The East Carolinian, April 8, 1980






�rre �ast (ftarnltman
N ol. 54 No. ?0
10 Pages
luesday, pril 8, 19X0
(reen die. N (
( iri iil.iiin HI
Iranian Students Unaffected By Visa Freeze
H I t i r (.rav
( �v I ililor
ImHhm) Iranians in the I nited
i.iU's will eventually have to leave,
as then isas cxi1o
announcement Carter's announcement also in
nited States will eluded the expulsion ot all Iranian
Iranians will diplomatic personnel from the
Iranian students United StaUs, and the instatement
the country, ac of official economic sanction
it ion given I he text ot his remarks tan as
Iranian stu follows:
'I ha ' today ordered she follow-
ideh said that ing steps: First, the United States ol
alul tot the dura merica is breaking diplomatic rela
, and need not be lions with the government ol Iran
ideh said that in rhe Secretary ol State has informed
-as had to be the government ol Iran that its em
;e a yeai bass and consulates in the I nited
- on noi to issue States are to be closed immediately.
at an estimated All Iranian diplomatic and consular
officials have been declared persona
non ratu and must leave this coun
tr b midnight tomoi row.
'The Secretary ol the rreasury
will put into effect official sanctions
prohibiting exports from the I nited
States to Iran, in accordance with
the sanctions approved b ten
members ot the I nited Nations
Security Council on lanuary 13, in
the resolution which was vetoed b
the soviet I nion. Although ship-
ment ot food and medicine were not
included in the I V Securityoun
cil vote, it u expected that exports ot
even these items to ban will be
minimal ot nonexistent
Cartel also ordered inventories ol
the frozen Iranian assets m the
stival
Thursday
The Mall
mall will again
ty rhui m.Li as the
k 1 or Progressive
si PR) sponsors its first
� the � i"eat
the I estial for a
Renaissance, the
les veral speeches on
sues, and music by
and indiidual per-
will aKo be natural
i a noon
i lot appro
Marl Kemp,
S PR member, will
'�� i-tninute solo
lestial's keynote
� �
festival vill ' 11
ho vs.ii .Kiuuss a variety
fron racism to
I lal
: behind the
? SCPR wa on-
: rhe goals o the
ble to
mote
tlternative
ed political
sec u rt t i ce
to manifest the
. . mopolitan commun
ible individual and
: nd to gi e v oice
deemed vital by
irgani.ation.
owei and alternative
� energy will be discussed
leannie Mclntyre and Paul
Waldrop. Mclntyre is a regional co-
: the C oalition tor a
n icleat World, and Waldrop is
tructor with the ECU depart-
� industrial technology.
other speakers include Stacy
ton, an ECl political
:ikc professor who will speak on
ERA;larenee Moore, ol the
NAA( P, who will talk about police
Patrick O'Neal, of the
( I campus ministries, who will
See Festival, Page 2. Col. 7
Scientists Gather
l nited States, and an inventory olmade bv the militants in 1 � i
all outstanding claims thatMemaradeh
American citizens and businessesagainst the hold ng of tl
may have againsl Iran I he presi-calling them "innocent"
dent suggested thai the Iranian( artei iccused Aval ih K
assets be used to settle the claims,meini,
including those made bv the familiesthe Ira
ol the merican hostageshand
Memarzadeh gave his personal�
reaction to the president's an
nouncement, saying that het h t i � � � �
suspected Carter's political motiveshad brougl 1 sij
and that the U.S. government wasint" '
mistaken in looking to Iran foi
solution to the problem. MemarV
zadeh said that the power to end the(, at 'cr said, " I he tep 11
stalemate rested in the United
States' willingness or lack ol it to( r
meet some of the demands being Interviewbev f tl
Student Expresses
Opinion Of Raid
B i STONE
Staff Writer
In the pi il 4 edition ol The �
Carolinian, we interviewed a
den' who. although not arre
the March 26 " i lege Hill Bust
expressed sentiments ol disillusi
ment even angei at the tad -
employed bv the law enforcen
agencies connected with the bust.
He revealed that "Sonny Gard
(an alias employed hv the undei
;ovei agent) I
drugs from students, but had used
them him sell:
"1 le'd sit around and sm �
joint with us. and I've h om
people thai he bought cocaim
that he'd sit dow n and tool a lint
two in front of them. 1 saw
smoke a joint my sell
In this edition ot The I ast c an
man we set out to interview a stu
dent who was actually arrested in
the drug bust. It was not an easy
task to accomplish. Several of the
students arrested in the Monday
raid refused to talk about it on the
advice o their lawyers.
I ventuallv. The East Carolinian
�.
follow.
.
M �

to km
resent�


� . �
� 11

s a v s.
' '
��
��
i
tei 1: s a
. the media
oi p 1 hit
reaso
h

is s.
j something tor their n
: Do you think this is s kind
ol a publicity l ml by the p
V A ' Not necessarily public
if they would have wai
was h
but like.
to, thai
Student, P
Photo b RICHARDGRFFN
Barefoot On the Mall
Even our canine pals seemed to have a good time I hursday as the Stu-
dent Union sponsored a day of music, mime, comedy and sunshine on
the ECl campus mall. Now only in its second year, the springtime
event promises to become a permanent fixture in the April calendar.
City Policy Causes
Fire, Rescue Conflict
ECU To Host Conferences
Professional and student scientists
North) Carolina locations will convene
1 i 12 tor the 7th annual meeting of the N.C
ol Science.
Also meeting here
trom various
at PC I pnl
cademv
Society, the College Academy of Science and the Stu-
dent Academy of Science.
will be the N.
Raleigh Accident
Claims Freshman
1 he annual meeting provides scientists m various
Entomological ticlds an opportunity to meet formally and informally
tor the exchange of ideas and reports of research results.
Among the scientific fields to be represented are ar-
chaeology, biochemistry, botany, cell biology,
chemistry, entomology, geology, geography,
mathematics, physics, physiology, science education,
toxicology and zoology.
Carolyn Cuddy, an ECU freshman, was killed Satur
day evening when she was thrown from a car after it ran
off an unpaved road and overturned 2.5 miles west of
Wake forest.
According to the Highway Patrol, Cuddy, IX, ol
Raleigh, was the only passenger in the vehicle, a 1968
Pontiac convertible driven by Marshall Christine Jones,
19, of Raleigh Jones was taken to Wake Medical
( enter for treatment.
Cuddy graduated last year from Raleigh's Sanderson
High School. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
David M. Cuddy of Raleigh. She lived in Fletcher
Dorm.
Among the highlights ot the meetings are a Friday
evening banquet in ECU'S Mendenhall Student Center
featuring an address by Academy President Daniel B.
Pyler of UNC-Wilmington. A film, "The living
Coast produced at the Wilmington campus, will be
screened.
A Saturday general session will include an address by
Dr. Charles Eilber, director o the N.C. School of
Science and Mathematics.
Commercial and special exhibits will be on view in
ECU'S Biology Building.
Dr. Everett Simpson of the ECU biology faculty is
chairing the Academy's local Arrangements Commit-
tee.
Programs listing events planned for the meetings are
available from Dr. Simpson.
Bv l.AKRY ZICHERMAN
Assistant News Editor
Changes in Greenville city
government and the city manager's
pursuance of policies contrary to the
:ity council's wishes are spelling
problems for the Greenville lire
Department and the Greenville
Rescue Squad.
At present, the city is undertaking
a merger of the fire department and
the rescue squad, with cross-training
and cross-utilization o personnel by
the two systems.
The program has created con-
siderable discontent within the
rescue squad. The volunteer rescue
squad disbanded in early February
over the policy, and four o the 14
paid members o' the squad have
left, seeking employment elsewhere.
The squad's main complaint is
that they are being required to per-
form a job for which they were not
hired and do not wish to do. They
maintain they were hired to work in
emergency medical services (EMS)
and not in fire service. The squad
also contends that levels of skill will
decrease due to service time on a fire
truck instead of an ambulance.
Fire fighters, though, do not seem
to be too upset by the program. Ac-
cording to several of them, they are
just as happy working in EMS as in
fire fighting.
A public meeting was held March
27 by several of the former
volunteer and paid members of the
squad. According to John Conway
III, a former paid rescue squad
member, the rescue squad attemp-
ted to persuade the
about two years ago to grant
squad autonomous adn ration.
Conway said they asked for noth
more - no building, no additional
manpower or equipment.
At a special call meeting of the
Greenville C"ity Council June 5,
99. reports on the proposal wt
presented by the N.C. league of
Municipalities, the Greenville rea
Chamber of Commerce and City
Manager Ed Wyatt. Ml three ad-
vocated integration of the two
departments.
W yatt presented his cost estimates
for separation of the two depart-
ments o $530,313.68, divided as
follows: construction of rescue
facility $444,078; additional person
nel to man facility "4.634; addi-
tional operating expenses 11,601 .68
However, this was not what the
squad asked for. Conway said the
only additional expense in the
squad's proposal would be to give
the chief officer a pay raise equal to
his new position.
When the city cc mcil adopted the
motion offered by Councilman
John L. Howard to cross-train per-
sonnel, they had no intention of
having rescue personnel riding a fire
truck or vice versa, according to
Percy Co, mayor at the time the
policy was adopted.
Another problem cited by the
squad is the loss of the possibility of
getting advanced life support
capability. In October 1979, 12
members of the rescue squad went
through an Emergency Medical
N
begir et
conti overs -
members i
feh it would -
servu
area to initiate sucl
to he inner turmc
depa its, Conway sa d
He added thai Greenville was :
be the site ol a pilot prog
paramedic system in r . a. b
due to the situation within tru I
and rescue department
moved the program elsewhere.
Inside Today
Barefoot Reiew
tree Hick Rock.
I m�r Realizes Orivm
Pirale Miell Heelv
fane
Pane t
I" a t
I'ii.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 8, 1980
Student Sounds Off Over College Hill Raid
Continued from Page l
You've gotta have trust
in somebody.
EC: Do you think the
way many students
were coerced into get-
ting drugs for this
under-cover agent,
while he was flashing
money around and do-
ing illegal drugs
himself, might con-
stitute entrapment?
Student: Hell yeah! 1
think so. The law might
not say so, but 1 think
if he's gonna bust you,
he should get you red-
handed, for whatever
you've got in your
room, and if he would
have tried to do that to
me, 1 wouldn't be in the
situation I'm in now,
cause there's not really
anything in this room,
and there never has
been. I mean, if they
wanted to, they could
90 percent of the
people who live in this
dorm for what I did.
1 hey jsut happened to
act me.
El : Do you think the
laws are right?
Student: If you're just
getting not for people
.on know, and it's a
victimless crime, you're
not hurting anybody. It
all stays within a circle
of friends, and I think
ihat they should not go
out of their way like
this to interrupt it. It is
against the law, but
they should look the
other way or something
like that.
EC: Was the bust �
being awakened at 5:30
in the morning, etc. �
dehumanizing for vou?
Student: It's Nazi-ism,
you know? They didn't
have to make such a big
stink about it. I mean, I
came back from jail,
and everybody knew
me. I couldn't go
anywhere without a
bunch of people
bothering me. And I
don't think that I really
did anything wrong. I
mean, there are lots of
people who don't even
smoke pot who know
where they can get a
bag as a favor for
somebody.
tC: How do you think
that the student com-
munity will respond to
this?
Student: Well, I
haven't really talked to
anybody who isn't, you
know, behind us.
Everybody seems to
think that what hap-
pened was wrong. But
it's happened, you
know, and there's
nothing you can do
about it.
The interviewer
played the tape of this
interview to one of the
other bust victims and
asked him for addi-
tional comments. His
response was that all of
the best words had been
said by his friend, and
he had nothing
substantial to add to
them. We were in a
room full of his friends
who expressed their
support for him and
their opinions of the
bust.
EC: Why are you guys
opposed to the bust
that took place last
Monday?
Student: It's just the
way they went about it,
I mean it's not well,
I guess it is the
American way, man,
but you know � it
shouldn't be like that. I
mean you shouldn't be
able to come into
somebody's house,
which is what "Sonny"
did almost and do that.
'Cause, man, we live
here, and we don't treat
it like that. I mean, that
was a pretty fuckin'
dirty thing to do.
EC: Did you think that
the entire operation
was warranted?
Student: No, 'cause as
much time and money
as they spent for what
they got � they got a
few people who not in-
to drugs that heavy
anyway, people that
were doin' somebody a
favor by going and get-
ting a bag for them. I
mean, everybody knew
each other, and people
would say: 'Do you
know where I can get a
bag of pot? and
they'd say, 'Yeah, I
know somebody right
down the hall It was
nothing like heavy deal-
ing. I'm sure there's
thousands of people
here who can get you a
bag of pot. I don't see
why they picked on
those people. They
didn't get what they
were lookin' for in my
opinion. What they did
doesn't mean anything
except that they fucked
those people's lives up
for nothing really.
They could've gotten
almost anybody for
what they got those
people for.
EC: What is your
baseline reaction to this
thing? Does it make
you paranoid?
Student: Well, when it
first happened, I was
paranoid as hell. I
threw out all my plants
and my seeds and shit,
and everybody was
really blown away. But
we were down here do-
ing bong hits the next
day. We just locked the
door instead of leaving
it open.
EC: What kind of a
response do you think a
marijuana protest
might meet at ECU?
Student: ECU is just
too dumb, ignorant, an
uncool place. There's a
few heads who would
do it and, you know,
wouldn't give a f�,
but the majority of the
people wouldn't do it.
At this point several
people in the room
voiced either their sup-
port or opposition to
the idea of a protest.
Student: If this were
Berkeley or UCLA,
you might find enough
people to do it.
Student: We need
about 5000 more
radicals on this cam-
pus.
Student: We need more
fourth floor hippies.
EC: Could you guys get
behind the idea of a
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Thursday April 10th
Ladies -I
66
Coming Apnl 23 MIKE CROSS
petition then, asking
for suspension of all
campus marijuana
busts or a drastic reduc-
tion in the penalties for
pot?
Student: 1 could get
behind a protest if we
could get enough peo-
ple from the dorms and
stuff together. There
are more people up
here than you think
that would go to a pro-
test. It might not be so
much a smoke-in as a
demonstration against
the kind of selective
bust that happened
here.
Student: You can help
to an extent, but you
can't buck the system
too much, man,
because the system
won't move. It's gonna
always be there, and
it's not gonna change
for a bunch of freaks
who go out and smoke
joints. They're still
gonna haul you away if
they can. This bust is
gonna make people
more careful, but it
won't really stop
anything.
Student: I think you
can compare that bust
to somebody in high
school trying to catch
somebody for smoking
cigarettes. They could
have put people at the
bkrs downtown and
gotten more drugs than
that. They could get
local people who really
deal heavily, and I'm
sure they know that.
But the thing is it's so
for something that, on pus seem to feel that
any given day, you the March 26 bust was
could get hundreds of unjust for a variety of
easy to bust us. They people for on this hill, reasons already covered
know it's an easy rap. I that's all. in this report. There
mean, they could come seemed to be no con-
up here any day of the Most people on cam- census, however, as to
week and bust people
for pot if they wanted
to.
what students can do to
help their classmates
and friends who were
bustedortoprevent
bustslikethisinthe
future.
Student: Most of these
people went straight
out of high school into
college, and they aren't
really criminals. But
their lives could be
completely fucked up
by this. If they go to
jail, they'll .never be
right again. It will
definitely affect them
for the rest of their
lives. Prison ruins peo-
ple. I would just hope
to God that the judge
would see that this is
just a cheap publicity
stunt and that these are
basically good people
who were singled out
Festival To Be Held
Continued from Page 1
speak about the April
13 Hunger Crusade to
be held in Greenville;
Mark Zumbach, ECU
student and president
of the Gay Communi-
ty, who will speak on
gay rights, and Steve
Summerford, who will
speak about the draft
and nuclear weapons.
Peanut butter, teas,
apples, fruit mixes and
apple juice will be sold
at the festival on a non-
profit basis.
Most of the speeches
are scheduled to last
about ten minutes, and
musical performers will
take the stage at least
once an hour.
Besides Mark Kemp.
the J e r r Thomas
Band. Tommv G. and
Co Buford I. and
The Tour.
After the closing
dress at 7:45 p.m a
debate on nuclear
the performers will be energy is scheduled.
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specializing in natural hair cuts for men & women
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Offer good thru 4 12 80
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appointments only
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Announcements
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 8, 1980
Kite Making
1 earn to des.gn and make your own
kitt hv attending a free workshop spn
Th Mendenhall Student Ceme"
;�0P' ���l by George
In R�Jcn,e ,s scheduled for Wednes
Jas Apnl 26. from 6-8 p m ,n L
Mendenhall C rafts Center "there ,s n
registration or vUpp1(.s fet fo um
guc workshop Just come by the Crafts
�. enter and 10m in the fun'
BKA
The Bankmg and F.nance Fraternity
�ill hold ,ts apr meeIlng Wednesday
1 9. a, 4:00 p.m. in room 22y,
Mendenhall Guest speaker will be Mr
la-ion eiibet. manager of the In
terstwe Securities office here in Green-
v.lle All .nterested persons are invited
i end
Family Fun
I act) 1 hursdas during April is "Family
I tin ,ghf at Mendenhall. From 6 10
p m . all children under age 18 accom
ramed b a parent or responsible adult
U1 K Pla billiards or play table
icnn loi . off regular price Each
"m( l" 'me of bowling will be hair
fw children, and billiards and
ennis will be half-price for the en
.milv Only one adult per group
muvt hae a Mendenhall Student
( enur Membership card or ECU ID
id to participate
Theology Series
rhe Greensille Unitarian Umversalist
fellowship invites you to attend its
H Ming our Own Theology" series
pril I "We Arc Meaning
Maker- ' The Fellowship meets the
4i h Sundays of each month at
m in the Planters National
Kink Community Room (basement),
�� Washington and 3rd Street
Billiards
Sign up today for the MSC 8 Ball
Billiards Tournament Open to all full-
time ECU students, the double elimina-
tion tournament will be held Monday.
April 14 at 6:00 p.m. in the Billiards
Center. Trophies will be awarded to the
1st, 2nd and 3rd place winners.
Registration forms are available at the
Billiards Center Deadline to register is
Friday. April II.
Table Tennis
A table tennis tournament, with singles
and doubles events, will be held in the
Mendenhall multi-purpose room on
Wednesday April 16 at 6 p.m The com-
petition is open to all ECU students and
faculty and staff MSC members.
Trophies will be awarded to 1st and 2nd
place singles winners and 1st and 2nd
place doubles teams Entrants must
register at the MSC Billiards Center by
Mondas. April 14
Tutoring
Dr Bndwell.
to check your
Olympics
No Summer Olympics is the
v she nest Sig Tau party at the
Man rwmii and prizes are
Vdulcd tor the Tuesday. April 15
event Fversone is invited! �
Phi Eta Sigma
Eta Sigma honor fraternity will
I meeting at 5 p m on Thursday.
pnl 10 in room 221 Mendenhall
Nr made for the April 17 in
Report will be given on last
bake sale and Easter parts for
n at the hospital Also, the
t4 a vear end party will be
led Please come
SU Artist
�lions for Student Union Artist
be accepted April 14-18. Apphca
ia be picked up in the Student
Office, room 224 Mendenhall
descriptions will also be available
foho required.
Need help in preparing for final exams1
The Center for Student Opportunities
provides free tutorial services to
students who major in Allied Health,
Nursing. Medicine or related health
professions. Contact
757-6122 or 757-6081
eligibility
Nurses
The representative from Nightingale
Uniform Company will be in the School
of Nursing building, room 102, on
April 17 from 8:30 a m. to 1:00 p.m. to
measure each freshman nursing student
for uniforms. Total uniform cost will
be $72.70 for female students and
$50 10 for male students. A money
order for the exact amount must be
submitted with the uniform order.
Please stop by the School of Nursing
Office, Room 152, to make an appoint-
ment
Wheelchair
The Office of Handicapped Student
Services is establishing a wheelchair
repair service on campus. If you have
experience in repairing mechanical
equipment and desire part-time
employment, contact the Office of
Handicapped Student Services in
Whichard 211 or call 757-6799
History Cookout
Phi Alpha Theta is sponsoring a history
departmental cookout on Thursday,
April 10. in the wooded area adjacent
to Memorial Gym All history majors,
minors and faculty are invited. Admis-
sion will be $1 00. The cookout will be
held at 5:00 p.m
SGA
There will be an SGA meeting Tuesday
at 5 p.m. in the legislature room in
Mendenhall, due to the Easter holidays.
PRC
The PRC Department is having an
awards banquet on April 12, from
6-12:00 p.m at the Holiday Inn in
Greenville All ECU students, faculty
and alumni are invited to attend. For
ticket information call Margie at
752-0306; Teresa at 756-8241. or Diane
at 752-1489. The cost of the banquet is
$5.00 per person or $8.00 per couple.
Best Male Legs
The Gamma Sigma Sigma 1980 Spring
Pledge Class is sponsoring "The Best
Male Legs Contest It will be held on
April 9 and 10 from 9:00 until 2:00 in
the Student Store Lobby, tnterested
parties can call 758-8727 or 752-8602
for more information. Entries can be
mailed or delivered to 120 Garrett or
321 White All proceeds will go to the
March of Dimes. Let's see some legs,
boys, for the March of Dimes.
College Life
College Life, featuring Lem Howard
speaking on "The World's Greatest
Love Story will meet at 8:30 p.m
Monday, April 14 in the upstairs
auditorium in Mendenhall. Door prize
will be given. Free admission. Spon-
sored by Campus Crusade for Christ.
Scholarship
The Society for Collegiate Journalists
will award a $50 scholarship to a
sophomore, junior or senior (not
graduating) journalism minor. In-
terested persons should submit the
following materials to Ira Baker,
Austin 334, by April 15: a statement of
professional goals including why he has
chosen journalism, a personal reference
and a grade summary. Candidates will
be screened according to professional
intent, background and initiative and
recommendation SCJ members who
are fn good standing are eligible to par-
ticipate also. The winner will be an-
nounced at the annual reception of the
English Department May 9 in Minges
Colliseum
Softball
Sigma Nu fraternity will be holding a
softball tournament April 13 and 13.
The entry fee will be $3 per player
which includes a jersey and beverages at
the championship party For more in-
formation call 758-7640 or 758-6493.
There will be a 20 team maximum.
Little Sisters
Kappa Alpha Little Sisters are planning
a night of fun Wednesday, April 9 from
9-1 at Chapter X Beer will be 50 cents,
and there will be a beer chugging con-
test. Tickets are 50 cents in advance and
75 cents at the door.
Booksale
The Friends of the Library will hold a
booksale at Joyner Library April 16
and 17. Hours will be 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
and 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesday, April
16, and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday,
April 17.
Gong Show
There will be a Gong Show in Clement
Dorm April 14 at 7:30 p.m.
Journalists
The Society for Collegiate Journalists'
pledge orientation meeting will be held
Thursday, April 10, at 6 p.m. instead of
Tuesday. April I, in room 248
Mendenhall. All pledges and members
are urged to attend, since officers for
next year will be nominated at this
meeting.
Foreign Lit
HAPPY
BIRTHDAY
LISA!
Recreational, popular literature in
foreign languages is now available in
Joyner Library. Foreign students or
those with an interest in foreign
language may select from records and
comics from French to Japanese. This
is the first time such a selection has
been available.
Summer Dorms
Residence hall room deposits for Sum-
mer School 1980 will be accepted in the
Cashier's Office, Room 105, Spilman
Building, beginning April 9. Room
assignments will be made in the respec-
tive residence hall offices on April 10
and 11. Thereafter, they will be made in
the Office of Housing Operations,
Room 201, Whichard Building.
THERE IS A
DIFFERENCE!
. our
nnarl
The Day Student representative
position on the Media Board is
now open and the Media Poard is
accepting applications for this
position. Interested persons
should apply in The East
Carolinian office from 8 am til
5 pm Monday - Friday. Deadline
for applying is April 10,1980
PREPARE FOR
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For Information About
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Centers in Major US Cities
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April 9 ONLY $1.59
Chicken & Dumplings with 2 vegetables
April 10 ONLY $1.49
Baked Spaghetti Feast with tossed salad and
dressing and garlic bread
Come home to eat at S&S � we're located in the
Carolina East Mall in Greenville, at the intersection of
West Haven Road (U.S. 264 Bypass) and Hwy. 11. Plenty
of free parking too.
Carolina East Mall
Serving continuously daily
from 11 a.m. till 8 p.m.
(8:30 Friday ft Saturday)
AFTER 3:
CHICK-FIL-A
SANDWICHES
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SAVE
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Present this coupon at your local
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One coupon per person per
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�ije �aat (Karnltaian
Serving the campus community for 54 years.
Marc Barnes, Km tkj
Richard Green, tmnnmi iuk,i
Robert M. Swaim, ���� Ammm Diane Henderson, �,� tw
Chris Lichok, ��,���� m�mm Charles Chandl er, ��
Terry Gray, v � Debbie Hotai ing, icuii��r
TUESDAY, APRIL 8, 1980
PAGE 4
This Newspaper's Opinion
Sanctions Were Overdue
President Carter's sanctions
against Iran were a long time in
coming and were long overdue.
At this writing, the hostages have
been within the tiny confines of the
American Embassy in Iran for over
150 days. An Easter visit by
clergymen gave the outside world
the impression that the hostages
were in good physical health, but
speculation has surfaced in recent
months thaUtheir mental health is
not faring well.
Psychologists and others who
work with mental health are yet
uncertain of the effect that the
length of time inside the embassy,
under constant physical and emo-
tional stress, will have on the sanity
of the hostages It is entirely possi-
ble that the hostages will never be
the same peole they were before the
embassy takeover.
The government in Iran is a farce.
The leaders there are inconsistent
with their policies, unfair to their
people and unreasonable in their
demands. They have arbitrarily
decided, through the guise of a
senile old man named Khomeini
that the shah must be returned, and
that the U.S. will be held hostage
until he is.
Every week, the same old song
and dance comes out of Iran. There
is a hope for a settlement of the
crisis, the revolutionary council
votes to ask the students to release
the hostages, and the Ayatollah
refuses to release anyone until the
shah is returned.
Speculation has existed in recent
months that the entire hostage situa-
tion may be a mask for deeper
economic troubles within Iran's
government, with some observers
saying that Iran may well go broke
and blame it on the U.S. This is un-
fair to the Iranian people, who may
be forced to desperate actions,
should food and adequate medical
care cease to exist because of lack of
funds. It would be easy for them to
blame the U.S because we were
pushed into the use of economic
sanctions to free our hostages.
The demands of the alleged Ira-
nian government are unreasonable
and illogical. Basically, the line has
been that if the shah is not returned
to stand trial for his reported
atrocities against the Iranian peo-
ple, the American hostages will not
be released. To begin with, the shah
is in the care of an Egyptian
hospital, and could not be released
to stand trial by the U.S even if we
would consent to do it. Secondly,
Iran has more to lose by holding the
hostages than it does to gain,
because the loss of American
technology and business in-
vestments will severely jeopardize
their way of life. The Ayatollah
seems to be unable to realize the real
harm his country could suffer from
these losses.
The overriding opinion of the so-
called leadership in Iran has been
one of frustration. The stubborn-
ness, and indeed the stupidity of
their arguments, will cost them
dearly in the long run. Their goal �
the return of the shah � is one
which could be argued about
endlessly, but there would be few
arguments that Iran's actions to
achieve this goal were wrong, and in
the end could mean a breakdown to
the peaceful processes in the world.
President Carter's actions yester-
day, which some will point to as a
political move, may restore a sense
of patriotism to America, and may
send a signal to both our enemies
and our friends that the America of
1980 is still a country that is not
willing to take an aggressive act ly-
ing down. Political move or not, it
was a message that has needed sen-
ding for a long time.
Move Over Some
Progress is a necessary thing, but
somehow we feel that it sacrifices
some of the better things in life.
Walking through campus the
other day, we noticed that the wall
outside the old campus union is be-
ing torn down betweeen the Wright
building and the faculty and staff
parking lot in front of Austin.
We noticed that the remaining
wall, the one that runs almost to the
front of Wright Auditorium, was
more crowded than usual yesterday
afternoon. Perhaps this better than
anything demonstrates the populari-
ty of the practice of sitting on the
wall and watching the world go by.
We would certainly hope that the
remaining seat space won't be taken
by the construction crews, and we
hope that everyone will be willing to
move over a little so that someone
else can have a seat.
i- Letters To The Editor
' Waiting' Describes Court System
To the Editor:
Recently waiting to testify in the trial of
a friend busted for possession of LSD, I
had the opportunity to observe the local
legal system in action. "Waiting" would
be the word to emphasize here.
The affair began when the friend, an
ECU student living in the dorms, was ask-
ed by a neighbor to store 93 tabs of LSD
in his refrigerator. The following day
Capt. Wiggins of the campus con-
stabulatory and a couple of uniformed of-
ficers came to call. They found the acid
and a small quantity of marijuana. A stu-
dent informant was suspected. This oc-
cured in October of 1979.
The first of our many days in court
began in late February. After a postpone-
menUand false start or two, a- definite trial
date had finally been set. The friend, with
his family and friends, gathered in the
courtroom. They didn't get heard.
The case before theirs was that of Sgt.
Douglas H. Ross of the Greenville Police
Department. He was on trial for having
8000 pounds of pot on his property. His
brothers on the force, through
surveillance and informers, witnessed the
unloading of the herb from a truck to a
small building in his yard. Upon raiding
they seized four men and four tons.
That morning the courtroom was pack-
ed, filled with prospective jurors and
friends of Sgt. Ross. It seems everyone in
town knew him. It took the entire day to
choose the jury. The situation was
worsened by the slow and laborious man-
ner in which the selection was made. My
friends and I sat and waited.
Per court order we were back next day
for more of the same. The morning con-
sisted of a tedious haggling over the
validity of the search warrant used in the
Ross raid. The afternoon was enlivened a
bit by the showing of the prize exhibits,
huge bales of reefer. Again we went
unheard, told to come back a few days
later.
Then the big blizzard of 1980 hit Green-
ville. The friends' case was postponed
again and again, until, supposedly March
24. His friends showed up in court that
Monday morning. Upon phoning the
defending attorney's secretary, they
found the case was no. 11 out of 13 and
might not be heard until the end of the
week. The courts' own clerks had no idea
at all of what was going on.
Later it was determined that the case
would commence that Wednesday. Guess
again. This time the case we waited
through was of an armed robbery suspect.
Sgt. Ross' case, we heard, had been
declared a mistrial. Half-jokingly, we
comforted ourselves with the thought that
the defendant in this new trial was poor
and black: it couldn't last too long.
We sat through the trial the next day,
as, that afternoon, he was found guilty.
Theft Was Wrong
To the Editor:
In front of Joyner Librarv stands a
flagpole in honor of Dr. Richard C. Todd
for his outstanding service to ECU and
the brotherhood of Phi Sigma Pi, an
honor fraternity on campus of which he
was the advisor.
A flag was flying since Col. Ed Tadlock
in ROTC had requested that special
lighting be provided around the clock, but
now no flag is flying. Two flags have been
stolen.
I could go into my lecture that I give the
junior high school students that I teach
about taking "something that is not theirs,
but I won't. I'd just like to say that I am
disappointed. It is a shame that the col-
lege has to go to the trouble and expense
jf getting new flags and possibly locks or
steel cables to chain up something that
stands for freedom.
Then our friend's trial went unc
He was put on probation and giver, S
fine. After five mont
postponements, uncertain over :
dates, and days wasted sitting in co
the entire thing was over within le
half an hour.
The court system here in Greenvil
characterized by slowness and confusion.
There is no reliable. workabL Cn-
dar. Those connected with a case m
continually come to court evt
case is not to be heard for da
Dates are often set and then
before the day even arrives. The
troom proceedings themselves arc
ducted in slow motion. Uncertain:
what's what is rampant. Justice
better than this. Something car
should be done about it.
.
John Yv
I
Colleen Flynn
Member, Phi Sigma Pi
Letters To The Editor
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
them by our office in the Old S
Building, across from the library.
Letters to the editor must include the
name, address, phone number
signature of the authorise and must
typed, double spaced, or neatly printed.
Letters should be limited to three
'voewritten, double-spaced pages. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obcenity and libel. Letters by the same
author are limited to one each 30 da vs.
Personal attacks will not be permitted.
Names of authors will be withheld onv
when inclusion of the name will cause the
author embarrassment or ridicule, such as
letters concerning homosexuaiitv, drug
abuse, etc. Names will be withheld onlv
on the author's request.
For Some, Battle Of Sexes Has Never Really Changed At All
By CHARLES GRIFFIN
National News Bureau
It has been called the battle of the
sexes and there is no man alive who
will admit to having won even a
skirmish. The old toast goes, "To
the ladies, God bless "em, we can't
live with 'em and we can't live
without 'em
It would be foolish of me to say
that I came late to the fray. 1 was in
my late 20's when a young woman
called me a "male chauvinist pig
But I well remember my earliest
skirmish.
At home, 1 had no siblings. We
had an outhouse for a toilet and a
large tin tub that we filled with
warm water and pulled over by the
heater when we took baths. It was
an old farmhouse and we were your
basic farm family circa 1949 in most
rural North Carolina.
Going to school for the first time
created a problem of adjustment.
My grandfather warned me not to
sit on the toilet seats the morning
before I was to catch the school bus.
He told me to climb up on the toilet
and squat just as I would if I were to
take a crap in the woods. I asked
him why. He said, "You'll see
I saw. When 1 had to go, I was led
to the boys restroom by a second
grader. The first thing that hit me
(
was the odor. The toilets were a row
of open booths. There were five
toilets. Two of them actually had
seats. All of them had spots of shit
everywhere on them. One cleve farm
lad had missed the toilet entirely,
apparently by squatting with his
back facing out while hanging on
the pipe and playing with the
flusher. At least he found out how
to flush. Most of the others hadn't
bothered.
Later on, the teachers and
janitors combined to housebreak us.
The toilets became much cleaner. I
�later understood that six-year-olds
who had never seen a flush-type in-
door john could be expected to
create a shitty situation.
Now, you must realize that I was
in close contact with girls my own
age for the first time in my life. As
boys go, I knew enough not to shit
on the toilet, but otherwise I was
wild as a colt. Notions of chivalry
and protection of the fair sex had
never occurred to me in my first five
years.
No one told me they had their
own toilet. I never saw a girl in the
one I went to. 1 figured they had a
special time they went, or maybe
they held it better than boys did. I
mean, what do you expect when you
know from nothing to begin with.
So, when a girl named Vicky hit
me in the back of my head with a
well-aimed rock, 1 took it very per-
sonally. She danced from foot to
foot singing, "Na-na, n'aaa-na �
yuh can't hit a gurlll She ran
when I chased her. She continued to
sing until it became clear that I was
very serious about catching her. She
ran very well, but time was on my
side, I thought.
Vicky ran into a door that was at
the opposite end of the hall from the
restroom that I used. My logic did
not function well enough to ring any
warning bells. I went through the
door also.
My eyes told me I was in a toilet,
but what a toilet. The floors were
clean. The walls had nothing scrawl-
ed on them. There was no urinal.
There was an extra sink. And there
were six private booths � each with
a slatted door. They had locks, too,
'cause Vicky was behind the fourth
door and it was locked tight. She
screamed and screamed. A teacher
came and got me.
In the principal's office I got a
lesson on women's rights, unequal
protection, chivalry, the sacredness
of the toilet, and the functions
of the handed one-inch-thick
paddle.
Years passed, but I still had sort
of an outlaw nature. The kids at
school had rules that were con-
sidered unbreakable. If you broke
them you became a social outcast.
Of course, the most sacred was the
one about not hitting girls.
Eventually, I found myself in
junior high in Holly Hill, Florida. I
was in the seventh grade. An eighth-
grade girl named Brenda was a
favorite of the leader of the local
gang. She considered herself tough
and above the rules. One day before
school started she slugged me just to
show off to her girl friends. I had
done nothing to her and I followed
my first impulse - which was to sw-
ing back. I knocxed her down. Her
lip was bloodied. She cried and bet-
ween sobs shouted at me that her
boyfriend was going to get me. We
came to a negotiated settlement.
In 1971 at a USSPA convention, I
opened the door for a young
woman. I admit that the door would
had opened for her had she pushed
against it, but her arms and hands
were full and I thought nothing of
extending a little courtesy to a
fellow student journalist. As I pull-
ed the door open she said, "Get
lost, you male chauvinist pig At
first, 1 didn't understand the ra-
tionale behind the phrase, but it was
drummed into me at that meeting.
V
Not all the girls were for the
feminist movement. One sweet
young Georgia peach said, "Honey,
1 will go along with this bullshit
when men can have babies and
women can pee standing up That
was not terribly profound. It is
theoretically possible to implant a
fetus on a male, and I have seen
women peeing while standing up.
They were good shots, too.
The myth of the fairer sex exists.
It echoes in the halls of Congress. It
hides behind closed doors in the
Pentagon. Big business brandishes it
every time some woman executive
gets too close to the board room.
Even the proponents of women's
lib are not immune to the myth.
They do ask for special protection
under the law. If they believed in
their ability, they wouldn't need
ERA.
Mention the idea of women in
combat and you get a mixed bag of
response Too delicate, says the
Pentagon. Too precious, says the
Southern congressman. Too
dangerous, says the girl who may
have to go. It's OK, say the
statewomen of women's lib who are
already too old to go.
They seldom point out that
women occupy a special status as
our only renewable source of
children. Without future genera-

tions, wars cannot be fought or
won. Wars also tend to obliterate
the best of a given generation of
youth. Reserving women for
childbearing insures that 50 percent
of the gene pool will contain enough
good traits to allow mating with in-
ferior stock � 4Fers and the like �
which will still produce normal
children.
As far as the rest of it goes, the
myth is just that. Women can shoot
and fight just as well as men. They
have up days and down days, but if
a man had to have a period in the
middle of his down days, he would
be flat on his back until it was over
with A woman might hit the bed if
she has a chance, but most of the
time she keeps right on making a liv-
ing and doing whatever has to be
done.
They are just plain tougher than
ntvirJi" WC Justified
Wmg themJess for equal work or
citizenship, PU never know
K.LiSU!?t' ?oweVCT� i! w�s Pro-
bably their idea - they juslcM
�ijund.to changu SrmiJ
wluch ,s a woman's prerogarWe!
And, as any man knows, no woman
ever blamed hersdf for hvTnH�
idea she is currently against
I





Features
Al'KIl H. IWO
Page 5
rHE EAS1 t AROl INIAN
Barefoot On The MalV Is Great Success
Photo bv RICHARD GREEN
I Dreamed I (irew Old
in my Maiden!arm bra
By DEBBIE HOT AUNG
Features Editor
Along with girls lying in the dorm
courtyards, guys cruising campus in
their convertibles and happy-hour-
regulars cramming the downtown
bars. East Carolina has a new spring
tradition.
Barefoot on the Mall originated
last vear and as a result of a lot of
hard work, was put on again this
year. Wednesday afternoon was
packed with all kinds of exhibits and
entertainment for students and
facultv to enjoy.
Warm, sunny weather brought
several hundred people out to be
entertained periodically by emcee
Michael Marlin, an amazing jug-
gler, who filled in between acts.
Marlin recently performed on Don
Kirschner's "Rock Concert the
Merv Griffin Show, and was a
special guest star on Doug Henn-
ing's tour.
One of the biggest attractions in
this year's festival was "Mainly
Mime Using today's themes as
subjects of their mime acts, Kate
Bentley and Jacqueline Wildau cap-
tured and held the audience's atten-
tion during two performances.
East Carolina's own "Fantasy"
performed, presenting the audience
sign language in song in such a way
that was effectively communicated
to all Mike Ernest, director of the
program for hearing impaired
students; Kathy Beetham; Bob Col-
trane; Shannon Gilley; and Jim
Haslup comprise the group which
performed a variety of popular
music.
If you believe in the telling of for-
tunes and futures and missed the
featured astrologist, you missed one
of the best. Marcella Ruble Rook
amazed students again this year with
her extraordinary talents in the art
of palm-reading, plotting
astrological charts, and providing
insights to personalities. Part of her
great ability to delve into people's
personalities comes from the fact
that she possesses great enthusiasm
for her work. She has a very open
rapport with those who seek her
enlightenment and has helped many-
people become more aware of the
many sides to their personalities.
Frisbee-throwing is a popular
pasttime on the East Carolina mall
every spring. This year, students
were given the opportunity to
observe professional frisbee
throwers at work. The Pro-Disc
Jammers, a professional frisbee
demonstration team, displayed 'heir
talents periodically during the after-
noon. One member, Peter Rick
Bloeme, was the 1977 World Champ
and at 19 was the youngest World
Champ ever.
The list of activities is endless. A
special thanks to the craft booths
and displays which allowed students
to view local artists' works. If you
didn't get a chance to have your
charicature done by John Weyler, a
fast sketch artist, maybe you can
catch him next year. It's well worth
your time for a buck.
Student Union once again suc-
ceeded in providing a great day for
everyone on the mall and hopefully,
will carry on the tradition. After all,
what is spring on ECU's campus
without it?
hard r R c I N
Emcee Michael
better
Marlin
juggling than jokes
Despite Conditions,
4Mainly Mime' Gives
A Good Performance
B 1FRR GRV
e don't often see mime acts
( I . and for most of us, the
pantomime" conjures up
f white-faced Marcel
trapped in a glass box.
I he appearance of Mainly Mime
annual Barefoot On The
Mall festival last Thursday show-
f us that mime can be
n that.
Mainh Mime is Jaqueline
d Kate Bentley, who
2 while performing
- � Mime Theatre of
Kate performed, taught
n years as the
emale. Jacqueline.
! 'ecole Jacques
� Mime. Move-
-atre in Pans.
;lown and mime
rk after touring
: merica. In 1978.
ces in New York to
. �i the country's few
.ale mime duets.
Vnd a damned good one. Most
fieir routines leave the glass
mtasies behind, focusing in-
td on the humor, the ex-
mities, the absurdities and the
itions ot real-life situa-
ns.
Mainlv Mime is just that:
nix mime. The purist believes
that mime is completely physical.
Mainly Mime, knowing that their
art fails when it confuses, include
music, dialogue, props and short
introductions � whatever is
needed to get the message across.
In one of the routines they per-
formed here Thursday, Kate and
Jaqueline used a spoken intro,
eight chairs (for the eight
characters in the piece), rock
music and a sprinkling of
dialogue to show how neurotic
and intense things can get in a
classroom at exam time. The ef-
fect was powerful.
Which is not to say that Mainly
Mime cannot do pure mime.
Watch them walk their dogs in
the hilarious "Job Hazards"
routine, and you'll see that these
women have paid their dues in
mastering the basics.
By creating scenes and feelings
out of thin air and showing our
imaginations hoyy to perceive
them. Mainly Mime gave the day
on the mall a dimension that
would otherwise been lacking.
The other acts entertained us
well, btrt-they did so without ever
needing to involve us directly in
what was going on. The beauty of
mime is that the audience
becomes a medium through
which the mime constructs small
worlds of idea and image.
MIME
Kate Bentley
Jacqueline Wildau
Mainly Mime gave us a varied,
entertaining, sensitive and funny
show, and the amazing thing is
that they did it yvhile working
under very difficult conditions.
There were hundreds of people
out there on the mall. Dogs bark-
ed frisbees sailed oy, people yell-
ed cannons fired. The other acts
could simply outshout everybody
else, but Mainly Mime had to rely
mostlv on the concentration and
the energy of their audience. In
order to tailor the performance,
the mime needs to know what is They pulled it off anyway, in
going on out there. Mainly Mime spite of the dogs and the cannon-
had to deal with what must haye tire
been a lot of ambiguous feed- The show Thursday was Main-
back, because the audience was ly Mime's first appearance on a
just as disturbed bv the distrac- southern campus, and hopefully
tions as thev were. it won't be the last.
Gay Folks Can Be Just As
Funny As The Rest Of Us
Photo by LARRY ZICHERMAN
Dunk-a-Chi O
proceeds for the March of Dimes
By ROBERT ALBANESE
Assl. Features Kditor
A Mr. Alfonso Chiacherone, of
Holyoke, Mass. writes:
Why don't you ever satirize
gays? Most of the gay humor
floating around is getting kind
of stale, and the guys down
here at the club are looking for
a few jokes to liven the place
up, you know what I mean?
Keep the humor flowing.
The truth of the matter is, gay
people homo homoque) are too
easy to make fun of because of all
the stereotypes provided by society
at large. Any junior high school
humorist can make up gay jokes,
and authorities report that most ot
the street-humor associated with
gays actually does originate in such
places. ,
Yes, gays certainly are funny, but
the self-respecting humorist must
seek new frontiers of humor. Take,
for example, the nongay (hetero
normal is).
Except for those who have no se
ual affiliation (such as certain
members of the clergy, those active
in politics and the dead), non-gays
come in three basic kinds: hetero in-
different us, hetero ultranormalis,
and hetero superliberalis.
Hetero indiffentus can be
recognized by his maxim, "If they
leave me alone, I'll leave them
alone He is interested only in his
own sexual behavior, but fears the
possibility of being propositioned
by a gay as he has not thought of a
cool way to decline. This particular
subspecies of homo americanus
thinks that the gay life style is
somewhat revolting but has relatives
who are more revolting still. He
would hire gays to work in his office
but only in groups of two The
"Gayness Book of World Records"
reports that although most
Americans think they belong to this
category, only about 5 percent of
the population actually does.
The second group of nongays,
hetero ultranormalis, is known for
. the expression, "Let's get drunk
and beat up some fags These peo-
ple have protruding bellies, arms
covered with hair, and in general
some kind of learning disability.
They imagine gays as weak and
pathetic, a mockery of the manhood
they themselves represent. They
usually have a harder time making a
woman than does the average gay.
and they enjoy farting and scrat-
ching their testicles in public.
The most characteristic aspect of
hetero ultranormalis is his sug-
gestibility. If you tell him that the
way he wears his cap is a gay signal,
ft will throw the hat away and wear
a fez. If you tell him that gays watch
"Hee Haw he will watch
Lawrence Welk and enjoy it. And it
you tell him that many professional
football players are gay, he'll either
beat you up or commit suicide.
By far the funniest group of
nongays is hetero superliberalis.
They imagine themselves as cham-
pions of freedom and are thought
by many to be an evolutionary
throwback to homo student is lef-
tissimus (circa 1969). They are
known for the statement, "Like, a
lot of my best friends are gay,
man
Superliberalis does haye many
friends who are gay, often at their
expense. He offers victory slogans
to gays who just want to be left
alone and hands out fliers without
askine the gays permission. They
hungrily await "fag' jokes, to
which they respond, "Hey, you
bourgeois repressionist element.
Dont vou realize that many of the
founding fathers were gay? I'll bet
you're against the blacks, too
Superliberalis also has a lot of black
friends.
Blacks and gays report that
Superliberalis can be a boon, as they
are alwavs ready to lend money or
drugs. They will let you use their
car, and if you wreck it, they won't
let you pay for it because you've
already paid your debt to society.
They are always quick with a balled
fist' and a hearty "Right on,
brother
I; myself, belong to a fourth
category of nongay. We believe that
the gays are basically all right, but,
to tell the truth, 1 wouldn't let my
daughter marry one.





6 THE EAST CAROLINIAN APRIL 8, 1980
Barefoot
On The
Mall
Peter Rick Bloeme (left), 1977
World Champion, shows his
stuff. A large crowd par-
ticipated in ECU's second
Barefoot On The Mall.
Photo by RICHARD GREEN
'Free Flick' Features Rock
BvSTEVE�BACHNER
Staff Writer
This Wednesday
night, April 9, the Stu-
dent Union Films Com-
mittee will present a
concert double feature
with a regional premier
showing of "Rod
Stewart � In Concert"
at both 6 and 9:30 p.m.
and a single showing of
"Ladies and
Gentlemen, The Roll-
ing Stones" at 7:30
p.m. Both films will be
heard in "concert"
Surround Sound.
The films will be
shown in Mendenhall's
Hendrix Theater. Ad-
mission for students is
by ID arcd activity card.
Faculty and staff may
use their Mendenhall
Student Center
Membership Card.
First released in a
series of ticket-only
presentations, "Ladies
and Gentlemen, The
Rolling Stones" has
emerged as the
brightest, swiftest and
least cluttered of the
many rock 'n' roll con-
cert films that have
come down the pike in
recent years.
The film captures the
magic that is the Roll-
ing Stones and has
made them the world's
most successful and en-
during rock
phenomena.
Long before Rod
Stewart decided to
spend his time turning
out disco singles, the
Scottish singer was one
of rock 'n' roll's most
exciting performers.
That excitement is cap-
tured in "Rod Stewart
� In Concert which
was filmed on Stewart's
last performance with
the now-disbanded
Faces.
The movie, which
has yet to be released to
commercial theater
chains across the coun-
try, serves as a power-
ful refresher course on
the direction of
Stewart's music at the
time, especially when
considered in contrast
to the schmaltzy pop
and disco efforts he has
produced on his most
recent albums.
There are the in-
evitable gratuitous
shots of Rod shaking
his behind for the
teenyboppers, but
Stewart's stage
presence rises far
beyond such instances.
The combination of the
Scotsman's singing,
posing, coaxing the au-
dience and prancing
around the stage con-
tributes to the magic of
a Stewart concert.
The mixture vaults
Stewart to a level below
only Mick Jagger and
Roger Daultrey among
rock's most charismatic
lead singers. This, com-
bined with the powerful
backup of a band that
features lead guitarist
Ron Wood (currently
with the Stones and ap-
pearing in "Ladies and
Gentlemen, The Roll-
ing Stones") and guest
appearances by revered
Stones' guitarist and
composer Keith
Richards, provides a
raw product that only
the most bungling of
filmmakers could dull.
Here, the product is
instead enhanced by
good camerawork and
excellent sound
reproduction. The film
consists of footage
from the concert,
without interruption by-
artsy, phantasmagoric
interludes (e.g. � Led
Zeppelin's "The Song
Remains the Same").
As a result, at no time
does the product seem
pretentious.
Stewart's show is
rather an unbridled
concert on film.
Stewart whips his
microphone stand
around like a baton and
several times coaxes the
audience into sing-
alongs (most notably
on his last song, the
classic "Maggie
May").
But it is the blonde-
haired artist's singing
that lends the most
worth to his perfor-
mance. A critic once
observed that "Stewart
has an awful voice, but
he sure knows how to
sing a song The
seeming paradox
perfectly describes
Stewart's showing in
the film.
His voice is as scrat-
chy and raw as ever,
but nothing is more
suitable against the
background of scream-
ing guitars and raunchy
rock. The distinctive
voice is just as perfect
for Stewart's occa-
sional ballads.
It is more than
anything the sensitivity
and skill with which
Stewart sings which
enhances his vocal con-
tributions. At several
points we are treated to
the singer's sense of
humor
At one point, the
bizarre Ron Wood,
under Stewart's direc-
tion, stands beside and
accompanies the string
section that sits to the
side of the stage. The
violinists, all middle-
aged and clad in tux-
edos, react with a com-
bination of smiles and
icy glares. A delighted
Stewart then joins
Wood and tosses a
towel to one of the
violinists.
At another point,
during a remarkable
performance of
"Twisting the Night
Away a flurry of ar-
tificial snow falling to
the stage gradually
becomes a blizzard.
Overall, the film, as
a chronicle of a superb
rock 'n' roll show, is a
reminder of what Rod
Stewart was once
capable of. "Rod
Stewart � In Concert"
is thoroughly
outrageous and en-
joyable.
Rod Stewart
�'v
"Jim Sji 2e H "�
on thi co�rr o� o�tm c��
SUMMER JOB OPENINGS FOR CAMP COUNSELORS at
camp Sea Gull (boys) and Camp Seafarer (girls) on the coast
of North Carolina The camps feature sailing, motor-
boating, and steamship, plus all usual camping activities in-
cluding a wide variety of major sports. Early June through
mid August Challenging work with young people, 7-16
years of age outdoors enjoyable stimulating. Qualifica-
tions include ability to instruct in one phase of the camp's
program, a genuine intrest in young people, and excellent
references Quick answer upon receipt of letter of applica-
tion whicn should include a brief resume' of training and ex-
rience in area(s) of the camp program in which you are
Dest qualified to instruct. Apply to Wyatt Taylor, Director,
Camp Sea GullCamp Seafarer, P.O. Box 10976, Raleigh,
NC 27605
Terry
Susan P.
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Molly
Becca
Carroll
Ellen
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Patty
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We are the women who make The
Fleming Center such a special place,
providing prompt and personal,
patientoriented care for women of all
ages. We know your needs. WeVe been
here since 1974.
Call 781-8880 anytime
Accurate, non-Judgmental
information whenever you need it,
about contraception, abortion, sex and
relationsnipe, from the resource
center for sexual health.
The Flaming Center, Inc.
3613 Haworth Drive
Raleigh, NC 27609
Campus Elections April 15th
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Elections for sdorm leaders across the campus will be held Tues. April
15th. With the re-zoning of the campus this year, elections will be
slightly different than they have been in years past. In the past, spring
elections have determined the executive staffs of the Men and Women
Residence Councils. The rezoning that has taken place divides the cam-
pus into three Virtually equal Campuses. This year students Belk.
Scott, Tyler, Aycock and Jones will be voting for members of the Col-
lege Hill Campus Executive Council. This coucil will be the governing
body for all the dorms on the 'hill Qrls in the high rise dorms, Greene,
Fletcher, Clement, White and Garrett will elect the executive members
of the West Campus Executive Council. The remaining dorms, Cot ten,
Jarvis, Fleming, and the two co-ed dorms, Slay and Umstead, will elect
representatives for the Central Campus Executive Council.
These three area councils, College Hill, West and Central, will all be
co-ordinated by a new student organization, the Student Residence
Association (SRAJ that will be in effect next fall.
Interested candidates should file with their Residence Hall Directors
or the Office of Residence Life, 214 Whichard.
The elections will be on Tuesday, April 15 with polls being located in
each dorm lobby between 10:00 and 4:00.
There will be a mandatory meeting of all candidates applying for
positions on the area Campus Councils on Thursday, April 10 at 7:30
in the basement of Scott Dorm. Positions available (all areas) include
President, Vke-President, Secretary and Treasurer. Remember, those
elected will represent YOU, so please vote on April 15.
i





THE EAST CAROUSE
APRIL 8, 1980
Billy Joel's Latest
Glass House Remains Pop
B STEPHANIE
K. riNGLEK
staff riter
i ou know what they
iv about people who
ve in glass houses.
(Veil, Billy Joel has
evei been too concern-
d with "they" and
ves it with his latest
ie, Glass Houses,
thei olume in his
ical odysscy.
loel hit the American
sic charts with
ano Man" in 1973.
He followed this suc-
ess with two good
ims that got cuts m-
the top 40 but little
fanatically adoring its way into the new
group in the Northeast, work. 52nd Street made
Joel finally got national FM, but only th less
recognition with his significant cuts made it
gem, The Stranger, a
four-time platinum in
1977, which won the
pianist a Grammy for
Best Song of the Year
("Just the Way You
Are) Practically
every cut on the album
got exposure on FM
stations all over the
world, and Joel and his
band took their first
North American tour in
1978.
52nd Street was
released shortly after
the 1978 tour was corn-
including publiei- pleted. This album ex-
Streetlife Serenade hibited Joel's ex-
4) and Turnstiles perimental streak, and
6) Once worship- the unmistakable in-
bs a small but fluence of jazz wedged
on the charts. Joel, the
Band, Stephen Stills,
Weather Report and a
few other notables were
invited to Cuba in
1978. Joel was an im-
mediate media draw,
made another tour of
the United States and
set to work on his next
release
New Wave. It's not the
blatant, offensive New
Wave of Squeeze, etc.
but a conservative
"thumb in the pie
Joel can no longer af-
ford to be the artist in
the ivory tower of
i very nice ballad display here with clean
en francais, "C'etait piano work (which is
Toi "Don't Ask Me
Why" carries on the
Latin tradition Joel
made popular with last
year's "Rosalinda's
Eyes but my favorite
hard to
release)
lyrics.
find
and
on this
caustic
freedom of expression piece is "Sleeping with
and admits it in cuts the Television On.
that show he is attemp-
ting to read potential
tastes. "Close to the
Borderline" and "it's
Still Rock and Roll to
Pure Billv Joel is on
It's definitely worth
the bucks, unless of
course you've gotten
your Summer School
bill.
Wh The Stranger Me" are real solid rock
offered to pop music and smack of Costello.
and 52nd Street to
those who feel
themselves tugged xinto
the realms of im-
provisation and extend-
ed solos, Glass Houses
will be to those who
can't quite
themselves to
Glass Houses retains
some of Joel's pop in
songs like "You May
Be Right" and
"Sometimes a Fan-
tasy "Through the
Long Night" slides like
bring late BeatlesMcCartney
enjoy material, and there is
WJNtetjB 5
HjgP
Senior
Art
Show
Communications
Arts major Brenda
Williams is displaying
her senior show in
Mendenhall upper
cases from April 8
dedicated to her
parents, Mr. and Mrs.
Wallace L. Williams of
Raleigh.
Works displayed in
the show include
through April 13. The graphics, illustrations,
show is titled "Mission typography, black-and-
Accomplished" and is white and color
photography. Ms
Williams will graduate
this May with a
Bachelor of Fine Arts
in Communications
Arts and plans to pur-
sue a career as a
graphic
designphotographer.
8
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Where do you want
to be this summer?
Oversea- mountains
sea-hote ranch?
Bydor.ig a minimum ot
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If you're a student or
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couW be a job tor you
that will reward with
income 1(J an 'n
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pend
p � work in the
Ji Mates, two
programs of work,
study and travel. C1EE
has been active in the
field of student travel
"Worldwide Summer
Placement Directory
published by the Ad-
vancement and Place-
ment Institute, is a
listing of jobs open
mainlv to college issue international Stu
students. Most are in dent l.D. cards. You 1
cost, simple, overnight
sleeping accomoda-
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Most students ar-
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need proof that you are
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the Council on Interna- many places
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b v state
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e directories in ma-
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he United States
ed bv Barbara
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ates and Canada and
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students 18-30: Britain,
France, Ireland and
New Zealand. You can
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on a kibbutz in Israel.
The fee for obtaining
employment authoriza-
tion is $40; in Ireland
it's $20.
CIEE is a private,
For further informa-
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United Nations Plaza,
New York, N.Y
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Students can save a
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to job destinations by
staving at American
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Before using the
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pay a membership fee
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 8, 1980
Anti-Nukes To 'Air' Views
As a Peace Corps Volunteer, you can help people
in developing nations try to meet their basic
needs in areas of Food, Energy, Community
Development, Health Care, and Education. Its
a full-time, 24-hour a day commitment with
built-in frustrations and sacrifices. It qpuld be
the toughest job you'll ever love. .
By J ACQUI SALMON
National News Bureau
Connecticut
residents turning on
their radios these days
are apt to hear a cool
male voice asking
them: "Did Three Mile
Island make you
wonder just how safe
nuclear reactors are?
Well, Connecticut
residents who live in the
general area of the
Millstone nuclear reac-
tors could be in just as
much danger
After reeling off a
list of the accidents that
have struck the two
nuclear power plants
supplying most of the
electricity for Connec-
ticut's giant Northeast
Utilities, the voice con-
cludes: "These
thoughts are brought to
you by FUSE, the Fund
for Secure Energy
It's all part of a
carefully planned
strategy masterminded
by John Aristotle
Phillips, the former
Princeton University
student who designed a
workable atomic bomb
three years ago for his
junior thesis. A Con-
necticut native, Phillips
founded FUSE in Oc-
tober 1979, in order to
take a new tack to the
pro-solar, anti-nuke
battle. Instead of
organizing mass
� demonstrations or civil
disobedience actions,
FUSE is taking on the
nuclear industry and oil
interests on its turf.
The group is buying
$250,000 worth of
radio air time over the
next year to air a series
of commercials urging
energy efficiency and
alternative energy and
attacking Big Business
energy control.
"Our is not a grass
roots organization
Phillips explains.
"We're not set up to
hold demonstrations or
rallies or that sort of
thing. We think that
our area of expertise is
in terms of media, and
that is where we should
be concentrating our
efforts
An attractive, ar-
ticulate 24-year-old,
Phillips is an effective
blend of young
idealism and clear-eyed
pragmatism. He
graduated from
Princeton in May 1978
with a degree in
aerospace and
mechanical studies. He
now lives in Norwalk,
Connecticut. Phillips'
design for the atomic
bomb, which he pieced
together using only
publicly available
documents, caused a
sensation in the scien-
tific world. Until then,
the scientific establish-
ment had believed that
designing an atomic
bomb took
sophisticated equip-
ment and extensive
knowledge. But
Phillips proved that
just about anyone was
capable of coming up
with the bomb � in-
cluding terrorist
groups. It wasn't a
pleasant thought, but it
is one that Phillips has
been using since then to
argue against nuclear
power and nuclear pro-
liferation. Using per-
suasion, and his
notoriety as the
"A-Bomb Kid
Phillips has so far rais-
ed more than $100,000
for FUSE. The group's
small staff works out of
a cluttered office in
Westport, Connecticut.
Phillips serves in a non-
salaried position as
chairman. A former
Princeton University
classmate, John Cof-
fee, is executive direc-
tor. There are only
three staff members,
although a number of
high school students do
volunteer work.
tions throughout the
state. Some will be
public service an-
nouncements, while the
more "hard-balled"
will be paid adver-
tisements, Phillips says.
FUSE bases its
philosophy on "Energy
Future the six-year
study conducted by
members of the Har-
vard Business School.
The study rejects the
prospect of significant
contributions in the
future from coal, oil
gas or nuclear power as
impractical and expen-
sive. Instead, the study
advocates energy effi-
"Did Three Mile Island
make you wonder just
how safe nuclear reactors
are?"
The results were en-
couraging for FUSE.
Forty-two percent of
those surveyed said
they prefer that the
U.S. be dependent on
solar energy in the next
10 years. Only 10 per-
cent wanted nuclear
power. Fifty-two per-
cent said they opposed
building more nukes in
Connecticut, while
forty-two percent
favored building more.
Using that informa-
tion, media consultant
Tony Schwartz is
designing 40 to 60 radio
spots aimed at various
demographic groups,
to be aired on radio sta-
ciency and solar energy
as the wave of the
future.
Explains Phillips:
"They will send us the
information � perti-
nent information regar-
ding where they think
public opinion is at,
what arguments are be-
ing made by the utility,
how to refute those
arguments and what
the concerns of the
public are. And then we
will, in turn, turn that
into professionally pro-
duced 30- and
60-second radio
spots
The need for such a
professional service is
becoming more urgent,
Phillips believes. The
Three Mile Island
debacle may have
wounded the nuclear
industry, but it is by no
means dead. Millions
of dollars are being
spent on radio commer-
cials, newspaper and
magazine adver-
tisements and
billboards to convince
the public of the in-
evitability and
desirability of nuclear
power and other syn-
thetic fuels.
FUSE doesn't have
that kind of money, but
Phillips isn't concern-
ed. He points to the
poll results as showing
that the public has not
yet been convinced of
the virtues of nuclear
power, despite the
millions.
"We can't match the
utilities dollar for
dollar. But we don't
have to, because the
public is not stupid
he says. "The public
usually knows when it's
being told the truth.
We can be outspent ten
to one and still get
public opinions on our
side
Phillips may not be
around to see that day
come to FUSE. Now
that he has the group
on its feet, he is eyeing
his next step. Both
political parties have
approached him about
running for Congress in
November. Although
he hasn't made up his
mind yet, he is leaning
in that direction.
I'm beginning to
feel more and more
that we need young
people and we need
people who are willing
to discuss these issues
and present a clear
choice to the American
public he says, ad-
ding, "it's fine for the
New York Times to say
that there's no hurry to
solve the nuclear waste
problem. There's no
hurry for them because
by the time this stuff
starts to leak, most of
the people who wrote
that editorial will be
dead. Buta s far as you
and I are concerned,
we'll be picking up the
tab, and we're going to
be paying a very heavy
price
The East Carolinian
Serving the campus community
for 54 yean.
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday during
the summer.
The East Carolinian is the of
licial newspaper of East Carolina
University, owned, operated, and
published for and by the students
of East Carolina University
Subscription Rates
Alumni515 yearly
All others$20 yearly
Second class postage paid at
Greenville, N.C.
The East Carolinian offices are
located in the Old South Building
on the campus of ECU, Greenville,
N.C.
Telephone: 75734. 637, 4309
The East Carolinian
s now hiring students for the following positions on the Summer 1980 and
198081 staffs:
MANAGING EDITOR Responsible for the overall operation of the editorial div.aon of
the newspaper lie. News, Features, Sports, Production. Copy Editing Management
and newspaper experience and completion of JOUR 2000. 2100. 3100, 3200
necessary Salary $150 month
COPY EDITOR: Edit for style all copy for editorial section of newspaper Completion of
JOUR 2000, 2100, 3100, 3200 necessary Salary: $125 month
FEATURES EDITOR: Direct Features section of paper Newspaper experience and
completion of JOUR 2000, 2100. and enrolled in or completed JOUR 3100, 3200
necessary Salary: $125 month.
STAFF WRITERS: To cover events for News, Sports and Features sections of paper
Completion of JOUR 2000, 2100 preferred but not necesary. Trial period with no pay
for first five stories. Up to 48 cents per column inch thereafter, according to
proficiency.
LAYOUT WORKERS: Layout copy and headlines in editorial section of paper
Experience necessary. Salary: $100 month
CONTACT RICHARD GREEN, 1980-81 editor of The East Carolinian, Old South Bldg .
757 6366, 6367, 6309. Make appointments with secretary for interviews Time of
interviews: TTh - 8 11:00 a.m 3:30 6:00 p.m.
All new employees will receive on the job training on Compugraphic typesetting
equipment
The East Carolinian is an equal opportunity employer
��!�.
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Pretenders' Album Is 'ForcefuV
IWIPOHTISO
By MARK KEMP
Staff Writer
Bands like the
Pretenders are
responsible for the
current revolutionary
musical explosion. It
has taken bands like
this to overcome the
obstruction of popular
music perpetuated by
the enormous music
industry during the
seventies. But now,
with the radical
progress of bands like
the Pretenders, Elvis
Costello and the Clash
to name only a few,
rock and roll will
certainly never die.
With their supreme
first LP, the Pretenders
have facilitated a very
promising future for
themselves. All of the
musicians present a
forceful drive which
illustrates the essence
of their sound. Chrissie
Hynde, the Grace
Slick-like lead singer, is
an extremely arrogant
woman, who, like
Slick, insists on
dominating the boys in
the band. She is a sassy
little bitch who is
obviously content with
her cynicism of the
stereotypical woman's
role.
Side one of the LP
breaks ground with a
powerful rock V roll!
tune, 'Precious This
song immediately
reveals Chrissie's
discontent with the!
typical macho man.
She sarcastically tells
her fellow friend in one
line of the song "But
not me baby, I'm too
precious Fuck Off
You can tell from this
song on that Chrissie
ain't going to take no
lip from any dude.
The rest of the first
side reveals the
enormous creative
ability of this new
band. "The Phone
Call" is a bizarre song
using a lot of
electronics to represent
the sound of a
telephone call. They are
sending out a message
to society. "This is a
mercy mission" is the!
line repeated
continuously
throughout the song.
"Up the Neck" is a
prettier more rhythmic
song.
It shows a hint of
Patty Smith influence
in Chrissie's voice.
"Space Invader" is an
instrumental, again
using electronics to
depict space sounds, a
very popular practice
these days. "The
Wait" is a direct
influence from Patty
Smith. It almost could
have been on her
"Horses" LP. One of
the strongest selections
on the LP is "Stop
Your Sobbing" an old
Ray Davies pop son.
It is the only song on
the album produced by
Nick Lowe (the rest are
produced by Christ
Thomas) and the sound
makes this very
evident.
Side two starts off
much softer than the
two previous sides.
"Kid" sounds a little
like something
Debborah Harry, of
Blondie, would do,
only with much more
life. The second song,
"Private Life" is a
slow space song which
sounds very much like
something Jefferson
Airplane might have
done. The lead guitar
solo echoes of the old
Jorma Koukonan style
and Chrissie again
punches at the lyrics in
the style of Grace Slick.
"Brass in Pocket"
shows Chrissie's total
arrogance.
The Pretenders are.
as of now, a brand new
band and cannot be
positively judged yet
however considering
the quality of this
album and theii
amazing creative
abilities, I cannot see a
disappointing second
album in the making.
Their influences are
very evident but their
own sound is strong
too. They are an
exciting group infested
with unique talent and
are on their way to
considerable amounts
of success.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
APRIL 8, 1980
P&?
Pirates Shell Tar Heels

By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports KdiJor
The East Carolina baseball team
delighted a capacity Harrington
Field crowd Thursday with a 10-3
win over arch-rival North Carolina.
The victory was the ninth in the
last ten games for the Pirates, giving
them a 14-3 seasonal mark, and
brought to an end an 11 game Tar
Heel winning streak, leaving them at
24-11.
The Pirates jumped on UNC
starter Bill Musser in the first inning
for three runs and then continued
their early rampage in the second,
scoring four off reliever James
Parks.
Bill Wilder went the distance for
the Pirates, pushing his record to
5-0. Wilder scattered ten hits, work-
ing himself out of jams on several
occasions with excellent support
from the ECU defense.
The Pirates hit the Tar Heel pit-
ching hard, banging out 14 hits as
every starter but Butch Davis col-
lected at least one. The 0-for-4
showing, ironically, brought to an
end Davis' 14 game hitting streak.
ECU coach Hal Baird was
delighted with the play of his club,
boasting mostly of the defensive
play in his post-game comments.
He did so for good reason as the
Pirates committed but one error and
came up with plays to aid Wilder's
decision throughout.
"We played a very good game
said Baird. "This was really a good
win for us. We beat a strong team,
one of the best in the Atlantic Coast
Conference
Baird seemed delighted at his
team's play in the early part of the
� season and expressed real hope
when speaking of his team's chances
at receiving an NCAA bid. "I'll tell
you he said, "if we can keep this
up, we'll have a real shot at
something in the post-season
Hitting standouts for the Pirates
included centerfielder Bill" Best and
rightfielder Macon Moye. Best had
a double and a homer in a 3-for-5
outing. Meanwhile Moye went
3-for-4, including one double, giv-
ing him 20 in his career, tieing him
with Ron Staggs for the all-time
school record.
With one down in the first Kelly
Robinette started things off with a
single off the pitcher's glove. Best
followed with a double. Robinette
scored on a wild pitch.
Catcher Raymie Styons then
walked and moved to second on
another wild pitch, which scored
Best. Styons moved to third on a fly
out and scored on a centerfield
single by Moye.
In the second inning second
baseman Mike Sorrell and Davis led
off with consecutive walks. Both
were sacrificed one base by
Robinette. Best then grounded out
to second, scoring Sorrell.
A walk issued to Styons was
followed by a Rick Derehailo single,
scoring Davis. Derechailo and
Styons both scored on Moye's
subsequent double.
The Pirates added single in-
surance runs in the fifth, sixth and
eight innings. The sixth was
highlighted by Best's lead-off home
run to right centerfield.
The Tar Heels saw a superb scor-
ing opportunity go by the wayside in
the second when, with two men
aboard, Craig Shumock's towering
drive to leftfield was flagged down
at the fence by Davis.
Carolina scored their initial run
in the third when shortstop Chris
Pittaro scored on a Lloyd Brewer
sacrifice.
Returns To Coach Alma Mater
Emory Realizes Dream
By JOHN EVANS
From the moment Ed Emory
graduated from East Carolina in
1960. he had a dream of returning as
the school's football coach.
That dream came true in
December when he was hired to
replace Pat Dye, who had resigned
and headed to Wyoming.
"For so long, my dream was to
come back to East Carolina as the
head football coach Emory said
during a stop in Durham recently.
"Everything I've done since then
has been with that in mind. In fact, 1
applied for the job six years ago
when Pat (Dye) got it. I really
thought I had shot at becoming the
coach then
Following Dye won't be an easy
task for the former ECU co-captain.
The Pirates were 49-18 during Dye's
six-year stint. Only six starters
return from last season's 7-3-1
squad.
"It's tough following a guy like
Pat Dye said Emory. "He won 80
percent of his games and he did a lot
to make the football program what
it is today. But I am going to do
everything I can do to be the best
coach I can
Emory has encountered the nor-
mal adjustment problems, plus a
couple he didn't expect. Starting
linebacker Jeffrey Warren was ar-
rested on drug charges recently, and
the wife of defensive coordinator
Norm Parker was paralyzed in an
automobile accident two weeks ago
in Ohio.
"That was tragic for Norm and
his entire family said Emory.
"For obvious reasons he won't be
returning to school until the fall.
That's slowed us down tremendous-
ly, because I've had to handle both
the defense and the offense
Regarding Warren's arrest,
Emory said the junior linebacker
was arrested for "telling the guy
(narcotics agent) of somebody who
could sell him some (marijuana and
cocaine). He's been charged with
aiding and abetting. We've suspend-
ed him from the team until the case
is settled
But Emory has remained true to
his dream. "You've always got to
fight for your dream because so-
meone's always testing you he
said.
"When we came in here we set up
our priorities and we've stressed
those things. 1 don't want to go
through the transition stage Bo Rein
went through at State, Dick Crum
went through at UNC and Red
Wilson went through at Duke.
We're trying to adjust our way of
doing things to the players rather
than have them adjust to us. It's
easier for everyone that way
Before taking the ECU job,
Emory served as an assistant coach
at Georgia Tech for two years. He
has also coached at Duke, Wake
Forest and Clemson. According to
Emory, some of the problems at
ECU are academics, weight-training
and recruiting.
"We want our guys to be sound
academically, and a lot of them
weren't when 1 got there. We've
worked on that he said. "We also
found that the overall strength of
this team was very, very poor. There
just weren't the facilities or the
equipment needed to get the body
strength our guys are going to need
to compete against the teams on our
schedule.
"We had only an adequate
recruiting year, although it's not
bad for the first year as coach, but
Davis' Hitting Streak Snapped
we're going to have to do better in
future years. Statewide and on a na-
tional scale, we're behind the rest of
the schools in recruiting
Emory also wants to get ECU's
alumni and fans more involved in
recruiting.
"We're going to have a meeting
in Greenville on April 25 and get all
the ECU fans together. We're going
to talk to them about helping us
recruit. We'll let them know how
they can help us and what they can
and can't do under NCAA rules.
"And we've got to Fill the
stadium. That's the single most im-
portant thing to our program right
now. When we try to schedule big-
name schools to play in Greenville
they ask how many people come to
see us, not how main people
(35,000) our stadium will hold
Emory is full of ideas on how to
change and improve the ECL pro-
gram but there are some things he
won't change.
"We'll start the season doing
tain things a certain way and we'll
end the season doing them the same
way Emory said. "We believe
what we're doing is the best system
we can have at ECL. We won't
panic. We might have to make a few
changes during the season, but we
won't be juggling people all over the
place
Dye Greeted With Open Arms By Cowboys
Remember the old "whatever
happened to articles? Well, if
not here's one to remember later.
For the past several months, a
number of ECU students and fans
have contacted The East Carolinian
and asked about ex-Pirate head
football coach Pat Dye.
Well, 'old Pat is doing fine and
dandy at the University of Wyom-
ing. Dye is in the midst of his first
recruiting season with the Cowboys
and has full support of a multitude
of supporters anxious to rebuild a
nearly-dead grid program.
The best way to exemplify what's
going on in Wyoming follows. A
month-old article concerning Dye
and the Cowboy athletic program
recently was found in my mail box.
It was sent by a long-time friend
who resides in Cheyenne and comes
from The Tribune-Eagle newspaper.
It reads as follows:
By LARRY JARRETT
Sunday Sports Editor
It won't be white tie and tails but
a sports gala is set for Cheyenne
when the First annual Cowboy Joe
Sports Night is staged Tuesday,
Feb. 26 at Holding's Little America.
The night to kickoff the fundrais-
ing efforts of the Cowboy Joe Club
will feature talks by University of
Wyoming President Edward H. Jen-
nings, Head Football Coach Pat
Dye, Head Basketball Coach Jim
Bradenburg and Women's Athletic
Director Mary Elhn Cloninger.
Charles
Chandler
Tickets are $12.50 per person for
a prime rib dinner and tickets must
be purchased in advance. A capacity
crowd of 600 men and women is ex-
pected and sitting capacity is limited
to 600 persons.
"We are launching a new era in
University of Wyoming Cowboy
athletics said Cowboy Joe Club
Sports Night Chairman Mickey
Powers in announcing the upcoming
event set for 6:30 p.m.
Tickets will be sold on a First
come, first serve basis and can be
purchased in Cheyenne at:
Greater Cheyenne Chamber of
Commerce, 122 E. 17th, phone
638-3388; Powers Building Supply,
1003 E. Lincolnway, 632-5521;
Dray, Madison and Thompson, 2.04
E. 22nd, 634-8892; Royal Travel
Agency, 914 E. Lincolnway,
778-2034; Del Northcutt Realty,
1721 Warrenn Ave 634-4406.
A number of Cheyenne Quarter-
back Club members have expressed
an interest in the night and the club
will likely have a good representa-
tion at the dinner to help boost the
athletic programs at UW. In fact,
the dinner is the large sports under-
taking in Cheyenne in recent years
save for the QBC meetings
themselves.
Local sports fans will undoubted-
ly enjoy hearing from each of the
coaches and the women's athletic
director, and especially from Pat
Dye who is launching a new gridiron
campaign at UW.
Dye, who turned a badly sagging
East Carolina football program into
a powerhouse, became Wyoming's
23rd head football coach in Dec. of
1979. He.is busy with recruiting in
hopes of fielding the kinds of teams
he had at East Carolina that posted
a 48-18-1 record over six successful
seasons.
A native of Blythe, Ga Dye at-
tended Richmond Academy in
Augusta, Ga where he won all-
state and All-America honors. He
then enrolled at the University of
Georgia and earned three letter v.
was named All-Southeast Con-
ference and AH-America in 1959
and '60 and was selected to the
Academic All-America Team in
1960. He played on the Bulldog
team that defeated Missouri, 14-0.
in the 1959 Orange Bowl. After
playing in three post-season bowls,
he played for two years with the Ed-
monton Eskimos in the Canadian
Football League.
Dye and his wife, Sue, have two
sons, Pat, Jr 17, and Brett, 13, and
two daughters, Missy, 16, and Wan-
da, nine.
V
V
I
y
0
ft
v
Lady Bucs Sweep State;
Riley Sparks Comeback
East Carolina third baseman Maureen Buck
watches intently on the base pathes for an op-
portunity to advance. The sophomore from
Silver Springs, Maryland, pounded out a
seventh inning double to drive in Janis Parlon
and build momentum for their eventual 4-3
victory.
By JIMMY DuPREE
. Assistant Sports Editor
East Carolina trailed the
Wolfpack of N.C. State 3-0 going
into the final inning of Thursday's
softball doubleheader, but the Lady
Pirates rallied to victory 4-3 with a
comeback capped by Kathy Riley's
bases-loaded single with one out.
ECU outlasted the Wolfpack 1-0
in the opener as senior Mary Bryan
Carlyle claimed both decisions to
raise her record to 10-2.
The Pirates pounded out their
runs on a flurry of singles and
capitalized on errors by N.C. State.
First baseman Shirley Brown
opened the decisive seventh inning
with a single, and was replaced on
the base paths by freshman
speedster Angie Humphrey.
Sophomore Janice Parlon reached
first on NCSU's first error of the in-
ning to advance Humphrey to third.
Junior Cindy Meekins stepped to
the plate to bat for Carlyle and pro-
duced a sacrifice fly to score Hum-
phrey. Steady third sacker Maureen
Buck laced a double to drive in
Parlon and Yvonne "Flea"
Williams reached base on an error
by the State shortstop.
Freshman outfielder Mitzi Davis
rapped a single to plate Buck.
Freshman outfielder Cynthia
Shepard drew an intentional walk,
setting the scene for the dramatic
climax.
ECU coach Alita Dillon went to
the bench, calling on Riley to supply
the crushing blow.
Riley stepped to the plate and
quickly fell behind with a one ball,
two strike count. The Lady Pirates'
hopes of victory dimmed as Riley
sliced a pitch straight up over home
plate.
In form which would delight
Charlie Brown (of Peanuts comic
fame), the Wolfpack catcher circled
relentlessly under the ball. With
grace equal to that of an albatross,
the chagrined backstop fumbled the
ball to the ground to give Riley new
salvation.
Riley drove the next pitch to
center to score Williams for the run
to lift the Pirates' seasonal mark to
11-2.
"I was really relaxed when I went
up there to bat said Riley. "I
thought it was over when I popped
up, but I got lucky
The Wolfpack toofc the lead with
a pair of unearned runs in the first
inning and another in the third.
"I think it was a matter of then
giving up mentally said Dillon.
"In a situation like that when you
have your eight, nine and ten batters
coming up, things don't look so
well. But we have excellent depth
and we showed that. They made a
couple of errors and we took advan-
tage of it.
"If the other team can make er-
rors and you can take advantage of
them, then you're going to be all
right
Davis pounded out two hits in
four trips to the plate and Brown
added a pair in three at-bats in the
final contest, but no batter claimed
more than one hit in the opener.
State had the bases loaded in the
first inning but failed to produce
any runs as they stranded the first of
six runners they would leave on the
bases in the contest.
ECU tallied the game's only run
in the third, as Brown singled and
advanced on a pair of hits before
Williams slapped an RBI fielder's
choice.
"We had a pair of errors in the
first inning said Dillon, "but
somehow we kept them from scor-
ing. Our defense kept us in it
The Lady Pirates travel to UNC-
Greensboro today for a
doubleheader before hosting a pair
with Methodist Wednesday at the
ECU field on Charles Street.





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 8, 1980
A mateur A thletics
Causes Problems
By JULIAN WEISS
National News Bureau
The sudden rise in
amateur athletics has
created problems for
both consumers and the
medical profession.
With as many as 100
million participating in
part-time fitness
regimes, there is a
strong need for
legitimate health prac-
tices to oversee
"weekend athletes
yet the medical profes-
sion has come under at-
tack in this field.
Twenty million in-
juries are tallied each
year, and doctors
themselves have been
blamed in part for their
refusal to apply the
doctrine of preventive
medicine as an antidote
to bodily wear and tear.
"Then Doctors must
tell you the cause of in-
jury says Dr. Gabe
Mirkin, sportsmed
authority, "and what's
injured as well as how
to avoid it Most
practitioners � in-
cluding many profes-
sional team doctors �
have relied on cortisone
shots and short-term
rest as treatment.
The use of pills has
been replaced by
biomechanics in the
more reputable
therapies. The or-
thopedists that were
relied upon for relief to
sprained muscles or
aching tendons have
been slow in adapting
this preventive concept.
In biomechanics, body
limbs are studied for
each individual to
determine exercise pit-
falls and limits of
stress. Mirkin is one of
a growing number of
advocates of this ap-
proach. "By looking at
muscles and what kinds
of things a person is
able to do in the office,
such as bending a knee
at a certain angle, I
know predisposing fac-
tors of injury right
away In this treat-
ment, rehabilitation
begins right after a
twist, fall or break
and continues
throughout the fitness
program's duration.
If amateur joggers,
hikers, runners, and
bikers want to avoid
calamity, they should
investigate sport-
smedicine. A car-
diopulmonary
specialist in Aspen
(Colorado) Dr. Bruno
Balke cautions exer-
cisers. "The greater
percentage do it
without proper medical
examination or testing,
without knowing their
full capability In-
juries are caused by
lack of flexibility,
structural abnor-
malities, muscle im-
balance, or bad train-
ing. Stretching exer-
cises are now regarded
as keys to avoiding
muscle abuse and a
remedy superior to the
pill-taking, arm injec-
tion technique used
after the fact.
There is danger to
the layperson through
misinformation. One
authority, Allan J.
Ryan (Physician and
Sportsmedicine editor)
has observed that "few
medical schools or
residencies offer train-
ing. Sportsmedicine is
not a recognized
specialty such as inter-
nal medicine or
pediatrics The pro-
blem of conflicting ad-
vice has been rampant;
podiatrists and car-
diologists are limited in
approaching a com-
prehensive view, while
orthopedic surgeons
are given only brief
athletic-related train-
ing. Maryann Napoli at
the Center for Medical
Consumers in New
York summarizes the
view of many. "With
the exception of a few
orthopedists who con-
fine their practices to
professional athletes,
the medical care system
has not been responsive
to the needs of those
who make vigorous ex-
ercise part of the daily
routine
Examinations should
include the treadmill
test, blood pressure
readings, and the car-
diac function test. The
borderline overweight,
smokers, and those
with physical problems
should be cautious
when designing their
regimes � and check-
jps are necessary. Joint
laxity, muscle
weakness, and coor-
dination are all factors
in the possibility of
future accidents. Dr.
George Sheehan,
another pioneer in the
field, emphasizes
strengthflexibility,
whereby undue stress
on the foot and
shoulder is explored.
One test designed by
Dr. Robert Kerlan at
the National Athletic
Health Institute in
California uses com-
puter analyses of
pulmonary functions,
and a monitoring of fat
content in the body to
draft a personalized
athletic program.
"Many consumers
are turning to local col-
leges for help in obtain-
ing sound sport-
smedicine examinations
and treatment. They
assume, correctly, that
the schools have many
close encounters of all
kinds with exercise in-
juries. Sportsmedicine
came into being only
within the last decade,
as did the exercise
physiology craft, and
will doubtless undergo
transformations in the
1980's.
It is closely allied
with the preventive
medicine ideal, and its
probe of body stress
and structure can add
sophistication to the
knowledge of
"weekend warriors"
intent on consoling
themselves for years of
inactivity.
If you've just
brought a set of track
shoes or dusted off
your tennis racket! then
follow one simple rule:
preconditioning is the
best medicine. Simple
warm-up exercises pre-
vent most strains and
stresses that bring on
charleyhorse, cramps,
aches and the like.
Here are some warn-
ing signals to let you
know if the bounds of
safe � and hence truly
worthwhile � fitness
activity are crossed.
Breathing trouble or
spitting blood means i
lung may be in trouble,
or punctured in severe
cases.
Pain and swelling in
the knee is a sign of
ligament tears (with
surgery likely).
Weakness or numbness
in the back is related to
spinal cord damage.
Aside from not
cramming in a week's
workout into a single
day, apply the
hardeasy principle.
Exert yourself one day,
then give yourself a
break avoiding possible
trouble, on the next.
An initial checkup
and following the rules
keep risks low for the
amateur athlete,
especially for the pre-35
group.
With almost half of
the population exercis-
ing daily, a great many
of them will continue to
be plagued by minor
and severe injuries. For
16 million joggers, you
can bet your last white
sox-and-sweatshirt
combo that shin splints
(leg muscle fars) will
be a continuing
possibility.
Some common sense
� such as trading in
high-heeled shoes for
sneakers to avoid ten-
donitis � can keep you
out of the doctor's.
����
ARMY-NAVY STORE
Backpacks, B-15. Bomber,
Field, Deck, Flight,Snorkel J
Jackets, Peacoats, Parkas,
Shoes, Combat Boots, Plus J
1501 S. Evans Street
�Ma
Riggan Shoe Repair
across St. from
Blount Harvey
Downtown
111 W. 4th St.
Parking in front and Re;
Si
DR. PETER W.HOLLIS
announces the opening of
his office for the practice of
OPTOMETRY
Family Eye Care
Contact Lens Fitting
Carolina East Mall, Greenville
756-9404
MonTues. 10-6, WedFri. 10-7 Sat. 10-2
FOSDICK'S
1890
Seafood
Tuesday Night
Specials
FLOUNDER 03.SO
TROUT �2.95
PERCH �2.95
all you can oat
No taka-outs please
�Ual Includes:
French Fries, Col slaw,
HttthpappUs
Peace Corps & VISTA
will be on campus
APRIL 15
Booth-Wright Bldg.
APRIL 16
Career Planning Off.
Sign up today for intwvtews
PEACE CORPS offers a volunteer
opportunity to help oeopte m
developing nations meet the oosc
numon needs
VtSTA volunteers work with
groups across America tryrg to
ncreose poor peoples voices
in community decision
making
We are proud to
announce that we
have added
one of the
AREAS FINEST
SALAD BARS
lor your
dining pleasure.
PEACE CORPS especially seeks volunteers
ith backgrounds n Nursmg, Math, Science,
and Business AdmmBtrafion
V1SFA invites ON degree candidates to
nqmre ooout a challenging grass
roots experience
Benefits tfclude paid Hwng. travel
heuffh expenses plus after
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ukjwunces
Nac�C�nK'VISTA
!7!3HS�i�e� MW
Washington DC 20525
ftmrn
DC (202) 254 7346
Vo Md MC
(To�Fwe)
(800)424 8580.38
OPEN FOR LUNCH
Dolly 11S30
San. Thar. a,Bi
4:30-9:00
Frl and Sot.
430-10:00
ECU Basketball
Awards Banquet
Join the 1979-80 ECU Pirate Basketball team
April 10 at the Greenville Country Club when
the players are recognized for their ac-
complishments during the most successful
campaign (16-11) since 1975.
Guest Speaker:
Clemson's Bill Foster
Tickets available through the coaches'
office: AAinges Coliseum (757 6472) OR
The East Carolinian office (757 6309)
ABORTIONS UP TO
I2th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
$176 00 "all inclusive"
pregnancy test, birth con
trol, and problem pregnan
cy counseling For further
information call 83? 0535
(toll free number
800 221 2568) between 9
AM 5PM weekdays.
Raleigh Women's
Health Organization
917 West Morgan St.
Raleigh. N.C. 27603
rc
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income By and Munch?
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Title
The East Carolinian, April 8, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 08, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.52
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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