor.
Spanning the entire spectrum of ECU'S athletic ac
tivity, our well trained staff of enthusiastic sports
writers will bring your family comprehensive
coverage of ECU'S exciting football schedule, in ad
dition to highlighting the rest of an impressive sports
program.
Our remarkable staff works around the clock to pro
duce the best possible newspaper, containing the
most essential news, features and sports of interest
not only to you, but to your parents and friends as
well, wherever they may be. The East Carolinian. . .
let us inform them.
Your parents, friends, and relatives can subscribe
to the East Carolinian for one year by sending a
check for $25 to: George Hettich, Circulation Dept
The East Carolinian, Old South Building, East
Carolinia University, Greenville, N.C. 27834
If you wish, you may subscribe for them by mailing
a check for $25 along with the coupon below to the
East Carolinian, or just drop by the East Carolinian
office.
�rje iEast (Earolfnian!
SUBSCRIPTION FORM
Name
Telephone .
RATE: $25 per year.
iEaat
(ftarfllftttatt
( ampt.
pan j'
Bri
To
i
rea
lllSl.i t






Cha


H
LtH
mmmm





Aid Goes To Half
Of Student Body
I HI S (. AROl IN1AN
�l C.l S! 28, IYKM
Back To The Bustle
(ampus life is slowlj returning to its normal estimates, 13,000 students �ill crowd the campus
pace after sleeping through a hot and mugg this fall.
Greenville summer. According to official
British Organization Seeks
To Stop Treasure Seekers
Continued from page 1
Other forms of student employ-
ment are PA 1 . Sell Help, and
Off-Campus Part-time Employ-
ment .
PACE is the Summer Off-
Campus Work-Study Program.
This enables students to work full-
time (40 hours a week) during the
summer to earn money toward the
next's school expenses. Each partici
pant is expected to save HO percent
Of his or her earnings tor college ex
penses.
Sell-Help is the University Part-
time employment. With institu-
tional hinds, ECU employs a
limited number ot students to work
m various locations of the university
cm a part-time basis. Recipients of
other forms of financial aid may not
accept a job in this program without
prior consent of a financial aid ad-
ministrator.
Off-Campus Part-time I inpay-
ment assist applicants andr their
spouses in securing part-time
employment in the Greenville area.
Although financial aid is given to
all who are eligible tor it, Bordreaux
stresses that recipients are under
obligation to maintain an acceptable
academic standing according to
university policy. He also added
that anyone with questons about
financial aid should come to the
financial aid office, which is located
on the second floor of Whichard
building. "We can direct anyone to
the right place or give them the help
they need Boudreaux said.
I QNDON U PI)
Michael Webb. 16, was
trying out the metal
detect oi tie got tor
Christmas when its
bleeps pinpointed
buried treasure worth
at least s2.s million.
That's the sort ol thii
STOP is trying to st
slop is an attack
upon a new army, ot
amateur t reas in e
hunters who use mt
detectors to dig up the
unbelievable riches
buried in Britain's soil
In initials stand
"Stop raking i
Pas
"That's w I
treasure hunters are do
ing,1 said Henry
Cleere, direct or ol the
Council oi British V
; fiaeology. ' I he re
ding our past "
STOP calls the d�
tor people pirates who
act in the name �
hob t leere used
the ord "lootei
Treasure hunters are
jus- a- bitter on the
other side ot the
debate
1 he issue is w hether
metal detectors should
be allowed to snifl out
every buried treasure
from prehistoric p
medieval jewels V
makes it important is
the stager ing wealth
there is to find.
Britain, an amencan
archaeologist once
said, is "the original
I reasure Island In a
very real sense, Cleere
said in an interview,
"the whole country is
an archaeological site
1 or 5 .()() ears
Britons buried gold and
silvei and precious
tone to safeguard
against Roman
soldiers, Viking
even the
i all those
centuries people have
lost oi mislaid coins
and rings and
- i. es
� ige pi opoi tion ot
this wealth presumably
is still there ()ne expert
savs there are "millions
upon millions" ot
treasures waiting to be
found.
finding them used to
be sheer accident. But
n same the metal
detetor, an american-
invented device which
win pinpoint under the
soil not only rusted
horseshoes or ciil war
cannonballs, but gold
cups and coins, Roman
Schoolboy Mick
Webb is the latest to hit
the jackpot.
Earlier this year his
Christmas-p r e sent
metal detector guided
him to what Irish of-
ficials called "the find
of the century" � a
gold chalice 1.2(H) years
old plus several other
pricelss objects.
1 hat was in Ireland,
outside STOP'S
jurisdiction. But the list
of British diseocries is
enormously rich.
George Puris, 20,
turned up a lead pot
filled with 14,105 coins
minted in the 13th cen-
tury. Man Holmes. 2
dug up 25 siber essels
dating to 275 A.D.
Malcolm Tricker, 37,
found five solid gold
iron age necklaces.
1 here is so much loot
to find that several pro-
fessionals make a living
with their metal detec-
tors. Not surprisingly,
the treasure hunting
hobby has exploded in
the last tew ears.
The home office sas
there are now 13s�,5(M)
licensed metal detectors
� in 1974 there were
30,000 used b
schoolboys and pro
lessors, housewies arid
truckdrivers. Cleere
sas UK),(MX) more peo
pie use detectors
without licenses despite
I he i isk ol an
880-pound fine and
three months in jail.
"It's happening in
the United States just
as it is here. " Cleere
said. But here there is
infinitely more treasure
to find.
Yikin
heild-
sw oru
a n d R e n a i s s a n c e
i e a e 1 s
Chairman Chosen
)i W illiam R.
Hoots Jr professor
a n d c h a i r m an o I
Graphic Arts in I Cl 's
School of 1 echnology,
s one of 20 educators
chosen nationally to at-
tend a two week series
oi technical workshops
and demonstrations in
the art ol punting
I he Workshop for
Graphic Arts I eachers
is scheduled Aug. 4 15
at Pittsburgh, spon
sored by the Graphic
Arts echnical I ounda-
tion and the American
Association ol Printing
f quipment Manufac-
turers Inc
Hoots said the
workshop sessions will
focus on rapid change.
advanced and "really
r e m a r k a b 1 e
developments" in prin-
ting technology
Hoots, a native ol
Hendersonville, N.C
began his "career" on
the "world's smallest
daily newspaper the
rryon Bulletin at
1 ryon, S.C working
there part time while
still in grammar school.
His interest in printing
increased while in voca-
tional training in prin-
ting at W atren W ilson
High School, Swan-
nanoa, VI
He received his bac-
chelor's and master's
degree- at Western
c arolina I niversity
and his PhD from Ohio
State I fnivei sity.
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than �. ami itJKWai MM

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Duties of Ambassadors
A art mmkn ot Amaaaaaoon Mil m wf mt MM
ka aananee m aw w mtrt aptotic actnritan at �a Aa�
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- �





Features
l i,l M 28, !W!
Page 8
II I AM K )l INI N
Edward Reep
In Hollywood
ECU Art Professor
Designed For Selznick
Man) a da) outside where the
skies and irees weie painted on a
H ( . He noM continues his
slot i with Si xperiences in
Hoilywi hxI v trking as a set
designer and painter during tht
iv-ws and 50s.
fi ientation issue oj I he
I as' i an, II Artist-in-
Residena Ed Reep told about his backboard, I ve watched the buds
experiences us an artist in World ' come sailing in lo land on a tree and
hit the scenic backdrop and slide
down to the ground.
"One day, although I didn't see
it, 1 was told thai a cat being chased
b) a dog tried to run undei the dum-
m western set barroom door. He
�� worked in the film studios as a just hit that wall hard, was stunned,
set designer, an illustratoi and and while the dog just watched in
ultimate!) as a scenic painter, amazement, the cat recovered and
Whenevei I needed money, I would ran away
ng md woik because Foi "Bandwagon" Reep painted,
leaching and painting is a luxur) lo m three weeks nine, a mural s0 feet
lain extent, and in m panning long and a hundred Feel high o! the
salCs m first 10 oi II one-man city ol New "loik.
,vss ! hadn't sold a thing. "But I nevei climbed a single lad
"When I wen; lo work in the film dei. because we worked in an eight-
studios, first job was on'Duel in stor) building, where on the sixth
the Sun ' 1 worked in a room next to floor, there were cuts in the floor,
the Shirle) I emple room, where two you just pressed a button, and the
were bus) all da) signing whole wall would go up or down.
s. temple's signature and sen- rhere were at least torn murals go-
ding out � ol her, and on the jng on at the same time. I hat was
othei side laran films were being i he hey da) ol motion pictures. Now
the) go on location more and
I was, wot king lot more
Sclnick International. I got paid an ven when he attended an school
I lot foi those days, $350 a Reep had a chance to gel free-lance
A . .i; vvas � Id nines work in the film industry. Bui no
,� . was m tviththeart mattei how lough u was lo make
" Reep id, smiling. mone) dining ihe Depression, the
later. Keep worked as an il- young aitisi refused lo sacrifice
Usti . Paradine Case respect foi the art in ordei to get i
with lames Mason, and on "1 ittle job.
Women " He then became a scenic "1 remembei once when 1 was
foi Mc.M ak worked on called to the studio by a young man
p . with stars such as lean Sun named Orson Welles, who is a COU-
M ii Brando and Fred pie ol years oldci than me. Mr.
Welles wanted me lo illustrate
"1 met some ver) profane Shakespeare's 'Twelfth Night
Hollywood si trs, but the stcaries that 'Hamlet,1 ' thello" five books in
were told abom ihe stars couldn't all thai he was going to rewrite
rcall be believed I was told Fred tor high school consumption, Alter
ver) hard man to get dickering with him the war-
aloi 'Don have anything to give me $3 a drawing, 15 draw
to 0,o - ' But while 1 was on ings m a book I went back to ihe
ihe foi "Bandwagon, head of the art school and told him.
he canu up and talked lo me foi "Ik- said I should take no less
about a hall houi and was uist as than $15 a drawing. So I went back
nice a man as you would ever want to RkO studios where Mr. Welles
to mee " was Inning his shave and haircut at
fo this da) Reep has main the time and yelling at me. He said,
�nds in the film industry. 'do in and talk to m business
"I had (taught) a class once with manager 1 did, and I got $15 a pic-
lerr Housner, George Fenneman mre, Siz a book, which was a lot
(onetime announcer foi Groucho ol mone) at the lime. When 1 came
Marx' game show 'You Bet Yout back out, Mr. Welles said. 'Well. 1
Life), Richard Crenna and Norman see that you've reached an agree-
rokar, who was the firsl Henr) ment line. You understand 1
Mdrich, Sidne) Miller, and others, went lo art school, and I'm going to
fro!esso! Keep remembers his pU onion skin ovei those drawings
class ol artists with a smile. so 1 can sav. 'Written and II-
�'I called them m celebrit) class, lust rated b Orson Welles.
and the) made me laugh so much, I "l said. 'You aren't going to Oo
don't know what 1 evei taught that with my drawings, Mr. Welles.
them I'll see you some othei time And 1
Reep takes pride in his scenic walked out
paintings most ol all his film work
He explained that it is a precise art
ECU Artist-in-Residence Edward Reep strikes a smiling pose in his
home studio. The studio is filled with files of many of Reep's
illustration for such magazines as Life, as well as photographs of his
years as a war correspondent and later as a Hulls wood set designer.
Some of Keep's souvenirs, current art projects and slutted birds fill
up the rest of his studio.
lifornia Town Doesn
See REEP Page 12. Col. 1
Worry
Bv
ROBERT LINDSKY
jn i rsfft is �� im-nii It
Gilro). Calif. � Tom Meyer took
a big bite of pasta el pesto, seasoned
heavil) with garlic, from a
stvrotoam dish and leaned over and
kissed Ins friend Pat. "This is one
place you don't have to worr about
having garlic on sour breath he
said "Everybod) does
11 e were among almost 60.000
people who converged on this farm
town M0 miles south of San Fran-
cisco last month to feast on the
glories of garlic. That aromatic ugly
duckling of th eliiy family has been
a friend o cooks and palates for
5.tKM) years, despite qualities that
have tended to give it an antisocial
reputation its strongest supporters
sa is undeserved and unfair.
What began a year ago as a
modest project to enhance the image
o' a town with a collective inferiori-
ty complex � a community whose
only distinction was that it produced
more garlic than any other in the
land � has ballooned into a mam-
moth celebration of the hometown
product, the second annual Gilroy
Garlic festival.
From hundreds of miles around.
people came to sing songs about
garlic, trade recipes and boasts
about its medicinal qualities, .to
recall again how garlic gave energy
to the builders of the Pyramids and
sexual drive to their pharoahs. and
to consume tons of food heabily
seasoned with what is known
botanically as album sativum.
Bands played and jugglers juggl-
ed; hot-air balloons carried visitors
up to the festival; Al Hansen moved
through the thick crowds wearing a
costume that made him look like a
giant bulb of garlic, and Jeannette
Arde, a local bank employee, vvas
crowned Garlic Queen.
Every where, it seemed, people
were eating and, afterward, exhal-
ing without any apparent feelings of
guilt.
"We blew out a Cuisinart grin-
ding up the garlic said Tim Filiee,
a real estate man who supervised
one of the food sales operations. In
all, he estimated that more than 900
pounds of fresh garlic had been used
to season the food sold at the
festival.
At the cluster of booths where he
worked, the visitors ate 1,800
pounds of calamari (squid) at S2.25
a dish; 700 pounds of scampi
sauteed in lobster b ' W
a portion; almost a ton ol pasta al
pesto at $1.25 pet serving; and
various othei items including 6,000
loav es ol gai lie bread
Cooks at the 60 or so other
booths sold such items as escargots
a la bourguignonne, garlic sausage
garlic-marinated turkey, garlic-
marinated mushrooms, garlic-
flavored olives and p � trlic-
seasoned artichoke fritters and a
wide range of othei dishes, all with
heav) accents ol garlic.
�t other booths, visitors could
buv garlic seeds, cookbooks with
gaihc specialties, a doen kinds ol
dehydrated garlic products and long
strands ol braided garlic bulbs for
$12, which the; draped over then
shoulders like Hawaiian leis.
I shirts that read "Garlic Is
Gorgeous" sold briskly; an
organization called the 1 overs ol
the Stinking Rose that lesci
itselt as a "garlic lover's society"
recruited new members; a natural
foods company from nona sold
what il called "odorless garlic" as a
means "to activel) combat fat,
cholesterol and toxic bacteria
At a booth operated b) the I resh
Garlic Association, visitors could
studv garlic lore and learn how over
the years garlic had been believed to
protect humans from vampires and
evil spirits and how . even now . some
medical researchers contend that it
has chemical properties effective in
treating problems ranging from
earaches to meningitis, arthritis,
tuberculosis and heart disease.
When a voting woman asked with
an embarrased smile how to deal
with the stench ol garlic on one's
breath, a spokesman tor the associa-
tion told her: "Try swallowing a
sprmg or two ol parsle) alter dinner
01 a teaspoon ol lemon juice
Meanwhile, at a local junior col
lege. finalists in a garlic cook-ofl
contest that had originall) drawn
more than 300 entries cooked their
specialties, and judges selected a
recipe tor baked garlic soup as the
winner; the runners-up were recipes
foi "mock oyster stirfry" and foi
"golden garlic clouds the latti
gai he-flavored popover. A recipe-
tot garlic ice cream did not place in
the winning competition.
today, just about everybod) in
Gilro) appeared to be saving that
the outdoor festival, which was held
in a park studded with tall oak trees
at the edge of the city. was probably
the biggest thing in the town's
historv .
Costa Rica
A Visit To Central America
On Aug. 4, Richard Green, general manager oj The
East Carolinian, traveled to Cosia Rica for 19 da) s on a
short vacation and to complete a photographic essay he
began in the spring of 1979. The following article is the
first in a series of his experiences in Costa Rua
By RICHARD GREEN
(rneraf Manner
Central America at
(diarrhea plus nausea).
1 had trouble balancing that with mv visions ol a
tropical paradise.
Well. 1 heard almost nothing about the revolution
(Three-Mile Island was the hot news item at the time),
but I did get ripped-ofl and I did contract Monteuma's
Revenge. And 1 fell in love with Costa Rica.
'The Country H ith A Smile'
Richard Green took man pictures; most did not
survive being x-rayed b overzealous customs
officials upon his return to the I nited States.
A little bo, lost in a crowd looks for his family
during a parade in Alajuela. 1 ��u Rica. While in
Costa Rica. East Carolinian General Manager
HERED1A, COSTA RICA
last!
The second session of summer school was over on In-
day, Aug. 1, and we boarded our flight in Miami the
following Monday. After 11 months of school and
work, landing in San Jose v.as a dream come true.
The Sanchez family greeted us at Juan Santamaria
airport. After many hugs and kisses and introductions.
we piled our surfboards and backpacks atop the Toyota
jeep and headed for Heredia. about 11 kilometers nor
thwest of San Jose.
During the spring semester 1979, 1 was a member ol
the ECU Costa Rica Program, headed by Dr. and Mrs.
Robert Cramer, both ECU professors. I lived with the
Sanchez family and studied at Universidad Nacional.
Now 1 consider this tiny, rugged and beautiful country
mv second home.
1 was apprehensive on my first trip south: the revolu-
tion in Nicaragua was in full swing just next door, not to
mention all the horror stories I'd heard about being
ripped-off or getting the dreaded Montezuma's Revenge
Costa Rica has the highest standard ol living in ten
ral America, the lowest rate o illiteracy. and the largest
middle class (not by North American standards).
Malaria and other tropical diseases are almost non-
existent, and education through the university level is
almost full subsidized by the national government.
The Costa Rican government is a representative
democracy, although the president weilds considerably
more power than his U.S. counterpart. Presidents are
elected every four years from a multi-party system but
can only be re-elected for non-consecutive terms.
(Maybe the U.S. presidential system would benefit from
that arrangement � the end of running for re-election
with the aid o incumbency.)
C osta Rica doesn't have an army, only a mellow na-
tional guardpolice force, which is seldom seen outside
the Central Yallev. The crime rate is verv low here.
See COSTA Page 9, Col. 1
Bru
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designer.
birds fill
some
ive in
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ica
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)st non-
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iderabK
ents are
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hemrfil trom -election
a mcHow na-
seeioutside
wlowhere.
THl I AST C AROL 1NIAN AUGUST 28, 1980
Cocaine Smugglers Use Elaborate Plans
To Elude American Customs Officers
Bruce Krye. guitarist and singer, performs at last year's "Student life
( elebrates � An Affair On The Mall This year's eelebration will be
held on Wednesday Sept. 3. from 3-7 p.m. The event is sponsored b
the Department of Intramural-Recreational Services in conjunction
with the Division of Student life. last vear's event attracted over 500
Bv BOB Ml RIMI
1 he young couple from Denver approached the
harried customs inspector at Miami International
Airport and plopped theii suitcases on the
countei.
I liev were self-assured and confident. hey
were well dressed I heir luggage was In Ciucci.
1 he onl suspicious item in their luggage was ;t
$1.98 white, glaed ashtray marked "Souvenii ol
Colombia
What Mould a well-to-do couple want with a
cheap ashiiax from Colombia, the inspectoi
wondered.
He asked senioi customs inspector Dale
()"( oonor 10 ha a look at the ashtray.
"I was flabbergasted (VConnoi said later.
"Thai very, mornig the Drug Einforcemeni VI
miistration showed me a photograph ot the same
kind ol ashtry. It was compressed cocaine, mold
ed and glazed to look like a cheap ashtray. It as
worth about $20,000 on the street. I hey were
mass producing them in Bogota
�s O'Connoi puts it, "Working narcotics at
Miami International Airport is like playing hide-
and-seek with the best brains in the smuggling
business. But sooner 01 later we usually win.
We'd better
()'(. unnor is part ot a 'hrec-ticred narcotics in-
tercept team composed ol customs, the drug
agency and the Metropolitan Dadc C ounty Public
Salcty Department narcotics intercept unit.
Customs looks tor contraband trom overseas,
the Metro police look lor i! on domestic flights
and the federal agency provides intelligence and
dev clops major casees.
I hi leant shares rcsponsiblity lor stopping the
How ol narcotics into Miami International Air-
port known as the busiest drug beat in the
I nited States. Miami is believed to be the port oi
entry foi as much .is 95 percent o the cocaine
thai eels into the country.
I ewei than 200 federal agents and Metro of-
ficers search foi the suspected drug couriers,
known in the trade as "mules I he mules n to
blend in anonymously with the masses wqho pom
into Miami daily, and they often succeed.
I asi year, 3.5 million passengers arrived here
from abroad, mostly latin America, thousands
ol cargo planes with freight as well as passengers.
It we see a drop in body earners, then wc
know ihe big shipments are gelling through
said Cieorge I Urn. the man in charge ol the drug
agent v airpoi t unit.
I he tall, skinny man w ith a pui se slung ober his
shoulder eyed the young man paying cash tor a
one-way ticket to I os ngeles. "Theyoungstei was
barely out ol his teens. His hail was in a ponytail,
his icans loose-fitting.
Ihe man with the purse was an agent, a
"narc He looked at Pearson, who nodded
slightly 1 he nod meant the young travelei fit the
Drug I nloiecemeii! dministraiion's com
puteried profile ol a domestic drug courier, a
profile which is updated almost daily.
ECU Student Tells Experiences During
Recent Travels In Costa Rica
Cont. from p. 8
Costa Rica doesn't have an army, only a
mellow national guard-police force, which is
seldom seen outside the Central Valley. The crime
rate is very low here.
Ihe international economy is totally based on
agriculture � bananas, coffee and sugar � and
the domestic economy is Still based on the
market, although U.S. influence is growing rapid-
ly. Rising oil prices have caused substantial in-
creases in tood prices. 1 ike most Third World
countries. Costa Rica must import all ot its oil
from Venezuela, Mexico, the United States or the
OP1 t nations.
Despite inflationary pressures, Costa Ricans
are still smiling. The climate and the easy-going
lifestyle promote a friendly and generous quality
sorely lacking in the United States. There is little
worrv about internal conflict � Costa Rica has
the most tranquil political history oi the isthmus.
The greatest external threat comes from (he
Superpowers and a possible nuclear war.
1V amos A Las Play as'
cow boys.
On the second day at Manuel Antonio, the
' 1 om's" went into town to buy some food while
Mike and 1 went surfing. It began to rain early in
the afternoon, so we headed for a small
barrestaurant. the Mar v Sombra, about a mile
south of where we were camping. We drank
cervezas and played cards until 10 o'clock that
night. Ihe Tom's finally showed up � they
didn't buy any iood. but they did have a bottle of
guaro (sugar-cane liquor).
nie
soft fitting
sport footing
'You Missed It'
I hat was then greeting. While in town they met
!ui vacationing computer salesmen from
Oklahoma. Together they went alligator hunting
with two hombres malos, Hdwin and Walter,
residents o' Quepos. The day's catch included
two medium-sized alligators and about 50 pounds
of clams. And we're all invited to a clam bake
tomorrow night 1 lungs were shaping up
already.
So we opened the bottle oi guaro and invited
our Dutch friends for a drink. It finally stopped
raining and we staggered down the beach to our
soggy campsite, looking forward to the next dav.
Little Tom and the computer salesmen drove
up around 9 p.m roudy and reeking oi alcohol.
One oi the "cowboys as the salesmen referred
to themselves, sat down and proceeded to harrass
Rita.
She told him where to go in the finest fashion,
but he wouldn't give up. Mike lost his temper and
traded insults with the cowboy, lor awhile a bar-
room brawl seemed so imminent that Chico, the
waiter, came to our table and collected all the
glass objects. I kept mv beer bottle firmly in
hand, expecting the worse
One week on the beach produced wonderful
tans, peeling noses, and man) new friends: a
fugitive from (ireat Britain, three students from
Holland, and a surfer from Peru. But our excur-
sion will be remembered for alligators, rain and
cowboys.
He'e's sure footing that's
for all your sporty doings
Soft leather uppers
laced with rawhide,
detailing top bouncy
crepe bottoms C'rnon,let
Connie set you comfort
bound Kittie in camel
leather, $35 00 s.zes
m&n simply tied slip on
in Tan. or Burgandy
leather $35 00 sizes
PHONE 756 8563
HOURS 10 00 Til! 9 00 Mon Sat
CONNIE SHOES
CAROLINA EAST MALL
AND
PARKWOODMALL
WILSON N C
Writers Wanted
Call 757-6366
"l et's go to the beaches That's why we came
here -� rest and relaxation on the "rich coasts
Our fust stop was las playas de Manuel Antonio,
near the Pacific port city oi Quepos.
Ouepos sprang up a few decades ago when the
United Fruit Company introduced the banana in-
dustry north oi the natural port. When it was
discovered that bananas fared better to the south
near dolt it o and on the east coast near Limon,
the Ouepos crop was converted to less-lucrative
palm nuts. Quepos became the tranquil village it
is today.
After two. days in Heredia, we took a morning
flight in a six-seat, twin-engine Cesna to the
coast. It's takes only 20 minutes, a short hop over
two gnarly mountain ranges, but the trip takes
nearly six hours by bus.
Ihe national park oi Manuel Antonio is a
15-minute busride from Ouepos. We set up camp
in the shade of a palm grove, near the house of a
campesino family who had befriended us a year
ago. 1 here we could get plenty oi fresh water and
have someone to guard our more valuable posses-
sions.
Our foursome included Mike Monahan, an
ICl student of Jacksonville, N.C and a veteran
oi the Costa Rica Program; Tom Quinn ("Tomas
grande or big Tom), of Jacksonville, N.C
rom Smith ("Tomas pequeno or little Tom),
oi Charleston, S.C and myself.
C osta Rica has only two real seasons, summer
and winter, more accurately described as wet and
dry. January through April are the dry months,
and Mav through December arc the wet months.
During the wet season, it usually rains only in the
afternoons.
One week on the beach produced wonderlul
tans, peeling noses, and many new friends: a
fugitive from Oreat Britain, three students from
Holland, and a surfer from Peru. But our excur-
sion will be remembered for alligators, rain and
Back To School
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specializing in natural hair cuts tor men & women
Present ECU Student I.D. Fot
20 Off Your Next Haircut
Offer good thru ).( -$0
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And While You're There,
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Be choosev and save on this delicious treat from Chick-fil A
With the coupon below you can get a Chick-fil-A Americas
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HBBaMaaBM COUPON �� ��� � ����-
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Sears
size for the
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Where America shops
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SEARS. ROEBUCK AND CO
Satisfaction Guaranteed or Your Money Back
Come by the
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Carolina East Mall
PHONE: 756-9700

�� i np
i





10
I HI EASTCAROI IN1AN
AUGUST 28, 1980
-
� V I
I

r�rf � �


f' irsHP5-?-
lEfc "
�j1 w
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY ALL SHOWS 500, 7:00 AND 900 P.M
The Auppet Movie Aug. 29,30
Breaking Away Sept. 5,6
The Deer Hunter Sept. 12,13
"10" Sept. 19,20
Alien-Sept. 26,27
North Dallas Forty-Oct. 3,4
Manhattan Oct, 10,11
Life Of Brian-Oct. 17,18
Apocalypse Now Oct. 24,25
Halloween Oct. 31, Nov. 1
Being There Nov. 7,8
The Rose-Nov. 14,15
Kramer Vs. Kramer Nov. 21,22
The Electric Horseman Dec 5,6
A Little Romance Dec. 12,13
i ft, �
m
�����"
4j4
Superlative Films Scheduled For Hendrix Theatre This Fall
.mh Mini's iatUm Aard Winning film "Manhatian a November 10 and 11 in the Hendrix Theatre in Mviulinhall Student
1979 release, is one of man fine films that the Student Union Films (enter. Admission is free with ECU student I.I), and actiit card.
( nmmittee is planning to run this fall. I his film will he shown on
WEDNESDAY SPECIAL FILMS 800 P.M.
Wifemistress Sept. 10 . ,
West Side Story Oct 1
Millhouse: A White Comedy Oct. 15
La Cage Aux Folles-Oct. 22
Grapes Of Wrath Nov. 5
Exhibition Nov. 19
DOUBLE FEATURES 700 and 9:00 P.M.
SILENT-The Gold Rush, The General-Sept. 24
INTERNATIONAL The Seventh Seal, The 400 Blows Oct. 8
WESTERN High Noon, She Wore A Yellow Ribbon-Oct.29
HORROR Repulsion, Invasion Of The Body Snatchers Dec. 3
LATE SHOWS
The Kids Are Alr.ght-Oct.10, 11 00 P.M.
Fantastic Animation Festival-Nov. 7, 11:30 P.M.
All films will be shown in Mendenhall Student Center
SPONSORED BY THE STUDENT UNION FILMS COMMITTEE
Life With Dormitory
Neighbors Is Crazy
I) ID ORRls lot rubbing them
together. It vou walk
.Oil!
vou, no on almost an flooi in
, think the dorm, there will be
real jerk beaucoups ol stereos
�, rna com ribuiing lo i he
�� fori general atmosphere ol
rock'n'roll bedlam. Ii
. i- almost guaranteed
h stereo will be
vc blaring loi ridels
koin roommate dilferenl kinds ol
monies to music, since rock lans
he grass is have such widch dil
on ihe fereni kinds ol taste, oi
lack of it.
id bad l; might greatl help
who insure domestic tran
- . medieval quililv in the dorms it
imill and alvtavs said students were grouped
according to iheii
c stupid waste ol musical preferences.
nine (while I was ' " example, fans ol
reading them) But, people like ih Rolling
h ir , i.ih pale STones and t I �
tit tide ol could gel one dot m,
L�ms sul� and nol have lo listen
hers I knew to beach music, which
1 pic. in agine would have its o� n
, nc ob- dot m.
hut luck I i'e- amount ol noise
and having (oi music) thai youi
:ep in the hall every neighbors make cat
ind ihen having have an influence on
lo Ins exploits sou: own musical taste.
old and retold all ll you get any disco
ne! da lans neai out room.
and music you'll have to give up
i the satne relatively quiel people
the mam like loni Mitchell foi
in bei 'lie duration ol the
we. � " . except v eat.
m TyCer
wine and cheese shop
The
More-Than-Wine-and-
Cheese Shop
Delicious imported and domestic
cheeses, tasty biscuits and crackers,
gourmet delicacies, candies, imported
and domestic wines or beer and party
foods to make your entertaining a suc-
cess Stop in and browse-it is the shop
that has moral.
POPULAR DOMESTIC BEER
NOW ONLY$2.15
STROH'S MILLER PABST
BUSCH BUDWEISER SCHLITZ
(pkg.ofSixl 2-Oz.Cons)
AMERICAN LIGHT BEER
FAVORITES$2.31-2.70
SCHLITZ LIGHT MILLER LITE'
NATURAL LIGHT
MICHELOB LIGHT
(pkg.ofSixl 2 Oi.Bottles or Cans)
Drummond Bros. Beer$2.19
(Pkg.ofSixl 2-Oi.Cons)
Rolling Rock
Beer$2.65
(Pkg.ofEight7-Oi.Cans)
Ask About Our Party Trays and
Cheese Balls
Shop Monday Through Saturday
10a.m. Until 9p.m.
Phone 756 B E-L-K(756-2355)
FACTORY T-SHIRT SALE
AUG26, 19609
A 6:00 - UNTIL
HAPPY PLACE PARKING LOT
CORNER OF 10TH (j EVANS
Thooiondi of �cr��n printtd TjW�U
nylon )OCh�t� gym �hort$ lodl�s Fr�nch Cut Ti
Ot drottlcolry r�duc�d p'ic�i
All �li�� colon prlntj or ovolk)bl�
T-Shirts storting at 50C
FREE ECU Shirt
with $10.00 purchase.
See you there!
ATTIC
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SAT. IN ACONCER
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FRI: Afternoon Delight j
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50� BEVERAGES
SAT: TORONTO & YOUNG
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If it's sfck to love a pen,
then the world's going crazy.
ppened 1 �� � first Thei .� � kKeepe waitress
il . ewive � � I to the beauty ol
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Son e people feit it wa k 1 ' emol olved wrtl
Bui � � . ' �' ' t pen that writes witl
� osts i mi � � �' ' ' ; -t- t � . �
ttle meta ir thai l point from going squ
If ! izy.rt 11 pie fact, wi
understand that P I �� '� � �� n I what n 1 ike � �
points with foot; i lyers
omestoi i ���� '
. . ire 1 � � �
with a 01
Point feal the 69C
Pilot Fine -
-0 � ILCyT
It's r. - JS1
fineline rTKirkef pens
Write them with no service charge when you have a student checking account at BB&T.
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Lil
Is
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THE LAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 28, 1980
vi
V


x
I
I
ct BB&T.
I
tha fame v y poTTWiMiLrte
) &�
Life In The Dorms
Is Fraught With
Oddball Roommates
B DWIDNORRIs
v I i ii.i.
roommate (room' mat) n. I: One
who lics on the othei side of your
room. 2: One who is always in your
room at inconvenient times and is
impossible lo get rid of. See PES1,
If KK and II kkM
rhe sa that death and taxes are
she two inevitable things in life. Io
life in college musi be added a third:
roommates. (Unless you are rich or
lucky.)
roommate is often the first pci -
son you evei meet at college, excepi
foi people who hand you room kes
or stand in line with, watting to be
given room ke s.
rhere are a number ol easj ways
lo get a roommate, especially in the
dorms. One wa is simplv to ask one
of sour friends lo room with you. In
such a wa has begun the decline
and tall of main a friendship. Some
people room with a brother or
sister. After putting up with a par
ticuiar sibling lor almosi a score ol
ears, it's hard to see how they'd
want to continue in college, but I
suppose some families are naturally
close. My own brothei sas un-
complimentary tilings about this
school and goes lo one I say un-
cj mpiimentary things about, solv-
mg that problem.
It possible that nobody will
wani to room with you, but you can
shll find a roommate by the process
ot pot luck. SmipK sign up tor a
room, and as soon as school starts.
you'll have a brand-new roommate
tilling up our room with junk.
My lirst taste of roommates came
m Jones Hall m one ol those tem-
porary t hree -1 o a-room ar-
rangements. One roomie was a nice
but incurably sloppy hippie; the
other was a cleanliness fanatic, and
lo top it oil. paranoid. It we went
lor a drink of water, we had to lock
the door and the transom. (You see.
it's possible to stand in a chair, open
the transom, unlock the door with a
broom handle and totally plunder
the room before someone can walk
twenty feet to the water fountain.)
I he next roommate was not as
colorful, but made up for it by being
a jerk. 1'eoplc from his home town
kept offering their sympathy when
they found out I roomed with him.
He snored like an unmuflled
lawnmower; every cold rainy night
he locked me out and brought his
girlfriend over and bragged about it
all the nest day; and if he got a
chance, he locked me out at
miscellaneous times. He'd get up at
five a.m. and crank up the stereo,
not even usinu the expensive ear-
phones he was always bragging
about. He finally quit school, and I
got a refund from the Mafia since I
didn't need the hit man.
Other people I've known were
worse off. One guv got turned in tor
smoking dope the first dav in the
dorms by his roommate. A friend of
mine loomed with a "drug zom-
bie Another was stuck with a mili-
tant misanthrope whose main
philosophies ol lite were things like
"don4i roucH n stereo"
and "STAi Ol I OF MY SID1 OF
Mil ROOM
I he whole idea of having room-
mates is pretty absurd, when you
stop to think about it. As if getting
an education wasn't hard enough,
they expect you to live cooped up
with a stranger in a tiny, ugly and
uncomfortable dorm room. I hat is
something I wouldn't wish on a dog,
but most of them have their own
doehouses, anywav.
r
i
i
i
Central News
and
Card Shop
Inviting freshmen and returning ECU students
to shop our store tor rctrriTU'c nooks,
c la s s ics ,n otes as well as m a g a zines .pa per ba cks
oi al and out ol t u w n ne w spa per s and sta t iona r y .
Must everything tor school.
Located on K vans St. M all,
( c n i r ,i I News is open 7 da v s a week 9a m -8pm-
752-3333
Put Your
Account
Where
Students
Count
We never charge students a service charge for
checking No matter how low your balance goes
(Just as long as there is a balance j
So come see us We're handy to ECU And
we've got special f reebies tor students who open
accounts now
Bank of North Carolina
Me"wFDC
Locations c,cc
10th and Hamilton - 4th and Colanche Telephone 758-5165
V
YOUSTfcOrfTS a,P
The Tlri covur youcc
Kajoim, Vouu. sc y 3
Hi 11�1 Hi 111
In tlii t, 4 is
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Heir I attar
life if 118 11
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ft
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�ratcrei�
The biest stars in Hollywood are coming to Hendrix Theatre in Mendenhall Student Center this Fall. The
Student Union Films Committee brings you the year's top box-office hits all semester long plus a diver-
sified line-up of special American and foreign classics from this year and years past. We also offer weekly
double features starring such legends as Gary Cooper, Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, and, of course,
The Duke. Don't miss seeing the Best Picture of the Year, Kramer vs Kramer and Best Foreign Film win-
ner, I.a Cage Aux Folles or such blockbusters as Apocalypse Now and Alien. See them in our plush theatre
and hear them on our new and improved sound system. For your convenience, we have added a special 5
p.m. showing of our Friday and Saturday evening popular films in addition to the regular 7 and 9 p.m.
shows. Admission? ID and Activity Card. The Student Union Films Committee-We Play the Hits!
mm
STUDENT UNION
t AST CAROLINA WNVfRSTTT


� m mm
mm
Npipi�Mgm





12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 28, 1980
Dormitory Cooking Can
Brew Up Troubles
�"
tes
Y
PST

B DAVID NORKIS
Anywhere between
zero and five times a
da. the average 1 Cl
student prepares a
meal, often in the most
makeshift kitchens im
aginable. (An) kitchen
that consists ol a
hotplate on the flooi
a nd a n opt ion a I
toast ci -oven on top ol
the teleision can salcl
be considered
"makeshift)
Man) students ai t ive
at college wocfull) tin
prepared foi dot ni life,
unable lo cook even a
proper ham sandwich,
much less complicated
hot dishes such as cann
ed ra 10I1 01 Spaghetti-
O's.
lew simple rules
and suggestions can noi
onl make a student's
mealtime more on
joyable, bui also help
avoid difficulties such
as malnutrition and
food poisoning.
One thing to
remember is 10 aim lor
a balanced diet. I r lo
eat oilier tflint's besides
"Nabs, cand) bars
and beer. Hamburgers
often have tomatoes
and lei Iuce on them;
pizzas have all sorts ol
things like mushrooms
and green peppers.
I hese arc two painless
was ol petting those
green vegetables needed
foi growing children
like us.
I V dinners usual!)
have a varict o!
various Foods in them.
II you gel about tfiree
or lorn, you'll have a
Fairly good meal.
A drawback to cook
ing in dorms is he large
number ol pests and
vermin attracted b
ood. And, besides
those htingr) cheap-
skates on the hall w ho
pop up aboui supper-
lime, (Hxasionall) bug
and sin.ill rodents are
attracted a well. Some
colleges solve this b
banning cooking in ihe
dorms. I his doesn't
w 01 k . since the
students can still eat
crackers, cand) and
potato i hips, l he cook-
ing ban simpl) results
in cockroaches with
vitamin deficiencies
and rotten teeth.
Sometimes, what lo
have foi a meal can be
a perplexing problem.
ECU Gay Student Adjusts
To Life In The University
Bv �l I (Ol I ls
siaffUrtiti

One of the last
minorities struggling
lor its rights toda) in
mei ica is ga) people.
So much has been w ril-
ten about sja s as a
group, yel what does
the average person
know about w fiat i! is
like to be gay? What is
a ga) person like
"I've known for so
lone' that I w as ua that
it seems like I've always
know n
I he speaker is lei i).
a 22 yeai old senioi a)
I asi (. arolina I nix ei si-
t Jerr) stands about 6
fee! 2 inches tail and
weighs about 195
pounds. He looks like a
tighl end, and in fact,
he played toot ball in
high school.
"here was a time
when Jerry would give
himself dates to
change. "I would sa
that b such and such a
date I wouldn't be ga)
am more Jerry ex-
plains. "It never work
ed
' � I never went
ihrough a ny real
trauma about being
gay Jerry comments,
' 'but it wasn't
something that was
easy to accept. That's
different now
Jerry says that he
began to accept the fact
that he was gay during
his sophomore year.
"Being away from
home for a while took a
lot of the pressure
away Jerry explains.
"1 felt more free to be
myself. Today 1 can
Edward Reep
Talks About
Hollywood
(.out. from p. 8
Although Reep enjoyed his work in films, he
noted that painting and teaching were more im-
portant to him. Most of the last thirty years of
his life have been spent doing these two things.
He spent almost twenty years at the California
Institute o the Arts (formerly the Chouinard
Art Institute), where he was chairman of the
painting department while Walt Disney was
board of trustees chairman.
"I was verv lond oi Disney, even though he
was a very straight, conservative man, and 1
considered myself a liberal. I think, in
retrospect, that he was not all that extremely
conservative, and I am not all that liberal
When he died, the school changed hands, and
some new people were brought in. Then 1 decid-
ed there wasn't any future for me there
For ten years the professor's lively wit and
wealth of experience have been helping young
artists at ECU grow. Reep seems to be as com-
mitted to his students' work as he is to his own,
and he lias some definite ideas about what it
takes to he a good teacher.
" lo communicate � that's the rub. To give
the private instruction that works and goes on
to serve as a foundation for tomorrow's ef-
forts; to give the instruction that inspires, in-
vigorates and be fully understood before mov-
ing on Reep wrote in a recent paper on
teaching effectiveness.
Part oi that communication, Reep feels, is
recognizing what level a student is capable of
performing at and getting that student to work
within guidelines, even if that means doing
remedial work.
A more practical concern for the school oi
art stems from the art students' special needs in
a university system.
"We have not yet come of age in the school
of art to the extent that our regimen is establish-
ed by us. We should make our own schedule.
We have got to either piggyback classes or ex-
tend art classes because the art student has
special facilities problems. This is one of my
greatest criticisms
Besides teaching, Reep sets aside a large por-
tion of his day for painting. After a variety of
professional experiences including working as a
court reporter for Life magazine, preserving
history in over 60 paintings which will someday
hang in a military museum for U.S. war
memorabilia, working with men such as Ray
Bradbury and Henry Dreyfuss, Fd Reep has
settled here in Eastern North Carolina. But for
him settled does not mean to stagnate.
"I'd hate to think I was stagnant. 1 try not to
be. I think that by trying to change that
hopefully it will keep me from getting old. And
until I reach senility, I'm happy trying to in-
vestigate different things
honestly say that I ac-
cept my being gay
However, now Jerry
looks a little uncomfor-
table. "1 mean 1 accept
it for myself, but that
doesn't mean
everybody accepts it or
would accept it he
sav s.
I here were times,
Jerr) admits, when he
wanted 10 tell his
parents that he was
gav. I hat was several
years ago, "when I was
feeling down about
things, and I wanted
somebody to unders-
tand Jerry says.
He has not felt that
need lor the past two
years. "1 don't feel
guilty about it now,
and I've come to realize
that it's not that impoi-
tant an aspect of my
life. My friends have
helped a lot
Jerry estimates thai
50 percent oi his close
friends are gav and
niosi of his straight
friends know that he is
gav. Jerry told one
friend, a girl named
Chrisiv, that he was
gav when he felt she
was beginning to expect
more from their rela-
tionship than he could
give. "So I just told
her. She took it well, no
hysterics or anything1
"lor a while he
continues, "she tried to
change me. She knows
now thai she can't
1 oday Jerry considers
Christy his best friend.
"Some oi mv best
Friends are women
Jerry laughs. "I know
that sounds corny. but
it's true I think a lot of
women enjoy being
friends with gav men.
I here is no sexual
pressure, and a woman
can enjoy a gav man's
friendship mote easi-
ly"
Jerry has never had
any problems in school
because he is gav. He
doubts thai many peo-
ple even know.
His job is a different
maitei. however. Jerry
is a waiter at a local
restaurant. "It's a good
job. I get good tips,
and I keep my private
life to myself. 1 hey
would lire me if they
knew 1 was gav lie
said. According to
lerry, the restaurant
lias sei a precedent in
the past of tiring people
w ho are openly gav "It
stinks, but it's not
worth losing mv job
over he says.
Jerry feels that it is
just a matter ol time
bet ore people unders-
tand what being gav
really means. "I'm noi
lhal differ eni than
anyone else Jerry
savs. "Prejudice nisi
lakes a long time to
erase. Meanwhile. 1
have mv lite to live "
( huc in .1 w lulc. ive all
gel in I hose moods
where ie can't make
up our minds about
w hat lo cat and eiihci
sii in ihe loom lot an
houi living lo decide,
oi may be even di ive all
a r o u nd (11 ecu v illc
several limes, lo save
you from this laic. I'm
going to prim here a
lew ol my favorite
recipes.
1. "I him Minute
Pizza Simply scleci
ihe size and flavor ol
the pizza you wain, and
call a fasi pizza place.
Within ihiriv minutes,
a piping hot pizza will
ai i ive at vout dooi.
2. "Three Hour Piz-
za Main beginning
cooks accident 1)
prepare ihis kind ol
pizza. 1 he recipe calls
foi ot dei ing a piza
from one ol ihe slow
pizza places. In ihrce
hours, .i piping cold
pizza mav arrive at
voui dooi
V "C harcoal and
Beans 1 his dish is ap
parent I) a great
favoine here ai 111.
Its preparation mvolcs
a lew easv steps;
V ()pcn a can ol
pork and beans.
B. Heal ihe
hotplate io "high
C. Place ihe can
on ihe red-hot bin nei.
I). I eav e the room
lo go lo class oi take a
ihirt) minute showci.
I . Remembei noi
io use watei on elec-
trical lues.
4. " oca-( ola and
( orn I lakes l his is a
s eII-e xpI an a lor)
breakfasi dish used by
people who don'l have
anv milk I do not real-
ly r ecom mend I his
recipe.
5. "Fried lea I
personally tried this
recipe last week . w hen I
was brewing some oi
d inary t ea a nd
wandered ol I lo watch
some " I om and lei i v "
cartoons. Ii you wain
lo uv ihis, cook the lea
on high heal foi about
six cailoons.
ft. "Hi nled Plain
Ihis is a populai
tegeiatian dish foi
w intei nine eating
Sei ihe room
radiatoi at KK) degi ecs
I .
Ii I lang a plain in
iis basket ovei the
ladiatot.
Cook Foi one
week, oi until brown-
ed
Broiled plain is an
cas recipe; so easv. in
Fact, lhal manv people
don'i realize lhal it's
being prepared. I here
are a couple ol pro
blcnis, though. Main
doi ins eui off I heii heal
m Mav. io save energy.
Olhei doi nis nev ei
have any heal io start
with.
EVERGREEN
MCAT-DAT Review Course
Take fhe course individually
in Atlanta in 3 to 5 days.
P.O. Box77034, Atlanta, GA
30309 phone(404)874-2454
J.D.DA WSON
Jewelers-Gemologist 2818 E. I Oth St. Greenville, N.C.
752-1600
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J





iter
ES
X
a
.R 1 Y
HT
County
THt tST CAROI INIAN
Sports
M ill si :8, iwi
13
Star Back Collins
Joins Injured List
By CIIXKI ES CHANDLER
Si.irl. I IH.ii
In nines are the preseason worry
ol even college football coach. Foi
new II head man Ed Emory, tins
is most definitely the ease. It became
more than a worry, though, lasi
Saturday when the Pirates looked
on a a stai tell !torn giace.
Anthony Collins, ECU's leading
rushet last yeai with I,HO yards,
went down during a Saturday scrim-
e with bruised ribs and has set
to return to practice. "Anthony
hasn't picked up the first step since
then I mory said "He hasn't even
run, much less worked out. We just
have to wail until he can run
houl so much pain
Injuries like Collins has can be
ei long 01 short, depending on
individual. Eor I mory and his
f, there are surely daily prayers
At V stay in "sick bay" will
a shot i one
"Evervbodv knows thai Anthony
is vital to our offense Emory said.
"He is one of the great hacks in
America. We can ill-afforl to lose
him, especially with Cobb out
Emory was referring to Marvin
Cobb, the club's top reserve back
who went down last week with a leg
injury and appears lost tor the
season. "Thai really hurts us the
lust yeai grid coach said, "because
Marvin is so flexible. He can play
either fullback or halfback for us
Pirate tans should not panic,
though, as it is believed thai t ollins
will return to practice soon. Emory
is not without worry regardless.
"We're a week and a halt away
from oui lust game he said.
" 1 hat's cutting it a little close. You
nevei know how these injuries will
react
nothei blow to the Pirates this
week was the loss o starting tight
end Norwood Vann, who had been
quite impressive during fall practice.
1 he Warsaw freshman injured his
Schwarz Named As
New Faculty Rep
Dt. 1 rnesi Schwarz, a membei ol
lie East s arolina faculty for the
past 15 vcais. has been named as
Faculty Representative foi athletics
and relations with the M A and as
chairman ol the University Athletic
C ommittee, it was announced bv
( ha ik ell oi I horn as
B.Brewei .effectivelyimmediately.
Schwarz cameto I C l in 1966
following a four-yeai tenure at
Methodist c ollege in Fayettville as
an assistant professor, coach and
athletic directoi.
Schwarz currently serves as a pro
fessoi in the department ol physical
education and is director ol that
department's graduate studies.
Schwarz served as interim Al)
here this summer follolwing the
resignation of Bill Cain from that
position.
He succeeds the late Dr. Clinton
Preweti as faculty representative.
One ot the tirst duties Schwarz
has is the clearing, ot the controver-
sial Hake vs. Theodore Sutton case,
in which the Blue Devils have charg-
ed that the star fullback is ineligible
foi the team's Sept. 6 opener in
Durham
thumb in practice and had surgery
on it earlier this week.
"That, too. is a blow I mory
said with a grimace. "Norwood has
such hands; big and steady
Vann is expected out for 3-4
weeks. In his stead is Will Saunders.
who held the top lighl end spot
following spring drills.
Furthei muddling the tight end
situation is the tact that big
freshman Steve Hamilton was hurt
one week ago and has vet to return.
The 6-4, 225-pounder has the size
and natural abihtythat Emory likes
for the position.
In addition to Cobb. reserve
linebacker Willie Swinson is also out
for the season. Swinson has one leg
in a cast and will most likely be red-
sturted tor the vear.
One good note for the Pirates in
the injury department is the tact
that number two quarterback dreg
Stewart returned to practice this
week after missing last week with a
minor leg ailment. 1 he signal-caller
is still not at full speed but should be
ready for action come the opener
with Duke.
Emory says he believes the reason
for all the injuries is th amounto
contact the team has been through
during fall practice. "We've had to
have a lot o contact work he
said, "because we're so young.
We've had to do more with fun-
damentals, like scrimmaging, with
only three weeks to prepare four our
first game.
"We've goi a lot o holes to fill
Emory continued. "We've got to fill
them with players, not just bodies.
The only way to develop into a
plaver is by experience. Most oi our
guys haven't seen much game ex-
perience so we've had to compen-
sate for that with tough practices
Anthonv Collins
suffering from bruised ribs
Four Former Pirates Presently In Pro Camps
I ormei I asl Carolina football
players in the pro ranks now
numbers lour and it looks as though
the numbei may remain that way
tor the entire National I ootball
1 eague season.
Zack Valentine, Eddie Hicks,
Sam Harell and Reggie Pinkney are
.ill still latched on to NI 1 clubs and
each seems to be secure of surviving
the final preseason cuts.
Valentine, of course, is a member
ot the del ending world champion
Pittsburgh Steelers. 1 he shifty
nebacker is a real prospect and is
aid to be a starter on most teams
but on the talent laden Steelers he
must wait his turn at playing tune.
At one time it appeared that
alentine might be trade bait as the
Steelers looked to pick up a high
drati pick or two tor the young
linebacker. The Pittsburgh
anization is high on the Edenton
native, though, and it appears he
may be there to stay.
Hicks a halfback, returns for his
second vear with the New York
Giants and was expected to con-
tribute greatly this season, maybe
even start. Injuries, though, have
slowed Hicks down and have limited
his preseason playing time. Still,
he is held in high esteem by the club
and looks secure.
Harrell has been somewhat o' a
surprise. An llth-round draft pick
by the Minnesota Vikings last year,
Harrell has used his long legs to
propel himself to the number two
fullback spot on the club. Harrell
shares that number two job.
though, with former North Carolina
star and Greenville native Doug
Paschall. Ironically, the number
one Vike fullback is led Brown, a
former N.C. State star, giving the
club three North Carolinians at the
position.
Pinkney is no new face to the
NFL, having spent time with the
Detroit I ions in the past. Pinkney is
currently a member o the Baltimore
Coils and is in the thick o the battle
for a starling spot in the defensive
back field.
PIRATE NOTES:
A number o interesting facts can
be found in the 1980 Pirate football
Charles
Chandler
press guide, put our bv the 1 C I
Sports information Office. Under
the heading. "Did You Know?"
much impressive data is listed. So
did you know?
�that ECU has lost only two
games in Ficklen Stadium over the
last eight years and that one o the
two schools to down the Pirates at
home will be returning to Greenville
this fall' Southwestern Louisiana
will be ECT 's opening home oppo-
nent on Sept. 13 and downed them
9-7 in 1977.
� that senior fullback 1 heodore
Sutton needs only "45 yards rushing
to eclipse the school recordcareei
nishmg held bv c arlester Grumpier
o 2.SS9 yards?
that among NCAA Division 1
players thai have at leas! 1,500
career rushing yards, E( I 's An-
thonv C ollins leads the nation in
careei yards per carry with a 6.63
average
-thai the Pirates rank 20th
among N( A A Division 1 schools in
won-lost percentage during the
I970's, exclusive ol bowl and
plavott games? Only three other
schools m the southeast rank above
IC Ion this list. Alabama. Georgia
and 1 SI . 1 he Pirate record foi the
decade was 72-36-1, a .frb percen
tage.
-that E( I ranks ninth foi the
decade ot the 70's among N A A
Division
schools in rush
tense' 1 he Pirates averaged 259.2
vards per game during thai spa
I he top eight include Oklahoma,
Alabama. Ohio State. Michigai
I exas. Houston, UCLA and
Nebraska. Pretty go my,
huh'
By the way, the me des that
include this info are avail fie at the
Sports Information Office and can
be purchased tor $3.
The Offensive Line
Coach Emory Feels ECU Front
Can Meet Fans' High Demands
By CHARLES CHANDLER
veryone knows that a successful
rushing football team must have a
strong offensive front. Such was the
case a year ago when last Carolina
led the nation in rushing ot tense.
Worry arose among Pirate tans.
though, when all but one of that of-
fensive hue graduated, leaving only
Ail-American Wayne Inman and a
rash o inexperienced
underclassmen to carry on in 19S0.
Many fell that real Pirate backs
such' as Anthony Collins and
I heodore Sutton would no longer
have the holes to run through. Many
still have these same worries as the
club prepares for its Sept. 6 opener
at Duke.
One ot those who is not a
doubter, though is ECU coach Ed
Emory, who says this year's line
mav surprise many. "They've done
everything the staff has asked ot
them he said. "They're a
remarkable group o young men-
who have worked their butts off
Along vvuh guard lnman, star-
trers as o now are guard lee Grit-
fain, tackles lootie Robbins and
Mark 1 rvin, as well as center Tony
Hensley and tight end Norwood
Vann. At the moment, though.
Only one remains from great 79 offensive line
several o those are injured.
Hensley and Robbins are down but
are expected back for the Duke
opener. Hensly is more ques-
tionable than Robbins, though,and
has Billy Parker ready to step in if
necessary.
The line was weakened when
sophomore Gary C.ambrell decided
not to return to school. Cambrell
was a super prospect and was
scheduled to start at tackle before he
left school for personal and disclos-
ed reasons.
"That really hurts usEmory
said. "It's very detrimental to us not
only because Gary was such a
superb prospect but because ot all
the rime we spent with him during
the spring. We could have been
working with someone else instead
of we had known then
Still, I-mory has confidence that
hts offensive front will be able to
perform up to his expectations.
"We're running the right offense
for an inexperienced line he said.
"Rather than having to hold blocks
for a long time, you just have to
stretch the outside so the horses in
the backfield can run wide with the
wishbone
And Emory has the horses in the
backfield with Collins, Sutton and
an impressive reserve corps. Know-
ing that, he says, will help the line.
"The guys have worked extra
hard because they realize we have a
great backfield behind them he
said. "They have the desire. All
they need is experience and timing
All American Inman has been a
big help. Emory said, simplv bv the
example he has set. "Wayne has
had a superb preseason the rookie
coach said He makes everyone
around him better jusl by being
there
Emory noted that Robbins had
developed into a first-rate lineman
ad that the remainder o the line was
becoming steadier as time rolls on.
The tight end position took a
blow this week when starter Nor-
wood Vann joined reserve Steve
Hamilton on the injured list. Will
Saunders reams and is slated as the
atarter until Vann returns.
Hamilton is f-4, 225 freshman that
has impressed Emory and his statt
with l s size and quickness.
and ot tensive linehe said. "On
ot tense it all starts with the line.
I he important thing is no matter
what it all comes back to the lins.
1'hey must perform.
"Becausehe added, "in toot-
ball. it's not who gets the credit but
who gets the blame, Nobodv wants
ihe blame. Neither does this offen-
sive line
The mai thing with the line, with
the exception o healing Henslv,
Vann. Hamilton and Robbins.
I mory said, was jelling together.
"That's something we can't be ex-
pected to do.though, until we have
everybody healthyhe said.
"Jelling together comes with play-
ing together and getting the feel of
one another
Emory added that the entire club
and staff was "pulling for"the line
and supplying it with confidence
because of its importance "I
always tell the guys that you win
with your kicking game, defense
All-America guard Wayne Inman







14
I Ml I M i ki 'I IM N

Smith Hopes Soccer Team Can Win Again
BjLHXRII'N starters. I he return oi club as a whole is ver adds to 5
illWmlR (he injurecj and Ifl0 positive tomism 'I ep
sophomores has the No seniors are on the see quiu .1 lew
In his fourth yeai as i( LOach optimistic am so Smith is look records brokei
I ad soccei "We've had bettei ' 1 a field leadei to said T
ach, Brad Smith practices this yeai than emerge He ma find have oui first w
I've evei seen here thai leadei in the pei on sinc� ! '
hai � Aas will smjln saitj pno, t0 a son ol Brad Winchell, l Pira .int 4-1
ednesdav pi av 1 1 e the onl retu 11 yeai
� 1
H V in
Ikh I - I Knl
MM I ll(M III hi I I
Smith's 1974 session
. I s 01
We
as
Wc'n
a more
ogt
Jissj
ricre
-
'Ml till-
Summer Season Brings Stars;
Sage, Others Burst Onto Scene
Hn IIMM Dul'KI 1
) hat


Macoi
1-
IW1 I M 1 VROI IN
K VM li I I M III Dl I I
Kla
I
plen
� omore
s k i r I Pa
Scot
I 11 i v e
n H : ma k
Ty I K
id in
fro ���
head k. oat h Ha
Ba J lot a success!ul
1481 campaign.
1
rival
I �. c hapel Hil
hei leadii
" �ved playei
101
I baseman Mike
S �� � ell and so
M - VVaka
Sorrel mproved
214 s ige
: marl

km
L'ome i hi ! ol
aseball was
hi Hallow �� . .
Ha : a i
rbi is

1 r: v � rbi
Hai �� ����

b 2 ' uMtomrafting
Qxl� and Repair
Original llandvrafit'd Jewelry
in Silrer and (,ttld
I 5 st
(.reenrilte, Y� . 27HA I
ig and Selling
I Silver and Coins
7582127
KEEP YOUR TAN YEAR ROUND
Keep That Healty. Happv Look
fttStudent Discount 1S v,slt8 for S25
20 v isits for $35
HAWAIIAN
SUNTANNING
;?V" CENTER
3006 E. 10th Si
758-0371
Don't envy your friends'
tans and don't spend hours
in the sun. Tan with us in
A confort. One minute equals
one hour in the sun and it is
just as safe
NO WAITING
3 Booths
Private Dressing Areas
Convenient Location
FDA Approved
Trained Attendants
9am to 9pm
Mon Sat
WANTED
Part time, flexible schedule; Sa!
Marketing position for enterprising n
and female students includes opportunr
attend a 3 1 2 day seminar in Milwauki
Wisconsin.
Send resume to CO. Tankard CoIm
1025, Washington.N.C. 27889. Induct
address, phone number age in sc
previous employment, intrests ond futur
(Applications Available in !
Mannc Jenkins Buildmq
��������iHpiMnpt
ECL's Mike Sage Gets Congrats Vftei Homer
IZOD
SHIRTS AND
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ON SALE AT
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FEATURING A COMPU
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req SI5.98)
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REDUCED 25 !
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I kwntown Greenvillf Ph. 7 . v
I .�� � tasl Vial Ph - 4J





rm � si c Man isixn
M 1.1 SI 28, 1981)
15
Lady Pirates' Chances Improved
'tS.
B JIMMY DuPKKK
nmM.iu Spurls t dmr
It's been a long time
since the field hockey
earn at Easl Carolina
posted a winning
record; prior to the
1975 arrival fo head
coach I aurie Arrants.
Bui 1980 will
rtopefull) be the charm
season, as the Lady
Pirates return a solid
leus tor the squad
tvhich posted a 5-6
record including a 1-0
v ictoi ovei High Point
in the North Carolina
Vssociation ol Inter-
collegiate Athletics for
omen I)i ision 11
I oui nament.
I he 1 ad Pirates will
ave the task oi replac-
leading scorer
kath Zwigard and
ading producer Sue
nes, but held of ap-
cants for the posts
ave ad equal e ex-
ence to cause op-
mism in the early
ils.
"We're starting off
nfidant foi the first
ne since I've been
ere says Airants.
"()ui speed is medium.
ve hae good stick
Aork
I he 1 ad Pirates
return three All-Deep
S mi performers from
i yeai ago. includig se-
cond team standout
1 ana Salmons.
Salmons, a
iphomore halfback,
licklj rained herself a
starng birth on the
19 squad and mi-
ned throughout the
ason despite sul fering
a broken nose.
lso earning All-
Peep South honors
were juniors Carol
Belchei and Drew Ken
d. both pa r -
. ;paling on the third
m unit.
Belcher, a native oi
irginia Beach, .vill be
.witched from right
.v ing to inner on the
rward line, where Ar-
rants believes she will
be a "good scorer and
offensive threat
Kennedy, afullback
with deceptive speed,
will be relied upon for
solidarity up the mid-
dle.
Arrants will rely on
senior link Donna
Nicholson to serve as
field general for the
I ady Pirates
"She's the one that
keeps the ball on our
end of the field says
Arrants.
Top returning defen-
sive performer for Pa
Carolina will be senior
center back Debbie
Harrison, who Arrants
relies heavily tor
leadership as will.
Other top returners
from the 1979 squad in-
clude sophomore
defensive backs Beth
Barton and Debbie
Mulvey, sophomore
goalie Jane Radford
and sophomore
halfback Alison Smith.
Arrants has five
freshmen in pre-season
drills, but sophomore
newcomer Ro Major
drew praise for early
performance. Majors
is a standout for Ar-
rants' track squad, but
had never participated
in field hockey until a
fateful afteroon last
season.
"The track team was
out running and we
needed somebody to
scrima g e
against recalls Ar-
rants. "We managed
to get enough to make a
team, and Ro was one
of them.
"She picked up a
stick and she was just a
natural. She looked
like she had been play-
ing three years. She has
excellant speed and is
extremely intelligent.
She could very well
start if she continues to
improve
Incoming freshmen
likelv to see extensive
action include Jennifer
Odenwaldt of Fairfax,
Yir goalie Susan
Carper from Maryland,
halfbacs Beth Christian
and Kim Milner of
Virginia Beach and left
forward Sue Sarre of
New Jersey.
Arrants pointed to
injuries as a possible
liability again this
season.
"Salmons had a
broken nose last year,
but that is all mended
nowsays Arrants.
"Belcher had aninjury
that slowed her down
late in the season, but
she's back healthy now.
"Harrison has bad
knees, but this is her
last season ad I think
she'll make it on guts
alone. She's such a
leader, we really need
her in the lineup, it's a
good thing for her it's
such a short schedule
The Lady Pirates
open the field hockey
season September 23 at
Wake Forest, which
Arrants conciders ter
squad to be the
favorite.
High Point, October
2, has sworn vengence
on us for the game we
beat them in the
semifinals of the state
tournament last year
grins Arrants, "but I
would have to consider
them the favorite
anyway
ECU hosts Catawba
and Davidson October
11 at the Bunting Field
for their onlv home
matches of the season.
The Pirates are favored
against Catawba, shile
Davidson is a toss-up.
The final regular
season game for ECU
will be at Pfeiffer Oc-
tober S3, with the state
tournament October 31
through November 1
"The Division II
teams are all we could
afford to schedule
laments Arrants. "We
will be hurting when it
comes to depth, but we
will be physical
Seafood
Lovers
Pirate
Players
A t Mall
I he last Carolina
football team and
coaching stafl will be
present at Carolina!
1 ast Mall this Saturday
from 1-4 p.m. tor an
autograph and
photography session
(thai is open to the
public.
1 he players will don
their jerseys, which
presents a good oppor-
tunity for any
(photographs th public
mav wish to take.
There also be some fall
practice photos given
awav bv the ECl
Sports Information Of-
fice
Tickets will be on
sale at the mall also.
I ickets to the Pirates'
Sept.6 opener at Duke-
are still plentiful and
�will be available.
ECU Field Hockey Action
Fosdick's
"All You Can Eat"
Seafood Buffet
Every night from 5 till closlnr. we will feature
our fabulous new Seafood Juffet - Delicious
Fried Shrimp, Golden Brown Oysters, Fish.
Deviled Crab, Shrimp Creole, Fried Chicken,
Clam Chowder, Slaw, Hush Puppies end Your
Choice of Ice Tea or Coffee.
All You Can Eat
Fosdick s
1890
Seafood
A Great Place for Seafood
Lunch Dinner Catering
Coming Soon:
Oyster Bar
Fresh Sesfood MM
211 Jarvis St.
Greenville, NX. 27834
Supermarket, line
Phone:
752-5025
Home of Greenville's Best Meats1
T.V. Dinners
Chicken. Turkey, Meat Loaf
& Salisbury Steak
2$1.00
Torino's Pizza
-�
12oz All Varieties
Charmin
Bathroom
Tissue
.98
4 ro
11 pack
51b Bag
White Potatoes .68
We will furnish a cart for vou to carry
your groceries back to your dormitory.
"Autocrat IceMilk"
12 Gal 88
"Pride of the Farm"
Applesauce
15oz jar 3$1.00
p�
16oz
Coke
$1.38
us deposit
carton of 8
Overtoil's Finest
Ground Beef
3 lb. min.
$1.69lb





16
lHt I SI C AROI IN1AN
AUGUST28, IW
?
Pirate Club Expands
For Future Needs
Bv JIMMY DuPRKK
1 O! the past few
years, the Pirate Club
siatt has vmm ked out ol
closets converted for
use as ol fice space and
entei tained members
and guests in the aged
pai i area ol the
building
Bui with the kickofi
ol the llSt football
season nisi around the
oi net. Pirate Club
Directoi Cius ndrews
and his stafl have the
luxury ol a new!)
renovated and expand
ed facility to look foi
ward ' i)
Saturday, ugusl 16
marked the beginning
a new era for the
Pirate t tub. as the stafl
held open house for the
embers and guests to
, bi ate their 'coming
out w the closet
I lie shrubbei and
flowers weren't even
her e until I i ida
laments ndrews. "So
. -1 w as a lot ol hustl
mil' to gel everything
id on time for
Saturday,
"All the office fur-
lure was pui in 1 ri
� we cui it prei t
V li ews lauded Dee
1 nson ol Heilig-
Meyer s 1 ui niture for
the I ii �
si : gs foi his ol fice,
.i- well as assistant
directoi Ken Hutchei
son and the secretaries
In iheir effort to
even thing
C lub added
� . rl HI ,quai e feet
ffict space in-
ample room
ding the
stafl from
listing ivu posi
up to five withoul
spa e
the ori poi
� he bulling, the
in retur n
rheii oi iginal
con
live
leni area in
a
carpet is brighi put pie
with 1I nisei in
gold.
Ml the indooi im-
provements are in keep
ing with Andrew's
philosophy ol main
taining a class facility,
but perhaps the most
readily noticeable
change is the addition
ol a patio complete
w ith decorative benches
and lamps to create a
testiv e atmosphere.
"We decided on a
patio for a numbei ol
i easons say s n
� I he pat io
d re w s
allowed us to double
out socializing area foi
aboul one thud the e
pense ol anothei
building. Also, it so-
meone wants to go out-
side foi fresh air, oi
whatever, t he
won't have to stand in
dirt or mud. Finally, it
give people who are
not contributors the
opportunity io see
members socializing
and basically having a
good time
1 he Pirate Club is
the institutional foun-
dation established 10
fund scholarships foi
intercollegiate athletics
at last Carolina
I nivei sity.
I he new building
and renovations were
paid for through a five-
year low interest loan.
Mat ndiews estimates
the added income
generated In the im-
provements will enable
the group to burn the
mortgage in just two
years.
Coi struct ion ol the
new facility began
shortly after the con
elusion ol the 1979
football season, but
Andrews indicated the
plans have long been
under consideration.
" I he project had
been I he discussed
before and the decision
was made, and I totally
agreed w ith it; let's not
do it urn il we can do it
tight
"Whei e lour years
ago. when I tirst took
this job. and where we
are now is only about a
million miles apart
Andrews states proud-
ly.
Susan
Mary Anne
Carroll
Ellen
Loretta
Pam
Melissa
Terry-
Lynn
Denise
We are the women who make the Fleming
Center a special place offering friendly,
personal, confidential care at a reasonable
cost and at times convenient to you
Saturday abortion hours
Free pregnancy tests
Very early pregnancy test
Evening birth control houns
Call 781-5550 in Raleigh anytime
osophy
rate lub
- io entertain
eplains ndrews,
1 ein bet s con
� bul iil�! v '� () oi more
iled ' use oui
facilities at all home
lootball games
"It is oui intention
tor the bulling to be us-
ed whenevei we bring
hie es � . ai e Iry ing �
to im-
�m the ty pe
ol program we are
The Fleming Center 3613 Haworth Drive Raleigh, N.C. 27609
Mardeer
THERE'S NO
BEATIN'
BEST EATIN
I Buy a Steak and Egg Biscu it And .
I Get a Second One Free4T J
foi ai la
rirsi impression- are
d to b asting ones.
d any newcomer to
visit the Pirate C lub
will be greeted with a
� pride in the
� pie and gold, as the
Please prers ouponoe�oreo�denn3
OnecouDontxrr customer please Thisoftef
not good m combination with any other "
otters Customer must pay an saes ta
Offer 900a until 10 30 A m at participating
Ha'dee s -estau'ants
Coupon good August 28 thru September 3
� Buy a Big Deluxe,
� Get a Second One Fi
I Please present this coupon before ordering
One C oupon per c ustome' please This offer
� � ; -f)ination vMth any otnef
I .�� imer must pay any sales ta
Offei 3ood at participating Hardeesrestau
� Coupon good August 28 thru September 3
WEDNESDAY IS NOW
TACOS
FREE APPLE EMPAN ADA
WITH PURCHASE OF
DINNER ON SUNDAYS
Located at S12 W. Greenville Blvd.
(next to Tarheel Toyota)
7562072
Come In and Enoy!
Speits Writers Needed
M ii I t� viitt? � iM
If M . � ill l-� H I
Open tonite till 9:00
Open all day Saturday
Open all day
Labor Day
See us this Fall
for all your
books and supplies
516 S. Cotanche
Greenville,N.C.
Downtown
GREENVILLE'S PREMIER NIGHTCLUB
OPEN SIX NIGHTS A WEEK
For ADULTS 19 and OVER
ALL ABC PERMITS
Our Atmosphere "is a Touch of Class
Our Lights and Dance Mucic Will
MAKE YOU MOVE!
�?
Tues.
Wed.
Gents Nite,Guys Free
and Bring your Nickles!
Ladie's Nite Lockout
Ladie's Only-everything
free until 10:00
Thurs. Half and Half - Custmer
Appreciation until 10:30
and the best in Dance
and Beach Music
Fri. E�d of The Week Party Super Customer
Appreciation
Sat. Dance Music at it's Best
Sun. Beat the Clock Customer Appreciation
Begining at 8:30!
WELCOME BACK
ECU STUDENTS SPECIAL:
Memberships are 16 price for students thru Sept. 15th
4





Copyright 1980
Kroger Seir-on
Quantity Rlghta Reaerved
FOOD.DRUG,GEN
MDSE. STORES
The store that brought you
tt
COST CUTTER
SAVINGS V�
jsfMW'lw
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of theae advertlaed itema la required to be readily available for
� ,n each Kroger San. �ac.pt �� .pacifically noted in this .d If
mm do run out Of an Itwn �� Will o��f yoo your cho4c� of t corrv
oarabl lt�m when a�eilable. reflecting the umi aevinga or a relrv
I check which will antltia you to purchaaa tha advertleed Item at tha
advertised price within 30 day�
Supplement to The Daily Reflec-
tor. The Reflector Shoppers
Guide and The East Carolinian
Items and Prices
Effective Wed Aug 27
thru Sat Aug 30. 1980
PAPERBACKS
FlUTOFnf LOOM
UNDERWEAR
CANNON l
rowas y
RUBBERMAID I
PRODUCTS
LITRE DEBBIE rsssfig?
4U snacks :iS�
.���
urro
PRODUCTS
BUY �
FORMUli
.�i
A SOtP W ,
0J
Greenville
and still
KROGER 12
Lowfat Milk
!&�
, aaJtiC 7 niPT PFPSI '
DEALERS
OPEN 7 AM TO MIDNIGHT
MON
THRU
SAT.
OPEN SUNDAY
9 AM TO 9 PM
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
Phone 756-7031





t
Day in and Day out Overall
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
Open 7 a.m. to Midnight
Open Sunday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
niCT DPPQI MT I fe
DIET PEPSI. MT
DEW OR
Pepsi-Cola
;
U S D A CHOICE -HEAVY" WESTERN BEEF TTL WQT J
4 LBS OR MORE BONELESS (S3.9M.B.) . VQ
Top 1 1R88 � CUT UP MIXED
Frver Parts
4 LBS"0RM0RE BONELESS (S3.97LB.) SrtFSfi
8-Oz
Sirloin Steaks . g.r
USD CHOICE HEAVY WESTERN BEEF TTL WOT
4 IBS on MORE BONELESS �3 22 LB I
Sirloin
A $1088
Tip Steaks�&2"
rDCCU CDA7CW � A
2f FRESH FROZEN

?
5-LBS. AND DOWN
4r &�
r
Limit 3 Ctns. with $7.50
ex more additional purchase
COUNTRY OVEN
Potato eo
Cnips SS OOq
AVONDALE
Catsup
32-Oz.
Btl.
'
KROGER FROZEN
Fried Chicken
$M9
�Lb
Ctn.
KROGER
OLDE VILLAGE REGULAR
Smoked
Sausage
Beans
r-
FRESH BOSTON BUTT
PORK ROAST OR
Pork Steak
QUARTER PORK LOIN CUT INTO
Pork Chops � ���.
48
58
FLEECE PAPER
Napkins
fe�
140-Ct.
55
SERVE 'N SAVE
Wieners
btfW
COf7 SERVE 'N SAVE
SlUfVtLY f� � -
Applesauce 0' I
STOKELY
PRESWEETENED BIG K
DRINK AID �
Fruit Drink MixEKl"
Sliced Bologna
7
FRESH FROZEN
Neck Bones
GENUINE
Ground Chuck Lb
A BLEND OF BEEF AND TEXTURED
HYDRATED VEGETABLE PROTEIN
PATTY MIX $"128
Kroger's Pro.
WHOLE OR BUTT HALF FRESH C Q
4J0 C0�i FRUIT DRINKS
$198
1
1
Lb.
1
58
RATH BLACK HAWK
Sliced Bacon
SERVE N SAVE
Sliced Bacon
Lb.
2-Lb.
Pkg.
$-58
069
Lamb Leg
JESSE JONES HOT OR MILD
Pork Sausage1
KROGER 1-LB. PKG. $4 38
All-Meat Wieners!0
GLENDALE OLDE SMOKEY 7-9 LB.
AVQ. WGT. S"i98
Boneless Ham
Bounty Towels
Lb.
M
Freezer Beef
USDA CHOICE "HEAVY WESTERN BEEF
18-22 LB AVG. WGT BONELESS
Whole Bottom $928
Round L
Seafood
Bakery
BULK PACKAGED FROZEN
Cod
Fillet�
'1
58
U S DA CHOICE HEAVY WESTERN BEEF
150-160 LB AVG WGT
Beef $-168
Hindquarters i� I
USDA CHOICE "HEAVY WESTERN BEEF
150-160 LB AVG WGT
Beef $439
Forequarters u I
BULK PACKAGED FROZEN
Turbot $-158
Fillet
1
55-60 LB AVG WGT WHOLE
Fresh
Lamb
�i
58
CUT & WRAPPED FREE
PLEASE ALLOW 5 DAYS
FOR PROCESSING
FRESH SEAFOOD
AVAILABLE FRI. & SAT. ONLY
FRESH PACIFIC
Snapper $918
Fillet u. C
'feS
ROUND C IEpfS
EXTRA LEAN
Virqinia
Baked Ham
Lb.
FRESH
Perch
Lb
$1
98
$2"
,69c
$139
. Lb.
AMERICAN OR MUSTARD
Potato
Salad
I TOP QUALITY
Jack & Jill
Bologna
SLICED AS YOU LIKE
Domestic $7"
Swiss Cheese u.
SLICED TO ORDER �.�
Hard $099
V Salami ��.
CAKE OF THE WEEK-
8DOUBLE LAYER
German
Chocolate Cake
FRESH BAKED-8
Apple
PieE-
EXTRA BIG
Chocolate
Chip Cookies �
$349
.$169
$129
Restaurant
Luicuonuc 's.
WISHBONE -NC
9-Piece sgSs
Fried Chicken
Ea
$3
k
49 ����
?ft?
SAVE Hamburger n
Buns
FREE! 12-Oz. Country Time
Lemonade with any
Deluxe Plate Lunch
PICNIC BASKET SPECIAL
99
14
� 2 Lb, potato aatad or
cot aiaw
� 1 jar (16-OxKrogaf
USt lk � 15Pc. bucaat of
J.(1?�M�!2SL.� chlckan ot (2) 2 Lb.
Country wan rotate -�- �.inmm.
OLtTbotltaot � 2 Lb bad boana
Coca-Cola
� � hotdoga
� 8 hotriog buna
ov
K
ft
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B;
&
Ti
FRll

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M
55
O
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?
H09
1
n .9b
lece
Chicken
V'V-
z Country Time
)de with any
Plate Luncn
IsKET SPECIAL
�14"
� ' 5 Pc buck o
chickan o (2) 2V Lb
1 wot� chtctant
� 2 Lte. tMk�d bwnt
8 NKdog
8 NoWoq bunt
f
AND CUTS OF
Kroger Meats
ALL KROQER MEATS ARE
GUARANTEED FOR
TOTAL SATISFACTION
Kroger buys only tht finest quality meats
that pass both U.S. Department o
Agriculture and Kroger quality tests. That's
why Kroger Sav-on guarantees the quality of
every cut If ever you are not totally satisfied
with a Kroger Sav-on meat purchase, we will
replace your Item or refund your money
:�
variety for you' Beef, veal. pork.
Seafoods, lunch meats, poultry.
You name it and. most likely, we've
if you don t see what you want, an
- will assist you in finding the
-ection that you desire.
That'
I
lamb
ALWAYS FRESH,
GRADE 'A'
HOLLY FARMS
POULTRY
W
u
m
farms
REGULAR 6R0UN0 BEEF
Made from various cuts of beef
Contains no more than 30 fat
EXTRA LEAN 6R0UH0 BEEF
Made from various cuts of beef
Contains no more than 25 fat
? GROUND BEEF CHUCK
Made only from beef chuck, nothing
added Contains no more than 20 fat
� GROUND BEEF ROUND
Made only from beef round, nothing
added Contains no more than 17 fat
� KROGER S PRO
A blend of 75 beef and 25 hydrated
vegetable protein Contains no more
than 25 fat
� CHOPPED BEEF STEAK
Lean -great for ' g Contains
more tl
SIX KINDS
OF GROUND
MEATS
Kroger Sav-on sells only 100
US.DA. Government In-
spected� U.S.DA. Graded
CHOICE BEEF its processed
and handled tor better quality
I control and product protection
in our own modern distribution
plant
Kroger beef is a much better
value, too' It's trimmed of ex-
cess fat and waste to no more
j than 'i inch on each steak and
roast and then carefully
packaged best side down for
your shopping convenience.
All Brands
SiMILAC
� Similac
� Enfamil
� S MA
� Isomil
� Pedialyte
Formula
SOLD
AT OUR
INVOICE
COST
PEPPERiDGE FAPVS
Bagged Cookies
& Snacks
d
V . , �f '�
Corning ware r0TsouNTEDj
Products
c

NES AND
f HUIT OF
THE LOOM
Men's
Umierwear
"
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SI . . ACTAH
Paperback Books





l
iU
s
X
y
Hams and Prices
Efi�ctlva Waxj Aug 27
thru S�t, Aug 30, 1980
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of that ad�aniaO Kama it raqutrarf to ta raadlly
a�anat � to saia m aach Rrogar Sa�-on a�capt aa
specifically notad m this ad it mi do u" out of an Ham ��
will oHa' you you' choica of a comparable it�fn whan
a�ailatla atiecting tha tama savings o s ralnchack
which win antitla you to pu'ehasa tha advarllaad item at
tha ad�aMisad pnea wlthm 30 days
Rubbermaid �itrttwj
Producls"
HEALTH & BEAUTY AIDS
iH
SHAVING CREAM
6CfAL
LOCKS fs�crhool
SroB.NAT.OH
COMBINATION LOCK
ci&Xcl' BEST-RITE
mm
Filler Paper
ANFS AND
RUIT OF
THE LOOM
Men's v
Underwear
M
U����
lowarSha
1
CalAA
Each
200-
Sheets
ASSORTED
4-Oz
REGULAR COUGH FORMULA
RobitussinbVi
MEDICATED 42c
Stridex Padsbox
COLD SYMPTOM RELIEVER
Comtrex Tablets24-ct
2-OZ WETTING OR 4-OZ CLEANING
Barnes-Hind Solutionb,i
SURE AND NATURAL 3QCt 01
Maxi-Shieldsbox
99c
$103
"27
$-187
2
?.i1fM1f't
REGULAR OR MINT
V x 450" or V x 300"
Scotch Tape
OFFICIAL
NFL Team Pencils .
BUY ONE GET 2 FREE PENS
Bic Value Pack
CRAYOLA
. . Roil1
14
Pencils
Crayons
Box of
. 24
ftMilfef
FOR OIL- NOMA. OR DRY HAIR
Enhance
RADIANT VALLEY 500 MG. 100-Ct
Vitamin Cbu.
MOUTHWASH 18.0z
ListerineBt!
ULTRA-RICH 1602
Conditionerbu.
ULTRA-RICH 16.0z4
Shampoo bu i
S099
School Bags� L
BEST-RITE 3-SUBJECT f f C
ThemebookC.99
44c
99c
37c
55c
�-� � � i I Crayola
�� 7-2924 ' W
AM FV WITH TV SOUND
Portable Radio
14 AC-DC L j
�m Cassette
m, Recorder 3
r
Corning ware rSuHito
Products
?�-
Ail Brands
�MILV
Baby Formula
SOLD �
COST

k 0UB
IH0IC(
Bagged Chips
& Snacks
O 0
0L
v7
a ii
" no
0 u a u
lfG.E.
SCHOOL GLUE OR GLUE-ALL
SCHOOL GLUE OR GLUt-ALL f "7
Elmer's GlueVSf-W

DAYTIME
DISPOSABLE DIAPERS
M
MEAD
"Buck Back"
i" MEAD SCHOLAR SET OR
Trapper 099 Theme
Notebook L Book
MEAD 5-SUBJECT MEAD 5-PACK
Theme $.139 Pocket
Book I Portfolios
BUY 4 SPECIALLY MARKED
BUCK BACK PRODUCTS
AND GET A DOLLAR
BACK WHEN YOU SEND
PROOF OF PURCHASE.
MEAD 3-SUBJECT
CORRECTION FLUID
Liquid Paper57�
ECS . , � , OUBPBICE $Q99
Touch n Curl 3
MISTDRY CURLER
WITH WAVE COMB:
FEATURES THAT
SAVE YOU TIME
vj Kroger Pharmacy
At Kroger, your
pharmacist fills
your prescription
while you fill
your shopping list.
756-7393
COST CUTTER COUPON
SJide ond Maie
&m PROCfSSNO
I
From 110 126 or 35mm I
,nd Super 8
36 Exposure I
I
TWIN PACK
Ice Cube
Trays
88
WOODEN
Framed
Picture
$4
RAID
V
RAID
Ant &
Roach M Yard Guards
Spray gj $447
16-Oz Spray Can
��

t
CC
Or;
P
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1
cr
Kal
i
OP
I
roge�
Craci
Whe;
ASSORT
Roy;
Vikii
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Chipi
Ahoi





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n
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F
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SI
Ki n i
on
list.
4 a"
wg
I
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I
S-499
1
icurr KROGER 1z
Day In, Day out you Cin'l heat Kioywt Savon foi overall
LOW PRICES We Invite you to COMI'AHt oui SOOPER
COST CUTTERS anywhere SOOPER COS1 CUTTERS are
everyday low piices on hundradt of pantry staple Items you
use every week And you Can SAVt up to 40 on those
SOOPER COST CUTTERS compared to other brands .it
Kroyer Savon You i an also nvti ono.i Cuttei Bonus
Buys which are Items temporarily rmhn ml In pri � loui (�
Six weeks t OOtl tor these throughout OUI �loi� Of . OUfSe
we also have Cost Cutter WewMy Spot lalS You (ust I an I do
better than Kroyer Savon for SAVINGS and )N STOP
SHOPPING, lOO!
l�� Prnom ,�� a I lIUtR?!
SERVING YOU COM! S IIHSI IN III!
Ice Cream
CLOVER VALLEY coff
Margarine
AVONDALE
MINUTE MAID FRESH
Orange Juice
64-Oz
r- &
0ffPA
:os
,r1 4 KROGER GRADE 'A
Medium Eggs
Kandu Bleach
v -
Cold Power
$�44

CCK RrrHt SMING I I AV
r�rUfct
lib
French Fries.
KROGER HOT DOG OR Ar
KROGER HOT DOG 0
Hamburger Buns
$
REG BBG OR SOUP CREAM ft OMOft
Ruffles ��� OOC
Potato Chios '?
89
BEEP
Stroh's Light
$
RHtNESIU E� ROSI Of
Colony
Chianti
Beer
Baked foods
5UMGC Li
Sandwich
Bread
Dm Foods
Frozen Foods
t
39
KftOSE WH:�" :
Cracked
Wheat Bead
Ass:r�r
Royal
Viking Danish
2 M
I (i
A-Ol
1
Chips
Ahoy
9-Oz
1
Ji.
American
Cheese
9 Q Qc
m up:
O 99 4WvJ
aL Kmnw
2�79
$-109
$419
$-115
Natural
Yogurt
PluSBJPY
�jn-pv STYLE OR
Buttermilk
Biscuits
v
r�rl
Lemonade
KROaEP
Corn-on
the-Cob
MOUEF
Sliced
Strawberries a
FHfctZEH P-fetZEt- I'wf JHtA BARfc
tee Cream $459
Sandwiches ��
1
KROGER SAV-ONA WHOLE LOT
MORE THAN JUST ONE STORE!





640-PAGE
Webster's
Dictionary
7-2924
AMFM WITH TV SOUND
Portable Radio
S AVI NGS!
G.ECS1
Touch & Curl
� �
OUR PRICE
$099
9
MISTDRY CURLER
WITH WAVE COMB
FEATURES THAT
SAVE YOU TIME
LESS REBATE
$900
2
YOUR
COST
$799
7
NEW
IYER'S
"Ithtl
i�,

ALL IN ONE
Jubilee
Pantyhose
1
E. Cassette
Recorder
2.
Pair
DC-60 TAPE
TDK Cassette Ea $177
PENDAFLEX BATTERY
OPERATED
$�88
Pencil Sharpener. 6
2-DRAWER
File Cabinet
SAVE
FF NCG
HOME PRIDE
SPONGE
MOPS
1
$
SAVE
62c
(A.) 2-DRAWER
FILE. BLACK WITH
WALNUT WOODGRAIN
DRAWERS.
GIANT
Porta File
PERSONAL
(B.) 10" HIGH x
12" WIDE x 9"
DEEP. WOODGR
FINISH
4
99
Porta File
$377
(C.) 10" HIGH
5 V DEEP
WOODGRAIN FINISH
TWIN PACK
Ice Cube Trays
PEN
Bic
Clic
99
&i�?
J j
BIC
Banana lnkftft
Crayons 99
BIC
Stick nnt
Pens 99�
I
V 5 BsC
m
sfc
10&
super
sale
V,
DESK
School Box
37e
Ea.
FAMILY PACK
Combs
6-Ct
Pkg.
66
r
MEAD
"Buck
Back
BUY 4 SPECIALLY MARKED
BUCK BACK PRODUCTS
AND GET A DOLLAR
BACK WHEN YOU SEND
PROOF OF PURCHASE
WITH POCKETS
3-SUBJECT
e S099 beme 4
Organizer � Book H
09
MEAD BLUE
Canvas ���
Binder "
5-PACK
47 Pocket o 7
Folios
87
WALNUT OR
NATURAL FRAMED
Door Mirror
V.
Choose from large three
inch frame styles with a
great collection of prints
from our selection.
Frame sized in 16" x
20 12" x 16" and 11"
x 14
FRAMED PICTURES
All with glass.
91911
ASSORTED STYLES
Cork Board
$
Each
ROUND OR RECTANGLE
Laundry
t
.
I
,





Title
The East Carolinian, August 28, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 28, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.71
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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