The East Carolinian, April 15, 1980






�he lEaat Carolinian
Vol. 54 Sogf
'81 To See
Top School
Enrollment
WASHINGTON, D.C. (CPS) �
The National Center for Education
Statistics, in its annual survey, is
predicting that college enrollment
will hit an all-time high in 1981
before falling to levels that could pit
four-year private colleges against
two-year community colleges in a
battle for older, part-time students.
The NCES expects 11.69 million
college students to enroll in 1982, a
record number. By 1988, however,
it sees enrollment shrinking to
11.048 million.
It projects that small private col-
leges will lose the greatest percen-
tage of students. Private school
enrollment should fall to 2.294
million in 1988, down from 2.49
million projected for 1981 and 2.478
this year.
NCES analysts predict that the
private four-year schools will have
to attract more older, part-time
students to compensate for their
losses.
Two-year community colleges,
though, have been the most suc-
cessful recruiting older, part-time
students. One reason, according t.
the study called "Projection of
Education Statistics to 1988-89 is
that community colleges are usually
in urban areas convenient to com-
muter students.
Older, part-time students current-
ly account for 40 percent of the na-
tion's two-year college enrollments.
The NCES expects two-year college
enrollment to decline "only slight-
ly" over the next eight years precise-
ly because of the community col-
leges' attraction to part-timers.
If private four-year colleges can't
compete effectively with two-year
schools for the older, part-time
students, NCES warned that "many
of them could face closure
The agency's projections for
four-year public colleges and
universities were less drastic. It ex-
pects total public college enrollment
to fall to 8.754 million In 1988 after
a 1981 peak of 9.2 million. Public
colleges' larger base should allow
the bigger schools to survive the
coming era of limits.
Most experts expect college
enrollments will decline because of
the dwindling number of current
school-age children. Other studies
predict enrollments will start to
grow again in the 1990s, when the
children of the post-World War II
baby boom reach college age.
Total enrollment for the 1979-80
academic year, according to NCES,
is 11.508 million, up from 8.006
million in 1969-70.
12 Pages
Tuesday, April 15,1980
(ireenville, N.C.
Circulation 10,000
Toto
The Student Union Major
Attractions Committee will
present TOTO this Thursday
in Minges Coliseum.
"Although ticket sales have
been poor thus far, we're hop-
ing to at least break even
said Charles Sune, chairperson
of the Major Attractions
Committee.
"If the TOTO concert fails,
there will probably be no con-
certs next year. We're hoping
students will understand the
importance of this concert and
support us said Sune.
Sherrod Sworn In
As SGA President,
Outlines Cabinet
Sherrod Takes Office
Charlie Sherrod takes the oath of office from acting SGA
Attorney General Lester Nail during Monday's SGA
Legislature meeting. Sherrod spoke briefly before the
legislators and outlined his tentative plans for the incoming
administration.
The new president of the Student
Government Association was sworn
into office Monday during the 23rd
session of the SGA legislature.
Charlie Sherrod took the oath
from acting SGA Attorney General
Lester Nail after delivering a speech
to the legislators in which he said
that his cabinet would be "different
than anything you've ever seen
before
Sherrod explained that he ten-
tatively plans to create volunteer
positions within the SGA executive
whose purpose will be to deal with
special problems. One of these
would be filled by a graduate stu-
dent in business administration who
would be charged with checking up
on the way student funds are used.
After the meeting, Sherrod said
that an example of misuse of stu-
dent funds occurred recently when a
group was granted $2,000 to finance
a research trip for its members.
When it was found that most of
those members were unable to go,
said Sherrod, the group recruited
non-members to attend the meeting.
Sherrod would not say which group
was involved.
Sherrod said another volunteer
position would be filled by a female
who would attend to women's pro-
blems on campus and report on Ti-
tle IX matters. Sherrod also said
that he intends to create a position
for an adviser on international
students and minorities.
In its regular business, the
legislature passed unanimously a
$7,000 appropriation request to be
used in constructing a bus stop
shelter at Mendenhall Student
Center. The proposed shelter will be
built of brick in three different sec-
tions, which, viewed from the air,
will spell out E-C-U.
The Visual Arts Forum also
received $895 in student funds to be
used in promoting ECU's Gray
Gallery in North Carolina and
around the nation. Gallery director
Raymond Osman spoke on behalf
of the bill.
In other business, the legislature
held over until their next meeting a
major piece of legislation which
would reorganize the SGA transit
system's operation.
The proposal would place the
transit system under the manage-
ment of two full-time managers, the
SGA president or his appointee, an
SGA legislator, a faculty member
appointed by the vice-chancellor for
student life and a business professor
who would oversee financial opera-
tions. At present, the transit system
is headed by two managers who
work with a faculty financial ad-
visor.
In other transit matters, transit
See SGA, Page 2, Col.5
Sierra Club To Study Flood Plains
By LARRY ZICHERMAN
Assistant News Editor
Greenville's Cypress Gruop of the
Sierra Club was recently awarded a
grant to develop a flood plain
management plan for two local
creeks.
The $2,938 grant, given by the
N.C. Department of Natural
Resources and Community
Development, will be used to
develop land management plans for
the Green Mill Run and Hardee
Creek watersheds.
Green Mill Run is the main flood
control creek in Greenville. It runs
southwest to northeast, crossing
Evans Street just north of Arlington
Boulevard. Running parallel to
Tenth Street from Rock Springs
Road to Village Green Apartments,
Green Mill Run forms the focus of
Green Springs Park on Fifth Street.
Students are most familiar with
Green Mill Run following a heavy
rain, when it floods the parking lots
at the bottom of College Hill Drive.
"The two main functions of the
project are to find the land that is
really worthwhile recreationally and
preserve it for recreational purposes
and to preserve the flood control
function of creeks and swampy
areas said Dr. Robert Graham of
the Sierra Club and professor in the
ECU psychology department.
"Floodways have been left to
deteriorate as the surrounding areas
of higher elevation have been
developed said Dr. Barney Kane,
project supervisor and a member of
the ECU environmental health
department.
"If the present City Council con-
tinues running things as they are do-
ing now, the entire flood plain will
be filled in said Dr. Graham.
"What they will do then, as they
have already done once and will
continue to do, is to bring in the Ar-
my Corps of Engineers.
"They will say 'Ah, Green Mill
Run isn't serving its purpose to get
the water out as fast as possible, so
we will make it better That means
making it into a channelized mud
ditch which is deeper and drains
water faster. It could possibly even
have concrete sides or bottom. For
recreational purposes, it would be
totally ruined
The main purpose of the program
is data collection concerning use of
the property and ways to better
maintain the floodplains, Graham
said. The club'also plans to produce
a slide program showing the effects
of flood plains and their proper
utilization.
Graham cited the Hopkins Park
housing project on Evans Street as
an example of poor flood plain
management. The project was built
on a part of the flood plain of Green
Mill Run, entirely on sand. During
periods of heavy rain, when the
creek would need to perform its
flood control functions, in flooding,
it would flood the housing project.
Graham said.
Rumored Letter Raises Fear
For Iranian Student Safety
AUSTIN, TX (CPS) � Two
University of Texas students have
obtained a U.S. Customs Service
report detailing possible Islamic ter-
rorist attacks by foreign students
within the United States. However,
some foreign student advisers doubt
the report's authenticity and fear it
may be used to exacerbate hostility
toward � and increase the danger
to � Iranian students in this coun-
try.
The report was prompted by a let-
ter, allegedly now being distributed
in some eastern cities, that calls on
Moslems to conduct "Islamic
guerilla warfare in the United
States" in the event the United
States uses military force in Iran.
The letter, reprinted in the
Customs report, warns Moslems to
prepare to defend "our lively in-
terests" and to use "rhetoric,
demonstrations, coordinated
policies and physical warfare if
necessary
Although the letter was circulated
in the East, the report was written
out of the Customs Service's
Portland, Ore office.
Special Agent Lawrence LeDage
wouldn't say how the Portland of-
fice got involved in the case.
Though reluctant to comment,
LeDage did confirm the authenticity
of the report.
Lt. Larry Soulsby of the
Washington, D.C. police told the
Daily Texan, which first broke the
story, that the letter did exist.
"Our investigative services unit
and our special operations units
working on the Iranian situation are
aware of that report he said, "but
they will not discuss it
"I'm sure the Secret Service
wouldn't give you any information
on this, and we sure won't he add-
ed.
�Rumors of conspiracies by
foreign nationals in this country are
nothing new, warns Bill Bray of the
National Association for Foreign
Student Affairs in Washington.
They are more likely now because of
the "group phobia" of Iranians.
"The problems with Iranian
students aren't new Bray told
See LETTER, Page 2, Col.l
Book Collectors Enter Library Contest
One might expect to find books
on art, painting, politica. theor,
American Indians and medieval
history on the shelves of a local city
or college library. But these are just
a few of the types of personal collec-
tions of books assembled in the dor-
mitories, apartments or homes of
ECU students.
Inside Today
High Gis PricesP�ge 3
KGB, CIA Gel LetterPage 4
Words Oa "EqaasP�e
ECU
Wilmington .Pate 8
Many of these bibliophile
students chose to enter their per-
sonal collections in this year's an-
nual Student Library Competition,
sponsored by the Friends of the East
Carolina University Library. To
enter the contest, they had to submit
a list of books in their personal col-
lections and also an essay explaining
why they collected the books.
The collection of last year's first
place winner, John Lawrence, con-
tained up to 500 volumes dealing
with the American Civil War and
Ancient Oriental History.
Lawrence said that his entry
reflected a life-time interest in col-
lecting books.
Another of last year's three win-
ners submitted a collection of
science fiction novels and short
stories.
One student in this year's com-
petition who has lived near the sea
for the past eight years and been in-
trigued by the ocean has an exten-
sive collection of books on marine
science.
Another student, who is majoring
in English, submitted an extensive
list of books by English, French and
American fiction writers of the 20th
century.
In their essays, many students
said that they collected books simp-
ly because they loved to read.
Announcements of three award
winners will be made April 16 at 3
p.m. in Joyner Library. There will
be a display of portions of the winn-
ing collections.
The judges of the competition are
Dr. Ralph Rives of the ECU English
faculty, Don Lennon of the library
faculty, and Dr. Virginia Herrin, a
member of the Friends of the
Library.
Although students were required
to submit a list of at least 15 of their
personal library titles, the judging is
based on quality, not quantity of the
collections and also on the imagina-
tion and intelligence shown in
creating the collection.
The first prize winner will receive
$75, the second $50 and the third
$25.
In connection with National
Library Week, April 13-19, the
Friends of the Library will also
sponsor a bargain book sale from 10
a.m3 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. on April
16 and from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on
April 17.
Exam Notice
The spring semester exam
schedule that appears in the
1979-80 campus activity calen-
dar distributed by the Student
Supply Store contains an er-
ror, according to- Joseph O.
Clark, student store manager.
The schedule should read
"12:00 MWF8:00-10:00,
Wednesday, April 30 The
exam schedule printed in the
1979-80 Undergraduate
Catalogue is correct, Clark
said.
The calendars were
distributed by the Student
Supply Store at the start of fall
semester, Clark noted.
Spring Rains Have Arrived p,Kobv ��cha.oc�.
sprouting dormant umbrellas
N. Greene Street Wreck
Results In Severe Injury
Three Greenville residents were
injured, one critically, in a three-car
accident on North Greene Street
yesterday.
Robert Harris Daniel was admit-
ted to the Intensive Care Unit of Pitt
County Memorial Hospital after
receiving "severe injuries accor-
ding to a hospital spokesman and
investigating officer I.E. Nichols.
Daniel was pinned in his car while
rescuers worked approximately 30
minutes to dislodge the car from
around him, using various rescue
tools.
Also injured in the accident were
Robert Keith Casper, who received
head injuries, and Carolyn Jean Lit-
tle, who received a shoulder injury.
Both were treated and released at
the emergency room.
Police charged Casper with driv-
ing under the influence of alcohol in
the incident.
Daniel's car was totalled, police
reported. There was $800 damage
done to Link's vehicle and $1000
damage to Casper's in the 2:10 p.m.
incident. The exact location of the
accident was North Greene Street
norta of the Dudley Street intersec-
tion, near Mum ford Road.
V
m





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 15, 1980
Kale To Speak
Announcements
Poetry Forum
The East Carolina Poetr horum will
have a regular workshop and meeting
Thursday. April 17, at 8 p.m in
Mendenhall, room 248 The public is
cordially msiled
Family Fun
tach Thursday during April is "family
I un Night" at Mendenhall hrom 6 10
p m . all children under age IS accom
panied hv a parent or responsible adult
may bovsl. plav billiards or plav table
'ennis tor . oil regular price Tach
game or line ol bowling will be halt
prut- tor children, and billiards and
table tennis will be hall price tor the en
ite family Only one adult per group
must have a Mendenhall Student
Center Membership card or III II)
aid to participate
Olympics
The New Summer Olympics is the
theme ol the nevt Nig Tau paru ai the
I Ibo Mam contests and pries are
scheduled tor the Tuesday, -pril I 5
event t vervone is invited'
SI Artist
Applications foi student I nion Vim
will be accepted April 14 is pplica
lions mav be picked up in the Student
I nion Office, room 24 Mendenhall
lob descriptions will also he available
Portfolio required
Dance
ciudrc dance i being held a. the
Methodist Student Center, 501 1 5ih
St on Saturday night, -pril 19, ji 8
p m Jerrv Powell will he out dller
I he price is right at Si i� pel person.
'Clreshmcntc provided Put on yout
Mjuare dance clothes and come on ovet'
Phi Beta Lambda
Out dinner meeting to install nest
u'jr officers will be at the "hree
steerc a; 7 00 p m . Wednesday, pril
lh Brownbag it you wish Hope lo see
all ol vou there
Kappa Delta Pi
I he t-ta Chi Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi
will meet on Saturday. April 26, ai
i!11am at the Holiday Inn in Green-
ville This meeting will be held in con
lunction with our Spring Initiation
Our speaker will be Dr f lovd Mattheis
sconce Education Department
kadelpia.is should send in then reserva
lions hv -pril is
Pi Sigma Alpha
Spring banquet on Saturday. April 14.
at p m Guest speaker will be John
� �� ommissionei ol I abot ol
Carolina I he banquet will he
held a; Ihe Three Steers Restaurant on
Memorial Drive in Greenville All
bers and guests are invited lo -it
tend The price ol the meal is S6.00 :h �
person nv interested persons should
go by a Ji! ei tor the dinner at the
Political science Office, 124 Brewster
Building ih ing
Table Tennis
A table tennis tournament, with singles
and doubles events, will be held in the
Mendenhall multi-purpose room on
Wednesday April 16 at 6 p.m Ihe com
petition is open to all ECt students and
faculty and statt MSC members
I rophies will be awatded to 1st and 2nd
place singles winners and 1st and 2nd
place doubles teams ntrants must
register at the MSt Billiards C enter by
Monday, April 14
Nurses
Ihe representative from Nightingale
I niform t ompany will he in the School
Ol Nursing building, room 102. on
April 1" from 8 0 a m lo I 00 p m to
measure each freshman nursing student
foi uniforms lotal uniform cosl will
be i72 70 foi female students and
$so in foi male students A money
ordei foi the exaci amount mud be
submitted with ihe uniform ordet
Please stop bv the School ol Nursing
Office, Room 152, lo make an appoini
mem
ECGC
ECGC will hold itc monthly business
meeting Tuesday. phl 19. 5:00p.m at
the Newman House, mis I s)th si
Plan- foi summei will be discussed Hr
tng yo beverage All in
lerested persons are welcome'
Kacquetball
There will be a meeting ol the ECI
Racquetball Club Thursday, April 7ai
p in in room 104 Memorial Gym Ke
quesi 980 si budgei will be
discussed along with the dub's rules
and the men and women - I addei
Please join uc'
Booksale
The friends of the Library will hold a
booksale at Joyner Library April 16
and P Hours will be 10 a.m. lo 3 p.m.
and 7 p m to 9 p.m. Wednesday, April
16, and 10 am. to 3 p m. Thursday,
April 17.
Auction
The Methodist Student Center is having
an auction of new and used items o
Vsednesdav. April 16 ai 7:00 p.m SOI
I Fifth St across from Garret! Dorm.
Pick up some bargains and have some
lun'
Attorney General
Anyone who wishes to apply for the
position of SCiA Attorney General
must till out an application in the SGA
office b 5 tx) p m . Tuesday. April 15.
ISIHO
NASW
Members ol NASW. social work and
corrections majors are now selling rat
tie tickets to raise money for their
departmental soltball g�me and
cookout Six drawings for dinners at
losdicks 1X90. Ihe Beet Barn, Pcppi's
Pitta, Shoneys and Parker's BBQ will
he held at the game on April 26 Tickets
are S 50 I or more information contact
Barbara Anderson, Anne O'Neal or
Diane Austin
SU Reps
Revival
The E I Fountain ol 1 ife c hnstian
ship will be sponsoring its second
annual revival ihis spring, on April 24.
25 and 26 i � onum The
"Behold I
(. onic Quickly " I he speakers foi ihe
thr� day rev sal are Reverend Ken
neth I: J bv the In
terdenon nat onalho i and the I i I
1 ountatn if on Tl irsdav
haplai Kenneth
ompamed by (he
I y I Gospel I nscmble (and possible
(he si Augustine's Fellowhsiphoir).
oi xa lay Rci Mi inffin with
1 N hapel Hill and the Fountain ol
L1SK Mis
Rosale induct two
seimnai- Saturday April 26 -tar
in the I edoma w .
. entei Ihe opto foi the seminar are
and sires Devotional set
� a I at 7 � ich night Please
ml and pra � (he I oid �vith uc
Toto
v i.
I ommittee present? rOTO with a
PBA Vpi 'a � �
M fickets w
al Monday. March 31 n 10 00
� Mendenhall Studenl i enter
rickets a ill b - 10 I r ECT students
.1" I $7 K) fo
Positions are open lor two day-student
representatives to serve on the Studenl
I nion Boaid ol Directors lor 1980-81
Dav students who wish to apply for the
positions mav pick up applications
from the Inlormalion Desk in
Mendenhall Deadline for applications
is Monday. April 21 at 5 p.m The Stu-
dent I nion Board of Directors is com-
posed of: President ol Men's Residence
C ouncil, President of Women's
Residence . ouncil. President ol the
Intei Fraternity Council. President oi
the Panhellenic Council, President of
the Student Government Association, a
taciiltv member appointed by the
faculty Setiale. an administrator ap-
pointed bv the Chancellor of the
I niversity . two day students appointed
bv Ihe Board, the President ol the Stu-
denl I nion te otticio member without
a vote) and the Executive Director of
Mendenhall iev officio member without
a vote) I he Board selects the President
oi ihe student Union, approves the SC
budgei and appiopnates funds, ap-
proves si committee chairpersons, and
sets organizational policy
Phi V la Sigma
Sl tdents lo be initiated into Phi Eta
Sigma, freshman honor society, are
reminded thai the initiation ceremony
will take place on rhursday, April l" in
-�� room ol Mendenhall.
beginning ai " 30 p m Students are
asked lo be present bv 7:15 pm in
order that proper arrangements for the
ceremony he made.
SCEC
The Student Council for Exceptional
Children will hold its last meeting of the
year on Wednesday, April 16 at 5 p.m.
in room 129 Speight. Officers for new
year will be introduced, and plans for
Special Olympics, Exceptional
Children's day at Camp Bonner, and
(he reception on May 10 for senior
SPED majors will be discussed
Episcopal Worship
An Episcopal service of Holy Commu-
nion will be celebrated Wednesday,
April 16, in ihe chapel of the Methodist
Studenl Center (5th Street across from
Ciarreit Dorm) at 6:00 p.m The
Episcopal Chaplain, the Rev Bill Had-
den, will celebrate. Supper will be serv-
ed at 6:30 p.m. following the service
SCA
The ECU-Greenville branch of the
Society for Crealive Anachronism will
hold its last meeting of the semester on
Tuesday, April 15 at 7 p.m. at 907 E.
4th St side apt. Officers are needed
lor the fall semester The SCA is a na-
tionwide medieval interest group
Phi Alpha Theta
Phi Alpha Theta history honor society
will have its final business meeting of
the year on Tuesday. April 15 at 7 30
p m in the Richard C. Tood room
located in D wing of Brewster This
meeting is very important and all
members are urged to attend
Student Welfare
There will be a meeting of the SGA Stu-
dent Welfare Committee on Wednes-
day at 4 p.m. in Mendenhall Room 239
All committee members are urged to at-
tend
Remember
We wish to remind all
students and faculty that we
will not accept any an-
nouncements for the An-
nouncements column unless
they are typed doublespace
and turned in before the
deadline. No exceptions will
be made. The deadlines are
2:00 p.m. Friday for the
Tuesday edition and 2:00
p.m. Tuesday for the Thurs-
day edition. We reserve the
right to edit for brevity. We
cannot guarantee that
everything turned in will ap-
pear in the paper, due to
space limitations, but we will
do our best.
Student Journalists Inducted
W. Wilford Kale,Jr.
SGA Holds Bill
Continued from page 1
co-manager Chubby
Abshire announced
that a new van would
be purchased soon for
$9300. Abshire said
that the van would save
$21 per day in fuel
costs, compared to the
larger buses now in use.
Legislator Sam Bern-
stein also suggested to
Speaker Mike Adkins
that the Rules and
Judiciary Committee
should write laws defin-
ing the exact dates of
the terms of SGA of-
ficers.
Bernstein said that
such laws would
eliminate the kind of
speculation that has oc-
curred this year over
the legal end of Brett
Melvin's term as SGA
president.
Fourteen new
members will be in-
ducted into the ECU
chapter of the Society
for Collegiate Jour-
nalists Thursday, April
17 in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center's Cof-
feehouse at 7 p.m.
The national presi-
dent of SCJ, W.
Wilford Kale, Jr will
speak to the society
following induction
ceremonies. Kale is
Bureau Chief of
Eastern Virginia for the
Richmond Times
Dispatch with head-
quarters in
W i 11 iamsburg . An
alumnus of William
and Mars. Kale serves
as chapter adviser of
SCJ at W&M Kale is a
much sought atler
speaker, especially on
college campuses. As a
reporter he covered
such.national events as
the arrival of Emperor
Hirohito of Japan, the
third presidential
debate of 1976, and the
recent Columbia
University NCCPA
conference in New
York City
SCJ is the nation's
oldest collegiate
honorary for mass
communications. The
ECU chapter was
organized in 1969 b
Ira L. Baker, as Alpha
Phi Gamma, of which
Baker was then na-
tional president In
1975 APG merged with
Pi Delta Epsilon,
another national
publications honorary,
to form SCJ. All
former members of
APG at ECU then
became members o
S4 I At present, there
are 200 active
honorars memb
ECU. President f tht
campus chapter this
year is Joyce 1 vans.
and Ira I Baker, who
will retire at the end of
the vear, has been ad-
viser since the orgarna
tion's charter das
Immediately foil
ing induction
ceremonies, a social
hour in honor of Kale
and new members will
be held in the
feehouse. The pub!
invited.
Inductees include the
following: John Jeter.
New Bern; Glenda S ic
K illingsw ort h .
Bern; Mrs M
Schulken. White.
I inda Allred.
ville; Joseph Dan
Jr Shelby; Marl
Kemp, sheb i
ward Will �
Durham; Me
th, C harlottes.
Susan 1
ipel Hill; Del
Hotaling.
I Drew. C hatl
N.J Ellen -
Chestei Pa . Ian
Stone. W
( it
Patronize
The East Carolinian
Advertisers
Letter Rumored
Continued from page 1
College Press Service.
"It's just the most re-
cent and greatest
political activists have
been Iranians
He notes that there
could be "political
motivations" behind
such a letter in an elec-
tion year.
"I would really ques-
tion the organization
attributed to these ter-
rorists he added.
But federal agencies
are taking the possibili-
ty of Islamic guerilla
activities in the United
States seriously. The
Immigration and
Naturalization Ser-
vice's round-up and
photographing of all
Iranian students is
widely suspected to be
part of anti-terrorist
preparations. Various
international student
advisors around the
country have reported
visits from FBI agents
seeking photos of
foreign students since
the November seizure
of the American em-
bassy in Tehran.

He says analysis by a
university Iranian
specialist suggests the
grammar and usage
were not originally in
English. Puffer con-
cluded the letter could
have been written in
any number of Middle
Eastern languages.
Puffer said the letter
itself advocates a
thorough, carefully-
planned approach t )
guerilla activities. It
warns that "targets
must be chosen in-
telligently and
realistically (and)
weapons should be
chosen in corrlation
with the targets per-
sons in mind
LeDage says the
Customs Service is
"still in the process of
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High Gas Prices To Blame
THE EAST CAROLINIAN APRIL 15. 19)
More Time Spent At Home
Reprinted from the
News and Observer,
Ralewh, N.C. April
14.
By
HOWARD TROXLER
N4l) Staff Writer
For years, Dennis G.
Jones o Garner took
driving his ear for
granted.
But when he realized
recentlv that he was
spending more than
$100 a month for
gasoline, he decided to
make some changes.
"Now, instead of go-
ing somewhere, a lot of
times we sit and talk (at
home) said Jones, a
financial analyst.
"We've found new
ways o entertainment
We build fires and
toast weiners. We go
for walks. We've met
our neighbors
Jones and his wife
are not alone.
News and Observer
interviews with 100
People in Eastern
North Carolina showed
many have changed
their lifestyles to curtail
driving. More people
are staying home more
often.
Last year, for the
first time since the state
Department of
Revenue began keeping
records 17 years ago,
North Carolinians
bought less gasoline
than they did the
previous year.
About 3.0 billion
gallons of gasoline were
sold in North Carolina
in 1979, compared with
3.17 billion gallons in
1978, state officials
said.
And a recent Gallop
poll showed that 70
percent of the nation's
car owners are driving
less.
i4I was considering
taking another job
Jones said. "So I got in
the car, drove to the
new place and
measured the mileage.
That's something I
wouldn't have con-
sidered three or four
years ago
The average price of
regular gasoline in
North Carolina was 72
cents a gallon in
January 1979, accor-
ding to a monthly
survey by the Carolinas
Motor Club. A year
later, the average price
had climbed to $1,078 a
gallon, the club said.
The club's latest
survey showed regular
gasoline costing an
average of $1.22 a
gallon during late
February and early
March.
"We drive as little as
we have to said W.
David Hawkins, a
Zebulon surveyor.
"We don't decide on
the spur of the moment
to drive to Raleigh for
supper anymore
Joan McFarland of
Sanford said, "We us-
ed to go shopping in
Fayetteville, and we'd
go to Southern Pines
just to eat. We don't do
that anymore
Instead of using cars
during leisure time,
most people interview-
ed said they were spen-
ding more time closer
to home, both around
town and in their own
neighborhoods.
"We watch TV a lot
more and get out and
walk more Mrs.
McFarland said.
"Come summer, we'll
find more things to do
around the house
"I don't know
what's going to happen
this summer she said.
"We'd like to go to the
beach, and if we're
lucky, maybe we'll get
to go once
Another Sanford
resident, Betsy Kelly,
said, "We used to go
riding on Sunday
nights, but now we just
Local Firm,
ECU Sponsor
Intern Program
Greek News
An internship pro-
gram for graduate
students studying
microbiology has been
established through the
cooperation of Bur-
roughs Wellcome Co.
and ECU. Wayne
Stephens, of Raleigh,
N.C has been selected
as the first intern.
Stephens is working
this semester in the
Bacteriological Control
Laboratory at Bur-
roughs Wellcome.
During his internship,
he receives both
academic credit and a
saiary.
The program also
benefits Burroughs
Wellcome, according to
Bill Underwood, a
scientist in the com-
pany's Quality
Assurance Department.
"The intern supplies
us with additional man-
power in our
laboratories said
Underwood. "Also, by
enhancing the
qualifications of
graduate students, the
Company increases the
number of qualified
potential employees in
the workforce
Minimum qualifica-
tions for interns are
that they have com-
pleted basic
microbiology course
work and are enrolled
as graduate students in
biology, medicine or
medical microbiology
or environmental
health. One candidate
will be recommended
each semester by a
selection committee at
ECU.
N.C. Realtors
Plan Symposium
By RICKI GLIARM1S
Greek Correspondent
The Alpha Phi's
celebrated their annual
Parent's Day on Sun-
day, April 13 with an
open house and lun-
cheon.
The Phi's would like
to congratulate Bobbi
Daniel for being chosen
TKE Sweetheart; Diane
Gray and Cynthia
Mewborn for being
chosen University Mar-
shall; Diane Gray for
being elected into Bega
Gamma Sigma
Business Honor Socie-
ty; and Karen Jones for
winning a $500 home
furnishings scholar-
ship.
The Alpha Phi's
celebrated with Joanna
Best at a reception
honoring her Senior
Art Show in Textile
Design.
Congratulations to
all the Phi's for their
outstanding sisters!
The Sigma's have
been doing very well in
Intramurals this Spr-
ing. They are currently
sorority division
leaders in Team Tennis.
They have also been
beating their opponents
soundly in Softball.
Tri Sigma is having
its formal Friday, April
18, at the Washington
Country Club. Other
functions for this
month include a rush
party and social
Wednesday night, Spr-
ing Cleaning, Senior
Send-on, a lock-out for
the pledges, and
Founder's Day.
The Alpha Delta Pi's
presented their eight
spring pledges Saturday
night at the Spring For-
mal at Bogue Banks
Country Club at Atlan-
tic Beach. Sunday
night, the Alpha Delta
Pi's honored the
graduating seniors of
the sorority at a
Founder's Day banquet
at the Beef Barn.
The Greek News has
a new writer for the
1980-81 school year.
Beginning in
September, Tommy
Bland, a member of
Kappa Alpha, will be
composing the Greek
News. More details
next week.
get together with the
family and play cards
and volleyball
In Murfreesboro,
Jack Hassell, buildings
and grounds
superintendent at
Chowan College, said,
"Rather than going out
of town when we have
time off, we are taking
advantage of activities
offered right here in
Murfreesboro. We're
visiting neighbors more
often
"There's no way the
consumer can win
said J.R. Winecoff, a
Wilmington policeman.
AprJIlay June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar
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The Fifth Annual
"Opportunities in Real
Lstate" Symposium
will be held Wednes-
day, April 16, on the
campus of East
Carolina University.
Sponsored by Rho Ep-
silon (the professional
Real Estate Fraternity
at ECU), the North
Carolina Real Estate
Educational Founda-
tion, and the North
Carolina Association
of Realtors, the sym-
posium will be held at
Mendenhall Student
Center from 9:00 a.m.
until 4:00 p.m.
SAAD'S SHOE
REPAIR
113 Grande Ave
758-1228
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The program, which
is primarily designed to
offer the real estate
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guidance on oppor-
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will feature speakers on
Commercial Develop-
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perty Management,
Residential Construc-
tion, Residential
Brokerage and Mor-
tgage Lending. In addi-
tion, the students will
be given an opportunity
to discuss employment
possibilities with in-
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i





Sty �aBt (Earfllinian
Serving the campus community for 54 years.
Marc Barnes, tmm m ms
Richard Green. uanaKmK wtor
Robert M. Swaim. a Diane Henderson, copy em
Chris Lichok. bum Manager Charles Chandler. spom Editor
Terry Gray � mm Debbie Hotaling. Features &au
TUESDAY. APRIL 15, 1980
PAGE 4
This Newspaper's Opinion
Political Games
The Olympics, at least for the
American team, is pretty much
given up for dead, now that the
House of Delegates have made their
decision not to participate in
Moscow.
The question remains, was the
cancellation of American participa-
tion a way to protest the upheaval in
Afghanistan, or was it merely a
political ploy by President Carter to
appear the hero in this election
year?
The leader who was murdered in
Afghanistan during the most recent
invasion was nothing more than a
Soviet puppet, a ruler that bowed to
every whim from the Kremlin.
Carter didn't get upset then. In
fact, the American government of-
fered not one word of resistance
against the man. Only when Soviet
leaders appeared to tire of him and
decided to dethrone him by force
did Carter begin to cry from his
soapbox about "human rights
The lingering hostage problem
has been marked by the fact that
Carter seems to hint that the
stalemate is about to be broken,
coincidentally at the time that the
polls are about to open in a major
primary. This political ploy is
reminiscent of the Nixon years,
when the Vietnam deescalation
would mysteriously slow down
while Nixon waited for the returns
to come in. This useless election-
saver cost America more than we
would like to admit in human lives.
What is there for us to do, then?
One of the few hopes we can have is
that politics will triumph and the
elected president, whoever he is, will
be too frightened that the rival party
will win a landslide four years from
now that he won't do anything too
crazy. Inflation, Iran and
Afghanistan notwithstanding, this
fear of the other party just might be
the thing that will save us.
Buy A Ticket. Save Our Concerts
The Student Union Major Attrac-
tions Committe is about to lose its
entire operating budget for the next
school year.
And it's nobody's fault but your
own.
Major Attractions, which has put
on such quality acts as Jimmy Buf-
fet, Pablo Cruise and Styx relies on
a break-even system of manage-
ment. Simply put, if they sell
enough ticketw to break even, they
will have enough money the next
time around to put on a good con-
cert.
only 1,000 tickets have been sold to
the TOTO concert next Thursday
night. 2,800 more need to be sold
for the committee to break even.
Major Attractions depends on
ticket sales, and ticket sales alone to
pay for concerts. No student fees
whatsoever go into any part of the
committee. It is the only committee
in the Student Union that is totally
independent.
If we don't, we have no right to
complain next year when there are
no concerts.
AFRICAN ELEPHANT INPIAN ELEPHANT
UA& two
urge: ears
AMERICAN ELEPHANT
pJOCKY MTU.
NtW�
College Press Service
HAfe TviO
EAR&
HA& ONE
6I6AN1JC RIGHT
EAR AND Ig
COMPLETELY
DEAF OM THE
LEFT SIPE
T�S A ReASOM I M�TW�T� K6NN6DY, BUT He FORGQTTeN MAT IT mn
Dear Mr. CIA And Comrade KGB
The following letter was written and sent
to the directors of the CIA and KGB by
Mark Gerzon, managing editor of
WuildPaper. It is reprinted here from the
March April edition.
Dear Mr. CIA and Comrade KGB:
Although the return to the cold war is no
doubt keeping you busy, I'd appreciate
your taking a moment to consider a modest
proposal that could transform your global
reputations from villains to heroes.
Before outlining the proposal, however,
let me assure you that I know you both
mean well and that your motives are ge-
nuinely patriotic. Each of you no doubt
undertakes your "dirty tricks" to
counteract those of your adversary.
But after watching for more than a
generation as you both interfere in Africa,
Asia and Latin America, I am becoming
suspicious. Beneath your enmity I detect a
paradoxical alliance. Without each other,
you would have no excuse to meedle in the
rest of the world.
Whatever your differences as capitalists
and communists, you both are afflicted by
the Superpower syndrome: a political men-
tality that denies one's own tendency to
dominate the world while magnifying the
tendency of one's adversary to do so. The
White House and the Kremlin have been so
quick to condemn each other's aggression
� and slow to admit their own � that the
history of the cold war reads like a case
history of two megalomaniacs. For exam-
ple:
�Mr. CIA, when Mohammed
Mossadegh's rise to power in 1953
threatened American control of Iran's oil,
you plotted his downfall and enthroned the
Shah.
�Comrade KGB, when Alexander
Dubcek peacefully tried to find his own
blend of socialism, you advocated and then
helped plan and execute the Soviet invasion
of Czechoslovakia in 1968. Of course you
claimed that members of the Czechoslovak
Communist Party "requested military aid"
for the Soviet Union because their country
was "threatened by counterrevolution" in-
spired by the West. But this excuse sounded
as hollow then as it does now.
�When your government was deciding
whether to escalate the war in Vietnam,
Mr. CIA, you adopted the same self-
serving logic that the Soviets used in
Eastern Europe. As your own high-ranking
employee Victor Marchetti reported (in
The CIA and the Cult of Intelligence,
which you censored), you installed your
own leader and later justified American
military presence on the grounds that you
were invited. "The Vietnamese have asked
our help Secretary of Defense Robert
McNamara explained in 1964. "We have
given it
�For the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan,
Comrade KGB, you relied once again on
the same tired phrases. "There has been no
Soviet 'intervention' or 'invasion' at all
announced Leonid Brezhnev, based on in-
formation provided by you and your
military cousin Comrade GRU. "We are
helping the new Afghanistan at the request
of its government to defend its national in-
dependence from armed aggression
from outside
People around the world do not need to
read George Orwell's description of
newspeak to recognize your deception. You
excuse your overt interference everywhere
on the grounds that the other Superpower
has already covertly interfered. At times of
crisis, the White House and the Kremlin
sound identical. With the appropriate word
substitutions, either Jimmy Carter or
Leonid Brezhnev could make the following
statement:
As the leader of the (Free
WorldSocialist Community), we cannot
permit a free and sovereign nation to be
undermined by the international
(communistcapitalist) conspiracy. The
enemy's attempt to instigate
(revolutioncounterrevolution) cannot be
tolerated. Nations that are united in
defense of (democracysocialism) share a
vital interest in safeguarding their mutual
security. Consequently, we will not hesitate
to defend any nation that is threatened by
(totalitarianimperialist) aggression.
No cure is possible as long as secrecy re-
mains supreme. As former US Senator J.
William Fulbright has said, "People who
have secrets travel in a kind of fraternity
and they will not speak to anyone else As
the primary members of this exclusive es-
pionage club, you both seem almost as
loyal to it as to your respective govern-
ments. When a high-ranking Washington
consultant recently asked a senior CIA of-
ficial why the agency did not "blow the
cover off" a KGB operation in a certain
African country, he replied, "We can't af-
ford to. If we exposed their guys, they'd ex-
pose ours, and the government would
throw us both out
Secrecy makes suspicions grow like mold
in the dark. Whenever a socialist nation
breaks away from Moscow, Comrade
KGB, you suspect that Mr. CIA is involv-
ed. And whenever a nation tries to liberate
itself from a tyrannical government, Mr.
CIA, you suspect that Comrade KGB ti
gered the insurrection.
In fact, the best countermeasure is to ex-
pose publicly the other's underccne-
tivities. If the problem is darkne the
solution is "light" � reliable, comprehen-
sive intelligence. This is why 1 am addre-
ing my proposal to both of vou.
As a journalist, I have learned thai
almost impossible to obtain informs
from either of you about your own
tivities, but that you are both eager
describe each other's. My propo
therefore, is quite simple. Don't di
your own covert operations, iut n
known each other's. Why don't both
you publicize the most complete and detail-
ed account of each other's activities
Asia, Africa and South America.
I am sure your superiors in the Kremlin
and the White House would approeo in
modest proposal. After all. Comrade KGB.
you will simply be informing the peopk ol
the world what the CIA is doing so
they can protect themselves igainst
"Western imperialism And, Mr.
you will simply be telling them what the
KGB is doing to save them from the "Rec
Menace
Before I close, however, let me re-p
in advance to a concern that 1 am sure
both have that this project � if it ultin
ly made all your activities public � m
make you unnecessary. But remember
proposal only covers your activities in the
rest of the world. You are still free to in-
filtrate each other's country as much a you
want. The United States and the Soviet
Union, after all, are big enough to absorb
an infinite number of each other's sleuths.
And the more you know about each other.
the better. There are over 200 KGB
operatives in New York Citv alone. You
could each keep many more spies emploed
full time if you blanketed each other's
country.
With thousands of your agents on the
other Superpower's territory, neither of
you would be likely to advocate launching
a nuclear attack. Your "intelligence"
would then serve the cause of peace. V
heroes instead of villains, wouldn't you
sleep better at night?
Sincerely,
Mark Gerzon
Citizens Party Is A Likely Alternative To GOP, Democrats
By PATRICK MINGES
Staff Writer
Only last week, in a faint effort of
desperation, I proposed to run my pet on a
platform that vaguely resembles one that
could meet the needs of our people. It was
a joke, but the idea of deciding between
Carter and Reagan is even more of a joke,
one that is not so funny. Anderson is the
only candidate even mildly agreeable, but
he is not the liberal messiah that many, in-
cluding members of the press, seem to
believe. Remember he is still a Republican.
Last Friday I received the answer to all
my dreams from an article in, of all places,
Rolling Stone, concerning the origins of a
third party entitled the Citizens Party and
its candidate for president, Barry Com-
moner. I have known about Barry Com-
moner and the Citizens Party for some
time, but this is the first detailed interview
with and exposition of the platform of
Barry Commoner and the Citizens Party.
This party has a promise for the future.
The Citizens Party has its origins among
ultraliberals in the Democratic Party who
have become disenchanted with the neo-
Republican platform of Jimmy Carter. In
August of last year, Commoner and other
progressive individuals such as Julian
Bond, Studs Terkel, United Steelworkers
Ed Sadlowski, 'Mother Jones' publisher
Adam Hothschild, and Gray Panther
leader Maggie Kuhn launched the Citizens
Party and last weekend the party held its
first convention in Cleveland. The party
elected Barry Commoner as their presiden-
tial candidate. Although the Citizens Party
is only in its founding stages, it can already
claim chapters in more than 30 states.
Barry Commoner was born in Brooklyn
in 1917, received his doctorate in biology
from Harvard in 1941 and has been direc-
tor of the environmental and economic
think tank Center for the Biology of
Natural Systems since 1965. He has
published such books as Science and Sur-
vival, The Poverty of Power and The
Politics of Energy and has been one of the
pioneers of the environmental and anti-
nuclear movements. Commoner was dubb-
ed "The Paul Revere of Ecology" on the
cover of Time in 1970. He has since grown
increasingly political because of his
abiding conviction that scientists have a
responsibility to make their work tangible
to the public.
The Citizens Party has as its basis the
needs and future of our country and its
people and is the very antithesis to the
corporate-dominated two-party system.
With the Democrats and Republicans
rushing headlong from the crucial political
issues that plague our country, the Citizens
attempt to meet these problems actively
and progressively. The Citizens Party
hopes to "give the voter something to
smile about when he enters the polling
place" by returning to him his dignity and
a new respect for the value of his vote.
The Citizens Party platform is as
follows:
�Public control of the energy industries
�A swift halt to nuclear power
�A strong push for conservation and
solar energy
�An immediate, sharp reversal in the
rate of military spending
�Vigorous support for human rights
here and abroad
�A guaranteed job for everyone who
wants to work
�Stable prices for the basic necessities of
life: food, fuelhousing and medical care
�Limitations on the political and
economic influence of corporations
Rolling Stone
May 1,1980
This platform rests on the wealth and
energy to be found in the American in-
dividual and the tremendous role that he
can provide toward the redirection of our
national goals with a strong emphasis on
living for the future. It plans to severe our
dependence on unrenewable energy
sources such as fossil fuels, nuclear energy
and the integrity of the corporations and to
redirect the national economy through
production of the photovoltaic cell and
conversion of automobiles to gasohol. The
only thing that is standing in the way of
making America once again the strongest
nation in the world is a political system
that is dominated by the profit incentive
instead of the drive for self preservation.
Barry Commoner and the Citizens Partv
may not have much of a chance in the up-
coming election, but the party is trying to
downplay the emphasis on personalities
and return the focus to issues. If the
Citizens Party can secure a firm political
stance by gaining five percent of the elec-
torate in this year's presidential election,
ic21W"J5L digibte for fcderal fusing in
i$4. This is the beginning of the Aqurian
revolution which may relinquish the power
of the corporate state and return it to its
nghtful owners, the people and the
motherland. The chance is now, and the
opportunity is within our grasp. Failure to
seize such may doom us to an uncertain
future. It is our choice - to face the sunset
or the sunrise.
V
r





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Op-Ed
Other Opinion
APRIL IS, 1980
Page 5
Is Nuclear World War Inevitable?
By FRANK BARNABY
The following article is reprinted with permis-
sion from the MarchApril edition of
WorldPaper.
Ever since World War II, great efforts have
been made to control military technology and to
stop the nuclear arms race between the Americans
and the Russians. Many of the world's most
brilliant people have been actively involved in
these efforts. No other problem has received so
much attention in the United Nations and other
international forums. Whole libraries have been
written on the subject. Yet, because of the enor-
mous political influence of those groups that con-
tinually press for every conceivable technological
advance for military purposes, nuclear and other
arms races go on just as fast as human skill in the
American and Soviet societies allows. We are be-
ing driven toward nuclear world war by the sheer
momentum of military technology.
1 have not always been so pessimistic. Quite the
contrary. When I began working as a physicist in
the early 1950s, I was convinced, along with most
of my generation, that science and technology
could � and would � solve most of the world's
major problems. We realy did believe, for exam-
ple, that nuclear power could help to develop
Third World countries rapidly by providing
massive amounts of cheap energy. (Remember
the Atoms for Peace program?) But now it has
become clear that the solutions to most, if not all,
major world problems lie in politics, not in
technology.
I am not suggesting that some evil group is
plotting our destruction. But I do suggest that we
may not have the sort of intelligence required to
set up the political and social institutions essential
to controlling military technology. So far as I can
see, we are drifting toward a disaster not because
politicians are either ignoiant or want this to hap-
pen, but because of man's very nature.
The world's arsenals contain tens of thousands
of nuclear weapons, probably topping 60,000.
The total explosive power of these weapons is
equivalent to about 1.25 million Hiroshima
bombs. If all, or a significant portion of them,
were used, the consequences would be beyond im-
agination. Even though I have witnessed nuclear
explosions and have been deeply moved by the ex-
perience, I can't begin to imagine an all-out
nuclear war.
All the major cities in the Northern
Hemisphere, where most nuclear warheads are
aimed, would be destroyed. Most of the urban
population there would be killed by blast and fire,
the rural population by radiation. Many millions
of people in the Southern Hemisphere would be
killed by radiation from fallout. And the disaster
would not end even there. The unpredictable
long-term effects might well include changes in
the global climate, severe genetic damage and
depletion of the ozone layer that protects life on
earth from excessive ultraviolet radiation. No
scientist can convincingly assure us that human
life would survive a nuclear world war.
Why then is the probability of such a war
steadily increasing? The major reason is that
military technology is developing weapons
suitable for fighting rather than for deterring a
nuclear war. These newer weapons are very ac-
curate and reliable ballistic missiles with
warheads that can be aimed at smaller and,
therefore, many more military tagets than in the
past. In other words, the day is coming when one
country might hope to destroy its enemy's nuclear
retaliatory capability by striking first.
For many years now, official nuclear policies,
at least in the United States, were based on the ex-
pectation of mutual assured destruction. The
theory was that the enemy would not attack for
fear that its own cities and industries surely would
be destroyed in retaliation. Moves away from a
deterrent strategy and toward a fighting strategy
(or "counterforce as the experts call it) are be-
ing made not because the requirements of nuclear
deterrence have changed. The psychology of the The energy shortage itself is also likely to the nuclear arms race, it would insist on action by
enemy is, after all, the same. Policies are chang- heighten the probability of a nuclear war. Low its political leaders. The job of getting objective
ing because military technology has produced economic growth brought on by energy shortages information across to the public must be left to
more precise weapons. Once available, weapons in the coming decade, with resultant high infla- the mass media. Whether or not we avoid a
are usually deployed, and policies then have to be tion and increasing unemployment, may lead to nuclear disaster may, therefore, ultimately de-
modified to justify the deployment. political and social turmoil in the rich countries pend on journalists.
Apparently, Soviet nuclear strategy always has and worsening poverty in the poor countries. And
had a stronger emphasis on counterforce than these are the exact circumstances under which Dr. Frank Barnaby, the author and editor of
U.S. strategy even though Soviet missiles are less countries resort to military action. (In the end, several books and articles on nuclear and disar-
accurate and reliable than their American North-South tension may be a greater threat to moment issues, was born in England in 1927. He
counterparts. As the Russians improve the quality world security than East-West tension.) The has been the director of the Stockholm Interna-
of their missiles, the counterforce doctrine will dilemma is that insofar as nuclear power can help tional Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) since
probably become more refined. And the more the the energy crisis (many believe it can't help 1971. He has also served as the executive secretary
two great powers adapt to counterforce doctrines, much), it may reduce the probability of nuclear of the Pugwash Conferences on Sciences and
the greater will be the probability of a nuclear war war. But nuclear power may also increase the pro- World Affairs, as a research physicist at Universi-
because the idea that such a war is both bability by spreading the know-how and material ty College, London, and has worked at the British
"fightable and winnable" will gain ground. The for making weapons. My own gut feeling is that Atomic Weapons Research Establishment.
path from the Hiroshima bomb to a nuclear the fewer the nuclear weapon states, the better �
world war brought on by the characteristics of even if this world is a somewhat colder one.
nuclear weapons themselves may be a The main, perhaps the only, hope for the
technological inevitability. future that I can see is that the public will learn
I am not suggesting that a direct nuclear attack the facts in time and that an aroused public opi-
by one Superpower on the other is a likely way in nion will force reluctant politicians to stop the
which such a war would begin, although the arms race and reduce armaments. I am convinced
danger of its starting by accident or miscalcula- that political leaders, left to themselves, will not
tion is ever present. The escalation of a regional be able to prevent a nuclear holocaust however
conflict to a general nuclear war is more likely. A sincerely they may wish to do so. I am equally
local conflict in, say, a Third World region like convinced that if the public knew the truth about
the Middle East might begin as a conventional
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war and then escalate to a limited nuclear war, us-
ing the nuclear weapons of the local powers. This
could in turn escalate to a general nuclear war in-
volving the Superpowers, especially if the Super-
powers supplied the conventional weapons for
the original conflict. And that is why both the in-
ternational arms trade, now totally out of con-
trol, and nuclear weapons proliferation are so
dangerous.
We seem to be on the threshold of a new round
of nuclear weapons proliferation, with Pakistan
the next probable nuclear power. The widening
access to nuclear weapons technology goes hand
in hand with the spread of peaceful nuclear
technology, which was itself a spin-off from
military programs. And whatever the apologists
for the nuclear industry say, I am utterly convinc-
ed that the more nuclear reactors there are
generating electricity around the world, the
greater will be the number of countries acquiring
the skills and fissle material to make nuclear
weapons. As the number of countries with
nuclear weapons increases, the probability of
nuclear war will increase.
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i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
APRIL IV 1980
Pag 6
'Equus' Opens April 16
"Equus the internationally ac-
claimed and award-winning drama
by Peter Shaffer, will be presented
by the ECU Playhouse April 16-19
and 21-26.
Each performance will begin at
8:15 p.m. in the ECU Studio
Theater. Tickets are now on sale at
the Playhouse Box Office and may
be reserved by calling 757-6390.
In addition to a three-year Broad-
way run, "Equus" toured across the
nation and has been produced by
mans top regional and resident
theaters. It received the Tony
Award, the Outer Circle Critic's
Award, the Drama Desk Award and
the New York Critic's Award and
has been translated into 10
languages for performance
throughout the world.
The action of the play revolves
around a brutal and inhuman crime.
Late one night, in the stables where
he works, 17-year-old Alan Strang
gouges out the eyes of five horses
with a metal spike. Why? He refuses
to say. When questioned, he
responds only by singing television
commercials.
The boy is referred to Child
Psychiatrist Martin Dysart, and the
play then traces his treatment,
parental interviews, a gradual
revelation and exhausting confron-
tations between doctor and child.
Played out on platform at stage
center, the drama involves a fluid
treatment of time and space. The ac-
tors, seated onstage throughout, rise
to play their parts, then recede. Five
young men portray the horses,
wearing iron hooves and
ceremonially donning wire horse
masks.
The ECU production of "Equus"
is directed by Del Lewis of the ECU
drama faculty. His cast is headed by
Travis Lockhart, also of the drama
faculty, as the psychiatrist who is
driven to solve the complex and
disturbing mystery of the boy's
crime.
Denny Wright of Greenville por-
trays the tortured young man.
Veteran area performers Hael
Stapleton and Bob Myers fill strong
supporting roles. Ms. Stapleton is a
member of the ECU psychology
faculty, and Myers is a morning an-
nouncer at WNCT radio.
According to Scott Parker,
Playhouse general manager,
"Equus" is "a play for adults
There is no nudity in the produc-
tion, but the play deals with very
serious psychological elements that
we feel may not be suitable for
younger audiences
The Playhouse Box Office is open
from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. each
weekday. Ticket reservation is ad-
vised, as seating in the Studio
Theater is limited.
First ECU
Anti-Nuke
Fest Held
B MARK KEMP
and JAY STONE
Staff Writers
It was a radiant April afternoon
as a lone voice rang out across the
student mall singing "The Times,
They Are A-Changin It seemed
an to be an omen � a message for
students who had begun to assemble
there at 12 noon, Thursday, April
10.
"The Festival For A
Humanitarian Renaissance" was
reminiscent of the late 1960's in that
it sought to present controversial
issues in a festival-like atmosphere,
combining political speeches with
folk and rock & roll music. Mike
Joyner gave the keynote address for
the Student Caucus for Progressive
Reform.
Speeches were given on alternate
energy sources, the Equal Rights
Amendment, Gay rights, the draft,
nuclear energy, holism, world
hunger and other humanitarian sub-
jects. Jim Garrison, with the Coali-
tion for a Non-Nuclear World, flew
to Greenville from Washington,
D.C. to warn students of the
dangers associated with the nation's
growing nuclear industry.
Garrison's speech was one of the
most powerful speeches of the day.
When he finished by extending a
personal invitation to the students
of ECU to attend the April 26 anti-
nuclear rally in Washington, he
received a standing ovation. Steve
Summerford, of the Chapel Hill
War Resistors' League, also receiv-
ed enthusiastic response after his
speech on nuclear weapons and the
draft.
Both speakers agreed to come to
the festival for half of their travel
expenses.
The audience tht attended "The
Festival For A Humanitarian
Renaissance" was an unusually at-
tentive and responsive group. There
seemed to be a sense of common
purpose.
Throughout the day, natural
foods were served to a crowd vary-
ing from 150 to 250 people. SCP'R
sponsored the concessions, offering
peanut butter and banana sand-
wiches, granola and apple juice.
Also offered were tomato and
sprout sandwiches.
Several of the speakers passed out
free literature and buttons. After
the literature was read, most of it
was placed in trash cans.
Meanwhile, onstage, the M.C
Hal Daniel, denounced school food,
excessive automobile travel, and the
lack of draft beer of campus.
Students persistantly urged Daniel
to tell them jokes but instead, the
ECU SLAP professor recited many
applicable poems and quotes.
People danced to the old time
music of Mike Wells and "fiddlin' "
Earl White and their friends. The
music was provided by local per-
formers who came to play and sing
for free.
Mark Kemp, an SCPR member
and one of the musicians summed
up Jim Garrison's Nuclear Power
speech with his own composition,
"The New Protest Blues The song
pleads for support of the support of
the movement.
Carol Simmione, another musi-
cian that played folk music, sang a
Photo by LARRY ZICHERMAN
Photo by LARRY ZICHERMAN
song written by a friend of her's.
Other performers who appeared
at the festival were, in addition to
Mike Wells, Mark Kemp and Carol
Simmione, were: Allen Oatley,
Alisa Mann, The Tour, and Buford
T. Band.
Acoustic Folk Music played from
the mall's stage until around 6 p.m.
when The Tour led off the electric
set with an Elvis Costello tune entitl-
edMystery Dance Lead singer
Mitch Bowen dedicated his original
song, "Wave" to the New Wave
movement of the world. "No
thanks, I already gave, all I have left
is Wave
By the time the Buford T. Band
finally came onstage, it was well
after 7 p.m. and SCPR personnel,
as well as musicians had already
been warned that electric music
would be cut off promptly at 8 p.m.
At 8 p.m. however, Buford T. still
had not had enough time to do their
last song, "Power which was
generally regarded as the anthem of
the entire festival.
An SPCR spokesperson was
quoted as saying, "The song went
on, which was a sort of coup de
grace in itself, but it was cut short as
a result of campus security's
threatening to pull the plug
Ending the festival, two NCSU
professors, Dr. David Martin and
Dr. Raymond Saxe, engaged in a
debate on the topic of nuclear
energy � pro and con. Fifty people
stayed for the debate, many of
whom had been at the festival all
day leaving only to take a shower
or drink a beer.
A reporter for channel 7, WITN-
TV estimated that the festival was
the largest anti-Nuclear rally ever
held in the state.
The Student Caucus for Pro-
gressive Reform is presently coor-
dinating the chartering of a bus for
ECU students and people in the
Greenville area to the national anti-
nuclear march in Washington, D.C.
Cross Releases
New Album
B MARC BARNES
rdilor-ln-( hief
"Twas the Pig fair last Septembei
A day I well remember
When my knees heaan to flutter
And I sunk down io the am
And a pig came up and lay down h
my side
As I lay (here in the guttt �
Thinking thoughts I could not utter
I thought I heard a passing lady -
You can tell the man who boozes
By the company thai he choost s
With that the pig
Got up and walked away. '
Irish traditional poem
The above (and rather typical)
Hurt. Roberl
I emon Jeffei
I rom m :

Paul S
the R Ston
fkrrv .
��!
ed to

danc k ol

with the pei
I here set n I

k e " W i
d th
tOOt-sl
like "Old Pa nt 1
quote from one of Mike Cross' live
performances signifies the fact that
he has not strayed very far from the
traditional although many of the
cuts from his most recent album
Bounty Hunter are rock V roll in
origin.
Most of his music has its roots in
the blues traditions of the early 20th
century.
"I was influenced musically bv
the old acoustic blues players from
the Mississippi Delta, like John
next album will feature the besl
both worlds
Titled Rock 'n Re and due
release in about two months, the
album will feature one side ol i �
and one side of country.
There are total!) new players on
the album Cross said. "Mosl ol
the songs that will be on the album
are songs that I haven't done be
m public
See CROSS, Page 7, Col. 1
Catch A
Fallen B-
Ball Star
By ROBERT ALBANESE
Assistant Features Editor
One of the things a Pirate learns
in Adolescent Psychology is that ac:
cording to a recent survey, high
school and college students most
revere the non-studious athlete.
I was fortunate enough to have
figured that out while I was still in
high school.
Most of us can still remember
those not-too-far-off days of
oscillating voices and puss-filled
faces. Who could forget the fond
and foggy memory of going to class
with a zit the size of Mount Etna
square in the middle of your
forehead? Our hormones seemed
forever out of balance, producing
erratic behavior and the desire to eat
ridiculous food with even more
ridiculous names. The overpowering
desire to eat a "Twinky" was
scarcely enough compulsion to give
you the courage to ask for some at
the store.
You had to prove you were a man
in those days, even though you
knew you weren't and neither was
anyone else in your class
Athletics was, of course, the vehi-
cle for asserting one's manhood.
For the hard-core hopefuls, the first
choice of sport was foorball.
Women will never understand the
utter torment the adolescent male
will subject his fragile body to for so
little as a leer of desire. Broken
bones, smashed fingers and frac-
tured femurs were not too much for
the young man's new-found hunger
for attention and whatever else he
could talk a cheerleader into.
I was among those who did battle
on the field. I was as mercenary as
all others who fought under the ban-
ner of the school but were actually
only interested in the plunder and,
of course, the booty.
In my first game, I discovered
that everyone else on the field seem-
ed a lot more desperate for romantic
adventure than I was. As 1 lay
smouldering on the field, a heap of
sheared cartilage and pulled tendon,
resnlendent with throbbing cleat
marks on my chin, a question came
into my mind (accompanied by
miscellaneous pain): "What price
petting?"
I decided at that moment that
there were indeed other sports that
would rocket me to popularity, so I
let my bones mend in anticipation of
the basketball season.
The basketball team at my high
school was like many others in in-
tegrated North Carolina high
schools: big and black. Now this
was before Disco, and if you
remember, that was when blacks
and whites didn't like each other too
much. Whites felt like blacks had
the mentality of crazed dogs. Blacks
seemed detrmined to make the
whites pay for 300 years o repres
sion The worst part o the trvouts
was not the epithets, thoueh. Ml the
other guvs trving out were about
three yards taller than me. and everv
time I tried to shoot the ball it was
slapped back into ray nostril or
pharynx. I left basketball with a tea.
Tn ee 3nd a lunip in nn tnro'�l
All this convinced me that
baseball had to be mv eame. Other
tahan-surnamed people like Joe
DiMaggio, Yogi Berra and Joe
Garagiola had made big in
baseball, and it seemed logical to me
�hat I could find stardom behind the
p'ate.
S STAR, P. 8, ol. I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 15, 1980
Mike Cross Releases 'Rock 7i Rye
Continued from Page 6
He added that the
only thing left is the
cover art for the album
jacket, and it will be
ready to go to the
presses.
Dispelling rumors
ihat he is about to sign
a major record con-
tract. Cross said that
the pressures were not
worth it.
"One major thing
about a label is that the
music is accessible to
the public, but what
you have to give up is
not worth it, for me at
least
Cross says that the
ensions would be
greater performing
under a label.
"Economically, I'm
under more tension to
sign, but artistically,
I'm under less. As long
is I can survive like
il " tine. The in-
teresl of it is not of
�uch a persuasive
nature hit it could
convince me to give up
nn freedom
lot his own enter-
lainment, Cross enjoys
nine to the tradi-
ial music of Ireland,
Hind and style that
uences some of his
k. merican music,
blues and
tegrass, are also
among his favorites, as
are classical composers
� e Moart.
�"1 like whatever
eems to entertain me,
you know. When I go
o see someone else
perform, I become a
part of the audience. 1
just want to enjoy the
show
Unlike structured
performers who write
at a set time of day in a
set place, Cross writes
his music wherever and
whenever the mood
strikes him.
"It might be in my
car after I have gotten
home from a concert,
or it might be at a waf-
fle shop on 1-85 bet-
ween Atlanta and
Greensboro
Unlike some per-
formers who wall
themselves off from an
audience, Cross seems
to know no strangers
from the moment he
takes the stage. Before
every song, he will tefl a
humorous story or tale.
This creates among
members of the au-
dience a feeling of
oneness with the per-
former and with each
other. Fairly soon, you
are laughing and look-
ing around at your
neighbors.
"I first started telling
tales about why it
struck me to write the
song. The truth of it is,
it was a natural evolu-
tion of my style. 1
started out playing a
small club in Chapel
Hill, and I knew quite a
few people in the room
personally. I talked to
them day to day, so
why shouldn't I talk to
them from the stage?"
Cross is not a likely
candidate for his self-
acclaimed role as
"modern troubadour
Although he was raised
in the mountains of
Tennessee and North
Carolina, he was not
musical at an early age.
In fact, his only ex-
perience with music as
a child was the time he
was kicked out of the
church choir. Not only
could he not sing, he
proved it in a voice
louder than all the
others.
"Although I grew up
around a bunch of
good musicians, my
great addiction in life
was golf. I was a hard-
core golfer from the
time I was about ten
years old until I went
off to college.
"I was gonna go to
college and play golf on
a scholarship. But I fell
in love with this little
girl, thought I'd go off
to college and study to
be a doctor, do
something solid and
secure so she'd marry
me.
"We broke up when
I was a freshman. I'd
given up my golf
scholarship, given up
my golf clubs actually,
so I had to find
something to replace
them. 1 think that's
why I took up the
guitar. 1 needed a new
passion in life
Many changes have
come since those days
back in 1970. Cross has
married and started a
family; he went to law
school (quitting, as he
puts it, "because I
couldn't grow a dorsal
fin") and taking up the
fiddle.
Cross went through
some trying times
("during those times,
we were TRYING all
kinds of drugs") when
he went without such
luxuries as food to play
his music. He got his
first fiddle when he was
bumped out of a golf
tournament, and he
spent the better part of
the weekend making
horrible noises with it.
To develop his arm
muscles on his right
arm, he bought heavy
wooden sticks, and
made bow-like motions
through thin air while
he was watching televi-
sion.
Gradually, however,
Cross built up a local
following in small clubs
in Chapel Hill, and
after his first album
Child Prodigy) was
released, he went to
music full-time. His se-
cond album (Born In
The Country) followed
in October 1977, and
immediately received a
Recommended LP pick
by Billboard Magazine.
Easily his most
popular album. Bounty
Hunter was released in
April, 1979 to regional
airplay and prominent
position in local record
stores. Fc; a time, it en-
joyed the status of out-
pulling albums from
national labels in the
Raleigh-Durham
market.
One amazing thing
about Cross the man is
that he has changed
very little in the last ten
years. For someone
who has had as much
acclaim as Cross has
had leveled at him, he
remains surprisingly
philosophical.
"I've been incredibly
fortunate to make a liv-
ing at playing music,
because there's no
logical reason why I
should be able to do it.
Starting out so late, not
having any idea of how
School of Music News
H a nd-Me-Down-
Music . a new collec-
tion of folk music from
Monroe and Union
Counties, North
Carolina, co-recorded
and edited by Dr. Otto
Henry of the ECU
school of Music facul-
ty, has been released by
Folkways Records of
New York.
Henry's collaborator
on the project was
Karen Helms of
Wingate, who teaches a
seminar in folk music
at Wingate College.
Henry is associate pro-
fessor of
ethnomusicology and
electronic music at
ECU.
The two previously
worked on other recor-
dings, Between the
Sound and the Sea and
Hand-Me-Down Music
I: Old Songs, Old
Friends.
In preparation, also
for Folkways Records,
is North Carolina
Sampler, a collection of
North Carolina folk
music from the moun-
tains to the coast.
Tenor
Tenor Dennis
Hamrick of Shelby and
pianist Florence Goode
of Petersburg, Va
senior students in the
ECU School of Music,
performed in recital in
the Fletcher Music
Center Recital Hall,
Tuesday, April 8.
Hamrick, a can-
didate for Bachelor of
Music degrees in music
education and music
therapy, has been an
active performer in
musical productions
during his studies here.
He appeared in several
Opera Theater perfor-
mances and has been
one of the Madrigal
Singers in ECU's an-
nual Christmas
Madrigal Dinners.
ATTIC
NC. No. 3
Tues.
Nightclub
Night
TOMMY G
&CO.
Wednesday
CRIPPLE
CREEK
All ECU
Students
FREE
Pizza ion
AMERICAS FAVORITE PIZZA
PIZZA BUFFET
ALL THE PIZZA AND
SALAD YOU CAN EAT
$2.59
Mon. -Fri. 11:30 2:00
Mon. fiP Tues. 6:00-8:00
758 6266 Evening buffet 02.79
Hwy 264 bypass Greenville , N. C.
OUTER BANKS
SAILING ADVENTURES
ONE OR TWO
WEEK TRIPS
$ 100 00 ppf week
Tnps thfotighout the
summer
Beginning May 18th
Instructional weekends
also aval ible
For Information
United Methodist
Ministry Outdoors
Comp Don Lee
Arapohoe, N C
28510
LA-KOSMETIQUE
Presents
u
1980 SPRING & SUMMER
HAIR FASHIONS"
OPEN
MONSAT.
�Redken
The Elegant Eighties Are Here, And Career Cut Are The Hair
Fashions For The New Decade. Individuals in the Eighties demand a
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CALL 752-3419 Eight
EastlOth Street Stylists
or
Stop by for a consultation.
to Derform for an au-
dience, having a tin ear
and a scratchy old voice
that behaves half the
time.
"Sometimes I come
home at night and I'll
lie back in bed and
think � 1 just can't
believe all those people
came out and paid
money to see me storm
around on stage for a
couple of hours
Cross remains
something of an
enigma to those who
know him and listen to
his music. A country
boy with little formal
training, he seems to set
you free to listen to him
and accept him on his
own terms � terms
which will make you
laugh freely and
without concern as to
how you look to your
neighbor or girlfriend.
In these days of $2 a
gallon gas and $75
mandatory disco jump-
suits, Mike Cross is a
bargain. He makes you
feel good again.
The Student Union Theatre Arts committee
presents
THE DIARY OF
ADAM AND EVE
(A Musical Comedy)
April 16 � 8:00 p.m.
Hendrix Theatre
Mendenhall Student Center
Tickets
$1.50 ECU Students
$3.00 Faculty and Staff
$4.00 Public
fed)
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EIGHT O'CLOCK
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�����&����. NC






8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 15, 1980
Anderson Still Attracting College Students
California Gov.
Jerry Brown, banking
on Wisconsin's liberal
tradition and an ex-
traordinary effort to
recapture the "youth
vote" that was once
thought to be his per-
sonal property, intend-
ed to accomplish a lot
in the April 1 primary
here.
He aimed to finish
ahead of Sen. Ted Ken-
nedy, to establish
himself as the cam-
paign season's leading
liberal over Illinois
Rep. John Anderson
and to pump life into
what had been a sur-
prisingly limp run for
the presidency.
The state's college
students were the only
voters who responded
at all, however. The
day after the primary,
the governor pulled out
of the race.
lhirty-seven percent
of the Democratic stu-
dent voters in selected
wards around eight
Wisconsin colleges and
universities endorsed
President Carter.
Brown, who in prior
primarires had often
finished behind U.S.
Labor Party candidate
Lyndon LaRouche and
"undecided captured
31 percent of the
Wisconsin Democratic
student vote. Kennedy
also attracted 31 per-
cent.
But no one could
diminish Anderson's
still-growing appeal to
college students.
Anderson took 48 per-
cent of the Republican
college vote, comfor-
tably ahead of former
Ambassador George
Bush (24 percent) and
former Gov. Ronald
Reagan (21 percent).
As in past primaries,
Anderson ran well on
all campuses. Reagan
beat him at University
of Wisconsin campuses
at Green Bay and
Whitewater, while
Bush won at Oshkosh
and Marquette.
Anderson's victory
margins were big
elsewhere, piling up 75
percent of the vote at
the University of
Wisconsin's main cam-
pus in Madison.
tials. Brown, who left like the one that carried
Wisconsin for only Eugene McCarthy to a
three days in the month Wisconsin primary vie-
before the vote, turned tory.
his sights from Carter Brown backed it up
and Kennedy to Ander- with a $32,000 last-
Anderson's more con-
servative positions.
"Mr. Anderson sup-
ports the neutron
bomb. He voted for it.
1 oppose it Brown
gasoline. I think we
have to have rationing.
Anderson also sup-
ported the Clinch River
breeder reactor, and he
has been the leading
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The Brown campaign covered campuses with flyers on Anderson's conservative stands.
He did it despite a
Brown campaign aimed
at discreding Ander-
son's liberal creden-
son early in the cam-
paign, hoping to
mobilize a student
"Children's Crusade"
minute radio and televi-
sion ad blitz and with
numerous campus
speeches dwelling on
told 1000 students at
Wisconsin-Milwaukee.
"Mr. Anderson sup-
ports $2 a gallon
proponent of nuclear
power in Congress. He
voted against the crea-
tion of the consumer
protection agency, one
of Ralph Nader's top
priorities
Steve Rivers,
Brown's Wisconsin
press secretary, ex-
plained: "There's been
a real successful effort
on Anderson's part to
obscure his record.
He's somehow been
made the media darling
of the 1980s. He ap-
peals to people who
would likely support
Brown, and he's refus-
ed to debate Brown
"Anderson's projec-
ting himself as a
liberal complained
Pat Boushell, another
Brown aide, "when in
reality he's a conser-
vative � at best, a
moderate Republican
To make the point,
the campaign also cir-
culated a flier called
"The Brown Anderson
Difference which
compared the two can-
didates' records on the
Vietnam war, military
issues, consumer pro-
tection, nuclear power
and labor questions.
In an interview, the
candidate claimed "On
women's issuev.
freedom of choice, ex-
tension of the ERA. in-
equality of opportune
in employment, it is
pretty hard to get am
debate between us
Though Brown quit
the race the da after
the votes were counted,
students may not have
heard the last of him
Tom Hayden. torn:
Chicago Seen defen-
dant and current dire.
tor of the Campaign
for Economic
Democracy, broadl)
hinted that Browi
might try again in 1984
�' s governor of the
state of California
Havden told studa
iournalist at Madison.
Brown is a viable
presidential cand
in 1984.
"In the vear 200
Brown said on the
stump. '1 will
younger than R
Reagan . lay
Falling Stars Always Get Burned
ft- A s � � organized crime, eftism and the
C ontinued from Page 6 . &
clergy.
For those of you who have never I couldn't get into organized
tried to stop an air-borne baseball, crime, as I have never really been
you should know before you ever good at organizing anything. That
stand in front of one that they can kind of knocked leftism out, too,
and unique approach to the fine art watch TV, I'd like to share a story
of dating. If a girl refuses to go out with you that has made a lot of dif-
with me, I try to reason with her. ference in my life, and it could help
"Be reasonable I say . "Wouldn't you as well.
punch a hole through plate steel. I
was calmly standing in right field
playing solitaire when I heard a
sonic boom. I saw a projectile hiss-
ing through the air. I planted my
feet, gritted my teeth, and the last
thing I could remember was a loud
"thud" and Whitey Ford's
autograph.
Well, badminton just didn't seem
to be my sport, and neither did
marbles. We weren't fortunate
because I couldn't get the pro-
letarians out of the county to unite.
And the clergy was out because I
was Catholic. Protestant ministers
and Jewish Rabbis often have cute
girlfriends, but Catholic priests
couldn't fool around much. That
was because the church always used
Latin, and most college and high
school women prefer Greeks.
Since that time, 1 have decided
that there's more than one way to
you rather go out with me than have
your car explode mysteriously in the
middle of the night?" It's a sure-fire
method, and I freely share it with all
you guys out there who can't seem
to cut it at being gladiators.
Before I close this column and go
Once a Roman soldier who had
longed to go into battle for the first
time joined the legions to go fight in
Gaul. When the battle started, he
realized that it was no fun matter.
He saw some of his best friends bite
the martial dust and discovered that
it was no pretty sight. He returned
home tattered and torn, disgusted
with the whole deal. On the road he
met Flatus Magnus, a renowned
man of wisdom. "O Flatus he
cried, "why do Roman men make
war?
To this Flatus replied, "Because
the Roman women are watching
STUDENT UNION
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
enough at my high school to have skin a pair of lips. I have dropped
intervarsity checkers. There seemed any interest in pain for pleasure,
to be only three choices left- and have developed a totallv new
LADIES NITE! LADIES NITE! LADIES NITE1 LADIES NITE' LADIES NITE' LADIES NITE! C
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April 16
8:00 p.m.
t
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
APRIL 15, 1980 Page 9
Pirates Victorious
As Davis Stars
Nh
.
V �$ ! ff
Photo by KIP SLOAN
Pirate Star Butch Davis Shows Off His Record-Breaking Swing
Mason Always
Striving Ahead
Bn JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
��People don't realize that in
track, you don't have to come in
first to be a winner. To me, you're a
winner if you just improve your
time over what you've done
beore
L ad Pirate trackster Linda
Mason has strived for improvement
throughout her four year career at
East Carolina University, but the
therapeutic recreation major has
participated in such a variety of
events that improvement has been
complicated by adjustment.
As a freshman out of Richlands
High School, Mason participated in
the 110 and 440 meter hurdles and
continued in those events until her
lunior year when she shifted to the
1500 meters. As a senior, she com-
petes exclusively in the 1500, 3000
and 5000 meter races.
"I think she's found her home at
5000 meters says coach Laurie Ar-
rants. "She'd do anything I asked
her to. When she came here, I think
she was like a lot of girls who think
they are suited for one event, but
really are at their best in another
Mason came to Pirate country
almost as a whim, having previously
selected the University of North
Carolina at Wilmington to further
her education. But spirited mentor
Arrants steered the Richlands native
away from UNC "by the sea a
decision which has paid off both for
the Pirates and Linda Mason.
"She changed my mind Mason
happily states "I was going to
UNC-Wilmington hoping they
would have a track program for
women soon after I got there.
"It's four years later now and
they still haven't got track for
women
Even though the Lady Pirates are
not competing as a team for points
and victories this season, Mason still
credits team spirit as a major force
behind her improved performances.
"Everyone on the team has been
an inspiration to me says Mason.
"If one person is down one day and
the team helps her through it, then
it's an inspiration to everyone. 1
know they help me all the time
Off-season training for Mason
consists of approximately 40 miles
running a week and numerous 10
kilometer road races, along with
competing with the Tidewater
Striders club from Virginia Beach
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
Butcb Davis was in a "breaking"
mood Sunday as the East Carolina
baseball team downed UNC-
Wilmington 7-4.
Davis tripled and homered to lead
the Pirates to victory, breaking a
two-game ECU losing skein. The
lead-off triple set a new single-
season school mark. Davis' fifth
three bagger of the season surpassed
the old mark of four set last season
by Billy Best and two seasons ago by
Bobby Supel.
The eighth inning roundtripper by
the Pirate leftfielder was his 11th of
the season, bettering by one the
record set by Rick Derechailo last
season.
The win left the Pirates 18-5 on
the season, a mark that has ECU
head coach Hal Baird pleased. "I'm
very proud of our record thus far
he said. "It will probably compare
with anybody's. I know it's about
the best in the state anyhow
The impressive mark has Baird
hoping, and expecting, a national
ranking this week. "1 certainly
would think that we'd be in there
somewhere. Our winning percentage
must be among the best around
Davis' heroics Sunday, and
steady pitching by Bill Wilder, may
have saved ECU's chances at a na-
tional ranking. The team was com-
ing off tough losses to North
Carolina and Maryland before the
victory.
In the 12-8 loss at Chapel Hill,
ECU was at an emotional peak. In a
8-6 loss to Maryland Saturday,
though, the Pirates seemed
somewhat drained.
"We didn't play either hard or
well against Maryland said Baird.
"We've always been successful
against Maryland before, but we
never have looked at them like we
do N.C. State and North Carolina.
We were especially flat this year
Down 8-0 to tlie Terps after six in-
nings, Baird's installment of a
younger lineup began to pay off as
the lead was eventually trimmed to
the final 8-6 margin.
"I felt like some of our starters
just weren't giving it their all said
the first-year Pirate coach. "So I
brought in some of our younger
guys, who did a real fine job for
us
Especially impressive among the
reserves was Pete Persisco, who
replaced Mike Sorrell at second base
and went three-for-three, scoring
once.
Uniquely, Wilder took both the
loss to Maryland and the win over
Wilmington, leaving his season
mark at 7-1. The sophomore lef-
thander went all the way against the
Seahawks, his seventh complete
game of the season, after a shaky
stint against Maryland the day
before had forced him out of the
contest early.
In the victory over UNC-W, the
Pirates banged out 14 hits in sup-
port of Wilder. The contest was
close until ECU broke a 1-1 tie in
the seventh inning, scoring twice.
Davis put the icing on the cake in
the eighth when his record-breaking
home run scored himself and Sor-
rell, who had reached on a one-out
single.
The Pirates had been scheduled to
face the Seahawks again yesterday
but were forced to cancel those
plans due to rain. The team hopes to
work out an arrangement with
Virginia Commonwealth for a
Thursday game.
"I hate to see us lose any more
games from our schedule Baird
said. "We need to get in as many as
possible in hopes of eettine into the
playoffs
Ladies Take Fifth
Mason
"She's probably the hardest
worker on the team states Ar-
rants. "She has a huge endurance
capacity, but speed is her problem.
She needs to set a quick pace and
hope to outlast her competition.
"They (teammates) know that
she's dedicated and I'm going to
have a hard time replacing her
leadership. I don't have another
personality coming around like Lin-
da. Her iight-heartednes really
keeps the teams' spirits high
Mason completed her degree in
December, but elected begin
graduate studies in order to compete
in her final year of eligibility.
"I guess the nicest thing someone
could say to me says Mason, "is
that 1 was an influence on their
lives; that I was helpful to them in
some way
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
East Carolina's Lady Pirate soft-
ball team earned a fifth place tie
with a split in the North Carolina
State University Invitational in
Raleigh over the weekend.
The Lady Pirates fell 3-1 in their
Friday opener against the University
of Florida, but rebounded to crush
UNC-Greensboro 11-0 and Flagler
10-0 before losing to Northern Ken-
tucky 6-5 in an eight-inning Satur-
day matchup.
Florida claimed first place honors
in the tourney, followed by Florida
State, N.C. State, Northern Ken-
tucky, ECU and UNC-CH (tie),
Western Carolina and UNC-G (tie),
Appalachian State and Flagler
(Florida).
East Carolina extended Northern
Kentucky to eight innings before
NKU's Redmond singled, advanced
on a pair of ECU errors and scored
on a single to right by Districh.
The Pirates jumped to an early
lead in the fifth with Cynthia
Shepard reaching base on an error
and scoring on a sacrifice by rookie
backstop Fran Hooks. Junior Kathy
Riley added another with a double
and a sacrifice fly by shortstop
Mary Powell.
NKU quickly answered with a
pair in their fifth, but ECU recap-
tured the lead in the sixth as Cindy
Meekins reached on a fielder's
choice, Mitzi Davis singled and both
scored when Riley's grounder was
mishandled by the Kentucky second
sacker. Shepard drew a walked and
was driven home by Hooks'
sacrifice to close out the Pirates'
scoring.
Senior Mary Bryan Carlyle earn-
ed the decision in each of East
Carolina contests, establishing her
seasonal mark at 13-4.
ECU opened the scoring against
Florida in the second, but the
Gators plated a pair of runs in the
third and another in the seventh.
Carlyle scattered three hits and
allowed only one UNC-Greensboro
runner to make it to third as the
Pirates belted out 13 hits and com-
mitted only one error en route to
victory.
Williams lead off the first and
scored the game's premier run, and
Meekins reached on an error and
Davis lashed a single. Riley follewed
with a three-run homer to right.
Powell was awarded first on an er-
ror and scored as freshman Ginger
Rothermel's grounder eluded the
UNC-G shortstop.
Catcher Jan McVeigh lead off the
third with a single up the middle and
Powell drove her home with a dou-
ble.
Meekins, Shepard and Riley
crossed home in the fourth to give
ECU the necessary runs to ab-
breviate the contest after five.
Carlyle turned in her best perfor-
mance of the weekend against
Flagler, allowing shortstop Minton
a lone single in the opening inning.
Offensively, the Pirates pounded
Flagler in the first and continued to
dHfheinsightr oT Riley stepping on
home plate was to be common, as
the Nashville, Tennessee native rap-
ped a home run to left-center in the
third to score Davis.
Williams lead off the fifth with a
single and scored on a Davis
sacrifice. Meekins singled and
Shepard reached first on an error.
This time at the plate, Riley sliced
the ball to deep right and legged out
her second homer of the game (her
third of the tournament). McVeigh
singled and capped the scoring by
crossing home on Rothermel's base
V tiocW
Riley posted a perfect three out of
three on the contest, with Williams
and McVeigh adding a pair in three
trips to the plate.
California Juco Star Decides To Join Terps
PIRATE POOP:
The battle royal is over for East
Carolina. For the University of
Marvland it has only just begun.
The ECU basketball coaching
staff learned this weekend that
Charles Pittman, a 6-foot-9 Califor-
nia junior college superstar, had
chosen the Maryland as his home
tor his final two collegiete seasons.
Pittman's decision ended weeks of
optimism in the Pirate camp.
The big Californian had seriously
considered joining the Pirate fold,
mainlv because his mother resides
nearby. ECU supposedly was in the
lead for Pittman until the final
week, when the Terps wooed the
voungster to the point that he could
not turn them down.
Rumor has it that Maryland has
promised Pittman a starting posi-
tion next season. That seems
somewhat unreal, though, as the
defending Atlantic Coast Con-
ference champions return all five
starters from this past season.
Who would he replace? The word
is that Ernest Graham will become a
"super sub leaving Pittman trrt
power forward position, something
the Terps did not have this season.
Graham actually gives Maryland
two starting small forwards (Albert
King the other one). If the husky
Pittman is all he is said to be, he and
center Buck Williams could make
the Maryland rebounding game
Charles
Chandler
unreal
The remainder of the Pirates'
recruiting efforts have gone very
well, says assistant coach George
Felton.
"I'm very pleased so far he
said. "We've signed five guys that
we feel can step right in and help
The basketball office is not of-
ficially releasing the names of the
players, but it is known that 6-1
point guard Herbert Gilchrist and
6-8 Jeff Best of C.B. Aycock are in
the group.
The Pirate staff is still awaiting
the word from Cecil Exxum, a small
forward from state 4-A champion
Southern Wayne and Anthony
Teachey, a 6-9er from Goldsboro.
Harold Thompson, a 6-5 forward
from Raeford and one of the state's
best prepsters this year, has commit-
ted to N.C. State. The signing of
Exxum by the Pirates would more
than make up for that loss to the
Wolf pack.
Harris earned many honors in his
prep days, including being named to
the All-Tidewater, All-Metro, All-
Southeastern District, and All-
Regional teams while.
Harris, a defensive and offensive
back, intercepted eight passes dur-
ing his senior campaign. The word
is that he is best in the defensive
backfield but is still a good prospect
on the offensive squad. He is said
to be a superb kick returner.
One thing Harris has is speed, as
evidenced by his 9.8 clocking in the
100.
An interesting note about Harris
joining the Pirates involves a sister
institution. The Great Bridge High
School senior had signed with North
Carolina on December 15, but inked
a national letter of intent with the
Pirates when national signing day
rolled around.
at fullback. There is talk around the
Pirate camp, though, that Roy
Wiley might rate a shot come fall.
Wiley, a bulldozer of a fullback,
could even move into the starting
lineup, moving Sutton to halfback
and giving the Pirates a speedy
backfield with plenty of blocking
ability.
On defense, the new Pirate
coaching staff has moved 6-5 Doug
Smith from nose guard to left tackle
in a unsuspected but logical move.
The Pirate staff has been well
pleased with the play of the defen-
sive line in spring practice, especial-
ly the right side where tackle George
Crump and end Mike Davis have
been superb.
The secondary doesn't look bad
either, with Willie Holley, Freddie
Jones, Marvin Elliott and James
Freer listed as the frontrunners at
this point.
The annual ECU Purple-Gold in-
trasquad football game is scheduled
for Saturday, April 26, at 3 p.m.
All procees will go to benefit the
family of Pirate assistant coach
Norm Parker, whose wife is still in
critical condition following an auto
accident two weeks ago.
ECU Grid Coach Ed Emory At Work With Line,
The Pirate football coaching staff
is still bringing in recruits also.
Recently, coach Ed Emory an-
nounced the signing of a bonafide
blue-chipper.
Clint Harris, a 5-foot-ll,
185-pounder from Chesapeake,
Va recently signed with ECU.
Pirate grid coach Ed Emory has
begun narrowing things down in
preparations for the upcoming
season. A look at his most recent
depth sheet reveals a few surprises.
At the all-important quarterback
position, rising sophomore Carl ton
Nelson has moved ahead of senior
Henry Trevathan in the battle to
take over the spot left vacant by
Leander Green. Running just
behind them is Greg Stewart,
another rising sophomore who
needs nothing but experience and
confidence to develop into a real
player.
The backfield has Anthony Col-
lins and Mike Hawkins at the
halfback slots and Theodore Sutton
And With Wide-Open Quarterback
i .





10
'H I VM i K ' ! I I M
M'KIl
TKE Boxing
Joy Of Victory And Agony Of Defeat
Phot
Podeszwa
Scenes from last week's TKE Boxing Tournament
exemplify the joy, pain, ecstacy and suffering in-
volved in competition. Victory, though, is oh so
sweet as is evident in middle photo at bottom.
The East Carolinian
6.701 ir.
?cuTco
R
OKLI) I TSUMMER JOBS
:ollk;km(;ht
!
u�'sia Ninlii
3
-A
f
i '
W
c
6:30- 10: U
Bring 1.1). and
Gel In ForOnl $1.25
Challenging, High Paid
Direct Sales Jobs In
Eastern NC
for Mature Goal Oriented
Students
Equal Opportunity Employer
CALL 758-3089
Tues. April 15 5:00-7:00 p.m.
Wed. April 16 9:00-10:30 a.m
i in; m:
i)i;oin;i;
Moderate & better
Sportswear
Dresses
Designer Jeans 3Q 5Q
& Tops
Just Arrived
Junior Skirts
.
$5.00 off on
reg. price
jeans for ECU
students with ID
MONOGRAMS
by LAURETTA RIGGS
COME BYANDSEE
OUR SPRING STYLES
and SPORT LOGOS
exclusively at
Hungate's
PITT PLAZA 7560101
is an equal or. pori





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 13. 1980
11
Records Fall At UNC
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
East Carolina
women's track con-
tinued along the
journey to the top
Saturday at the
Carolina Relays in
Chapel Hill with a trio
of varsity records fall-
ing during the competi-
tion.
The 400 meter relay
team of Dawn Hender-
son, Catherine Suggs,
Irdie Williams and
Lydia Rountree placed
second in the meet with
a time of :48.2 to
establish a new ECU
mark in the process.
Freshman Eve Bren-
nan set an East
Carolina record in the
1500 meters with a time
of 4:49.3 to earn third
in the event.
The big news of the
day for East Carolina
was senior Cookie
McPhatter winning the
Suggs
800m with an ECU and
Carolina Relay record
time of 2:10.9 as she
coasted to first in the
event. The Raeford
native bested her own
Carolina Relay mark
by almost two seconds
in the championship
race.
The previous v "ek at
the Columbia Relays in
South Carolina,
McPhatter was award-
ed Most Valuable
Player honors as she
McPhatter
established new meet
records in the 400 and
800 meter events.
Other top finishers
for the Lady Pirates at
Carolina included Roz
Major with a second
place leep of 18 feet,
nine inches in the long
jump; Elaine Davis
with third place heave
of 37 feet, three inches
in the shot put and a
seventh place toss of
105 feet in the discus;
Toya Revils with sixth
in the discus at 107;
Gwen Dancy with a
:26.0 performance in
the 200m for third; and
Rountree with fourth in
the 100m at :12.3
followed by Suggs in
sixth at .12.6.
Major added a per-
sonal best in the 400
meters at 1:01, but fail-
ed to place in the event.
Veteran Linda
Mason failed to place
in the Carolina relays,
but the previous week
at Columbia set a new
varsity record in the
3000m with a time of
10:27, as well as a per-
sonal best in the 1500m
at 4:47.
LWIN fcuD 5
ECU Spring Football Drills
Photo by KIP SLOAN
CHANELLO'SisNow
Looking for 3 Fast
Delivery Men
Come by anytime
during the week
after 4:00 pm
to pick up an
application.
507 East 14th St.
758-7400
-n

CO
H
71
70
m
m
i
o
H
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m
r

m
70

Classified
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: 1974 Cutless.
sunroof,power brakes, power
sTeerinq, power windows and
locks, cruise cootroll. Call Brian
7S2 0373.
FOR SALE: 19T3 Pinto Station
Wagon. AT, AC, Good Condition.
S6S0. Call 758 8665.
FOR SALE: 74 Yamaha 175 En
duro, less than 4000 miles. Ex-
cellent condition. Call Gail
758-92M.
FOR SALE: Steel retted Radials.
Four 14 inch, Uniroyal, white wall
ed �tires with 8 10,000 miles of life
left. SS0 for all four. Call 758 �f 19.
FOR RENT
APARTMENTS FOR RENT:
Duplexes and Townhouses $175 to
$270 per month Call 752-6415 9:00
til 5:00.
ROOM AVAILABLE: in four
bedroom house on 5th street, near
campus. Rent $87.50. Call
Hill
HOUSING FOR SUMMER
SCHOOL: available, $100 per ses
sion plus percentage of utilities.
Apply 803 Hooker Road. Phone
756 3J40.
ROOM F0R KENT: with private
entrance and bath, located on 14th
street behind dorms. $80 month.
Open May IS. Call 758 2585.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
artment at
Eastbrook for fall semester.
Share half expenses. Call 752 6068.
ROOMMATE . NEEDED:
(female) to share two bedroom
apartment. Must call by April 30.
Call 7SS-M38.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: To share
three bedroom duplex near cam-
pus tor summer only. $67 plus
third 'jtilities. Washer dryer, fur-
nished bedroom. Call 752 5977.
GOOD STUDENT: seeks to share
trailer expenses, country location,
write Box holder 567, Bell Arthur,
N.C. 27811.
TWO FEMALE ROOMMATES
NEEDED: beginning May 7. $50
and one-third utilities. Three
blocks from campus on Jarvis
street. Call Becky 758-6173.
ROOM FOR RENT: $80 month
plus utilities. Close to campus,
available May 15th. Call 758 3545
PERSONAL
HORSEBACK RIDING: Day or
Night, individual or groups. Tri-
County Stables Grimesland. Call
II HM.
REWARD $50: Mr the return of
Charter to Kappa Alpha order at
N.C. State missing since January.
No questions asked.
REWARD $50: for the return of
1979 composite and 1974 Ammen
Award to Kappa Alpha order N.C.
State missing since January. No
questions asked.
MARY KAY COSMETICS: to
reach your consultant for a facial
or reorders phone 7S6-36S9.
RIDER NEEDED: to share ex-
penses and good times. Leaving
for N.E. New Mexico in mid-May.
Return in August. Call 752 8288
after 4:00 p.m.
POUNDS AND INCHES OFF!
Special pre-summer spot reducing
at Sunshine Studios. Call 756-7235
after 1:00.
DON'T RISK: your frture with
uncertainty and doubt. See what
lies ahead for the month with your
personal Biorhythm Chart. Send
name, address, birthdate, along
with the month and year for your
chart. Enclose $2.00 for each
month requested to: Ross Enter-
prises P.O. Box 4104 Greenville,
N.C. 2734.
BALLET CLASSES: beginning
soon. Mornings. Sunshine
Studios. 754-7235 after 1:00.
SW ATTENTION: Business Ma
jors, summer work, practical
business experience. Tremendous
for job resume. Hard work equals
good pay. Call 758 3719 for inter-
view.
HATHA YOGA CLASSES: offered
soon. Emphasis in weight loss.
Sunshine Studios. 756-7235 after
1:00.
TYPING DONE: Term papers,
Resumes, Thesis, Etc.
Reasonable. Call Jane Pollock
752-9719.
CLASSIFIED HOURS FOR TAK
ING ADDS ARE 3:00 - 4:00 MON-
DAY THRU FRIDAY.
The East Carolinian
is now hiring students for the following positions on the Summer 1980 and
1980-81 staffs:
MANAGING EDITOR: Responsible for the overall operation of the editorial division of
the newspaper tie. News, Features, Sports, Production, Copy Editing). Management
and newspaper experience and completion of JOUR 2000, 2100, 3100, 3200
necessary. Salary: $150 month.
COPY EDITOR: Edit for style all copy for editorial section of newspaper. Completion of
JOUR 2000, 2100, 3100, 3200 necessary. Salary: $125 month.
FEATURES EDITOR: Direct Features section of paper. Newspaper experience and
completion of JOUR 2000, 2100, and enrolled in or completed JOUR 3100, 3200
necessary. Salary: $125 month.
STAFF WRITERS: To cover events for News, Sports and Features sections of paper.
Completion of JOUR 2000, 2100 preferred but not necesary. Trial period with no pay
for first five stories. Up to 48 cents per column inch thereafter, according to
proficiency.
LAYOUT WORKERS: Layout copy and headlines in "editorial section of paper.
Experience necessary. Salary: $100 month.
CONTACT RICHARD GREEN, 1980-81 editor of The East Carolinian, Old South Bldg
757-6366, 6367, 6309. Make appointments with secretary for interviews. Time of
interviews: TTh - 8-11:00 a.m 3:30-6:00 p.m.
All new ynphyees wrH receive onttie-job training on Compographic typesetting
equipment.
The East Carolinian is an equal opportunity employer.
AUTO SERVICE SPECIALS
NEW & USED
Retread Tires
17.00 & Up
SEB
iwac-StT �Z giuE
SHOCKS 4Cs"�
All size
tires
available
wfr
m
?�5SSPia:
OFFICIAL NORTH CAROLINA STATE INSPECTION STATION
WE SERVICE NATIONAL ACCOUNTS
KFGoodrieh Cogglns Car Car
756-5244
SbTlRE CENTER
WMMH
MMJLfclM.
SAM,
tauL-iaui
lip these coupons and Save $$
Pepsi Cola
10 oz. carton of six
Sealtest Autocrat Ice Cream
half gallon carton
98
plus deposit
Grade A Whole Fryers 41 c
rozen T.V. Dinners
Turkey or Salisbury Steak, 11 oz. package
Campbell's VegetarianVegetable Soup 1 Q
lOoz.can
Sealtest or Maola Homogenized
r-
i
i
i
i
i
i
i

i
i
i
r
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
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I
I
limit 6 with $7.50 food order
I
Fab Detergent Giant Box 98c
with this coupon and $7.50 food order
excluding specials
without coupon $1.28
Limit 1 coupon per customer
Expires April 19,1980
per lb.
58.
Cottonelle ToiSet Tissue
4 roll pack 68c with this coupon
and $7.50 food order excluding specials
Without coupon 98c
Limit 1 coupon per customer
expires April 19,1980
ScotTowels Giant Roll 48c
With this coupon and $7.50 food order
excluding specials
without coupon 78c
jjSLi Limit 1 coupon per customer
Fresh Milk
:
i
Gallon Jug $1.99 -
Expires April 19,1980
Health and Beauty Aids
Listerine Mouthwash
32 oz. size, reg. $3.09
Right Guard Deodorant
3oz. can, reg. $1.65
Aqua Fresh Toothpaste
8 oz. tube, reg. $1.85
$1.78
$1.18
Overton's
Why Pay More P I ECU Pirate Coupon
� j 5 Discount on all food
orders $20.00 or more (excluding
Look What A Dime Will Buy: i keg beer). Present this coupon
Juicy Florida Oranges 10c each J and show ECU ID CQrd to
Juicy Calif. Lemons 10c each � cashier. Nnm
Texas medium onions 10c per lb. I Coupon effective id No.
Florida Crisp Carrots 10c per lb.
Purchase.
kl
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"�" l Jji Hn I 'yy� ��-
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� . ,
12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 15, 1980
Maynor Named MVP
By CHARLES
CHANDLER
Sports Kdilor
Seniors George
Maynor and Herb Gray
came away as the big
winners last Thursday
nigru at the first annual
Hast Carolina Basket-
ball Awards Banquet.
The banquet, held at
Greenville Country
Club, honored the en-
tire 1979-80 squad and
most especially the
year's outstanding per-
formers.
Maynor, a senior
guard, was named the
club's most valuable
player in an earlier
voting by his team-
mates. The Raeford
native led this season's
squad in scoring with a
17.0 average.
Gray, a four-year
team member, was
named the team's
outstanding defensive
player and received an
award for being the
team's top rebounder
with an average of 8.5
boards a game.
Two other seniors,
Kyle Powers and Herb
Krusen, also received
awards. Powers receiv-
ed the most improved
player award while
Krusen was rewarded
for being the team's top
free throw shooter,
connecting on 85.2 per-
cent of his efforts from
the charity strike.
One award recepient
was unable to be pre-
sent at the ceremonies
due to an illness.
Guard Tony Byles, who
had a stomach ailment,
was named the team's
outstanding newcomer
after transferring from
junior college.
Each team member
received a plaque eom-
merating the 1979-80
season that saw the
Pirates go 16-11, the
team's first winning
season since 1975.
Senior team
members Mavnor,
Photo by KIP SLOAN
Clemson Basketball Coach Bill Foster
Addresses ECU Banquet
Gray, Krusen, Powers
and Frank Hobson
received special senior
awards in addition to
being presented with
their home jerseys.
Guest speaker at the
initial banquet was
Clemson head basket-
ball coach Bill Foster.
The ex-UNC-Charlotte
mentor spoke to the
team on the meaning of
winning and what it
takes to win.
"The big word
said Foster, "is at-
titude. You've got to
have a positive ap-
proach, not only in
basketball but in
everything you do
Foster said that this
positive approach
should reach an end
result. "Success
claimed the Tiger head
man, "sums it all up.
That word covers many
areas. It's what
everybody strives for.
"But he con-
tinued, "success is dif-
ferent that just winning
and losing. If you're
doing all you can do
and you're doing it
together, then you're
successful
Foster said that often
teams were
"successful" even
though they may not
have been victorious.
"I always tell our guys
at Clemson if they
come in the locker
room and after a ten
minute cooling off
period feel good about
themselves, then
they've had a successful
night
The ultra-successful
coach ,whose team
recently made it to the
quarterfinals of the
NCAA Tournament
told the crowd of over
150 assembled at the
banquet that building a
successul program
meant "surrounding
vourself with good peo-
ple
"You have to have
them everywhere.
Your assistants must be
as well as your
players
Foster spoke of what
he looked for in a
recruit. "If we're in-
terested in a guy he
explained, "we look at
him personally,
academically and then
at their basketball abili-
ty � in that order.
You've got to recruit
people that come to
college wanting a
degree
The Clemson head
coach warned of
players with attitude
problems. "You don't
need any 'head cases
It's not only in college,
either. I have pro
coaches calling me all
the time asking me
about players' at-
titudes
He spoke to the
Pirate team in par-
ticular about team
togetherness. "The key
words are loyalty and
optimism he pro-
claimed with authority
"The word 'team' is
important also. You
may not be good in-
dividually, but you can
be good collectively.
That's been the case
with us at Clemson.
"Heck, I remember
once we were picked to
finish eighth in a seven
team league Foster
said with a grin. "But
we went on to win 22
games because we
played together. You
can get anywhere you
want if you get your
heads together and
work hard
HEAPING tiny
PORTIONS. price
Wednesday Feature
April 16
Chicken Kan Pie
with 2 vegetables
ONLY
$1.59
Thursday Feature
April 17
Trout Almondine
with hot slaw
and french fries
ONLY
$1.89
Come home to eat at S&S � we're located in the
Carolina East Mall in Greenville, at the intersection of
West Haven Road (U.S. 264 Bypass) and Hwy. 11 Plenty
of free parking too.
Carolina East Mall
Serving continuously daily
front H � o� till 8 p.m.
(8:30 Friday & Saturday)
Photo by KIP SLOATT
Forward Mark McLaurin Eyeing Plaque
Given To All Members Of ECU Team
STUDENT UNION
�an caaauai auunvn
CARTOON HISTORY
OF OS. FOREIGN POLICY
MARCH 30-APRIL 27
MENOENHALL STUDENT CENTER
WW STUDENT UN�I ART EJWBTWN OlilTrEE W
1Rcc�& (fate Z6o&
Announces
Giant 40OFF Sale
Friday, April 18 & Sat 19th
Alvarez Guitars40Off
Amplifiers40 Off
Garcia Guitars50Off
Banjos40 Off
Good selection of used
guitars at tremendous
savings
Morley Pedals50Off
All strings&accessories
40 Off
Blue Grass Music
Friday Night
Hours:Fri. 10am-10pm
Sat. 10am-6pm
207 E. Fifth Street
Downtown Greenville
752-2509
THANK YOU SALE
UBE is slashing pri
for the BIGGEST
sale of the year.
We want to thank you, ECU Students for making this
our best year ever! To show you our appreciation
we're slashing prices.
Clip these coupons and come on
down to UBE and save
Tennis Shorts
Reg. $7.95
and $8.95
$l.00OFF
Gym Shorts
Reg. $3.49
to $5.99
I ECU T-shirts and I
I novelty T-shirts i
J Reg. $2.95 and $3.95 j
$1.00OFF j
I ECU and plain i
l hooded sweatshirts j
Reg. $8.95 to $9.95
528 S. COTANCHE
GREENVILLE, N.C.
J ECU and plain
jerseys
j Reg. $5.95 to $6.95
! $1.00 OFF
! Wild Coupon
i
J 20 OFF ANY j
sportswear
$UX)OFF $2.00 OFF j
Sale ends Saturday, April 19th
We pay cash for Textbooks
l�-zmI
Hurry downtown and SAVE SAVE SAVE
Prices will never be this low again
Now is the best time to selI
i





Title
The East Carolinian, April 15, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 15, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.54
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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