The East Carolinian, April 22, 1980






mt lEaHt
12 Pages
Tuesday, April 22,1980
(Greenville, NX
Circulation 10.000
Professor: Good Work If You Can Keep It
By TERRY GRAY
News Editor
When it comes to paying for the help,
education at the university level has all the
earmarks of Big Business. And like the
employees within big business, the "help"
at the university faces a certain amount of
job insecurity.
During the 1979-80 school year, East
Carolina University paid its professors a
total of about $10.5 million � a sum that
does not include the salaries of the
leaching staff below the level of assistant
professor.
If the salaries of instructors, lecturers
and others without academic standing are
included, the figure approaches $11.8
million.
Of course, the payroll for professors was
divided among 485 faculty members,
resulting in an average salary of about
$20,500. According to Dr. Susan
Mcbaniel, assistant to the vice chancellor
of academic affairs, the actual range of
professors' salaries at ECU is between ap-
proximately $13,000 and $37,000.
When one considers that most pro-
fessors at ECU are employed on a nine-
month basis, the average salary looks even
more attractive.
But being a professor involves more
than collecting a paycheck. In addition to
the teaching duties, committee work,
bureaucratic papershu filing and summer-
time unemployment, the faculty member
has to deal with the uncertainties of the
tenure system.
Dr. McDaniel explained some of the in-
tricacies of this system in an interview
Monday.
According to McDaniel, there are four
classifications of permanent faculty posi-
tions at East Carolina University: instruc-
tor, assistant professor, associate pro-
fessor and professor. To gain tenure, a
faculty member does not have to rise
through these grades � he or she may be
tenured without such advancement.
Though there are instructors who have
tenure at ECU, this will eventually become
a thing of the past, since recent changes in
the university's guidelines prevent the
tenuring of this classification in the future.
As it now stands, only the latter three
classifications may earn tenure.
The assistant professor must hang onto
Bus Replaced
By New Van
By LARRY ZICHERMAN
Assistant News K.ditnr
ECU's Student Government
Transit recently purchased a van to
supplement its existing fleet of
buses.
The blue Dodge Maxi-Van has a
capacity of 15 passengers and cost
the SGA $9,300.
It is currently being used on the
Purple route, which runs between
the apartment complexes and cam-
pus, from 3:30 to 10 p.m. Ridership
on the new night route is very good,
according to Chubby Abshire, SGA
transit manager.
Since the price of gas went up,
many students are using the SGA
bus instead of driving Abshire
said. "We added the night trips on
the Purple route so that students liv-
ing in the apartments far from cam-
pus would be able to take the bus to
the library or late classes
Abshire said the new van is saving
the SGA approximately $21 a day
compared to the cost of operating
one of the big buses.
"We hope that during the re-
mainder of this semester, the sum-
mer and the fall, the van will pay for
itself with the money saved by
reduced fuel usage Abshire said.
"In addition, the van will be
available for charters every weekend
this fall, probably for out-of-town
football games, for those people
who do not wish to charter a large
bus
For the summer, the SGA will run
the big buses on the Purple and
Gold routes from 7:30 a.m. to 3
p.m. After a few weeks, though, the
ridership will be studied, and if con-
ditions permit, the routes will be run
by vans, Abshire said.
Last summer, the SGA used two
of the Athletic Department's vans,
he said, but this year they will only
need to use one van since the SGA
has its own.
See VAN, Page 3, Col. 1
Photo by LARRY ZICHERMAN
New Landscaping
in full bloom at Mendenhall
Art Seniors Show Work
An exhibition of art works in
various media by ECU School of
Art undergraduates will be officially
opened tonight at 8 p.m. with a
public reception in Gray Gallery.
The works to be displayed have
been chosen for their quality by
faculty members in each medium.
Each of the undergraduate classes
will be represented in the show,
which will run from April 23 until
May 5.
"It's i good show � like all
undergraduate shows, it has its ups
and downs, but on the whole it
shows that East Carolina Universi-
ty's School of Art is very com-
petitive among art schools in the na-
tiaaV said Randy Osman, director
of Gray Gallery.
Gray Gallery is located in the Leo
Jenkins Fine Arts Center, in the cen-
his job for seven years before joining the
ranks of the academically secure. During
this probationary period, his job perfor-
mance will be reviewed several times. If all
goes well, at the end of six years he will be
notified that he has tenure.
For associate professors and professors,
the process is not so lengthy. The proba-
tionary period is reduced to five years,
with notification given at the end of the
fourth.
The process whereby one gets final
See TENURE, Page 3, Col. 1
Humanities
Director
To Speak
New SGA Van
will save $21 per day in fuel costs
Photo by LARRY ZICHERMAN
Inflation Hurts New Graduates
By Lowering Buying Power
BETHLEHEM, PA (CPS) �
Graduates going into the job market
this spring will be offered higher
starting salaries than last year's
graduates, but the salary increases
are probably worth less in real
dollars, according to a study by the
College Placement Council.
Average increases, the CPC an-
nounced April 8, are nearly nine
percent, although the inflation rate
has been 18 percent.
The CPC calculated the averages
by studying the starting salaries of-
fered graduates between Sept. 1,
1979 and March 6, 1980.
According to the study,
petroleum engineering graduates
can expect salaries up to $1979 per
month.
Not surprisingly, engineers of all
types can command the highest
salaries. Mechanical engineers were
offered an average of $1866 per
month. Chemical engineers got
$1790 per month, civil engineers
$1524, and electrical engineers with
advanced degrees $1852 per month.
The high starting salaries have
convinced many engineering
undergraduates to take jobs instead
of going to graduate school, a
development that causes some
engineering teachers to worry about
where the next generation of pro-
fessors will come from.
Dr. Donald Marlowe of the
American Society for Engineering
Education in Washington, D.C
says the high starting salaries for
new engineers has thrown the
discipline "into a very serious
crisis Even full professors are be-
ing lured from faculty positions into
private industry by the high salaries.
Business graduates are also doing
well. Business administration grads
are starting at an average $1197 per
month, with accountants comman-
ding $1284 per month.
Dr. William J. Bennett, Executive
Director of the National Humanities
Center, will be the speaker for the
1980 Commencement at ECU.
More than 2,800 students are
scheduled to receive degrees during
exercises beginning with a tradi-
tional academic procession at 9:40
a.m. May 9 in Ficklen Stadium.
Of that number, approximately
2,000 are undergraduates and 800
are graduate students.
Last year, 2,562 ECU students
were awarded degrees.
Bennett received his B.A. from
Williams College, a Ph.D. in
Philosophy from the University of
Texas, and a Law degree from Har-
vard University.

In addition to writing for scholar-
ly journals and for magazines such
as Newsweek, Commentary and En-
counter, Bennett is an adjunct assis-
tant professor at N.C. State and
UNC-Chapel Hill.
Some of the issues Bennett has
spoken and written about include
the Bakke case, morals and values in
American life, and TV censorship.
Photo by CHAP OURLEY
Sherrod Plans To Veto
Clement Dorm Beach
Spring attraction or traffic hazard.
SGA Reorganizes Transit System
The SGA Legislature met for its
last session of the year Monday and
passed a transit system reorganiza-
tion bill that is expected to be vetoed
by SGA President Charlie Sherrod.
The reorganization plan provides
for the creation of a Transit Board,
to be composed of two transit
managers, two day students, two
dorm students, one administrative
staff member, one advisor who will
be drawn from either faculty or
staff ranks, and the SGA president
or his appointee.
The justification for the bill, as
stated in the preamble, is that there
is a "need to have the system
managed in such a way as to allow
for more input from the students
and staff of East Carolina Universi-
ty
The transit system is financed
wholly through student funds.
Sherrod said he would veto the
bill because he was not involved in
its preparation, although the bill re-
quires the SGA president to be
directly involved in the board's
operation.
Besides sitting on the board
himself (or appointing someone to
sit in his place), the SGA president
would also appoint the two transit
managers.
The membership of the board
would have to be approved by the
SGA Legislature.
Kirk Little, recently elected as
SGA treasurer, reported that,
because of committments with
ROTC, he would be unable to serve
in his office during the second sum-
mer session. Sam Bernstein was
nominated and approved as acting
treasurer for the period of Little's
absence.
See SGA, Page 2, Col. 1
U. Of Florida Sees High Suicide Rate
tral section of the main campus. The
gallery is open each weekday from
10 a.m. until 5 p.m. and on Sunday
afternoons, 1-4 p.m.
Osman added that the purpose of
the undergraduate art show, which
will be the only one of its kind this
year, is to show the students and
general community what is being
produced by the art school.
The exhibition will include works
in ceramics, jewelry, painting and
drawing, sculpture, printmaking,
fibers and other media. According
to Osman, the artworks might also
be sold to interested parties, depen-
ding on the desires of the artists.
The public is invited to the recep-
tion to meet students and faculty of
the School of Art, and refreshments
will be served, said Osman.
GAINESVILLE, FL. (CPS) � A
few weeks ago, Mitch Gortler, a
University of Florida student, told
his girlfriend in Atlanta he wasn't
feeling well, and asked if she would
call him back in a half-hour. But
Gortler didn't answer her return
call. Concerned, she took the next
flight to Gainesville, hurried to his
off-campus apartment, and found
that sometime between Gortler's
phone call and his girlfriend's ar-
rival, the 19-year-old sophomore
had placed a rifle to his head and
shot himself.
Yet Gortler's was only one of five
suicides during a recent ten-week
period at the University of Florida. '
Two students, two faculty members,
and one former student have killed
themselves. An unsuccessful at-
tempt by a student in the UF park-
ing lot was also made during the
same period.
While UF's suicide rate during the
ten-week period is extraordinarily
high, so is the recent national col-
lege rate. In fact, suicide in the 18 to
24-year-old age group has risen to
epidemic levels, and the only thing
the experts can agree on is the fac-
tors responsible are baffling.
Health statistics for college-age
people tell a grim story of depres-
sion .and stress quite frequently tied
to academic endeavors and college
life. Suicide is the second leading
cause of death for 18-24-year-olds.
Only auto accidents claim more col-
lege students. Many law enforce-
ment officials, though, suspect
some of those may also be inten-
tional acts of self-destruction.
"There are as many reasons to
commit suicide as there are people
who do it says Liz Jones, director
of the Alachua County Suicide and
Crisis Prevention ' Center in
Gainesville. Uf students account for
20 to 30 percent of the center's case
load. "Each time we took at a
suicide, it's unique. There's no way
you can say a person kills himself
because of college
L. Thomas Cummings, director
of student mental health services at
Arizona State, thinks college
pressure can help push an unstable
person over the edge. Yet he adds
that a lot of students who commit
suicide bring the potential for killing
themselves when they enroll.
"There are so many dimensions
to suicide that it really isn't fair to
implicate the university complete-
ly he says. "There are life
pressures, pressures with boyfriends
and girlfriends, economic pressures.
One has to stand a certain amount
of pressure. Academic stress is a
validating factor, but not a primary
one. e .
"The university may be the last
straw he adds, "but the whole
comprehensive mass is responsi-
ble
But Michael Zangari, a student at
the University of Nebraska whose
extensive research into suicide was
prompted by a friend's death, firm-
ly believes college can be a determin-
ing factor.
"A lot of college students haven't
the slightest idea why they're at col-
lege, except that they've been told
they should be Zangari observes.
"Then, there are the social
pressures. The pressure to fit into a
peer situation, the pressure to be
with someone sexually. Finally, the
pressures become too much
Conversely, some mental health
professionals even suggest that col-
lege could be a deterrent to suicide.
Sec SUICIDE, Page 2, Col. 5
Inside Today
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 22, 1980
Suicide Rate Causes Concern
Photo by LARRY ZICHERMAN
Lot Paving Completed
I he paving of large parking lot behind Mendenhall Student Center was completed last Saturdav bv Bar-
ms Constructs Co of Kinston. The lot can be used now, but it has not been laned off vet and the
umversity has not officially taken posession of it
Continued from Page 1
A study done between 1960 and
1970 by Dr. Michael Peck of the
University of Southern California
Medical Center found that college
students in the Los Angeles area had
a lower rate of suicide than non-
college students in the same age
group.
"College is a safe, highly-
structured environment opines
Dr. Peck, who contends his study
applies to today's students as well.
"In school a student is protected
from the ambiguities of life. The
worst time is when a student comes
to the end of his academic career,
and faces the real world
"Once upon a time agrees Dr.
Marvin Miller, a San Diego-based
suicidologist, "there was a pattern
to life that could be counted on: get
through high school, go to college,
get a job, and get married. It may
sound dull, but it offered security.
"Now, there are no more
guarantees. Students cannot be sure
of getting a job in their chosen field
and there's a general sense of disillu-
sionment with the world
"Suicide is ambivalent says
Gainesville crisis center director
Jones. "People end up in the posi-
tion of killing themselves or not kill-
ing themselves, but when they see
stories in the newspaper, thev feel
like, 'Yeh, I can do that
Yet no one pretends there's a
single solution to the problem.
"Those people who are willing to
pick up on the (campus anti-suicide)
programs offered will benefit (from
them) says Arizona State's Cum-
mings, "and most of the universities
provide a broad spectrum of ser-
vices for students who have pro-
blems. The challenge is to get to the
students who need them
But of course funding is also a
barrier to those trying to help
students with emotional problems
Counseling centers are chromcalK
understaffed, unable to provide
enough time and attention when
center traffic gets thick. "In the
end Cummings sighs, "it all
comes down to money
Although mental health profes
sionals are reluctant to admit the)
have few means ot preventing the
self-destruction plaguing campuses.
all agree that, given the scarcm
money, an individual student musi
be willing to ask tor help
"You can prevent pregnanev ru
telling someone to take a pill
Cummings says, "but when a pci
son says, 'I won't commit suicide j.
long as life goes my way vou cant
guarantee that
SGA Holds Last Meet
Continued from Page 1
The Legislature also passed an
amendment to the SGA constitution
that requires all SGA officers to be
sworn into office seven calendar
days after the SGA elections. The
amendment, which will be inserted
as Article 7, section 5 of the con-
stitution, goes into effect im-
mediately. In the past, the terms of
SGA officers have been ending on
different days.
Dr. Floyd Mattheis, a professor
in the Science Education depart-
ment, appeared before the
legislators to report on a student
science trip he led around the world
that was partially financed by stu-
dent funds. Eleven ECU students
travelled to India earlier this
semester to observe a total eclipse of
the sun, and Dr. Mattheis thanked
the legislators for approving a $2200
appropriation to the group to help
cover expenses.
A senior Interior Design student
also thanked the Legislature fop its
financial support of the Interior
Design house project, located on
Ninth Street. Patti Wells invited all
SGA members to attend the pro-
ject's Open House on Sundav, April
27.
In other business, the Legislature
passed resolutions of appreciation
for the work of a fellow student, a
staff member and a faculty member.
Mrs. Joy Clark, of the Student
Fund Accounting office, was com-
mended for her years of service to
the student body. Eddie Walters,
SGA Refrigeration Manager, was
officially praised for his handling of
the refrigeration rentals, and Dr.
Jack Thornton was recognized for
his service to student organizations.
Announcements
Family Fun
bach I' irsda) during April is "Famih
I un s. ght" al Mendenhall I torn 5-JO
p m . al! children under age is .1.
� sible ajuli
may b pla table
earns 1 .Kt-
bowling Mill hi- run
rice ' '
�ihie tennis �ill K hall he en
re � aduli pei crimr
have a Mendenhall Student
erne- 1. n bership card .�� I Cl II)
ard 10 par' tcipate
SU Artist
Vpplicanons 'or Student I nion nisi
will be accepted through pnl 23 p-
ns ma be pilled up in the Stu-
dent I nion Office, room 234
Mendenhall lob descriptions will also
he available Portfolio required
Kappa Delta Pi
the I'd C hi (.hapier ol Kappa Delta Pi
a ill meet on Saiurda -pril 26. at
0:30a.m at the Holiday Inn in Green-
�Me. This meeting ssiii he held in con-
lunction with our Sprint Initiation
' �ur speaker will he I): I loyd Mattheis
! 'he Science Education Department
Kadelpians should end in their reserva-
lions tn April 18
ROSSE
�( sst (Returning Older Students
Seeking Education) will hae its final
meeting ol the semester on Iridas.
Vpnl 25 a? 4 iK) pm in room 248
Mendenhall Ml interested students are
.ordialh insited to attend. This will be
1 formal business meeting and plan
�sill be di-iuvsed tor this summer and
'all as'iities
SCJ
ll members ol the Socict) lor Col
egiate lournalists are urged to attend a
meeting luesdas. April 22. at 6 p m .
al the home ol Ira I Baker. I4H i
cih Street The purpose ot the meeting
' is to elei' new officers
Rho Epsilon
I here will be a Rho tpsilon meeting
pril 24at 3:00p.m m Raw! Mo EJec
ions will be held and 11 is mandatory
hat all members be present to sole for
he is-M) x, officers
Summer Rooms
Rooms JH. available lor Summer
vhool C ontact the Methodist Student
enter. 758-2030
Sidewinder
The band. Side�indei wil
the Atiis this I � si v ;
1.11. sponsored 1 �
and last until " p 1 . ;�
cents and domes! 1. h
�1" 50 cents I -t-
Comic Books
The K I c OfllK Hk i lub will hold
us third spring comic book comet
at 'he ' in downtown Greens
Sunday, Vnl 27, from IOtOO a.m 10
5 1' ;� m Admission is Iree Ml people
interested in busing, selling, collecting,
etc . comic books, science fiction and
related subjects are insited to attend
For more information, call X-6�N
Anderson
John Anderson, Republican presiden-
tial candidate, is gaining increasing in-
terest and support on American college
campuses Those interested in helping
Anderson's campaign should call
758-7955
Marketing
Revival
I 11 1 I if life On .ii
' � - � -1 sponsoring its second
pnng 24
1 d � el id tonun 1 'u
1 - Beh
Quiet
thicc d.� icwsal ate Reverend Keni
m 1" n and accompanied bs the In !
icrdenomirutttonal c hoti and the I 1
fountain ol I ife (. hoir on ! I
night. Iridas nigh' chaplain Kenneth
I dwards will be accompanied hs the
It I Gospel Ensemble (and possibh
the Si Augustine's Kellowhsip c hoir)
on Satuidas Rev All Griffin with
I M c hapel Hill and the Fountain of
I ife t hoir rendering musk Mis
Rosalee f dwards will conduct two
setninats Saturday April 26 starting a
10 a.m in the 1 edoma Wright Cultural
Center fhe topics tor the seminar are
nutrition and stress Devotional ser
vices start at 7:00 cash night Please
come oui .rid praise the 1 ord with us
NCSL
There will be a sers important meeting
of the C SI on Tuesdtrs at 5 (X) in
room 24H Mendenhall I ins ,s a verj
important meeting All members are
urged to attend
fhe American Marketing Association
will meet on Wednesday. April 23 at
4 00 p m in room 130 Raw! Member-
ship applications will be available
NASW
Members ol NASW, social work and
corrections majors are noss selling rat
tie tickets to raise money for their
departmental softball game and
cook oui Six drawings for dinners at
Fosdicks 1890, The Beet Barn. Peppi's
Pia. Shoness and Parker's BBQ will
be held at the game on April 26. Tickets
are S 50 I or more inlormation contact
Barbara Anderson. Anne O'Neal or
Diane Austin.
WZMB
There will be a stall meeting for
WMB (campus radio) at 6 p m lues
day in Old Joyner library. Second
Moor
Advisor Needed
A lacults adsisor is needed 10 torm
I C I Baha'i C lub lor more inlorma-
tion call h S7(J
Fall Co-Op
Fellowship
T-Shirts
Delta Zeta will sponsor a Pancake Din-
ner April 23 from 5 p m until 8 p m at
the Delta eta House All sou can eat
lor $2.00
The last I ellowship supper of the
-emester at the Methedisi Student
' enter will be a cookoul on Wednes-
day. April 23, a c JO p m Hot dogs,
hamburgers and soghurt pie will be
sersed SI.50
Pancakes
Fall Co-Op
The Center for Disease Control in
Atlanta. Ga is recruiting for
C ooperative Education assignments
beginning in September 1980 and or
January 1981 fhe following trainee
positions will be available:
.Microbiology Trainee at Atlanta,
t hemisi Trainee at Atlanta; Chemical
I ngineer Trainee al Cincinnati; Com-
puter Science Trainee at Atlanta;
Mechanical Engineer Trainee al Cincin-
nati; Biology Trainee al C incinnati; In-
siructional Systems Specialist Trainee
in Atlanta. Necessary forms and ap-
plications can be obtained in the
t ooperative Education Office. 313
Kawl Application deadline is April 18.
Students must be enrolled in an
undergraduate or graduate program to
he eligible; graduating seniors are not
L-ligible Sophomores and juniors are
urged 10 apply
"1 lose iou" T-Shirts are now being
sold bs the EC I Sign I anguage C lub
T-shirts are black, blue, light blue. red.
green, orange or burgundy in medium,
large, and extra large sies All shirts
are $5 00 Shirts are oh sale in A-114
Brewster or may be purchased from
members of the club Support the Sign
language Club and show the world
how you feel.
Episcopal Service
The last meeting of the Episcopal
fellowship this year will be held on
Wednesday, April 23 at 6:00 pm. in the
Melhodist Student Center (5th Street
across from Garrett Dorm) The Holy
Eucharist will be celebrated. An infor-
mal supper will be served al 6:45 p.m.
al the home of the chaplain, the Rev
Bill Hadden
Family-Child
The Family Child Association will have
an end of the school cook-oui Tuesday,
April 22 at 500 pm ai the Elm Street
Park
Volunteers
Volunteer work can play a vital role in
getting the job you really want. If you
are interested in work experience which
will help you after you graduate contact
the Easter Seal Society at 758-3230
The Smithsonian Institute, beginning m
1980, will conduct a program in
cooperative education under which
graduate students in selected fields mas
pursue individual programs ol study at
the Smithsonian The program features
alternating semesters ol work at the
Smithsonian followed by on-campus
studs ol job related subjects The
Following opportunities are among
several now asailable to highly
qualified siudents. Public Affairs
Writer Assistant. National Air and
Space Museum. Research Trainee.1
( enter lor Earth and Planetary Studies.
Museum Programs. Audio Visual Pro
duction Assistant. Script Writer.
Museum Programs. Audio Visual Pro
duction Assistant, Video Studio; Na
nonal Portrait Gallery, Bibliographic
Researcher. History Department:
Radiation Biology Laboratory,
Physical Science I ngineering Student
Trainee; Radiation Biology
I ahoratory. Biological Science Student
trainee. Office Ol Audits. Accounting
Student frainee; Division ol Perform
ing Aits.Genct.il Arts and Information
Assistant. Smithsonian Institute Press.
General Arts and Intormalion sw
lam Necessary forms and applications
can be obtained in the Cooperative'
Education Office, 31s Rawl
Poetry Forum
The East Carolina Poetry Forum will
have a regular workshop and meeting
Thursday, May I, at 8 p.m in
Mendenhall. room 248. fhe public is
cordially insited
Remember
We wish to remind all
students and faculty that we
will not accept any an-
nouncements for the An-
nouncements column unless
they are typed doublespacs
and turned in before the
deadline. No exceptions will
be made. The deadlines are
2.00 p.m. Friday for the
Tuesday edition and 2:00
p.m. Tuesday for the Thurs-
day edition. We reserve the
right to edit for brevity. We
cannot guarantee that
everything turned in will ap-
pear in the paper, due to
space limitations, but we will
do our best.
l Patronize I
I The'Fast Crimtininn
I




Patronize
The East Carolinian
Advertisers
HEAPING tiny
PORTIONS. p"cc
Wendesday April 23,
Smothered Chicken with
vegatables
Thursday April 24
Liver and Onions with
vegatables
two
$1.89
two $1.79
Come home to eat at S&S � we're located in the
Carolina East Mall in Greenville, at the intersection of
West Haven Road (U.S. 264 Bypass) and Hwy. 11. Plenty
of free parking too.
Carolina East Mall
Serving continuously daily
from 11 a.m. till 8 p.m.
(8:30 Friday & Saturday)
Ladies Nite Ladies Nite
Wednesday Night
April 23
-a
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Ladies Nite
Bring Your Nickles
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The Complete
Student
Shops
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
E�ch of tries advertd Hem, requ,red -c be read a�a iaD� for
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Items and Prices
Effective Tuee April 22
thru Set April 26. 1980
TAB, SPRITE OR
Coca-Cola
Copyright 19S0
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 22.1980
Tenure Demands Complex Path
Continued from Page 1
tenure is in itself com-
plex, requiring agree-
ment from at least five
sources.
When the professor
comes up for his final
review, the Faculty Per-
sonnel Committee in
his school or depart-
ment must approve
him, passing that ap-
proval along to the
department head. The
department head then
passes on his recom-
mendation to the vice
chancellor for
academic affairs, who
in turn submits the case
to the university
chancellor. At this
point, the matter goes
to the UNC system's
General Administra-
tion in Chapel Hill for
final approval of
tenure.
Even when the pro-
fessor is tenured, the
job security he seeks is
not ironclad. Accor-
ding to university pro-
cedures, a tenured pro-
fessor may be dismissed
if he is judged incompe-
tent, in neglect of his
duties, or if he engages
in "misconduct of such
a nature as to indicate
that the individual is
unfit to continue as a
member of the facul-
ty
While these offenses
are phrased in broad
terms, Dr. McDaniel
contends that, when it
comes down to the
"nitty-gritty it is not
hard to determine who
is unfit.
To complete the
analogy: like rising
hopefuls in the world
of big business, univer-
sity faculty members
must constantly
demonstrate their com-
petence.
Or so goes the
theory. To have a com-
plete picture of what is
involved in
demonstrating com-
petence, one would
need to know some of
the criteria by which
professors are judged.
(Next issue: What
happens to classroom
teacher evaluation
forms.)
Greek News
Reagan Rallies
Dubious Support
Among Students
By RICKIGLIARMIS
Greek CorrespoadeiU
With the end of
school just around the
corner, fraternities and
sororities are winding
up the year with ban-
quets, formals, and
The Kappa Deltas
are having Parent's
Day Sunday, April 27.
The Tri Sigmas held
their Founder's Day
dinner last night at the
house. Two new
BERKELEY, CA
JCPS) � Presidential
candidate Ronald
Reagan, who has fared
poorly in student-
dominated precincts
during the primaries,
has unwittingly rallied
some dubious support
on the University of
California-Berkeley
campus.
Calling itself the
"Reagan for Shah
Committee a group
of allegedly pro-
Reagan activists has an-
nounced plans to pro-
test the "ugly emergen-
cy of neo-anti-war
hysteria on America's
campuses
Zodiac News Service
reports that committee
members claim
"thousands of clean,
decent, obedient young
Americans" support
them. The committee
plans university rallies
to protest the
"disturbing specter of
draft resistance hang-
ing over our univer-
sities and colleges
Organized support
for the committee's ef-
forts is said toe ome
from such groups as the
"John Wayne Peace
Institute "Mutants
for a Radioactive En-
vironment "Berkeley
Students for War
"The National
Grenade Owners
Association and the
"Peace Resistors
League among
others.
Zeta would ttke to con- The Delta Zetas are
gratulate Cindy having a pancake din-
Rodger s for being in- ner on Wednesday,
ducted into the sorori- April 23 from 5 p.m.
ty. until 8 p.m. at their
Dream Girl, the house.
Delta Zeta's annual
DledeeV Lvnn Calder spring formal, was held The Sig Eps would
and 'aren Murray' last weekend. Awards like to thank Mark
awards for their parting presented at the were presented to Tracy Duckworth for another
seniors. banquet Blackwell, Dream Girl; great Beach Weekend.
This past Sunday Te Sigmas held Kathy Swigard, Ann They are also holding
night, the Chi Omegas their spring cocktail Winstead Award and
held their Farewell party at the Scholarship Award; their annual Senior
Banquet at the Beef Washington Yacht and Brenda Hawkes, Best Banquet this week
Barn. The following Country club Friday Pledge; Becky Henry, honoring graduating
night Best pledge Pledge Scholarship; seniors Steve Woodie,
award went to Vera Susie Boyd, Most En- Jeff Triplett, Larry
Nichols while the Best thusiastic; Krista Moss, Speed, Hudson
Sister award was Best Scrapbook; and Howell, Mark
presented to Sandy Dookie Scarboro, Duckworth, Chris
Burke Always-on-Time Holloman, and Steve
The sisters of Delta Award. Williams.
seniors were presented
with awards: Janet
Nethercutt, Outstan-
ding Alumni; Christie
Priestly, Scholarship
Award; Cathy
McLean, President's
Cup; Mara Flaherty,
Most Spirited Senior;
Cathy McLean, Sorori-
ty Before Self Award;
and Molly Jordan,
Outstanding Senior.
The Chi Omegas will
be presenting their Spr-
ing Pledge Class Friday
night at their annual
Spring Cocktail Party.
The party will be held
at the Washington
Yacht and Country
Club.
The Kappa Deltas
held initiation for their
pledges Monday night.
Congratulations to Kim
Flora, Lynn Moore and
Wanny Winslow.
Journalism Professor Receives Award
- Ira L Baker, coordinator of ECU's journalism program, was
presented a Certificate of Appreciation by the National Council of the
Society for Collegiate Journalists at their Spring Induction ceremony
last Thursday night. � ,
The award was presented to Baker by W. Wilford Kale, Jr na-
tional president of SCJ, for his service to the society. Baker has
started three chapters of the organization, at High Point College, Fur-
man University and East Carolina University.
Baker will be retiring at the end of the semester after 12 years at
ECU.
Van Replaces SGA Bus
H FOR THE SUMM
WE ARE n
Students Last Year
Averaged $3500 For Summer
SOUND GOOD? YOU BET!
COME HEAR ABOUT IT TODAY
� Must be hard working
� Must be willing to travel out west
Interviews will be at 3:00-7:00
Tues. April 22 Wed. April 23
In 302-C Brewster
� Please Be On Time �
FOXHUNTER
(formally the Rathskeller)
OFFERING
LADIES NITE
TUE.NITE8pm-lam
LADIES
BRING
YOUR
NICKELS
L
Owner and Operator
Randy Alford
Continued from Page 1
The SGA is also con-
sidering reviving the
third bus route for the
fall. Abshire said the
proposal is for the ex-
isting Purple route to
be split in half, with
one half left as it is, to
allow faster travel bet-
ween apartments and
the campus.
The other half, Ab-
shire noted, would be
merged with the old
Brown route, which ran
between main campus
and the downtown
area, including some of
tne apartments.
The Gold route,
which links main cam-
pus with Minges, Allied
Health, Oakmont
Square apartments,
Pitt Plaza and Green-
ville Square, will not be
affected by the new
routes, Abshire noted.
nBfc-r
Heinoken
Distributed
By
Taylor
Beverage Co.
Goldsboro
NOW
THREE
IMPORTED
MRC Banquet Held
REASONS
TO BUY'

Last Friday members
of the Men's Residence
Council met for their
final banquet and
awards ceremony.
MRC President
Grady Dickerson open-
ed the ceremony by
citing some of the ac-
complishments of the
MRC during the past
year, including concerts
on the hill and institu-
tion of the James
Mallory Scholarship.
Next academic year,
the MRC will merge
with the other residence
councils to form the
Student Residence
Association.
Heineken
HOLLAND BEER
THE 1 IMPORTED BEER IN AMERICA.
2.
CHOOSE
y
A selection of 17 innovative
and contemporary stytes on
display this week only.
ARTCARVED FEATURES MORE
DESIGN VARIETY THAN ANY
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Save $20.00 on Four Ladies
FREE RING
Trade in your men's gold
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ARTCARVEO ALSO ALLOWS
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PURCHASES
Gold H. S. rings,
trade-in values.
Man's: $99.00
Women's $50.00
Fashion 3�
R'ngs SAVE
The East Carolinian
Serving the campus community
for 54 yean.
Published every Ta �
Thursday during the academ.c
year and every Wednesday dur.ng
the summer. .
The East Carolinian is the of
,iJlTnlpaPro.EastC.ro1,na
university, owned, operated, and
puTshi tor ad by the students
of East Carolina Univers.ty
Subscription Rates
�; 15 vear,y
Alumni $20 yearly
tecorclass post, p I
GTenenEisicaCro.inian oMicesar
I , JaTed in the Old South Bu-ld.n
ocamposofECU.Greenv
N.C.
Produced from a strong jeweler's
alloy, SILADIUM� College rings
are available at special sale prices.
ARTCARVED PROVIDES AN
ALTERNATIVE TO THE HIGH PRICE OF GOLD.
All Men's Siladium rings
are on sale for $74.95
?BONUS: ArtCarved's Colege ring specials! is on campus today
to assist with this important and meaningful purchase.
COLLEGE RINGS
symbolizing your ability to achieve.
April 22nd and 23rd
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Deposit requ�d Mailer Charge or V�o accepted
immnn -�- 0�f m�?
mmmm m �� i m ��� r "� '?'





M
B
QUie �aat ffiaroKniati
Serving the campus community for 54 years.
Marc Barnes, �m i iiur
Richard Green, &�
Robert M. Swaim, �������mh� Diane Henderson, cw ��
Chris Lichok, m. w Charles Chandler, ��� ��
Terry Gray, �� �.� Debbie Hotaling, mm m��
College Press Sefvicv
TUESDAY, APRIL 22, 1980
PAGE 4
This Newspaper's Opinion
Freedom Of Choice
It has often been said that politics
makes strange bedfellows. In the
sn.all Columbus County town of
Nakima, the case of a book banning
reminiscent of Carrie Nation and
her hatches has become a political
football just three weeks before the
election of the county commis-
sioners there. The old saying about
bedfollows is at the heart of the
argument.
"Wifey a supposedly sexually
explicit book, has been banned
from the county library shelves by
the commissioners following com-
plaints from the Veterans of
Foreign Wars and other groups.
Apparently, one child's mother
found out that her daughter was
reading the novel and got so upset
about it that she organized a suc-
cessful effort to ban the book from
the public library.
Some observers, according to a
story in the News and Observer,
have painted a picture of a political
issue where one hasn't existed
before. The idea seems to be: there
really aren't any pressing issues that
we can disagree over for the voters
� so why don't be get hot and"
bothered about a book-banning?
That will surely help us get votes,
and it will be mud that can be slung
against those on the other side,
some commissioners are probably
saying to themselves. Some of the
more foresighted citizens of upstan-
ding towns like Nakima and Old
Dock are dismissing the entire affair
as total nonsense.
The issue here is not really the
book in question. There is no in-
dication from any authority that
reading the book will make your
child grow up to live an immoral
life. It is the fear � the fear of the
unknown that has raised its ugly
head yet again.
No one who was interviewed by
the News and Observer had read the
book, save for one retired farmer
who had photocopied some par-
ticularly torrid passages from the
work and who was showing it
around to people at a country store.
It doesn't seem that a person could
get an idea of the sexual explicitness
(if there is such a word) of a literary
work without reading all of it, in its
full context.
If looked at in a different way, we
see that the banning of any literary
endeavor is as wrong as is forced
reading of any piece of literature.
The fact is � no one is forcing
anyone to read anything against his
will. It is the freedom of the action
which we are concerned with � the
freedom for us to make up our own
minds about what we want to read
and what we don't want to read. It
is not the job � and it should not be
the concern � of tthe Veterans of
Foreign Wars or any other group to
ban books for our children. If we let
this go unchecked, the floodgates of
censorship will swing wide open,
and even seemingly innocuous
works will come under suspicion.
And that would be sad. For that
would be close to the same thing
Soviet dissidents have beenc
omplaining about for the last 20
years.
Finally, we would hope that the
attorney general's office will see
these senseless battles for what they
are and put an end to them forever.
If this decision is not made, one
of our basic and most important
freedoms will be sadly diminished.
WE BANNED TME �MUT OF
&TEW&ECK, HEMINGWAY &
FANNER, WT 7Tig) B�oK
HA&MORE FiLTHY W�R&&
THAN ALL. OF THEM- WE
CANT AUPW BooK� UKt.
THI&1NCUR l
SCHOOL! jgj&
i
g0CKV MTN.
NEVJ�

9)
O
o
Earth Day Is Being Revamped
Just In Time For New Decade
By PAT MINGES
Exactly ten years ago today President
Nixon, in perhaps the finest hour of his
tenure, declared April 22, 1970 Earth Day.
On January 1, in his first act of the new
decade, Jimmy Carter proclaimed today
the second Earth Day, and throughout the
nation individuals are celebrating through
such acts as sunrise ceremonies, acid rain
conferences and aluminum recycling con-
tests. Earth Day 1980 is a testament to the
tremendous gains that our nation has made
in such areas as pollution fighting, protec-
tion of natural resources and public health
efforts. At the same time, Earth Day is a
clarion to the tremendous struggle that we
have before us.
A splendid fervor highlighted the acts
and protests of the first Earth Day, when
individuals decked themselves in green
paint and arrangements of flowers. The
proverbial peace symbol, once the object
around which a generation had rallied,
became eclipsed by a new standard, the
ecos � symbol for the fight to preserve our
earth.
The gains that we have made in these last
ten years are very impressive. On the first
day of the last decade, Nixon signed the
National Environmental Policy Act that
established the Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA) to insure ecological impact
assessments of proposed federal actions
and to watch over the private sector. Since
then, there have been many significant
legislative landmarks such as the Clean Air
Act Amendments of 1970 which set auto
pollution standards, the Occupational
Safety and Health Act, authorizing
Federal workplace standards, the Water
Pollution Act of 1972, setting the
"fishable, swimmable" criterion for the
nation's waters, the Endangered Species
Act of 1973 and many others. The federal
government is attacking environmental
issues directly by monitoring air and water
standards, limiting pesticide use, protec-
ting wildlife and unspoiled lands and
�generally being more observant in areas
concerned with environmental depriva-
tion.
This year, however, there is not the overt
exposition of environmental concern like
that which was manifested on the first
Earth Day primarily because these issues
have become internalized into the
mainstream of the American psyche. Just
as the civil rights struggles of the "60s
brought about a change of attitudes within
the average American, the environmental
campaigns of the '70s have made concern
for the environment a critical issue of our
daily existence.
As Douglas Costle, administrator of the
EPA, puts it, "Ten years ago, there were
only a handful of adults in this country
who knew what the word 'ecology' meant.
Today every schoolchild is taught ecology.
Environmental protection is becoming a
permanent part of our political value
system
Our past decade is something that we
can be proud of, but the real fight is just
over the horizon. Conversion to alternative
sources that are unrenewable is a dubi
possibility, for coal and ynthetic fuel
contribute significantly to higher levels
air pollution as does increased wood
ing. The threat of nuclear proliferaiK
the most ominous of proposed alterna
energy sources. To become der
upon such is to toy with potential disaster
and place the welfare of future gene-
in the hands of the profiteers. All
above-mentioned sources of ene
only prolong the immediate problem
not solve permanently the crisis before
The future depends on our abii
make use of the resources that oui eartli
has provided for us through en
technological applications that surr
as integrative beings in our enir
rather than just abuser. Just as Earth
1970 was the genesis of a new de
committment to environmentalism. th
cond Earth Dav could bring about
consciousness of the ecological role
ween man and his environment.
The most tragic thing that ve cou d -
to our planet is to destroy her because
the inability of her inhabitant to
together in peace. Above all, it m�
remembered, whatever disagreements at
have as nations and peoples, we must
to resolve these problems in rational,
telligent methods that are indicative o
higher levels of communica:
Militarism and threats of forceful a.
are incompatible with sincere concern
the welfare of our home and its pe
Let's save the world, not destroy it.
'Born To Run' To Be N.J. Theme?
Here's some news you can't live
without:
New Jersey State Assemblyman Richard
Visotcky is planning to sponsor a resolu-
tion making Bruce Springsteen's song,
"Born to Run the official state theme.
Says Visotcky: "Bruce is a New Jersey
native, he often talks about how much he
loves the state, and most important, it
would make young people in the state
believe in politics again
Personally, 1 love the idea. But as a true
Springsteen fan who once traveled several
miles just to eat breakfast in his home
town, I'd like to recommend several other
songs he's done. "Born to Run" doesn't
really capture the true flavor of New
Jersey. How about "Jungleland" or
"Streets of Fire" or maybe "Badlands"
instead?
Hopefully the New Jersey vote will set a
precedent that other states will follow.
Think of all the possibilities.
California could adopt the Eagles'
"Hotel California" as its state theme.
David Bowie's "Panic in Detroit" would
do well as Michigan's state song. And
Ohio, which has given this country many
great rock stars, including DEVO (a group
truly proud of its state heritage), could
adopt "Are We Not Men?" as its theme.
Somehoe I've always pictured people from
Ohio as the type to go staggering about,
chanting: "Are We Not Men? We Are
OHIO
Now that's something that will make us
believe in politics again.

You say you've got a friend who's a
political science major and you can't
quite the right birthday gift? Richi
Oldshue has the answer.
The People's Primary toilet paper.
Oldshue, president of a Detroit co
party called All-in-good-fun, is marke
this new item in various noveltv -
around the country.
It comes in six different varieties (one
for each candidate), each featuring I
caricature of a presidential candidate on
every sheet.
According to Oldshue his producl
"gives Americans the right to vote for a-
many candidates as they mav wish - a-
often as they wish � in the privacv of their
own homes
I always thought Ronald Reaean would
look better in a toilet.
War Talk Abounds, "Heroes" Don't Know What Is In Store
By CHARLES GRIFFIN
National News Bureau
The smell is in the air. Blood leads
to blood. Old soldiers chew their
bits and kick at their stable doors.
Newshawks gather around the fresh
kills like the brethren of vultures
that they are.
Incident follows incident and the
public finds that each new event
raises a froth at the mouth and a
fever to do something � anything
� about the world situation.
Congress moves slowly toward a
first step to a new draft, but
presidential politics and the jackals
of the global jungle feed on and
enlarge each bloody event until one
explodes.
The explosion is coming. It may
not be in Iran or Afghanistan. It
could be in South America or in
Israel or in Europe. Something is
building � lurching darkly this
way. The pressure is too great for it
to be otherwise. Some half-assed
terrorist or politician will overdo it
and the world will stumble into war.
If war comes, this life of ours will
cease to exist. Our only hope is that
the war. may be limited in scope �
contained in the spark area. If it is,
then we might win � with a hell of a
lot of luck. But we are far more like-
ly to lose. Whatever happens in a
limited war, at least we will survive
as a society and be able to rebuild
and, perhaps, change our ways.
Unlimited war means only
destruction � the end of civilization
as we know it:
Either way, the big party is over
for us. The frills win be gone. There
is no room in a soldier's backpack
for a silk pillow.
War requires gas rationing, food
rationing, and personal sacrifice.
We have never been so short of na-
tional shipping resources. Our mer-
chant marine is now Liberian or
Panamanian. The true owners may
be American, but they are unlikely
to risk their ships too often if supply
lanes to America are cut by Soviet
submarines.
Things we have taken for granted
will be in short supply. Coffee, tea,
and bananas are not native to the
U.S. I don't even want to think
about strategic materials produced
overseas.
America will have to mobilize.
The population will have to accept
discipline, if we are to survive as a
nation. Conscription will be a fact.
Men and women will be in uniform
if they are of age and capable. They
will drill and train to defend or at-
tack our enemies. They will not easi-
ly be able to question or ponder the
why of an order. When the captain
of the hundreds says "go they will
go. And by the pointing of a finger,
men and women will die. Not in
defense of liberty, for our liberties
will be gone. Not in defense of our
way of life, for our way of life will
have changed forevermore. They
will die to maintain the government
and to overcome the foe.
And the outcome is in doubt.
We face an enemy whose whole
population is prepared and trained
for war, whose major point of pride
in World War II was that they sur-
vived everything the Germans could
do, held their ground, then came
back to overwhelm them. Moscow
subways are ornate and practical
bomb shelters. They are deep
enough to withstand direct overhead
hits � nuclear hits. Except for a few
well-protected cities, the rest of their
people and industries are widely
dispersed.
The Soviet government may have
problems with minority populations
and with dissidents, but it has no
qualms about putting down either.
We could exploit taht, but our
foreign policy is too weak to allow
us to take advantage of the situa-
tion.
The Soviet citizen is a hard
worker who knows little of personal
luxury. He walks more and 'per-
forms more physical labor than the
average American. He makes a
good soldier.
During World War II most
Americans entering the military had
some prior experience with hard-
ships. Today that is not true. The
Russian is now hardier, more willing
to obey orders, more pauiotic, and
better trained and outfitted than his
American counterpart.
He is less independent, and his
leaders are less felxibk, since Soviet
strategy is more single-minded than
anything we have. But the Soviet
soldier is brave and willing to tr.
the officer wastes little time worry
ing about his orders, and his
superior's strategy is to win.
When there is nothing left to
decide, there is little time for indeci
sion.
4i!aPh Waldo Emerson once said,
�The dice of God are always load
��" If he didn't say it, someone
else equally wise did. We have
always had the dice on our side. But
Vietnam was a warning. Our roll
can t last forever. It is high time we
helped load the dice.
Skip ideologies and make military
i5aiH?s whcre wc �"�. Bring our
old allies into line or neutralize
them. Sow dissension in the Soviet
backyard. Tighten our belts and
Pftpare for survival.
t � who survives the best wiH be
-the victor. He may stand in triumph
over at pile of slitt, but he will have
won if he is able to stand.
��� .��.
��A-
��- . ' V
��"4- "irW- ���� � ?






THl EASTCAROI INIAN
PKIl 22, I9K0
Toto
More Than Just Studio Musicians
ap-
C ontinued from Page 6
majesty in "Child's Anthem" and "Hydra
1 oto included several upbeat numbers in their
repertoire. These were usually placed between the
more mellow pieces, keeping the audience alive
with hand-clapping fervor. Rocking songs such as
�All Us Boys" and "Rockmaker" may very well
have been chosen over slower, more melodic
pieces like "I orraine" because of audieno
peal.
Near the end of the show, two members of the
band put on a long, vet exciting duet. David
Paich and Steve Porcaro began the interlude with
rich, strong keyboards, and gradually Paich took
over, capturing the spotlight and the audience's
p�!vntion along, until 1 ukather joined in with
v ibrant guitar work.
Patch then treated the audience to a view of his
and Steve Porcaro's new invention. I hey call it a
totar, which is a mini-moog synthesizer with all
controls built into the neck. The totar is like a
hand held keyboard, and Paich, standing, jamm-
ed with I ukathei on guitar for several minutes.
Each of the members of I oto was superb in his
own right, but the band as a whole performed
without the sense of group effort. Individual per-
formers tried to steal the show. Because of this,
description of I oto as a unit is difficult. The
crowd lett Minges Coliseum elated, not so much
because the) had seen a great group perform but
because they had witnessed the excellence of six
talented musicians.
portraying the character in "Hydra" and "St.
George and the Dragon" as he goes to slay the
Hydra. The sword Porcaro holds in the two
photos is fashioned after the one on the cover of
Toto's first album. Porcaro noted that the sword
may become a symbol for the band, used on each
successive album, although this is still only a
possibility.
Asked about the lighting effect on the cover,
where the sword appears to attain an almost neon
glow, Porcaro explained, "He (photographer Jim
Hagopian) kept having me tilt it at different
angles where the light was, until it was just
right
"1 spent eight hours in the sewer in IA. to get
those pictures. The green light (in the photo) was
supposed to signify where the dragon is The
lyrics of 'St. George' are the dragon lives 'below
Seventh Avenue It was me supposedly going
to give a stage performance, but we do. We really after the dragon on the cover. Then the inside is
like the aftershot, with my shirt all torn up
Porcaro freely answered more personal ques-
studio work because we still have a lot of friends
who helped us when we were first starting. So
when they ask us to do stuff for them, we like to
oblige. If it wasn't for them, we wouldn't be
here
Porcaro explained that Bo Scaggs has been a
long-time friend whom members of Toto worked
with before the group was formed. This is the
reason for three of Toto's members appearing as
principle artists on Scaggs' new release.
Porcaro also mentioned that the band owed
much of their concert skill to traveling with Bo
Scaggs, Gary Wright and others.
"Going on the road with those guys was great.
It kinda' gave us the experience to make decisions
about the road and know what we were doing. A
lot of people hear we're studio musicians and
think we've never been on the road before with
anyone, and we don't know what it's like or how
do Porcaro said with a grin.
After Toto's first album, critics complained
Interview
fter the concert, Steve Porcaro, Toto's
keyboard and electronic wizard, discussed the
group's status in an interview and defended their
weaknesses with a smile.
Porcaro made it jiear that Toto docs not mind
being referred to as "studio musicians' even
after the release of their second album. It's the
image they started out with, and something which
may sta with them for a while.
"Being called studio musicians doesn't really
bother us. We're just musicians, whether it's in
the studio or live. We continue to do a lot of
Headache 79
that while group members were good musicians,
they were not songwriters. One member of the
band replied that precision playing made up for
content. When asked to defend this point of view,
Porcaro was reluctant, but, still smiling, explain-
ed that he would never have made such a remark.
"I like the songwriting myself. I would never
have let it get past that. Of course, it's a matter of
opinion, but I liked the songs a whole lot. They
(the critics) might have been talking about the
lyrics he added, "because that's what they
think is one of our low points
Porcaro then went on to discuss the making of
the second album. Hydra, which the group had
first considered making a double album.
"Deciding against a double album was pretty
much a joint agreement. We kind of wanted to do
a double album because we had so much material
all ready to go. So many different members of the
group write a whole lot. But it just wasn't a wise
idea for so early in our career
Porcaro also mentioned the cover and inside
photographs for Hydra. He appeared on both.
lions about group members. He proudly remark-
ed that both his father and David Paieh's father
had influenced the group. Arranger Marty Paich
and drummer Joe Porcaro introduced their sons
David and Jeff 12 years ago.
"I take lessons from David's father. He's a
great orchestrator, one of the best in the
business
Asked about a rivalry between his brother Jeff
(Toto's drummer) and himself, Porcaro replied.
(Ontinued from Page 6
quipped. She nodded in
agreement. so I decided
that conversation was
out as a form o amuse-
ment tor the evening.
�n the soiree pro-
gressed, most of the
partiers reverted to
their i d -1 e v e 1 s and
engaged in all forms o
body-pollution. My
friend was at the
forefront o the gang,
and he slowly began to
pale.
The evening had
reached its zenith at
about 10:30. Crazy go-
ings on could be
witnessed throughout
the house, and
everyone was happy
because it had gotten to
the point where even it
we could have thought
o something intelligent
to say to each other, we
no longer had the dex-
terity to enunciate. We
were getting complaint
calls about the noise
from Stubenville,
Ohio.
t 1 1 :(X) most people
weren't feeling too
well. Poor Z. was
stooped over the toilet,
his face contorted in a
grim expression of
serious nausea. The
sound of his heaving
took the glee out of the
ambiance, and soon we
had to pack him up like
a sleeping bag and lay
him brusquely on his
bed. There, colorless
and unconscious, he
had the serene look o'
an assassinated head o'
state.
. was the first to go,
but not the last. His
was an example follow-
ed throughout the even-
ing, and soon the house
was littered with corp-
ses and semi-ruminated
let or.
1 called the Z. the
next afternoon to see if
he had made it back to
the 20th century. One
of his r o o m m at es
answered the phone,
and in the distant
background. I could
hear my friend's voice
reverberating off the
porcelain o' the
johnny. I heard him
ambulate to the phone.
"Hey, man, how are
ya' today?" he said.
"man, 1 had a great
time last night 1
heard him choke, and
then there was a pause.
"Man. 1 can't wait 'till
next weekend
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
all inclusive"
prccinni y test birtfl ton
na proni. m preqnan
ounseling For fui " � �
reformation call
� � � � numbei
800 ii ;S6H bi � � n v
� � s p m weekday
Raleiqh Worm n s
Health Ornuation
917 West (Worqan St
Raleiqh N.C 27603
ATTIC
N C NO 3 1 Nightclub
LOUISIANA'S LeROUX
Cap'toi Recording ArtistsTHURS. 24th
tin; wmi:
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v?

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756-4001

$5.00 off on
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jeans for ECU
students with ID
FOSDICK'S
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OYSTERS $4.95
FLOUNDER &S.50
TROUT �$.95
PERCH 2.95
all you can eat
No taKoutt pUmam
Frtnch PrlM, Cote �tew
Piano
Recital
A piano recital will
he presented by ECU
senior Deborah Anne
Lambeth of Greenville
on April 24 at 9 p.m. in
the Fletcher Reeital
Hall on eampus.
For her reei'al. Miss
l.ambeth will be play-
ing two sonatas, I . 497
in B flat Major and I .
104 in C Major by
Scarlatti, Polonaise in
C sharp Minor, Op. 26,
no. 1 by Chopin, three
Scriabin preludes, Op.
1 I (part I), no 6 in B
Minor, an original
composition entitled,
"I'll Always
Remember" and Scott
loplin's "Magnetic
Rag
SPECIAL WORDS
PUBLISHING
BRANDY MUSIC
and
SOUNDS INC.
Nashville, Tenn.
proudly announce
the debut album
W� are proud to
announce that wo
have added
ono of tho
AREAS FINEST
SALAD BARS
lor your
dining pleasure.
WO R DS I ��� FOR LUNCH
The versatility of this new artist is fan-
tastic We m Eastern North Carolina
should be very proud
Steve Hardy,
V-Pres. & Gen. Manager
WRQR-FM. Farmville, N.C.
a very remarkable endeavor, one that
is sure to catapult Richard Duane to na-
t'onal acclaim
Pat Minges
Staff writer,
East Carolinian,
March 18,1980
Greenville, N.C.
an introduction to the language and style of a new artist
by Richard Duane
The man's music is superb. He writes
the words, he composes the music and
he sings the songs. The album will be a
hit.
Walt Cunningham
Pianist a Music Arranger
Nashville, Tennessee
Dolly UtSO
Dr. Richard Duane Logue has reached
the unattainable
Daily Reflector
Sunday, December 2,1979
Greenville, N.C.
unquestionably head-
Sun. - Tnur.
4S30-OSOO
Frl. and Sat.
43-XOlOO
as3�
"There was alwavs that when l was younger, you
know what I mean, wanting to make it, be a
good-enough musieian. But I've already proven
that to myself now
Noting that the group seemed more sedate than
mans bands who go on the road. I questioned
about what the road is like for I oto.
"We come on the road to relax. There's so
much partying going on all the time back in I A.
(where the) live), when we go on the road, we feel
like it's time to rest
With that, Steve Porcaro ended the interview,
still smilinu and energetic.
m
mm
STUOf NT UNION
(1ST CMKXM jaKHtV'
m
mm
STUDENT UNION
lit' CIWuU .�.(���
I
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be readii
I below the advertised price in each ASP Store except as
�n this ad
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT APRIL 26 AT A&P If
y available for sale at or
�s specifically noted
-GREENVILLE
A&P PUTS THE LID ON MEAT PRICES!
Plus Over 200 Reduced Prices On other items
In addition to AAP s more than 200 NEW LOW PRICES A&P brings you the security of MEAT PRICE
CEILINGS on all fresh beef pork veal lamb poultry and fish now through May 17 These prices can be
lowered, but A&P guarantees they won t go higher See the posted meat ceiling prices at A&P
264 BYPASS GREENVILLE SQUARE
SHOPPING CENTER
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STRAWBERRIES
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BIG
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MILD TENDER
YELLOW
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white
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frozen foods
MARVEL REG. OR CRINKLE CUT
FRENCH FRIES
2-LB.
BAGS
ANN PAGE
PIZZAS
HAMBURGER PEPPCRONI
SAUSAGE
CHEESE
12 OZ
PKG
TAYLOR
LAKE COUNTRY WINE
Red-White Pink Gold
3 liter bot. $5"9
good in greenville
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GENERIC- WHITE
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rJUint I larvcv
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1 I I W. 4ih Si.
ed for stardomThere is something very meaningful m the magnificent debut album
for everyone who cares Gene Cash
Songwriter, Sound Engineer
Nashville, Tennessee
Available at Record Bar & Apple Records
(Pitt Plaza)
SAVE fiY
0 ORANGE
JUICE
LIMIT ONE
WITH THIS
COUPON AND
AOOITIONAl
�7 SO ORDER
SAVE 56c
15c OFF LABEL
CHEER
LAUNDRY
DETERGENT
Effective April 18 Fosdick's will
o longer accept personal
V-GAL.
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'ark i
in
Inrfil awl K ar-
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M � ft f - m � ��
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I r lir 9 4-m �� w� .� .� �"�� �����-�-��
? - - �
p m m 00 0
nmm�





ITHE EAST CAROLINIAN APRIL 22. 1980
April Means Disaster
V
Continued from Page 6
TO STU0S
THirri Hoots kn L


1

V M!T fit STUriC
The Cowards are another grup that uses a
"not-studying" method in coping with exams.
1 hey are the ones who even now are packing their
things and buying bus tickets.
A number o' people study with the help of elec-
tronic aids, such as stereos, television and radios.
Although these seem to help the particular in-
dividual, they can greatly hinder the other 399
people in the dorm. In case you want to use televi-
sions to help your studies, I have found that
movies of the 1930's and reruns of "Wild, Wild
West" are the most helpful things to have on.
Bribery is a dishonest, underhanded and unfair
way o' passing exams that I would never con-
sider, due to the expense.
Cheating is a big problem at exam time, but
one that I feel is blown out of proportion. Most
o' my teachers have cheated very little on my ex-
ams. I do think that students would benefit if they
did know how professors who do cheat go about
it, so here are a few things to watch for:
Tables Turned
�Coming in late. Some dishonest professors ar-
rive very late for the exam, cutting the time
students have to complete complex essay ques-
tions.
�Complex essay questions.
�Comprehensive finals.
�Complex essay questions on comprehensive
finals on material never covered in class.
�Last, but the worst � Saturday morning exams.
The victims of this terrible practice are so sleepy
and hungover that they don't know what has been
done to them until their vacations are ruined by
the arrival of their report cards.
I do want to say that most faculty members do
not cheat on our exams. Just as students who
study properly don't need to cheat, the professors
Usually make their courses hard enough to render
the above-mentioned dishonest techniques un-
necessary.
I hope everyone's exams turn out as un-
traumatic as possible. I have to go buy some ex-
otic coffees for my own all-night coffee-tasting
seminar, and see what's on the late shows on TV
next week.
12. Explain vajIov Tvarel'ne is
d great poeno.
THOUGHT
IT lvj,4s
' J
w
y
By WAYNKHOWE
National News Bureau
Men have been gap-
ing at breasty women in
Ci-strings for years, and
women have been
Hocking wide-eyed to
male exotic dance
shows for several mon-
ths, but the owner of
Daniel's, an ultra-chic
disco in New Haven,
Conn has added
mother provocative
m ist.
lor two hours or
more, near-naked men
perform for an ex-
clusively female au-
dience. Then, when the
all-male revue is over,
owner Danny Kearns
opens the door to his
male customers.
When the swarm
from the outside meets
the swell on the inside,
ihey mix faster than
lka-Selt.er in water.
Prior to the men's
entrance one recent
evening, there were an
estimated 250 women
stacked six deep around
the dance floor, wat-
ching Tony the "Italian
Stallion" bump and
twirl in his bulging
G-string. Outside, a
line of male customers
waited. The show was
running long, but no
one left. They all seem-
ed to want a peek at the
fantasy land inside.
The women came to
Daniel's first "Ladies
Night" in all shapes
and sizes. Occasionally
their applause drowned
out the music.
"We've come a long
way said Delia, of
Shelton, Conn
through her round-
rimmed secretary
glasses. She was stan-
ding on top of a bar
stool to get a better
view. "I didn't think
the men would come. I
didn't think they would
accept that, all the
women looking at other
men's bodies
Beverly is 22 and
engaged. Her fiance
didn't know she was
here. Before the wed-
ding, she will hold her
own stag, and -he said
she hopes to invite all
three of the male per-
formers at Daniel's.
She said the show ex-
cited her.
"I couldn't give
them a dollar. I only
had four quartrs and
there is no place to put
them. You get to kiss
him if you have a
dollar Beverly said.
"Next time I'd like to
bring my mother
There was louder ap-
plause from the dance
floor.
Grant, the bartender
farthest from the door,
said that the crowds
have been large, and he
expects them to get
larger each week.
At the door, Robert
Arbaszenski is the one
to know. He enforces
the dress code, which is
left laigely to his inter-
pretation, as at New
York's Studio 54.
"We look for clean,
nice people, no
punks explained Ar-
baszenski, who is 19.
"The underage, the im-
properly dressed, peo-
ple with the wrong at-
titude don't get in
The line of men grew
impatient, and surged
against the door. Ar-
baszenski gave a two-
minute warning. When
the show was over, he
would allow them in, a
few at a time.
Back at the bar, Mar-
tha said she was turned
on by the entire idea.
Her daughter was home
with a baby sitter. "It's
my first time. You
would have to be ab-
normal not to get turn-
ed on (by the dancers),
especially when you
come from an inky-
dinky town like
Cheshire (Conn.)
Martha said.
Dave was one of the
first male customers to
get in. For a moment he
leaned against the bar,
appearing slightly over-
whelmed. "I came
down to see the reac-
tion he said.
Danny Kearns, the
club's owner, is 31 and
single. He said he was
proud of his
"product To
eliminate over-
crowding, he plans to
open an hour earlier
and schedule two
shows.
'War Without
Winners' Shown
At Mendenhall
MiKe Cross, the musical enigma, will appear at The Carolina Opr House
tomorrow night. Tickets are $5 and are available at CON and Apple
Records.
Theatre Of Gesture
Plays A t ECU
The North Carolina
Theatre of Gesture, a
newly formed theatre
group composed of
both deaf and hearing
actors, will bring its
newest production to
the campus of East
Carolina University on
April 23. The play will
be NCTG's adaptation
of the Japanese Noh
drama entitled "The
Monstrous Spider
The performance will
be shown on Wednes-
day, April 23 at 8:00
p.m. in Mendenhall
Student Center, Room
244. The performance
will be free to the
public.
Along with the
"Monstrous Spider
NCTG will present a
short play called "The
Maids" and show some
scenes from a work in
progress to
demonstrate some of
their production and
acting techniques.
The North Carolina
Theatre of Gesture was
established as a non-
profit corporation to
promote deaf
awareness through the
dramatic arts. The
group is also exploring
the possibilities of a
nonverbal theatre.
"The Monstrous
Spider" represents
some of their research
into non-verbal theatre
� the play is perform-
ed without any spoken
or signed language.
Michael I arson,
creator and director of
NCTG, is emphasizing
movement, pan-
tomime, gesture, and
imaginative staging
techniques in the pro-
duction.
"The Monstrous
Spider" is based upon
an old Japanese legend
which tells of a race of
spider-people who
return to the surface of
the earth to reclaim the
land. The Queen of the
spider-people uses her
magical powers to
transform herself into a
beautiful Japanese
maiden in order to get
close enough to the
Emperor to kill him
with her venomous
sting. Because of the
fantasy and imagina-
tion involved in the
show, it is suitable for
all ages.
NCTG's Acting
Company consists o
three deaf performers.
Donna McCord, who
portrays the Monstrous
Spider; Richard
Glover, who plays the
Emperor; Larry
Smolik, who plays the
old samaurai warrior.
Elaine Montgomery,
the interpreteractress
portrays the Stage
Hand in the produc-
tion.
NCTG is currently
an Artist-in-Residence
at North Carolina State
University's Thompson
Theatre for the Spring
Semester. Thompson
Theatre and NCTG are
presently seeking funds
to continue the residen-
cy in the fall.
The Spring Residen-
cy was funded by
grants and contribu-
tions from the Z. Smith
Reynolds Foundation,
North Carolina State
Ar.ts Council, the
Governor's Advocacy
Council for Persons
with Disabilities, North
Carolina State Univer-
An Evening
with
MIKE CROSS
April 23rd
Carolina Opry House
758-5570
CLIFF'S
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
�MMM0M Miw�, in C DCili GrMovtii NamtCaro4in�
nann
ALL YOU CAN EAT!
Monday - Thursday
Crab Cakes$2.95
Trout$2.95
Flounder$3.25
CLIFF'S SUPER
SPECIAL
WEDNESDAY
CRAB CAKE SPECIAL
2 Golden Fried Crab Cakes
French Fries, Slaw, and
Hush Puppies. $.99.
sity, the Winston-
Salem Foundation,
Burroughs Wellcome
Co and IT&T Cor-
poration.
Everyone is welcome
to attend this unique
style of theatre produc-
tion.
For many serious
thinkers the issue ot the
nuclear arms race has
been difficult to com-
prehend. It so often is
linked with such other
issues as nuclear power,
pacifism and dratt
registration that anv
sort of moral analysis
of this single issue is
unclear at best.
What is deterrence?
What tvpe of defense is
adequate' Are our
nuclear stockpiles real-
Is in danger? rhese are
the big questions that
demand our attention
vet so often get glossed
over.
Tonight at 7:00 p.m.
in Mendenhall a movie
will be shown entitled
II ur H ithoui II inners.
It is put out bv the
Center tor Defense In-
formation. The man
behind this organiza-
tion and the film is
Rear Admiral (retired)
Gene I a Rocque. He is
one person who seeks
to discern some sort o!
reasonable analysis in
the contusing facts and
figures ol military
language.
B
Mr. la Rocque
military man who sees .1
need for an ad
defense, but he
critical thinker
dares to wrondei
the whole new arraj
military techi
now being offered
Pentagon (l
system, I r k:
marine, and the
bomber) W ill
$100 billion m
military pouci
am safer?
I his is flu
question �e
ask. it �c
responsible
nrovidci
II ithtmi H �
IO ask sut
questions m
responsible
expenditure- 1 I
is directed r
Wexlet H '
the !� I �
n ho �
Virginia 1 '�

includes a
p e r t v t r o: �
physicists
eencrat
negotiators
To get the most money for
selling your books,check
with the Customer Service
desk at the Student Supply
Store. We now have a com
plete list of books that will
be required for the Summer
and Fall terms.
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
Wright Building
D.A. Kelly's Circus Premiere
MON. Buy a 'Cheeno' skirt and get an oxford
shirt at 20 off
TUES. All swimsuits, rompers, & shorts 15
off.
WED. All pants 10 off.
THURS. Buy a golf shirt and get a pa.r of
regular priced 'Cheeno' pants at 15 off
FRI. Buy a pair of shorts and get a T Shirt 2
price.
SAT. All regular priced Spring Mdse. 10 off.
Special Events
AH customers who purchase $10.00 or more
will recieve a chance to "fich" j
up to 30 off. 'or a d.scount
A Clown will be in the store Sat from 2 4 to
entertain Kids with free ballon, andTuckers
bS5?2 tiCuetS t0 �� Beany Cole
Bros. Grcus. No purchase necessary.
SALE
MonSat. April 21-26
Carolina East Mall Ony
7568242
'0-9 Daily
1 ����� i
qf 0 I
�� �. -p- .





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Op-Ed
Other Opinion
APRIL 22, 1980
Page
Worst Case' Shouldn 't Be Basis For Deft
B W.H.FF.RRN
a orst case" analysis is a widely
echnique for deciding between
vo opposed forms of action. Ex-
traveler hastening to an
tanl business meeting comes
a shak bridge over a torrential
1 here is a solid bridge miles
It he chooses to drive to the
bridge, he may arrive perfectly
. Mt. he may be late, he may get
he mav be so late that he misses
appointment altogether and
s business. This last possibili-
worst case that can be made
oosing the safe bridge. If he
�ies the shakv bridge, he also
?s certain possibilities. He may
cross safely, he may stall ir the
He of the bridge, his car may
ff the bridge, the bridge may
k and hurl him into the river
re he loses his life. This last is
torsi case that can be made for
�sing ttic shaky bridge. The in-
dent traveler w.ll weigh both
possibilities and decide on the
of 'heir comparative threats to
e problem is the uniqueness of
situation. We have no tested
jides to policy or action. We are.
us, prospective agents o col-
ve extermination and collective
cide. lodav we can kill other na-
s, cultures, civilizations. We
e indeed the capability o an-
iting the world. So have the
riis. number of other na-
ns could make a good try at it.
History cannot help us; there has
,er been such a possibility before.
1 his accounts for our inability to
nk clearly about it. and for our
lingness to confront ourselves as
ral beings with duties to our
�w-beings and to posterity.
1 he main issues arc not how
,v bombs, bombers, tanks and
ops 1 he arc moral issues. By
at right will this or any subse-
� generation murder millions ot
� � ; ings, wipe our civilizations
built up over tens of centuries, and
poison the world' The matter seems
� satanic devising. For we are
skidding unluckily into
lastrophe but are being tempted
calamity by our own
hnological virtuosity. And it is
made to appear that we have no
choice.
The argument for the arms race is
the presence of an enemy awaiting
the opportunity to subjugate its op-
ponent. Russia believes this is the
aim of the U.S. We believe that it is
Russia's aim.
"Worst case" analysis furnishes a
stark definition of the choices
before us. Worst cases occur at the
far ends of the military-political
spectrum.
Radical disarmers occupy one end
of the spectrum. They are a con-
siderable group in the West though
far from a majority. They are not in
favor of arms control but of disar-
mament, with the United States
leading the way. Some want disar-
mament done f;�si. others in phases.
To the many moral reasons
clustered under the question, BY
WHAT RIGHT, they add practical
considerations. They assert that
growing militarization of the
economy is chiefly responsible for
inflation, that the arms race has
produced pernicious divisions
among Americans, that the prospect
of atomic war haunts generations of
children.
Radical disarmers also point to
the steady progress from atomic to
hydrogen bombs, to battlefield
nuclear weapons, to cruise missiles,
to laser beams to scour the heavens,
and thereafter to the superstroke
that will shatter the earth. This is the
Doomsday Machine popularized by
Herman Kahn 19 years ago.
and helpless against them. They
would have nothing to gain. One the
contrary they would have a mighty
industrial nation at their feet, one
rich in resources, technology, skills,
capital. This is an utterly hateful
prospect but it is one that radical
disarmers must accept as a most
likely outcome of their policies. This
is one pole of the "worst case"
argument.
The vast majority of Americans
are not, of course, radical
disarmers. It is a lamentable pro-
bability that most Americans are at
the other end of this argument: that
they see their security and welfare
bound up with the arms race. So
most Americans also must take
responsibility for the worst results
of the military policies that they ad
vocate and pay for.
The "worst case" here is all-out
nuclear exchange between this coun-
try and Russia. This supposes a
storm of nuclear weapons of every
dimension from submarines, silos,
and aircraft, the Russians on
American cities, industries and
military installations, our on theirs.
The military majority must accept
that there is no defense against such
attacks.
As long ago as 1968 Secretary of
The "worst case" that advocates
of radical disarmament must accept
is that following their advice would
result in the domination of this
country by the Soviets. They must
accept that the United States would
be overrun, that American institu-
tions would be transformed into the
service of Communist aims, that the
Soviets would do their best to
remove the rights and comforts to
which Americans are accustomed.
Radical disarmers must stipulate
their acceptance of every
disagreeable result that might ensue
from a takeover of the nation by
Russia.
No one seriously supposes that
the Communists would bomb this
country if we appeared disarmed
Defense McNamara put into the
record an estimate of the conse-
quences of a limited version of
nuclear war. He said that an attack
by 20 of our nuclear-armed sub-
marines alone would kill 74 million
people and destroy 76 percent of
Russian industry.
These unimaginable figures do
not begin to meet the "worst case"
test, since they deal solely with sub-
marine power. They are 12 years
old, and in that period there have
been numerous refinements, so-
called, in these exotic arms, both in
their effectiveness and in the preci-
sion of delivery.
Many years ago Lewis Mumford
foresaw the deadly trap that nuclear
weaponry was laying. Our leaders,
he said, are mad, and "the fatal
symptom of their madness is this:
they have been carrying on a series
of acts which may lead eventually to
the destruction of mankind, under
the solemn conviction that they are
normal, responsible people, living
sane lives, and working for
reasonable ends
There is no happy ending to a
worst case analysis of the ther-
monuclear confrontation. But it at
least permits us to see that the real
enemy is not Russia. It is war. at
least permits us to see that our
choice is literally between the life W.H. Ferry is a writer and con-
and death of civilizations. If sultant to foundations and non-
Americans want life they must turn profit organizations. For 15 years he
away from arms and violence. They was vice-president of the Center for
must renounce nuclear war. There is the Study of Democratic Instil li-
no other choice. lions.
Why
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r






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
APRIL 22. 1980
Page 6
Toto Plays ECU
Guitarist Steve Lukather
Headache No. 79:
The Helluva Time
By DIANE HENDERSON
Copy Lditor
Minges Coliseum was only slight-
ly mote than half filled last Thurs-
day night when Toto took the stage,
but those who came were entertain-
ed with beautiful .sights and, most
importantly, sounds. The 2000 plus
that missed the superb show could
never make up for the loss simply by
listening to Toto's albums. You had
to be there.
After a brief and uninspiring
opening act, the audience became
anxious. Applause spread through
the crowd when roadies strolled
across the stage. The 45 minutes bet-
ween shows passed laboriously, but
finally the lights went down, and a
vision of the hydra flashed on the
sheet behind the stage. Clouds of
fog rolled slowly out into the au-
dience.
On the sheet, an image of green
that looked somewhat like a
distorted headlight was focused on
the right, and a purple neon ladder
was set against a blue-green bricked
wall. It was the inside cover of
Hydra larger than life. Absent only
was the figure of the "soldier of for-
tune sword in hand, in search of
the dragon.
Combined with visual enticement,
the majestic strains of "Hydra"
captured the audience in hushed ex-
citement � until the moment the
stage lights flashed on and the first
verse began.
From the very start, it was ob-
vious Toto loved performing to an
audience. The various members
smiled, cajoled, pranced, danced
and generally overwhelmed us with
charm. A love for every note of
music came through with their
precision.
"Hydra" led into "St. George
and the Dragon" without a pause.
David Paich, keyboardist, lent his
strong vocals to the lead in both
songs.
"Mama also from Hydra,
seemed to drag a bit. The repetitious
beat and chording which worked so
well in "St. George" stifled the
slower song, but the audience atten-
tion was quickly regained by new
visuals and the following succession
of songs from the first Toto album.
An animated creation of the first
Toto cover astonished the crowd. A
large circle appeared in the center of
the screen. From the top, a shining
sword pierced the circle. Then from
the image of the sword, a "T" was
formed and an "O" from the circle
Lead Singer Bobby Kimball
until "TOTO" stood above the
emblem. On either side, a golden
ribbon flowed toward the center.
finally encircling the emblem like a
banner. The audience went wild
with whistles and cheers
Images behind the band changed
throughout the concert, from dif-
ferent styles of numerals during
"99" to the face of a beautiful
young woman during Angela
one of Toto's most emotional
melodies.
The music went far beyond the
visual trappings, however. Each
song was executed with finesse and
precision. David Paich was especial-
ly notable for his beautiful piano
work on songs like the instrumental
"Child's Anthem
Steve Lukather. lead guitarist, ad-
ded gentle vocals to his fine guitar
work. Lukather sang lead on
"Angela Georgy Porcv" and
the groups biggest hit vei. 'w " Hi
softer stle wax perfect ! i
songs and a nice offset to the
more blues-sule vocals
singer Bobby kimball
At no point did the g
vocals, background or lead
even brought another singe
road to insure this quah
The rhvthm section wa-
ding. Jeff Porcaro on drun
Porcaro and David Pa
keyboards and David Hl
ing bass, made up the ba �
the band. The heart of alma
song wav tronglv depcrv-r
these members. The keyboai
rangements set the mood I
concert, bringing beauty an
to such tunev as "Git! Goodb
"Angela" and "Georgv p
and evoking an air M mystei
See TOTO Page 7. C ol. 1
By ROBERT ALBANESE
Assistant Features Kditor
The flowers and verdure are
almost enough to make me forget
a single experience I had during
the winter, but before my
memory of it passes into obli-
vion, I'd like to share it with our
readers.
"This is going to be a big
one rasped my friend Z.
"Man, we bought a keg, and we
got all kinds of interesting frolick
lined up. Yeeeeeooooo he
cried out the window of the
Chevy van, making me spill my
Coke.
It was colder outside than
usual. (I don't really like having
to do this paragraph, but all you
readers are probably going to
want what they call "the set-
ting) There was the hint of
coming snow in the air, and all
was grey. The month was
December, and though exams
were nigh, Pirates from all cor-
ners of campus were thinking of
noise and strong drink and going
home for Chrisimas. (Will that
do? If you have any questions,
write me care of this newspaper.)
Z. was listening i ud music
on the radio of the van, rocking
and rolling his body and head
with the music. We were weaving
on the road. "Man, I need this. I
been busting my hind parts with
all that school trash, and now I'm
ready to cut loose!
Yceeooooooo Another Coke
bites the dust.
I found myself at Zs house
around 8:30 that cold Friday
night. I say "house I mean
dwelling. It was a den of iniquity,
where no righteous man wouid
have the unmitigated temerity to
go. Naturally, everyone wa, hav-
ing a good time.
I was toot-sweet equipped with
a beer and a joint, the latter of
which I immediately snuffed out
on the carpet so as not to under-
mine my moral character.
Around me were winsome lassies
of all descriptions: blondes,
brunettes, red-heads and dance
majors with their sinewy legs.
Tall business majors with fuzzy
chins lined the walls, talking
about investment procedure and
conjuring images of broken pen-
cil points and drinking their cof-
fee black. They were thinking
about the blondes, brunettes,
red-heads and sinewy legs.
The music was so loud it was
breaking window panes down the
street. I went up to a particularly
winsome fraulein and said, "Hi.
Did you come here alone?"
"What?"
"Did you come here alone?"
"What?
"I SAID, DID YOU COME
HERE ALONE?"
"WHAT?"
"Your father's a pimp I
See HEADACHE Page 7, Col. 1
New Group Seeks Changes
By DEBBIE HOTALING
Features Fdiior
How old are most freshmen and
sophomores � 18, 19, mavbe 20?
Upon high school graduation, many
young people decide to enroll in a
four-year college where thev will re-
main until the ripe old average age
of 22. B
What about those in the Armed
Forces who have served their coun-
try and wish to get their education
after being out of high school for
three or four years? there are also
those who had to work for a few
years because they could not afford
a college education immediately.
East Carolina University has
many students who are encounter-
ing problems as a result of the age
differences.
Returning Older Students Seeking
Education (ROSSE) is a new
organization attempting to help find
solutions to the problems these non-
traditional students are facing
Membership will not only be open
to retired service personnel, but also
to handicapped students and late
returning high school graduates.
"We represent at least 1,000
students on this campus explained
Cid Ross, an ex-serviceman. "We're
on a limited income. Our mamas
and daddies don't pay our bills so
we can't move off campus, but the
noise is terrible in the dorms, and we
can't study like we want to. Let's
fact it, older students are a little
more responsible
"AH activities are geared to
younger students Roy Pate, a
wheelchair student living in Slay
commented. "Whether it's with
alcohol or without alcohol, we
would like to be able to have a de-
cent social gathering
Not only do these older students
want better social functions and liv-
ing arrangements, they would like
the opportunity to concentrate on
their studies.
"Sometimes, the only time I
could sleep was between 1 and 4 in
the morning Terry Wall, another
handicapped student in Slay dorm,
complained. "How can you study
for an exam when guys on the hall
are having shaving cream fights,
water balloon fights and everything
else? And when you ask them to be
quiet, they tell you to go to the
library
The possibility of setting aside
one special dorm for these students
has been discussed. "Maybe setting
aside one dorm for older students or
lower housing costs in off-
campus apartments set aside
specifically for ECU older students
would be the answer Ross of-
fered.
At the present time, no organiza-
tion exists on the ECU campus to
assist these students with their
various problems. ROSSE is the
first attempt at an organizational
pull, and all students interested are
invited to attend the final spring
meeting on Friday, April 25 at 4
p.m. in Room 248, Mendenhall.
ECU Student Roy Pate
by LARRY Z C�-E�� VAN
April Brings Showers, Exams, Disaster
�a ROSSE Member
By DAVID NORRIS
Staff Writer
April has been a traditional month for disasters The
Revolutionary War and the Civil War both began in
April - not the same one, luckily. The San Francisco
earthquake, and the sinking of the Titanic also occurred
ib April. What may for many East Carolina students be
?rtSi!T'l?r d,saster' the sPri"g Semester Examinations of
1980, begin April 30, continuing a long and honorable
tradition of springtime catastrophes.
Exam time is a time of furious activity all over the
university community. Some art majors turn out what is
supposed to be a semester's work in as little as three
days, although I work in such a careful and meticulous
manner that it takes me a week to do a semester's work
Typewriters work overtime as last-minute term papers
are hastily thrown together. Happy hours and parties
abound, so that students can unwind from all the last-
minute panic.
Proper study habits can make exam time much easier
but it's probably too late for that now. You should have
dropped by your classes a little more often. Attending
class can give you good notes to study from, as well as
tell you when the exam is going to be.
Over the years, students have perfected a number of
Fatal&ts
ways to cope with exams. Some study a few hours each
week all semester. Others say this is a waste of time, and
do all their studying at once, two days before the exam
to make more efficient use of study hours.
To further increase efficiency, many students
eliminate sleep in the last couple of days before an ex
am. If you decide to stay up all night studying, I can of-
fer a couple fo tips. One is to get one of those little
samplers of different kinds of coffee. This makes drink-
ing coffee all night an educational experience in itself
No matter how your exam turns out, at least you can be
pretty much of a coffee connoisseur after trying fifteen
kinds in one night. Another thing to remember is this
after staying up all night, there is no such thing as "a lit-
tle nap before the test These "little naps" have a way
of turning into big naps, lasting until just after the exam
is over.
There are other methods of study, such as not study-
ing. This curious way of getting through exams was
originated by the Fatalists, a strange cu!t of students
who are convinced that they are predestined to fail by
s�m� omnipotent force called a "professor They
spend their time in a continuous ycle Qf wild, drunken
parties.
See APRIL Page S, Col. 1
) �MTAfcn�5� ; �v-
6acJSDOg A -oU i

MjanwuiMit�W?





H
f' her
t i
�Wt
THE LAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
APRIl 22. Imi

ist Of Cage Signees Numbers Six
Carolina's basketball
jng has all but come to an
i players have been signed.
remains is waiting on one or
ters to make final decisions.
Pirates have thus far inked
i Gilchrist, a 6-1 point guard
illington; Quan Roseboro, a
uid from Fayettville and a
transfer; 6-4 shooting guard
�ox of Raleigh; 6-5 Willie
i o Dunn; 6-7 Morris
kes of Pinecrest; and 6-8
d-center Jeff Best of
ic.
Iboro is somewhat different
H Ihc other recruits in that he has
�H � h the Pirates since the mid-
eoil the past season. Unhappy
tth tfu situation at a muddled
orida program, the ex-Seventy-
First High star joined the Pirates for
half a season of practice and will be
eligible for action by second
semester next year.
Gilchrist and Hargroves have
received rants and raves from the
ECU coaching staff for quite some
time. Hargroves is supposedly a
super small forward while Gilchrist
is looked upon as the point guard in
the Pirates' future.
McNair is a strong, muscular
power forward. He is expected to
add some much-needed bulk to the
Bucs' inside attack. Fox hails from
Sanderson High and is said to have
a fine outside shooting touch.
Best is the sleeper of the group. A
very slim 6-8, Best was overlooked
when the 3-A All-East team was
selected earlier � Gilchrist was a
Charles
Chandler
first-teayn selection � but is highly-
regarded by ECU coach Dave Odom
and his staff. Best is said to have a
good outside touch and a good deal
of quickness. All he needs to be
really something, say the coaches, is
a little work with weights.
The Pirate staff is still awaiting
word from the Goldsboro boys �
6-5 Cecil Exxum and 6-9 Anthony
Teachey. Both are in that stage of
confusion that many high school
stars reach before makine a final
decision.
Teachey is set to visit Virginia
Tech this weekend, another in a
long line of schools that he has
entertained thoughts of attending.
Word has it that Exxum is down
to two schools � North Carolina
and ECU. The Tar Heels recently
signed two star players, one ot them
6-9 super Sam Perkins, to go along
with a previous signing of 6-7 All-
America Matt Doherty.
The Heels have supposedl) had
Exxum on somewhat of a "waiting
list The word has been that the
Heels would otter him a scholarship
if 6-5 Alt-American James Banks
did not decide to attend the Chapel
Hill-based school.
Banks is reportedly considering
INC. Georgia. Georgia lech and
Maryland at this time. Should he
opt for the Heels, it is believed that
Exxum is signed, sealed and
delivered a Pirate.
The signing ot Exxum would be a
big one as he is one of the better su
mg prospects in the state � the un-
questioned leader of state 4-A
champ Southern Wayne.
The las; Carolina Purple-Gold
intrasquad football game is slated
for this Saturdav afternoon in
Ficklen Stadium at 3 p.m.
The Pirate grid team held a
"draft" last night in preparations
for the intrasquad contest, lust.
the seniors were divided equally.
Next came the draft.
Ihc seniors 'hen held a drat'
the services ol the remaining
plavers. The Purple squad, headed
bv offensive coordinatoi W �
Anderson, came awa with I
running q u ar terbacV
Nelson, fullback Ro Wilev
America candid i fback An
thonv Collins, Ml- Vmei
Wayne Inman .split
Davenport, defensive :i v �
Da is and punter Rodnev t
Gold coat
dinator Parker . fullbacl
I heodore Sutton, � '
Hawkins, del - h
Smith andi
back Willie Hollev
backs Greg Stt d Henry
I revathan.
fn Ten-Run 8th
ECU Stages Rally
�jfCH ARIES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
"All tiood thines must come to an
;nd
Someone said this a long time ago
and, though it may not always be
true, it was certainly the case for the
UNC-Wilmington baseball team
and Seahawk pitcher Mike Williams
Sunday.
Williams held a strong East
Carolina team to one run and three
hits through seven innings. Going
into the bottom of the eighth he
owned a 6-1 lead. Things were go-
ing just fine. Then it happened.
The long-dormant Pirate bats ex-
ploded for ten runs in the eighth,
chasing V llliams away, and earning
ECU it- 20th win oi the season
against only five losses with the 11-6
victory
ECU coach Hal Baird was
evidenth disgusted with his squad
for mo si o! the contest, but praised
the team following the eighth inning
revival
"They did it themselves he
said. "1 didn't say anything special.
They just wanted it and they went
out there and got it. I'd have to say
that was our best comeback o the
year
The Pirates were first on the
scoreboard when Kelly Robinette
reached on an error and later scored
on a Raymie Styons double in the
first inning.
Williams then held the Pirate bats
in check until the eighth. Mean-
while, the Seahawks built a sizeable
lead.
Wilmington erupted for four runs
in the top of the second. Tom Jones
led off with a walk, which was
followed by a Clyde Holley single.
With one down, John Tallent
grounded to third. ECU third
baseman Todd Hendley scooped it
up and turned in an attempt to tag
out Jones, who was headed for
third. Hendley missed and was
subsequently late on his throw to get
Tallent, loading the bases.
Seahawk Jim Montague then lin-
ed a timely double to left, scoring
Jones and Holley. Tallent then
scored on a sacrifice. Two singles
by Mark Scalf and Tom Phillips
scored Montague and gave UNC-W
a 4-1 lead.
Wilmington added a fifth run in
the fifth stanza and scored its final
run in the top of the eighth.
The Pirate eighth inning massacre
began with a Butch Davis walk.
Shortstop Kelly Robinette then
singled to left. Davis scored
thereafter on a Billv Best double to
rightfield.
The crucial play of the inning
then followed. ECU catcher
Raymie Styons rocketed a long fly
ball to centerfield that was dropped
at the fence, allowing Robinette to
score.
Macon Move then extended his
hitting streak to 14 games with a
single that scored Best. Walks to
designated hitter John Hallow and
pinchhitter Bob Sage loaded the
bases and forced in Styons.
It was then "make-up" time for
Hendley as he compensated for the
prior fielding mishap with a two-run
single, giving the Pirates a 7-6 ad-
vantage. The necessary runs for the
un may have been in but the
onslaught was not over yet.
Davis grounded to short and
reached first as a wide throw to
home plate allowed Hallow to get
around the tag and score. Best was
then intentionally walked after an
infield out. A subsequent wild pitch
scored Hendley.
A two-run single by Styons, scor-
ing Davis and Best, completed the
ECU scoring and sealed the doom
of the visiting Seahawks.
Styons and Hendley were the bat-
ting stars for the Pirates as both got
two hits.
Pirate Baserunner Heads Home
Lady Bucs
Sweep Four
B JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant sports Editor
�The Lady Pirates continued on
Kir winning trail Monday with a
H i r o victories over St.
�ugustine's 13-0 and 11-2 at the
8K U soft ball field Monday.
East Carolina eliminated
CAIAW Division II UNC-
ilmington Sunday 11-4 and 4-0 in
It her weekend softball action at
lc I .
Third sacker Cindy Meekins
cached base on an error in the first
fining of the opener and freshman
ihti Davis followed with a single.
"he pair scampered home on Cyn-
hia Shepard's double to deep left.
Shepard trotted home on a drive
'the fence by junior Kathy Riley
which the speedy leftfielder legged
tor an inside-the-park home run.
Mary, Powell singled and scored on
an error by the St. Augustine left-
fielder to close out the first inning
barrage.
Davis, a steady slugger from
Iavlorsvilk. lead off the third with
a homer to center as the Pirates
igain attacked the visitors per-
miable defense.
Shepard singled and scored when
vonne "Flea" Williams' smash
a as booted by the second sacker.
Rile) came through with a ground-
rule double and crossed home of a
fielder's choice by Shirley Brown.
Brown was plated by a triple from
(nnger Rothermel, and winning pit-
cher Judy Ausherman helped the
ause with an RBI double and a run
on catcher Jan McVeigh's single.
The Pirates added a pair of in-
surance runs in the fourth to
guarantee an abbreviated contest.
Shepard singled and Riley followed
with her second double of the after-
noon. Powell gathered a pair of
KBIs with a single to plate Shepard
and Riley.
Powell, a veteran shortstop from
Jacksonville, suffered a slight mus-
cle pull late in the contest which
forced her to the bench for the re-
mainder of the afternoon. Dillon
reports that Powell should be
available for action when the Pirates
next take to the field.
Ausherman scattered a pair of
hits by St. Augustine's, while the
visitors provided four errors which
aided the lop-sided victory.
Riley notched a perfect three of
three on the game with her homer
and two doubles, along with three
of three for Shepard and Davis who
added a pair in three trips to the
plate.
East Carolina coach Alita Dillon
went to her bench in the second con-
test of the day, but the results were
virtually the same as the Pirates
again jumped on the visitors in the
first inning.
Freshman recruit Terry Andrews
drove in Maureen Buck with a single
to left as St. Augustine again fell by
the wayside in the early going.
McVeigh singled and Riley followed
with yet another homer to left,
worth three RBls.
Sophomore Lillion Barnes single
followed by another by Brown ac-
counted for the other first inning
run.
Buck scored another run in the se-
cond after rapping out a single and
McVeigh reached on an error and
was driven in by Andrews' single.
Jackie Conyers and Brenda
Rozier accounted the St. Augustine
runs in the second aided by a defen-
sive lapse by the Pirate infield on a
run-down situation at first.
Brown claimed another RBI in
the fifth as she belted home Robin
faggart on a single up the middle.
Fagart again made her mark in
the fifth with a homer after An-
drews and Riley each belted
doubles.
Senior Mary Bryan Carlyle claim-
ECU Thinclads
Take Second
Photo by KIP SLOAN
Kathy Riley Takes A Cut
ed the victory, her 18th in 24
outings, while allowing just five St.
Augustine safeties.
Andrews led the Lady Prates
with an unblemished three of three,
with Riley, Brown and Faggart each
punching a pair of hits in three at-
bats. Buck followed with two out ot
four.
"The teams we played the last few
days are not up to the caliber of
competition we've had during the
year admitted Dillon. "We were
able to give everyone game ex-
perience, which is valuable because
they did not get as much during the
season.
"They know that if they're not
hitting they can be replaced by so-
meone off the bench Dillon stated
in reference to the team's depth.
The Lady Pirates will carry their
25-4 record into the NCAIAW tour-
nament as the top seed, having
beaten all Division I opponants at
least twice.
By JIMMY DuPRKK
ssislant sports r ditor
East Carolina captured second in
a tri-meet o' women's track at the
University o Georgia Saturday,
with the host Lady Bulldogs claim-
ing top honors and Berry College
finishing in the cellar.
The Lady Pirate thinclads posted
67 points on the day, with Georgia
claiming 153 and Berry 63.
East Carolina placed first in a
variety of events, but the lack of
depth nullified any hopes of a pur-
ple and gold victory.
"Winning isn't our goal this
year said ECU coach Laurie Ar-
rants. "We want to have good times
in the events we run and we just
didn't have very good times Satur-
day
Arrants noted that conditions
were not in East Carolina's favor
throughout the day, as the hot and
humid Georgia weather proved to
be a hinderance for the Lady
Pirates. Senior Linda Mason suf-
fered heat exhaustion during the
3000 meter event and was forced to
retire for the remainder of the meet.
"We hadn't had any training in
the heat at all so far and that really
seemed to bother us said Arrants.
"Linda came off the track hot and
pale and had bad cramps, but just
wasn't able to sweat. She told me to-
day (Monday) that she still had
cramps
Freshman standout Eve Brennan
captured first place in the 1500m
with a time of 4:48, three seconds
off her best time as a Pirate. Bren-
nan also placed second in the 800
meters, an showing which greatly
pleased the veteran Arrants.
"1 guess if you're looking for a
highlight of the day Eve's 800
meters was it said Arrants. "To
have her come from the 1500m to
the quarter-mile and do that well
was just great
The quarter-mile relay unit of
Dawn Henderson, Catherine Suggs,
Irdie Williams dnd Lydia Rountrct
posted a :59.3 first-place finish.
Senior Roz Majors Seeped 17 feet,
10 inches to first in the lo a np,
but Arrants explain .
competitor surpassed 173
Rountree placed second in the
100m dash, clocking in ai : 12 6. also
oi her best time of the season.
The lady Pirates suffered
without the services of senior 800m
specialist Cookie McPhatter, who
was absent to take the National
Teachers' Examinations.
"We could have scored a few
more points if cookie had been
there, but they simply beat us
nnumbers maligned rrants.
"For the conditions. 1 guess uv
didn't do to badly,
The I ady Pirates enter the North
Carolina Association of Inter-
collegiate Athletics for Women
championships Friday and Satur-
day, and Arrants is concentrating
on individual titles rather than team
glory.
"UNC and State are just too
strong she says. "There's just no
way we can compete with them.
They take track very seriously at
those schools and recruit heavily.
"This year Ro is going to have to
have good jumps in order to win.
The girl at Carolina is jumping in
the high 18-foot range
McPhatter is favored to win het
event, but even that could be in
jeopardy if she is not at her best.
Arrants touts the 800m sprint
medley group o Williams, Hender-
son, Rountree and McPhatter as the
favorites in the state meet, but adds
that injuries will be a factor for the
Lady Pirates to conquer
beforehand.
"Dawn Henderson has had trou-
ble with her legs recently and we've
had trouble with flu and virus, but
that is to be expected said Ar
rants. "It's just caught us at a bad
time.
"It's going to be tough





� 1
10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN APRIL 22, 1980
AYCOCK HALL
Aycock Men's Residence Hall, located on Col
lege Hill, is No.l in Campus Life. It's
facilities include a gameroom with pinball,
pool, footsball, and a color T.V as well as
laundry facilities for your convenience. This
gameroom also serves as an equipment
checkout area. Through the House Council,
the dorm is provided with movies, suppers,
guest speakers, and recreation tournaments.
Each year Aycock Dorm has been a strong
competitor in intramural activities. Other
activities for the year include t-shirt sales
and socials.
BELK HALL
Belk Hall is "on top" of College Hill. Belk
houses a large portion of East Carolina's
athletes including members of the football,
basketball, baseball, soccer and track teams.
These are not the only residents who par
ticipate in athletics, however, Belk Hall
always produces competitive intramural
teams. Laundry services are provided for
students "on the hill" in the basement of
Belk along with several recreational items.
These elements combined with various other
features make Belk Hall a nice place to live.
JONES HALL
Jones Hall, the Hotel Hollywood of College Hill, is a very
nice place to live and meet friends. It is Said that the gover-
ning body of the dorm tries to make things as nice as possi-
ble for the residents, through movies, socials, pig pickings
and recreational tournaments. So far we have had two
movies, a couple of socials, and a few recreational tour-
naments. Before the semester ends, we plan to have another
movie, a social and to end the yoar with a pig picking and
Softball day. When up on the hill we ask that you "check in"
the Hotel and see exactly what we are doing. We're sure
you'll have a nice stay.
SCOTT HALL
Scott Hall, a Men's Residence Hall, is one of
the two university dormitories which has the
suite design. It is comprised of students who
excel in a variety of campus activities.
Recently, the dorm was named the Red Cross
Blood Drive winner in the dorm classifica-
tion. Scott Hall is proud of it's outstanding
intramural record. Presently, the "Scott
Rogues" won the All-Campus Track and
Field Meet. We also have tremendous par-
ticipation in the other intramural sporting
events. Scott Hall is also working towards
it's fifth consecutive Chancellor's Cup Award.
By offering a study hall room, the dorm pro-
vides students on the hill with a quiet place to
study. The Scott House Council is actively in-
volved in planning and organizing many
dorm functions. Such activities include:
dorm socials, free doughnuts and hot
chocolate for the residents, a resume
workshop, films, and question and answer
sessions with prominent speakers.
1979 HOMECOMING QUEEN
LISA ZACK
MRC REPRESENTATIVE
MRC GAMEROOM
LOCATED IN BASEMENT
OF AYCOCK ALSO SERVES
AS CHECKOUT AREA
FOR EQUIPMENT
MRC STRIVES FOR
IMPROVEMENTS SUCH AS:
PARKING, GROUNDS, AND
VISITATION





m i asi Akoi im-w
prii ivso
11
Califi
To Take Western Pennant
HHRI ES-
( H VND1 VK
Spot K I dilor
v assessing the
1 eague divi
es ol 1980 one
one
facl that Detroil would
have finished second in
the W est with its Ss "6
mat k Instead, I he
1 igeis finished tilth in
the Easl
Ml ol this is not to
downgrade the quality
ol the Western Divi
sion, but to shov how
things wei right a
I at deal more lot the
easterners last yeai
m those in the op
?site di ision.
Ihe 1980 season
. mid tut n out the same
as ' 79 sn more va
in one as the 1 ast
- again supet ioi Also,
ngels should
epeat as class ol the
We
Many ward off pick
( alifornia because
� free agent
i het Nolan Ryan
s that though
at times
h e w a s
sporadic. His
mine percentage is
the l�l

this nua , the tree
agent acquisition ol e-
Pittsburgh star Bruce
Kison compensates
tank well.
1 he ngels have all
the hitting necessai to
win a great deal more
games than last season
it the regulars stay in
food health. Brian
Downing, Rod Carew,
Bobby (nich. Carney
I ansford, Don Bay lot,
Dan 1 ord, Joe Rudi
and M Co wens
V hew '
lust thinki iif ol
those eight players in
the same ba; ing ordei
each day must di ive op-
posing managei s i ray.
1 oi ngel leader lim
i regosi it must be like a
dream come true
Ba lot. mainly a
designated hitter, won
the 1 Most Valuable
av ei u a t d last
season with his $6
homers, league leading
! ?9 KBIs and
averaj Bayioi was
, . the
outfield some ol last
season, something that
is considered nsk by
defensive experts.
I herefore, the acquisi
tion ol Cowens from
Kansas City is vital.
Cowens, a one tune
all stai would could
easily reach that level
again, came in the trade
that sent Willie Mays
Aikens to the Royals.
Mkens is a superb
young talent but out-
field help is what
( ah tor nia needed and
got.
I he Angels' pitching
strengths rest heavily
on the light arm ol
frank 1 anana If the
young flamethrowei
stavs healthy, he will 20
antes I' s
guaranteed.
1 he star ting rotation
alsincludes Kison,
Dave Frost (16-10 last
season), Chris Knapp
(coming ofl injury
marred 5 5 ampaign)
and Don Aase, �lhe
relievers weren't tiood
Pirates
Downed
i Dint wii 11 ms
Staff N nit r
We're Number 1
$719.95
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last season with the
single exception oi
Mark Cleai but
could improve. 1 lie
pn tout oi )a v e
1 aRoche could decide a
lot about the div isional
i ace
c hallenging the
ngels v ill he a strong
rexas Rangei ballclub
and the perennially
powerful Kansas City
Royals.
1 he Rangers appear
strong and deep
ai most positions.
Behind the plate is Jim
Sundberg, perhaps the
best defensive catcher
in the league. Veteran
John bills is a good
backup and serves as
part tune DM
1 he infield is also
strong ith Pal Put-
nam (18 HRs, 64 RBIs,
.277) oi Willie Mon-
lanc (8 HRs, 24 RBIs,
,319 in lust Vs games
alter corning over from
1ets las! year) at first
base. Hump ills is tht
second baseman. Hud
d Bell (In. 101, .299)
had a super yeai ai
third last season and
n. peei
Second-year shortstop
Nelson Norman
defenshe hi.
Ihe out held is a
� - u ea in V
ington. I lungs are so
crowded, in fact, that
Richie Zisk is now a
full-time DM . Zisk was
CENTER
injured much oi last
season but still blasted
I H homers
I he Ranger outfield
corps consists of AI
Oliver, who hit .323
last season, e Yankee
Micke Rivers, John
Grubb, Hillv Sample,
Jim Norris and possibly
Montane Over
crowding is an
u n d e r s t a t e m e n t .
I a len ted is a n
understatement.
Still, the kev to the
Ranger fortunes lies
with the pitching and
more specifically the
pitching o f I o n
Matlack. Due to in-
juries Mat lack saw ac-
tion m onlv 1" games
last season. Had he-
had a normal Matlack
yeai the Rangers could
have edged b Califor-
nia. I he year betore he
had won 1 5 games with
a 2.27 earned run
average.
1 he other starters are
n e v i v acquired
Gaylord Perry, Steve
c omer (17-12), old pro
1 erg us on I enkins
(16 14) and Doc
Medieh 110-7).
I he bullpen is poten-
tially spectacular with
rjoth Jim Kern; the
tgue's best reliever
last yeai with 13 wins,
29 saves and a
ERA; and Spark I yk
around.
in Kansas City thing
have been in an uproar
There was big noise
made last season when
the Rovals tailed to win
the division tor a
fourth straight yeai
Changes were made, in
eluding the tiring oi
manager W hitev Hei
og in favor oi lim
1 rev.
Ihe big change,
though, was the trade
that sent AIowei
Calfifornia in exchange
tor first bagger V illie
Mavs Aikens and short
stop Ranee Mulliniks
Aikens is one oi the
bright young hittei
the game today and will
add m u c h ne ede d
power.
ikens . who nil
homer- with 81 RBI
only .s trips to the
plate last season, will
be the first basem
ATTIC
Wed.
Roundhouse
ThursLouisi-
ana's Le Roux
Fri SatSun.
Sidewinder
Frank v hue is superb
ir econd while George
Brett is the best at third
in the circuit.
Bret! tunshed second
in the M P voting
v e a r with his 42
ibIt 20 t ripies, 23
RBI
29 a
i l v. �
M

sh
- )
29!
-

it as his 21 average
: 20 homers attest
Pitching in Ro
1 and - uld e very
Busby
returns to his old form
ters are
D e n i

McR
ABORTION
Free Pregnancy Test
Very Early Pregnancy Test
Call 781 8580 anytime
The Fleming Center
We Buy
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516 S. COTANCHE
GREENVILLE, N.C





12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 22, 1980
Activities Come To A Close
Frazier Dominates IM Putt-Putt
By RICKI GLIARMIS
Intramural Correspondent
Putt-Putt
It was "Freddie
Frazier Night" at the
1980 Intramural Putt-
Putt Championships in
Greenville on April 8.
"Fast Freddie as he
is known around the
Intramural office,
dominated the field of
36 participants with an
exceptional score of 64,
to capture the men's in-
dividual championship.
Art Graepel and Jeff
Von Cannon tied for
second place with a
score of 65 while Buddy
I uper shot a 5-under
par 67 to receive third
place honors.
In the women's com-
petition, Jennifer Daly
and Cindy Rouse battl-
ed it out for the in-
dividual championship
with Daly outshooting
Rouse to claim the title.
In the team competi-
tion, "Fast Freddie"
teamed up with Graepel
to beat out 11 other
teams for the overall
championship. Their
score of 55 gave them
the win while three
teams vs ith a score of 58
ended up with a three
way tie for second
place.
The Intramural
Department would like
to thank all those who
participated in the
event and would
especially like to thank
Don Edmonson and
Putt-Putt of Greenville
for their cooperation.
Team Tennis
The regular season
matches are over, but
the best is yet to come.
Good competition was
seen throughout the
season and this should
continue all the way to
the finish.
In the fraternity divi-
sional playoffs, Kappa
Sigma, Sigma Phi Ep-
silon, Kappa Alpha,
and Pi Kappa Phi will
battle it out for a spot
in the All-Campus
finals. The Dolemites
and Kappa Alpha Psi
are the representatives
from the
ClubIndependent divi-
sion, while the Aycock
"Aces" survived the
dormitory division
competition to reach
the finals.
In the women's All-
Campus competition,
Tri Sigma sorority out-
dueled its only oppo-
nent Alpha Phi to claim
the women's All-
Campus Champion-
ship.
Divisional cham-
pionships will be played
April 22 at 7 p.m. and
the All-Campus cham-
pionships will be decid-
ed April 24 at 7 p.m.
The matches will be
played on the College
Hill tennis courts.
Good luck to all teams.
Badminton
Twenty teams were
entered in the women's
badminton doubles
competition with Gail
O'Brien and Lynne
Alexander of Alpha Xi
Delta scheduled to meet
the winner of the match
between Dana
SalmonsMary Sawyer,
and Amy WilsonTam-
my Welsh.
Salmons advanced
through four rounds of
play in the singles com-
petition to meet Jen-
nifer Counterman in
the finals of that divi-
sion.
Participation in the
men's division was
sparse. Hank Wylie
was matched against
James Rouse in the
singles division while
John Russ and Zack
Valentine were paired
in doubles against
Bruce Hollmuller and
Joe Moore.
Cross Campus Run
Despite a small tur-
nout, a field of 18 run-
ners competed in a well
organized and suc-
cessful Cross Campus
Run.
Stan Shue captured
the five-mile race with a
time of 29:21 and Rusy
Jenkins ran to a win in
the 2.5 mile race with a
time of 13:47.
Bob Morrison finish-
ed second to Shue with
a 31:27 finish. Ellen
Bond was the top
female racer in the five-
mile with a time of
34:56 for sixth place
overall.
John Russ, with a
time of 14:32, finished
second in the 2.5 mile
run. Susan Davenport
was the top female run-
ner in the 2.5 mile race
with a time of 22:03,
fourth place overall.
Horseshoe
Horseshoe doubles
competition began
April 21 with a single
elimination tournament
being held. A total of
11 men's and 1 1
women's teams entered
the competition.
Last year's cham-
pions were Jackie Har-
ris and Sylvia Jones of
Fleming Dorm and
Bobby Little and Kurt
Baumwart.
Sylvia Jones will be
teaming up with the
1979 singles champion
Lisa Davis to defend
her crown.
Constitution
A constitution for
the Intramural Coun-
cil, written by the Stu-
dent Advisory Commit-
tee, was read and
unanimously approved
by the representatives
at the final meeting of
the school year.
A discussion and
evaluation of the In-
tramural Program
followed, with the sug-
gestions being made to
delete team tennis from
next year's calendar
and to add frisbee and
team golf. The ten
dollar forfeit fee and
the hiring of officials
for the volleyball
playoffs were also
discussed.
STUDENT UNION
EAST CAROUNA UNIVERSITY
Classified
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: 1�7� Cotless.
sunroof,power brakes, power
steering, power windows and
locks, cruise controll. Call Brian
752 0373.
FOR SALE: Red 1971 MGB. AM-
FM Cassette, new convertable top.
Many more extra's. Excellent
condition. Call 752 154.
FOR SALE t pair A.Rll
speakers, new wotfers and
tweeters 7SI-0J04 before 10:00 a.m.
or after 6:00p.m.
FOR SALE: good used couch only
$25. Call 752-0172, ask for Cynthia.
FOR SALE: 1971 Ford Capri
automatic, 4 cylinder, good gas
milage. Call 750551 or 752-0111.
PERSONAL
HORSEBACK RIDING: Day or
Night, individual or groups. Tri
County Stables Grimesland. Call
752-4W3.
MARY KAY COSMETICS: to
reach your consultant tor a facial
or reorders phone 754-365?
SW ATTENTION: Business Ma-
jors, summer work, practical
business experience. Tremendous
for job resume. Hard work equals
good pay. Call 750-3719 for inter
view.
TYPING: dissertations, theses,
term papers. Excellent skills and
reasonable rates. Call 7S4-9U9.
WANTED: Tank, wet suit(med),
regulator, etc Call Sam at
750-3911 weekdays 6:00 9:00 p.m.
SUMMER WORK: are you tired of
the same old job A national Co. on
campus is interviewing Wednes-
day, April 23 for $350 per week Ob.
Interviews at 1:00, 4:00, 7:00 in
Brewster D-104.
FOR RENT
APARTMENTS FOR RENT:
Duplexes and Townhouses $175 to
$270 per month Call 752 6415 9:00
til 5:00.
ROOM FOR RENT: with private
entrance and bath, located on 14th
street behind dorms. $80 month.
Open May 15. Call 758 2585
ROOMMATE NEEDED:
(female) to share two bedroom
apartment. Must call by April 30.
Call 758 0836
ROOMMATE NEEDED: To share
three bedroom duplex near cam
pus for summer only. $47 plus
third utilities. Washer dryer, fur
nished bedroom. Call 752 5977.
ROOM FOR RENT: $80 month
plus utilities. Close to campus,
available May 15th Call 758 3545
NEEDED ONE MALE, to share
duplex from May until August
Rent $40 a month. Call Phil or
Mike at 758 7724
TWO BEDROOM APARTMENT:
tor summer. Village Green Apart
ments 10th street. Call 752 0442.
TWO FEMALE ROOMMATES:
Needed to share furnished apart
ment at Riverbluff for both sum
mer sessions possibly into fall
Call 758 5823
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Cable
T.V dishwasher, two bedroom,
half expenses. Call after 7:00
M-Th. Ask for Kevin. Available
May 1. 750-4317.
FOR RENT: Private rooms for
summer school or yearly. Share
kitchen and bath $75 plus
OD U Blanks
Buc Netters
Bv
ALEX
CUNNINGHAM
staff Writer
ECU ran up against a
verv strong Old Domi-
nion University tennis
team last Friday ?t the
Minges courts, losing
9-0.
At the number one
singles position Kenny
Love was beaten by Bill
Clark 6-3, 6-1; Henry
Hostetler was crushed
b Robert Hale 6-2,
6-0; Keith Zengel was
edged by Colin Davis
6-4, 6-4; Ted Lepper
was downed by Todd
Furniss 6-2, 6-2; Barry
Skakle
Succumbs
By
ALEX
CUNNINGHAM
Staff w riter
WINSTON-SALEM
� The University of
North Carolina receiv-
ed the sad news Friday
morning that Don E.
Skakle, the head tennis
coach, was found dead
at his sister-in-law's
home. Skakle ap-
parently died in his
sleep of a heart attack.
Parker was defeated by
Ken Phelen 6-3, 6-3;
and Mark Byrd was
outlasted by John Har-
rison 6-3, 6-3.
ODU continued to be
tough in the doubles as
they swept through all
three matches. In the
number one flight
Zengel and Lepper
were retired by Clark
and Furniss 6-0, 6-2;
Love and Hostetler
were defeated by Hale
and Phelan 6-3, 6-1;
and Parker and Nor-
man Bryant were turn-
ed back by Davis and
Harrison 6-2, 6-3.
The Pirates are
hosting the ECU In-
vitational this weekend
at the Minges courts.
The matches will begin
Saturday and continue
on through Sunday.
GOLD and SILVER
Compare and then call
758 1892
for best prices
by Les Jewelers
120 E. 5th St.
AFTERNOON
DEUGWT
FEATURING
the band:
wSdIr
His death occurred
the morning that the
ACC Tennis Tourna-
ment was to begin. The
Carolina players met
after his death and
decided to play because
it would be his wish.
Skakle was the fifth
winningest coach in the
United States. His ef-
forts have been praised
for making tennis in
North Carolina
stronger. Jim Leighton,
the Wake Forest tennis
coach, said, "Carolina,
in my opinion, is one of
the great tennis colleges
in the country
A memoriai service
was held for Skakle
during the tournament
on Sunday.
PRESENTED BY
SIGMA TAU GAMMA
Friday, April 25th
3S30�7:OOp.m.
Domestic beverages
only 504
Admisson 254
ATTIC
utilities. Two blocks from cam
pus. 752 5796
APARTMENT FOR RENT at
Tar River Estates for the sum
mer. Call 752 8860
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED: apartment located one
mile from campus, furnished,
assume half rent and half utilities.
Available May 15th Call Debbie
758-0269 after 5:00 p.m. for more
information
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed
May 11 thru Aug 20 Own room
plus one-third utilities Call
752 0172 ask for Cynthia
FURNISHED ROOM for two
females available for summer
rental One block from campus on
Charles Street 585 monthly
(including utilities) Phone
758 7010 afternoons
FOR RENT: large, furnished, one
bedroom apartment May 1 thru
August. S13S a month Low
utilities. Close to campus Call
758 7630
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed
for three bedroom apartment at
Eastbrook One third rent and
utilities Call 758 5201
ROOMMATE WANTED
(female) fo share two bedroom
townhouse Call 756 3851 after
500
TWO ROOMMATES needed for 4
bedroom house three blocks from
campus $87 50 per month
752 6901
CLASSIFIED HOURS FOR TAK
ING ADDS ARE 3:00 4:00 MON
DAY THRU FRIDAY
II
AFTER 3:
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Drop your guard for a
minute. Even though you're
in college right now, there
are many aspects of the
Army that you might find
very attractive.
Maybe even irresistible.
See for yourself.
MB) SCHOOL, ON US
You read it right.
The Army's Health Professions Scholar-
ship Program provides necessary tuition,
books, lab fees, even microscope rental dur-
ing medical school.
Plus a tax-free monthly stipend that
works out to about $6,450 a year. (After
July 1, 1980, it'll be even more.)
After you're accepted into medical
school, you can be accepted into our program.
Then you're commissioned and you go
through school as a Second Lieutenant in the
Army Reserve.
The hitch? Very simple. After your resi-
dency, you give the Army a year as a doctor
for every year the Army gave you as a med
student, and under some conditions, with a
minimum scholarship obligation being two
years' service.
& CASH BONUSES
Besides scholarships to medical school,
the Army also offers AMA-approved first-
year post-graduate and residency training
programs.
Such training adds no further obligation
to the student in the scholarship program.
But any Civilian Graduate Medical Educa-
tion sponsored by the Army gives you a one-
year obligation for every year of sponsorship.
But you get a $9,000 annual bonus every
year you're paying back medical school or
post-graduate training.
So you not only get your medical educa-
tion paid for, you get extra pay while you're
paying it back.
Not a bad deal.
A GREAT PLACE TO BE A NURSE
The rich tradition of Army Nursing is
one of excellence, dedication, even heroism.
And it's a challenge to live up to.
Today, an Army Nurse is the epitome
of professionalism, regarded as a critical
member of the Army Medical Team.
A BSN degree is required. And the clinical
spectrum is almost impossible to match
in civilian practice.
And, since you'll be an Army Officer,
you'll enjoy more respect and authority than
most of your civilian counterparts. You'll
also enjoy travel opportunities, officer's pay
and officer's privileges.
Army Nursing offers educational oppor-
tunities that are second to none. As an Army
Nurse, you could be selected for graduate
degree programs at civilian universities.
ADVANCED NURSING COURSE,
TUITION-FREE
You get tuition, pa and living allowances.
You can also take Nurse Practitioner
courses and courses in many clinical special-
ties. All on the Army.
While these programs do not cost you
any money, most of them do incur an addi-
tional service obligation.
A CHANCE TO PRACTICE LAW
If you're about to get your law degree
and be admitted to the bar, you should con-
sider a commission in the Judge Advocate
General Corps. Because in the Army you get
to practice law right from the start.
While your classmates are still doing
other lawyers' research and other lawyers'
briefs, you could have your own cases, your
own clients, in effect, your own practice.
Plus you'll have the pay, prestige and
privileges of being an Officer in the United
States Army. With a chance to travel and
make the most of what you've worked so
hard to become. A real, practicing lawyer
Be an Army Lawyer.
R0TC SCHOLARSHIPS
Though you're too late for a 4-year
scholarship, there are 3 2 and even 1-year
scholarships available.
They include tuition, books,
and lab fees. Plus $100 a month
living allowance. Naturally
they're very competitive. Because
besides helping you towards your
degree, an ROTC scholarship
helps you towards the gold bars
of an Army Officer.
Stop by the ROTC office on
campus and ask about details.
UP TO ST70 A MONTH
You can combine service in
the Army Reserve or National
Guard with Army ROTC and
get up to $6,500 while you're still
in school.
It's called the Simultaneous
Membership Program. You get
$ 100 a month as an Advanced
Army ROTC Cadet and an addi-
lonal $70 a month sa
Kant's pa) j a Am
Reservist.
When you graduate,
you'll be commissu
Second Lieutenant, bui
necessarily assigned to a.
five duty. Find out about ii
A BONUS FOR PART-TIME WORK
You can get a $1,500 bonus just for enlist-
ing in some Army Reserve units. Or up I
$2,000 in educational benefits.
You also get paid for your Reserve duty.
It comes out to about S 1,000a year tor about 16
hours a month and two weeks annual training.
And now we have a special program to
help you fit the Army Reserve around your
school schedule. It's worth a look.
A SECOND CHANCE AT COLLEGE
Some may find college to he the right
place at the wrong time for a variety of reasons
The Army can help them. loo.
A few years in the Army can help them
get money for tuition and the maturity to use it
wisely.
The Army has a program In which mone
saved for college is matched two-f or-one by the
government. Then, if one qualifies, a generous
bonus is added to that.
So 2 years of service can get you up to
$7,400 for college.years up to12,100, and 4
years up to $14,100. In addition, bonuses up to
$3,000 are available for 4-year enlistments in
selected skills.
Add in the experience and maturity gained,
and the Army can sendan individual ba'ckiocol-
lege a richer person in more ways than one.
We hope these Army opportunities have in-
trigued you as well as surprised you. Because
there is indeed a lot the Army can offer a bright
person like you.
or more information, send the coupon.
I
I
I
I
I
I
Please tell me more about(AM Medical School and Amu
Medicine. D(AN) the Arrm Nurc I"orpv 1 rm I j�.
? (FR) ROTV Scholarships.(SS) Arrm Reserve Bonuses
? (PO Arm FAlucational Benelux
sTvSr
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S� HHM Mil SIMS
nut �h wmii
Scndio BRkiKroPPORIl-MTlKSPO BOX 177,
MT.VERNON,N.Y.I0TO
I THIS IS THE ARMY
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Title
The East Carolinian, April 22, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 22, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.56
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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