The East Carolinian, April 1, 1980






�hc iEast Carolinian
Vol. 54 No.� 5 0
10 Pages
Tuesday, April 1,1980'
(ireenville, N.C
Circulation lO.(MM)
WECU Changi
Name, Format
For FM Statioi
By TERRY GRAY
News Fditor
Visitors to the office of the old WECU radio station
will find that its purple and gold walls are fast d.sap-
nearina behind a fresh coat of beige.
ne change is more than cosmetic If things,go accor-
dine to plans, WECU will soon become WZMB a
student-operated FM station with an avowedly alter-
native approach to music programming.
A new broadcasting tower was erected ori topot Tyler
dorn'orv last week, giving a visible sign that the three-
year silence in the station's control room is coming to an
ei,For now, the station is waiting for confirmation of its
new call letters from the Federal Communications Com-
mission, and also for new equipment trom the state,
said general manager John Jeter Monday afternoon.
Ac" ordingTo Jeter, the first show should go on the air
in late May.
"We're not sure � the problem is that we don't know
when the equipment is coming in. It could come next
week or next month, Jeter said
Jeter explained that the state had let out bids tor the
equipment, and was waiting to get the lowest offer.
Since the station will by law be primarily an educa-
tional tool, there will be no advertisements. Jeter feels
this will free the station from the economic considera-
tions that usually influence programming on commer-
cial stations. , , Mn
"My personal opinion is that this station should pro-
eram an alternative type show for this area because
we're not in competition with anyone else for the adver-
tising dollar. The commercial stations here are suffering
from what 1 call the 'burn-outs' - instead ot creative
programming, they rely on the trade magazines and on
the "computer-generated formats to tell them what thev
should play said Jeter.
The format planned for the station will be oriented to
album rock selections and jazz, with some classical and
opera on the weekends. In addition, there will be hourly
news broadcasts of five or ten minutes, concentrating
on campus and local news. The station will use the UPI
wire service, and also news services that distribute more
colorful and offbeat news.
Jeter said that the station will attempt to broadcast 24
hours a day. . lty7fi
Since he became general manager in April, iv�,
Jeter's main problem has been to reactivate interest,
support and action in getting the station back on the air
The old WECU had its funds taken away by the SGA
because of a disinterest that was caused in part by inade-
quate technical facilities, and new efforts for a station
have since run into problems with the FCC in getting a
broadcast license approved.
With the license finally approved, and the tower in
the air, Jeter describes his mood as "ecstatic
SGA Candidates
Explain Election
Platform Stances
proposals.
DRAKE MANN:
CHAR1 IF SHERROl):
establishing an ECU seat on tne ureenvmc sherrod' A lot of our superior students arc absorbed in
Commission? . rricuium ancl do not have the time to get involv
Mann: My idea there is no o use the Seat to pr�s for a �"�t. , lhmk lhal Vs , shame, but
reduction'oT rates" for ECU students - - that would be
ridiculous - but to get some representation for the
thousands of consumers on this campus.
EC: What about your proposal to replace the transit
system's buses?
ed in student politics. I think that it s a shame, but I
realize that school work is the most importanl thing.
When 1 say inferior students, I'm talking about the peo-
ple who don't do well in school and wouldn't do well in
any curriculum. What we need are some of our
TSiSh each, ttS.JSSS of a
S SKSKSt- in your proposed Student ,o, of things ��� concern SX
SSSK in this forum would be used in three Mendenhall? Can we find ap!ace: park, instead o�
See Candidate Page 2, Col. 1
See Candidate Page 2, Col. 1
Days Lost To Snow
Have To Be Made Up
Photo by KIP SLOAN
The New FM Tower
was erected last week
��Every time that 1 walk or ride by the tower, 1 have to
stop and look. There has been a lot of talk about this
station and now we have something tangible to look at.
It reminds me that the end of a long road is coming into
view, and it's very satisfying .
"We're going to be releasing a lot of new music that
just doesn't get played around here, plus a lot of the old
rock classics said Jeter. "But we're not going to be
plagued by the 'burn-outs It's an insult to people s
mentality. People aren't dumb. They know when
thev're listening to a machine and when they re listening
to another human being, and the human contact, the
one-on-one relationship between a station andjhe
listener that's the most important factor in radio.
By KAREN WENDT
Staff Writer
The two days missed due to snow
in early March by ECU students will
have to be made up, Dr. Elmer
Meyer, Vice-Chancellor for Student
Life told the SGA Legislature last
night.
According to Meyer, the days will
be made up the second Saturday
before exams and reading day. He
said that he desired the students'
reaction, which was generally sup-
portive.
SGA legislators also overrode
President Brett Melvin's veto of the
SGA banquet bill. "If they hadn't
used student fees I wouldn't have
vetoed it Melvin said prior to the
meeting.
However, the legislature
disagreed with Melvin's decision
and voted to override the veto.
The bill requested $230 of student
fees to pay for a banquet that is be-
ing planned for the legislators. Dur-
ing debate of the issue, Melvin said
that many students had come up to
him and expressed their desire that
the SGA should not get the funding.
"I realize we worked for them all
year long, but that is not the issue
said Melvin.
Nicky Francis, who proposed that
the legislature override the veto,
said that he believed that someone
in the SGA was "trying to carry a
point a little bit too far
"The idealistic head of the stu-
dent government leader has reared
its head said Francis, speaking
against the veto.
Melvin had said earlier that he felt
a large number of students had
come up to him concerned over the
funding. He stated that he felt a
'large number' was ten people, say-
ing that most people will not seek
you out in such a situation.
"I for one do not feel that the
SGA or any other organization
should use student tees for the
entertainment of a few in-
dividuals said Melvin.
One legislator pointed out that
there were about 50 members ot the
legislature, and that Melvin con-
sidered "50 a few and 10 a lot.1'
In other business. Jay Stone, of
the Student Caucus for Progressive
See SGA Page 3. Col. 1
NCSL Receives Top Award
Bv LARRY Z1CHERMAN
Assistant News Editor
East Carolina University's delega-
tion to the North Carolina Student
Legislature returned from the an-
nual legislative session a little bit
richer for the experience.
The delegation captured the
organization's highest award - Best
Large School Delegation.
The award represents the most
outstanding delegation from a large
school throughout the entire year.
Annual Legislative Session was
held Mar. 26-30 at the old State
Capitol Building in Raleigh.
ECU'S State-funded abortions
bill was a close contender for Best
Bill from a Large School Delega-
tion but fell second to UNC-Chapel
Hill's Low-Level Radioactive Waste
Management Act by only a few
points.
"I am especially proud of ECU s
performance said Anne Nor-
thington, ECU delegation chairper-
son, "considering that I am the only
member who had been to a previous
session. When you can begin fresh
with a new delegation with no ex-
perience and can turn it into tthe
best delegation in the state, that says
something about the people you
have ,
Mark Lewis, a member of the
delegation, served as Reading Clerk
in the House of Representatives
under Speaker David Collins of Ap-
palachian State University.
ECU'S other bill, calling for the
passage of a state Equal Rights
Amendment, passed unanimously in
the Senate and by a large margin in
the House of Representatives.
"I was pleased with the reception
that the state equal rights bill receiv-
ed said Margie McCormick,
delegation secretary and author of
the bill. "It proves that the leaders
of tomorrow have a strong belief in
full equality for all the citizens of
the state
A light point of the session came
when an ad-hoc committee was
established to probe the shooting of
J.R. Ewing of Dallas. McCormick
served as chairman of that commit-
tee in the Senate.
Next year's officers were elected
Saturday morning. They are,
Governor, Harry Kaplan, UNC-
Chapel Hill; Lt. Governor, Steve
Beam, Wake Forest; Secretary of
State, Steve Roper, UNC-
Greensboro; Attorney-General,
Mark Bremmer, UNC-Wilmington;
Treasurer (appointed), Mark Fit-
simmons, UNC-Chapel Hill.
Photo by CHAP GURl EV
Greeks Enjoy The Party at Mosier's Farm Saturday
Another Alternative Press Rumored
. - � � - - -� ThP naivr lt was distribut
HUM, UUi iv
ECU Drug Operation
Nets Another Student
JStZLSiit SS38TS. "Sf WETS
�ndetcover investigation which net- enable students to be released
JfS JtVn s last Wednesday. without payment to the bondsman
Andrew siTth 20 of" Jones and then having a flexible amount
rwm was arrested and charged of time to repay the company
D?L o rnun s of sale and posses- Melvin reported that adm.nistra-
W" r ne tion sources told him that the agent
S?k S' Wednesday was the was not set up as a student, but that
7 �ti of an undercover he "made himself available" to
oration conducted over the last students to make drug purchases.
several months by the OreenviHe according to the
Police Deparuent and he N.c. �?J tne ony university
ST ,S of 12 "ludems and two officials to know of the operation in
SGA President Brett Melvin made gins.
A News Analysis
For those who can or care to
remember the SGA election last
year, the 1980 campaign has ap-
peared very tranquil, almost boring.
Last year the campus witnessed one
of the most controversial and scan-
dalous campaigns in recent years.
The appearance of a political pro-
paganda "newspaper" called The
Alternative Press was probably one
of the most influential factors in the
election. Even those who felt the
brunt of the paper's criticism admit-
ted it was a politically shrewd piece
of propaganda.
Of course this year's freshmen are
probably wondering what The
Alternative Press was, what it was
all about, what the big deal was and
could be again, and why talk about
it now. :�
To put the whole situation in
perspective one must examine the
recent history of campus politics at
ECU There were two rival factions
that arose in late 1976 and early
1977 that came to dominate campus
affairs. Both factions fought bitter-
ly for control and for power.
One group emerged from the
ranks of the student newspaper,
Fountainhead, the predecessor of
The East Carolinian, of which
Advertising Manager Robert M.
Swaim was the dominant figure.
Others in this group included Neil
Sessoms, 1977-78 SGA president;
Reed Warren, 1977-78 SGA vice
president; Tommy Joe Payne,
1978-79 SGA president; David Cart-
wright, 1978-79 SGA vice president;
and Charles Sune, former Student
Union president, perhaps the
foremost political strategist in the
student ranks.
The other group was led by Tim
Sullivan, 1976-77 SGA president.
Sullivan's faction in the early years
consisted mainly of his fraternity
brothers, Ricky Price, speaker of
the legislature, and Craig Hales,
1977-78 SGA treasurer and a three-
term legislator.
For three years these two groups
fought many battles for control of
the student government � Sullivan
against Fountainhead. The paper
called for the defeat of Sullivan in
his second and third races for the
presidency, and both times he lost to
candidates endorsed by the paper.
On the day before the election last
year the campus was startled with
the appearance of The Alternative
Press a document described by
members of the ECU Board of
Trustees as "scurrilous an act of
cowardice
The Alternative Press was a four-
page political propaganda sheet, as
described by ECU political science
professor Dr. John East, who was
called to testify at a Review Board
hearing following the election as an
expert witness.
The central theme of the publica-
tion was that the newspaper and
particularly Swaim and Editor Doug
White had in the past and were con-
tinuing to slant the news in favor of
alleged handpicked candidates ac-
cused of being puppets of the paper.
One trustee said that The Alter-
native Press was "filled with venom
and sarcasm . fc
U was distributed in the dorms
and across campus on the morning
preceeding the election and was
taken as the gospel truth in the
freshmen dorms.
See ANOTHER, Page 2
Inside Today
Battle of the BandsPage 5
Squeeze ReviewedPage 5
Baseball Team
Sweeps Packrag �
Softball Team
Captures Totiraey �

A
b
. .
�� T





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 1,1980
Candidates Review The Issues
MANN
Continued from Page 1
Another Alternative Press
Rumored For 1980 Elections
" -m :� �, rn,rllilt; that it i,T
one. If we can raise $1.5 million to
enlarge the football stadium, why
EC: What about your proposal to Mann: Soda Shop No. 2 is basically can't we raise enough money to buy
�ni� tha troncit cuctpm'c hints' a duplication of the Croatan. It's npw huses over the summer?
replace the transit system's buses?
Mann: I'd just like to investigate
more fully that option. I can't see
spending $25,000 to buy new long-
distance type buses when we might
have the chance to buy older and
a duplication of the Croatan. It's
better to have that than to have
nothing at all, but I think the space
could be used to serve the needs of
the students much better. I mean,
buying one of those packaged ham-
smaller city buses that were made to burgers and popping it into the oven
be used around town. Greenville to w�nt for to come out "piping
bought some older buses from the not and delicious" � forget it.
city of Roanoke, Virginia for about
$2500 each, although they did need EC: Are there any additional corn-
some repair. ments you'd like to make?
EC: What would be involved in Mann: The new administration we
your proposed Student Research have now is willing to listen to the
students and act on their needs
think that's an area where I could
serve the students best � to prod
the administration in responding to
the students.
Also, the SGA is not really in
touch with the people. The SGA is
Forum?
Mann: The funds in this forum
would be used in three ways. First,
the money could be used to finance
trips to conferences by students who
have been invited to present
research papers. Second, the money
could be used to award prizes to
ECU students who have written
papers deemed to be worthy of
recognition. Third, the funds could part of it. The direction should be
be used in conjunction with the Stu- more toward the students.
dent Union to bring nationally- and
internationally-known scholars to
this campus. 1 think this research
forum would be a fantastic oppor-
tunitv for the university to improve
new buses over the summer?
EC: Does your concentration on the
practical aspects of student life
mean that academic matters are less
important to you?
Sherrod: No. I made an excellent
grade in an English honors pro-
gram. I'm a member of the History
Honor Society. 1 qualify for the
Political Science Honor Society. So
I think I'm a good student, and I'm
proud of that. I don't ignore the im-
portance of academic affairs,
students ana act on ine.r -ecu. � everybody's
They need a direction, though, and cau camnaian to im-
goal. But I don't campaign to im
prove academics because that
should be left to the professionals.
I'm more concerned with student
welfare.
EC: What is a positive-activist, as
something sitting up in Mendenhall, you have described y ousel f?
and students don't feel enough a
its academic image, and I'm confi-
dent that the administration would
back me on this idea.
EC: What did you have in mind
when you mentioned the campus
fast-food facilities in your plat-
form?
SHERROD
Continued from Page 1
buying a $25 hun-
ting license? If someone applies for
a confidential loan, will it remain
confidential? And there's no excuse
why the bus fleet doesn't have a
system where one bus is replaced
every third year with another new
Sherrod: A positive-activist is a guy
who sits in his office on the phone
with paperwork in front of him and
a lot to do. But when a student
comes up to his door with a pro-
blem, he will say: Can I help you?
He'll listen, get the facts, and say,
let's do it, let's solve it. Bureaucracy
has gotten a rotten reputation
because people get delayed and
pushed around. The positive-activist
gets to it, and a solution is reached.
troduced Robert bwaim to the ar-
Continued from Page l uj.
tist, a fraternity brother ot Melvm
However, its effect was felt less and Sullivan, who drew the ear-
by upperclassmen who had witness- riCatures of Swaim and three can-
ed the two previous elections. Older didalPS for the front page of The
students had seen propaganda and Alternative Press,
dirty tricks in the past and many
were skeptical about the validity of
material in The Alternative Press.
The East Carolinian has received
several comments from those close
to election activities hinting that
another edition of The Alternative
Press will appear and has reportedly
been in the making for some time
now. Confidential sources within
the SGA have said that there will
most likely be another Alternative
Press attacking certain candidates.
Many say they will be very surprised
if another one doesn't appear before
the election.
Student politicians who are, so to
speak, "in the know say the
reason that old allies of Tim
Sullivan and Brett Melvin will most
certainly want to see one of their
own in office � they figured it
worked once so it will probably
work again.
It was firmly established at Brett
Melvin's two trials last spring for
election rule violations pertaining to
the publication of The Alternative
Press that the paper was written and
paid for by Tim Sullivan for the ex-
press purpose of swaying votes.
More revealing was the recent
episode where Brett Melvin in-
going so smoothly that it would be a
real shame for another one of those
things to come out and create
another mess like we had last year,
said one source.
The upcoming election could be
one of the cleanest in four or five
Overall, the political community years, or it could be a repeat perfor-
seems to be saying that it will be mance of last ear's election,
very surprised if another version of plagued with scandal and dirty
The Alternative Press does not ap- tricks perpetrated by anonymous
pear. Most say they fear it because "publishers" who seek to secure
of the adverse affect it might have victory for their candidates at any
on the election. "The campaigns are cost, no holds barred.
HEAPING tiny
PORTIONS. pric
Break the junk food routine and get a good, hot meal with
vegetables.
WEDNESDAY FEATURE
April 2 only $1.69
Salmon Croquettes
with hot slaw and choice of potato
FOXHUNTER
(formally the Rathskeller)
OFFERING
LADIES NITE
ARMY NAVY STORE
�� Backpacks, BIS, Bomber,
Field, Deck, Flight, Snorkel �
Jackets, Peacoats, Parkas,
�� Shoes, Combat Boots, Plus.

S01 S Evans Street 4
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
$176 00 "all inclusive"
pregnancy test, birth con
trol, and problem pregnan
cy counseling For further
information call 832 0535
(toll free number
800 221 2568) between 9
AM 5P W weekdays
Raieigh Women's
Health Organization
917 West Morgan St.
Raleigh, N C 27603
THURSDAY FEATURE
April 3 oNLY $1.69
Stuffed Green Peppers
with 2 vegetables
Come home to eat at S&S � we're located in the
Carolina East Mall in Greenville, at the intersection of
West Haven Road (U.S. 264 Bypass) and Hwy. 11. Plenty
of free parking too.
Carolina East Mall
Serving continuously daily
from 11 a.m. till 8 p.m.
(8:30 Friday & Saturday)
oa �
ia
TUE. NITE8pmlam
LADIES BRING
YOURNICKELS
THE COMPLETE
STUDENT
DAILY LUNCHEON
SP-�ULS
69
99
HOt D0gOnly
Hamburger,
French Pries $4
& 12-0z. Drink I
ALL YOU CAN EAT
SPECIALS
4 DO 8 00 PM NOCAMYOUT
SALAD-50 EXTRA
ASST. VAR.
EVERYTHING
FOR
SPRING!
MELLO YELLO OR
Coca-Cola
PIZZA
ONLY
Owner and Operator
Randy Alford
WITH GARLIC BREAD
ITALIAN
$199
SPAGHETTIoIyI ��
Magazines and
CLIFF'S
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
�i�mwisa�i in c ne�ijtmM MMMM
ALL YOU CAN EAT!
Monday - Thursday
Crab Cakes
Trout
Flounder
CLIFF'S SUPER
SPECIAL
WEDNESDAY
CRAB CAKE SPECIAL
2 Golden Fried Crab Cokes
French Fries, Slow, ond
Hush Puppies. $.99.
Records and
Tapes
Plus Deposit
BEER
Black Label
$i
12-Oz.
Cans
RHINE, ROSE, PINK CHABLIS OR
Gallo Hearty Burgundy
$
1.5-Ltr.
FRESH
ICheese
Pizza
COUNTRY OVEN
Cheese
Balls
$
Priced
From
flK
iMSGQUNTEDj
Little Debbie Snack Cakes & Archway Cookies
BAGGED
Chips, Snacks & Bagged Nuts
POUCH PACK
Sauces & Gravy Mixes
PEPPEMIOGE FARMS
Bagged Cookies & Snacks
"�it
OFF MANUFACTURER S
SUGGESTED RETAIL
ADVERTISID ITEM POLICY
J Hwm advartiaad Hams Is required to ba readily availaMa lor
i aaoh Krogar Sav-on Store sxeapt aa apaeMteaNy notad in tNs
� do run out of aw advarttaad Hawywa wW oQsryou your cfK'
� iparaote ilarn, whan svatiaow. renscting tha sarns savings - - �
racncnacK wmen win arums you re purcnaaa ma aQvaraaao warn av mn
advartlaad pries within 30 days.
5V-Oz.
Pkgs.
REG. OR DIP
COUNTRY OVEN
Potato
Chips
8-Oz. Twin Pack
EftacHva Tuoa April 1
thru Sat April s, 1M0
Copyright 1M0
K rogar Sanr-on
Quantity Rights
�m �oU to Oaalars or Wholasslari
FOOD, DRUG, GEN
MDSE. STORES
NONE SOLD
TO
DEALERS
OPEN 7 AM TO MIDNIGHT
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
Phone 756-7031

1





Announcements
Social Work
�Ml Social Work jitJ. C'orrcclions ma
lors interested in aiicnding the
workshop anj pig picking should
prefcgKtCf and pa before April I,
ls�H�i See Donna May ot hiticHorvaln
Vour favorite beverages will be served
at the pii; picking
Journalists
I he Societ) tor Collegiate lournalisls'
pledge orientation meeting will be held
1 hursd.o . Xpi ii 10 al h p m instead ol
luesdav. pnl I. in Room 24H
Mendenhall Ml pledges and officers,
arc meed to attend
Kite Making
learn to design and make youl own
kite hv attending a tree workshop spun
sored rn Mendenliall Studententer
I he workshop, conducted bv ticorge
Brcll, I'liioninumilvolk'gc nisi-
In Residence, is scheduled loi Wednes
i Vpril fv Irom h H p n in the
Vtcndcnhallrafts i enter. I lieu- is no
registration or supplies tee lor ihis uni-
que workshop lusi cotne bv ihe C rails
t enier .hkI itvin in ihe tun'
Boxing
Lifesaving
Red vioss dvanced I ifesaving
course wl be offered during ihe month
1 pnl Ihe first class me ting will be
hekl ruesday, pril I. ai b p m al
i m Pool i iMite prepared
swim lor furlhct information, call
-s 42VII, S.injv Skellre
IVCF
lei aisiiv l hrtsltan I ellowship now
nects eveiv Wednesday night at 7 til
� U.ble study, piavei. Icllowship and
1 yonc is welcome to cornc! We
sting ai ihe Methodist Stu
m t entct lovaied on 5th Sireel across
iromliarrctt Dorm s e also have small
HiMc studies ihai m " ai various
during ihe week W encourage
I set to know us
Openings for TKI: biuing arc still
available The tournament will be held
April K, S and 10 Openings are
available in IKVI92. l3-20t and
Unlimited weight classes Interested
boxers sail IK 7X94 or drop hv I KI
House. 951 I Tenth St. This tourna-
nient K-netits St ludcs C hildrens
Hospital.
Scholarship
Ihe Soviets tor collegiate lournalisls
will award a SM) scholarship to a
sophomore, mnior or senior (not
graduating) journalism minor In-
terested persons should submit the
lollowing materials to Ira Baker.
ustin t4, bv April IV a statement ol
professional poah including whv he has
shosen journalism, a personal reference
and a grade sunimarvandidalcs will
be screened accordinf to professional
intent, background and initialise and
recommendation SC I members who
arc in good standing are eligible to par
luipale also Ihe winner will be an-
nounced at Ihe annual reception ot the
I nglish Department Mas 9 m Mmges
C olliseum
Marshals
female siudenis who are interested in
tvmg marshals lor ihe ISX0commence
mem cwetsei may applv this week in
ihe SCiA olliee, room 22 Mendenhall
Vpplicanls should be rising seniors with
good academic records Dunes will in-
clude handing oul progiams and
sealing those m attendance.
French Night
I he International I anguage Organia
non is sponsoring I a Soiree I-rancatsc
on Thursday, pril t al X p.m. al ihe
International House on Ninth Sireel
fasie imported wines and cheeses with
Iresh French bread and friends Ad-
vance tickets are $2.50. $3.00 al the
door, covering lour glasses ol wine and
ihe tood I stra glasses will be S.50
each. Door prizes will be given awav
I vervone is invited 10 attend.
Bake Sale
CORSO will have a bake sale April 2.
1980 in the Allied Health lobby from 9
til 2. Members arc asked to bring baked
goods
Graduation
Attention, all Second Semester
Graduates fhe delivery dales for caps
and gowns al the Student Supply Store
are April I, 2 and 3. Announcements
are on sale ai this time. There are live in
a package lor $2.25.
Little Sisters
Kappa Alpha I ittle Sisters arc planning
a night ol tun Wednesday. April 9 from
9 I al Chapter X Beef will be 50 ccnls,
and there will be a beer chugging con
test. Tickets are MccMs in advance and
75 cents al the door
Twig
I he Way Biblical Research Outreach
will have a book sale on Tuesday. April
I. from St am -3 p.m. in the bookstore
lobby In addition to a wide selection of
Biblical Research maicrials, sonic of
the most controversial books on sub-
lects of interest to any Christian will be
available
Softball
Sigma Nu fraternity will be holding a
soliball tournament April 13 and 13.
Ihe entry fee will be $3 per plavcr
which includes a jcrscv and beverages al
the championship party for more in-
lormatton call ?5S 7M0 or 75R-A49.V
There will be a 20 team maximum.
Phi Beta Lambda
Phi Beta lambda will meet Tuesday,
April I. at 4:00 p.m. in Rawl 103. A
Buccaneer group picture will be taken
and nominations and voting for next
years officers will be held We will also
have a guest speaker.
Holy Communion
A special Holy Week service of Holy
Communion will be celebrated Wednes-
day evening, April 2, in the chapel of
the Methodist Student Center on 5th
Street across from Garret! Dorm. The
service will be al 6 p.m. with the Rev.
Bill Haddcn. I piscopal Chaplain, and
the Rev. Dan larnhardt, Methodist
C haphan, celebrating. Supper will be
served at 5:30 p.m preceding the scr-
Toto
The Student Union Major Attractions
Commit tec presents TOTO. wilh a
special guest TBA. on April 17 al MB
p m in Mingcs Coliseum. Tickets will
go on sale Monday. March 31. al 10:00
a m in Mendenhall Sludcnl (enter.
Tickets will be $5.00 for ICU siudenis
and $7DO for ihe public.
UFCDC
The University folk and Country
Dance Club meets on Thursday nighls
from 7-9 in Brcwsler D-109. ir you are
interested in folk and country dancing
or have always wanted to learn but have
never tried, come on over. Everyone is
welcome, for additional information,
call 752-0826.
AFROTC
Air force ROTC currently has one
scholarship available under the Com-
mitted Scholarship Trial Program
which will be awarded to a May 1982
graduate. This scholarship is open to
Sophomores with the following
qualifications: CPA, 2.8 or higher;
SAT score, 1000 or higher; major,
math, physics, chemistry, computer
science or business quantitative
mclhods; and qualification for military
service. The scholarship pays in-state or
out-of-siatc tuition, books, lab fees
plus $100 a month tax-free. To sec if
you qualify, call 757-6597 or come by
room 206, Wright Annex.
Summer Dorms
Residence hall room deposits for Sum-
mer School 1980 will he accepted in the
Cashier' Office. Room 105. Spilman
Building beginning April 9. Room
assignmcits will he made in the respec-
tive residence hall offices on April 10
and 11. Thereafter, ihey w ill be made in
the Office of Housing Operations,
Room 20I, Whichard Building.
SGA Votes Down
Student Caucus Bill
Continued from Page 1
Reform, spoke before
the legislature about
their request for $1330
worth of SGA funding
for their upcoming
"Festival for a
Humanitarian
Renaissance
Mark Zumbach, who
introduced the bill and
who asked for a
suspension of the rules
to have it considered,
said that the funds
would be used as
follows: literature,
$500; security, $180;
t-shirts, $150;
honoraria, $100; and
technicians fee, $50. He
pointed out that $350
of the money would be
considered a loan and
would be paid back.
However, a vote to
suspend the rules fail-
ed, having only four
supporters: Jeff
Triplett, Cheryl
Boehm, Susan Vollmer
and Zumbach. The ral-
ly, which is scheduled
for April 10, will come
before the next schedul-
ed SGA meeting, so
there is little chance for
the bill's introduc-
tion.
One supporter of the
bill who attended the
meeting said, "These
people are worrying
about partying and not
about life and death
The SCPR supports
full employment, the
halting of nuclear
power, stopping the use
of nuclear weapons,
renewable energy, and
the honoring of
American Indian
treaties.
ABORTION
The decision may well be difficult. . .
but the abortion itself doesn'thave to be.
We do our best to make it easy for you.
Free Pregnancy Test.
Very Early Pregnancy Test
Call 781-8880 anytime
The Fleming Center �
Friendly . . . Personal. . . Professional Care
at a reasonable cost
AT BARRE, ltd.
Dancewear Specialty Shop
The New
DANSKIN
Swimsuitshave
arrived
10:00-6:00 AAonSat.
422 ARLIflOTOfl BLVD.
QRECriVlLLE. tl.C 278M
(919) 756670
CHARLIE
SHERROD
SGA
Book
Foreign Lit
Recreational, popular literature in
foreign languages is not availahle in
Joyner library, foreign students or
those with an interest in foreign
language may select Irom records and
comics from Trench to Japanese. This
is ihe first time such a selection has
been available.
Bowling
A 'No-Tap Bowling Tournament'
sponsored by Mendenhall Student
Center will be held March through
April 21. 1980. In this tournament, a
9-pin hit will count as a strike, with all
other bowling procedures remaining as
usual. Trophies will be awarded to the
first and second place singles winners
and to the first place doubles winners in
both men's and women's divisions. The
competition is open to all full-time
F.CU students. Rules arc available at
the Bowling Center or call 757-6611,
Ext. 267 for more information. The
competition opens March 31; don't
miss it!
PRC
The PRC Department is having an
awards banquet on April 12, from
6-12:00 p.m al the Holiday Inn in
Greenville. All F.CU siudenis, faculty
and alumni are invited to attend. For
ticket information call Margie al
752-0306; Teresa ai 756-8241; or Diane
al 752-1489. The cost of the banquet is
$5.00 per person or $8.00 per couple.
The hook used for comments on Nancy
Wogsland's Senior Show is missing. It
is asked thai the hook he returned to
Mendenhall Sludcnl Center. The con-
tent of the hook is of sentimental value
to the artist but of absolutely no value
to anyone else.
S.O.U.L.S.
SO.U.I .S. will hold elections fag ol-
ficers for the 1980-81 school year on
Thursday. April , from II to 5 al the
I cdonia vA right Cultural Center.
Nominations lor officers will be held
open until 12 noon Wednesday. April
2.
Poetry Forum
The lasi Carolina Poetry I orum will
have a regular workshop and meeting
Thursday. April I, al 8 p.m in
Mendenhall. room 248. The public is
cordially inwicd.
Remember
We wish to remind all
students and faculty that we
will not accept any an-
nouncements for the An-
nouncements column unless
they are typed doublespace
and turned in before the
deadline. No exceptions will
be made. The deadlines are
2:00 p.m. Friday for the
Tuesday edition and 2:00
p.m. Tuesday for the Thurs-
day edition. We reserve the
right to edit for brevity. We
cannot guarantee that
everything turned in will ap-
pear in the paper, due to
space limitations, but we will
do our best.
THE FAST CAROLINIAN APRIL 1. 1980
JB Support
WsW Student Union
Activities
N
N
z
o
r�Come By and Munch?
re
c
a Lunch
with us at
CHANELO'S
We Open at 11:00
Daily
For Fast Free
Delivery
758-7400
3
to
Win valuable prizes for your organization help support
four U.S. National Sports Teams, and generate scholarship
funds for your school All you do is collect empty recyclable
Miller Brewing Company containers, and receive a receipt
for the points earned. The top point earning organizations
will win their choice of many valuable prizes
NO PURCHASE NECESSARY
Call your Miller Campus Rep today for information'
0J

01
N
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01
CAMPUS REP.
JoeMims
PHONE NUMBER
758-4175
197mEER BREWED IN USA BY MILIER BREWIHG COMPANY
i!?
tCUatudant Union Cnoorflllnx hum
THE RECORD
SOLID EXPERIENCE
1979-80 SGA Vice-President
?Chancellor's Athletic Council
Selected as Outstanding Legislator during 1978-79
Winner of Best Legislation Award 1978-79
Student Union Films Committee for 3 years
?ECU Law Society
Phi Alpha Theta Honor Society
Football Coach Search Committee
?Thomas Jefferson Film award presented by the producers of CBS's
60 minutes
LOOKING AHEAD with realistic goals
NEW BUSES for a reliable transit system
Fall Break
Larger Emergency Loan Fund to allow for more loans
?Use of Wheel Boots to replace need for towing
IDE
Vote!
ThunApr17 & fflhqwColMi�
TU�t:�CU$tudtn!4&OQ Pubk$J0O fitDoor$�0
TICKETS NOW ON SALE!

' '4CMj5Wi





3W�e Sart (Eanrtiniati
Servwg fie campus community for 54 years.
Marc Barnes, ���hm
Diane Henderson, twimaww
Robert M. Swaim, m i Richard Green, o &
Chris Lichok, mk Charles Chandler, spm mu�
Terry Gray, f�fw Debbie Hotaling, ����&&
TUESDAY, APRIL 1, 1980
PAGE 4
r? Newspaper's Opinion
Few Real Options
Vice Chancellor for Student Life
Dr. Elmer Meyer has announced
that the two days of classes cancell-
ed because of snow last month will
have to be made up, and that one
plan currently being considered
would call for classes on one Satur-
day and on reading day before ex-
ams.
While we, as most students,
would not complain if the lost days
were completely forgotten, we
understand that this is a necessary
step. University accreditation is
dependent upon, among other
things, a certain minimum number
of class hours. If failure to make up
the "snow days" could in any way
jeopardize our university standing,
one or two Saturdays spent in the
classroom is a small price to pay.
We trust, however, that the ad-
ministration will give serious
thought to two points. First, some
students may have previous com-
mittments for those days. It would
be helpful if the administration
could encourage the faculty to con-
sider this in planning class activities.
Second, having classes on reading
day may handicap students who
have first-day exams.
If these considerations are taken,
perhaps the consequences of an un-
fortunate situation can be minimiz-
ed for everyone involved.
Sherrod Is Newspaper's Choice
After careful consideration and
debate, the editorial board of this
newspaper has come to the conclu-
sion that Charlie Sherrod should
become the next president of the
Student Government Association.
Although there were dissenting
opinions among the board
members, the majority held that
Sherrod is the best person for the
job.
Sherrod, a likable, mature person
with a penchant for trying to help
cut through the red tape, is our
choice because he has enjoyed an
active role in campus life. Rather
than sit back in a relatively easy
position as SGA vice-president, he
has pursued subjects of student in-
terest and tried to change things at
this university for the better.
Sherrod, who has woira national
award for journalistic excellence,
feels strongly that the public has a
right to know what is going on in
government. He is more than will-
ing to discuss current issues before
the SGA Legislature, not only with
the newspaper, but also with anyone
who has any questions. Those who
disagree with him will find that he is
willing to discuss the issue at hand.
One of the better things about
Sherrod is his adaptability. He
looks equally at home at a party
with students as he does at an im-
portant meeting with the chancellor.
This is important for we feel that he
will have to deal with all kinds of
people in many different settings.
Although Sherrods opponent,
Drake Mann, is to be commended
for the clean handling of his cam-
paign, we feel that Sherrod is more
qualified to do the work required by
an executive branch, an area that he
has had almost a year of experience
in.
Mann is likely to be saddled with
his position as Attorney General
when the time comes to count the
votes. Mann's job (which is involv-
ed with student judiciary) consists
primarily of handling cases involv-
ing students who are in trouble, a
task which very few would be will-
ing to take. He does a consistent
and competent job as attorney
general, but he does not have the
same experience that Sherrod does.
In a race that is a close as
observers have predicted this one
will be, this should give Sherrod a
victory at the polls.
ECU Lampoon Edition Returns
In case you haven't gotten yours
yet, you had better move fast.
The 1980 lampoon edition of The
East Carolinian (affectionately dub-
bed the Views and Disturber) is on
your local newsstands now, and is
sure to move fast.
This specific edition is located in
or around the bright red boxes or
stands which still read
"Fountainhead" on the outside.
This in itself is a bit of a joke, but
since we neither have the money nor
the inclination to traipse all over
campus and print "The East Caroli-
nian" in Old English Text on every
box, this is the way things are.
This is the first year in two years
that a full lampoon edition has been
published. Last year, the special
humor edition was not published,
due to circumstances beyond
anyone's control. The absence of a
humor edition caused such an
uproar on campus that this year, we
felt that we had to save a little face
(and have a little fun at the same
time) going ahead with a plan to
release the special edition on time
on April 1.
It has been said that imitation is
tjie sincerest form of flattery. It was
with this in mind that we deliberate-
ly did a spoof of our favorite (and
rival) eastern North Carolina
newspaper. We know that this
newspaper (which shall remain
nameless) runs a daily column by a
very good writer which often in-
cludes humor. We hope that this
sense of humor extends to the whole
paper, and that they can enjoy a
laugh on themselves.
We feel that it is the responsibility
of every newspaper to inform, to
alarm, to awaken and to entertain.
It is with this last that we are con-
cerned with today; our responsibili-
ty to entertain. We trust that our
meager efforts will entertain at least
some of you.
With this in mind, we deliberately
steered clear of references to people
in Student Government who may be
running for office. This was a dif-
ficult thing for us to do, because as
we all know, politicians are often a
prime source of lampoon material.
We felt, however, with the spring
elections coming up, that it would
be unfair to certain students to poke
fun at them too much.
Not long ago, Chancellor
Thomas Brewer spoke of an obliga-
tion that he felt that the newspaper
had to its readership. Brewer said
that administrators were open
game, but that the newspaper need-
ed to be fair to all students. We
know that Chancellor Brewer has a
gopd sense of humor, and that he
wilf probably enjoy the humor edi-
tion more than anyone. We also
send along the wish that Penelope
and Cleo, the Brewer's two basset
hounds, have as good a sense of
humor as their master.
Enough said. If you have read
this far, and none of this makes any
sense to you, you haven't yet read
the humor edition. Borrow one
from a friend. Steal one from a
friend. But read it.
If anything in the humor edition
offends you, remember the saying
from the wise books: "No matter
how bad things are, they could only
be worse in Milwaukee Aloha.
NEWS ITEM: LOST CLASS DAS MIGHT BE MADE UP ON SATURDAYS
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QW CLASS. FOR TODAYS LESSON�
Letters To The Editor
Arrested Student Tells His Side
To the Editor:
I am one of the fourteen students that
were arrested last Wednesday. I am not
writing this letter to defend myself or the
others. I am writing so that the truth con-
cerning the arrests will be known. I can-
not state how I am involved, but I can
generalize as to how many of those ar-
rested became involved and how the in-
vestigation took place. This I feel the peo-
ple at ECU have a right to know.
Sometime during the fall semester the
SBI and the Greenville Police Dept. plac-
ed an undercover agent on our campus.
This man is in his early twenties, has curly
blond hair, a beard, and always wore fad-
ed jeans and a jean jacket.
He went by the name of "Sonny but
his real name is R.F. McClendon, Jr. He
hung around the dorms on the hill and
met many students. He would talk of
photography, scuba diving, hunting and
so on and he won the friendship of
students with similar interests.
Over the months some of us less for-
tunate students mistook this man as a
friend. He acted friendly and sociable and
would even catch a "buzz" with some of
the students in their rooms.
He would ask the students if they could
find him some pot or some of the recrea-
tional drugs on campus. With pot smok-
ing as widespread as beer drinking among
young people today, one did not have to
go very far to do this man the favor he
asked.
Of course, the student did not know
that the thanks he would get would be a
future arrest for possession and sale of il-
legal drugs. Some of the students arrested
did not get this narc what he wanted but
told him where to go to find it. These
students were somehow charged with the
sale of whatever drugs he was able to buy
from this source.
This undercover agent did not attempt
to catch the big dealers on campus or to
get to the bottom of the drug traffic. He
would befriend students and mercilessly
entrap them. It appears to me that an in-
vestigation of this type would be a crime
even in the eyes of law enforcement of-
ficers. Although this agent did meet a few
small time dealers, the majority of those
arrested were entrapped.
It is a pity that our government will
allow a man who is an expert liar and ac-
tor, a man who illegally consumes drugs
himself and betrays young people like
himself, a man who in my opinion crawls
with the lowest scum on earth, to be the
soul witness against a dozen or more col-
lege students.
What this man says in court will deter-
mine the future of these students. Many
will probably go to prison. All will have
the scars caused by this arrest for the rest
of their lives. Futures have been ruined.
No good has come from this! Sure, the
drug traffic will be temporarily oppress-
ed, but otherwise law abiding citizens will
continue to break the law and not respect
it or its enforcers until the law quits
harassing the people and starts protecting
them.
I would like to thank Brett Melvin and
the SGA for their support and I want all
students to realize that this unfortunate
incident could very easily happen to them.
Steven W. Smith
To the Editor:
Thanks to NBC, the FBI, and now the
North Carolina SBi with the minute help
of the Greenville Police Dept a new fad
has come upon us: ABSCAM, or better
known as "The Sting If you remember
the movie, "The Sting you remember
the elaborate measures and methods used
to take in the sucker, known as the "Big
Fish" (Robert Shaw).
Now every pee wee police department
in the nation is getting into the act. If you
are into drugs for a profit, BEWARE: the
cops are out to get you anyway they can,
and preferably by the balls. Don't take
anything for granted. They can move into
a dorm and pose as a student (which
seems illegal according to the ECU hous-
ing contract), pose as a day student from
Wilson, pose as a janitor, and even pose
as your friend. They can show you an
ounce of cocaine, and bust you for selling
them a gram of it. They can smoke a joint
with you, and arrest you for selling them a
quarter pound (and you thought you were
doing him a favor). You thanked him for
buying the case of beer, and he busted you
for selling him a few Quays. Anything is
possible.
Beware of any new faces, and if so-
meone says he's a student, don't be afraid
to ask him to show you his student I.D.
That's a helluva lot better than seeing his
badge, early one morning with a bunch of
smelly looking dudes standing behind him
with a narrow piece of paper called a
search warrant. In fact, ask anyone
open up his wallet and proe who he is,
the proof is in the pudding, bab. and
he refuses, tell him to hit the road.
BEWARE of new faces, fast talkers, and
in general anyone over the age of nine
Call it paranoia, or caution, or prenative
matience, but it's your ass and not his
Forty million people in the USA have
now tried pot. In time that figure will
become sixty, then eighty, and een one-
hundred million. And hopefully one sun-
ny day we all can smoke joints in traffic
court. But whether we buy pot in the
supermarket, meet someone in a dark
alley, or sneak bong hits in a dorm room,
we'll all stay one toke over the line
somehow. Be cool brothers and sisters.
John Breanen
P.S. I challenge the SGA to hold a spring
smoke-in on the mall!
Writers Endorse Candidates
To the Editor:
I have known Drake Mann for the past
two years. During this time, I have notic-
ed that Drake has the abilities and the in-
itiative that are required to carry out the
duties of the office of SGA President.
Drake is honest, dependable, and has a
genuine interest in his fellow ECU
students. Not only is Drake well ac-
quainted with the procedures and respon-
sibilities of holding SGA offices, but he is
also a hard and devoted worker. In the
past, he has served as chairman of the
Honor Council and as Attorney General.
I am confident that Drake is the best man
for the job of SGA president.
Teleena Lester
To the Editor:
I am writing in full support of Charlie
Sherrod as SGA President. His past
record indicates his devotion to the stu-
dent body as a whole. Charlie Sherrod is
what the students need for better relations
with student government because of his
strongd evotion and loyalty to his job. Do
your part by voting in the SGA elections.
Charlie will take care of the rest.
Grady G. Dickerson, II
MRC President
To the Editor:
As freshman class president, I would
like to say that on many occasions I have
personally worked with vice-president
Charlie Sherrod. He is enthusiastic about
his work and the well-being of his fellow
students. Charlie is a hard worker and will
do everything possible to help students.
For example, he is currently working on a
fall break, and has recently lowered tow-
ing rates of four major towing services.
Charlie also supports such school ac-
tivities as art, drama, and the athletic pro-
gram. While his opponent has discourag-
ed the student fees supporting the athletic
program, Charlie sees the need of a good
athletic program and East Carolina's pro-
gram is still in the building process. With
more student fees going toward the
athletic fund, East Carolina can expand
their schedule, playing bigger schools and
being victorious.
Charlie also supports the confidential
loan service offered to the students. If he
is elected president, he will see that the
person needing the loan will not have to
go through a student to get it. Receiving a
loan will be done strictly confidentially.
In closing, I would like to say that
Charlie Sherrod is highly capable of
fulfilling the office of president and will
do everything possible to fulfill anv sug-
gestions.
Eric Henderson
Freshman Class
President
To the Editor:
During elections, it is important to elect
responsible and dedicated students to of-
fices. It is for this reason that I endorse
Kirk Little for SGA Treasurer. Kirk's ex-
perience in the legislature this year has
given him the background he needs in
understanding the financial concerns of
SGA funds. Kirk has a genuine interest in
serving the students of this university and
I hope you will support him on April 2.
Karen McLawhorn
Student Union
President
To the Editor:
Tor three years I have never worked
and observed a more amiable and
cooperative person as Charlie Sherrod.
He is always willing to give a little extra to
help students. Quite simplv, he uses his
energy to work hard and has earned
countless friendships by his efforts He
will make a fine SGA president
To the Editor:
Ed Walters
Refrigeration Mgt.
I would like to take this opportunity to
endorse Kirk Little for the office of SGA
Treasurer. I have known Kirk for almost
five years, and I have been a member of
some of the same organizations as Kirk.
He is a very hard worker, and he shows a
great concern for the welfare of others.
Kirk is a Business major who has takci
some accounting. Currentlv, Kirk is
Sophomore Class President, "and he has
been a member of several SGA commit
tees, giving him a necessary understan-
ding of the SGA. Please take ihc time to
consider each candidate's qualifications
and choose the candidate who is the best
qualified.
Susan I
Wilson
i
V
� - v � Mft. �, �.
"���� - �





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
APRIL I, 1980 Page 5
3 Area Bands
Make Finals
In Competition
By RICHARD GREEN
Three Greenville area bands were
among the top six finalists in the
Plantation Music Park Battle of the
Bands last Saturday. The
preliminary competition was com-
pleted, but the finals were postpon-
ed until next Sunday because of
rain.
The Greenville bands are Buford
T, Most Wanted and The Tour.
Other finalists include the Corlee
Ticker Band, and Cahoots, both
from Jacksonville, N.C and Smug-
gler, from Smithfield, VA.
The six bands will compete on
Sunday, April 6, for a total of $3500
in prize money for the top three
finishers � first place, $2000; se-
cond place, $1000; and third place,
$500. The competition will begin at
12:15 p.m. at the Plantation Music
Park off N.C. 41 near Trenton.
Despite impending bad weather
and four inches of rain on Friday,
about 2000 people showed up at the
20,000-capacity park, according to
John Hill, coordinator of the event.
Many people brought tents and set-
tled in for two days of local musical
talent.
The usual problems with this type
of event were evident and almost an-
noying to the bands. The sound
system was provided by the Mar-
shall Downing band of Kinston,
who will also give a special perfor-
mance next Sunday. The system
mav be fine lor that one band, but it
takes a knowledge of each band and
their repetoire to get a decent mix
with any sound system.
The sound reproduction for the
audience was fine, but it was
another story for the bands on
stage. There were no individual
monitors and the vocals for most
bands suffered. One or two bands
brought their own monitors and, as
a result, got the best sound. The
other bands didn't know they could
do that, apparently.
On the whole, the sound system
was an equal handicap for all the
bands, and the judges seemed to
take that into consideration. The
judges included Becky Dunn of
Record Bars of America, and
representatives from the following
record companies: Capitol, Epic,
Columbia, A&M, and Magnum.
The judges seemed impressed by
many of the performances and some
of them spoke with bands about
possible bookings. Even the losers
could end up winners with that type
of exposure.
The judging criteria included
stage presence, quality of in-
strumentation and vocal perfor-
mance. The judges were asked not
to judge crowd response or the
selection of songs, and from the
diversity among the finalists, that's
exactly what the judges did.
Coordinator John Hill said that
the same judges would be unable to
return for the finals on Sunday, but
Spring Fever
Is Just A Bug
Photo by RICHARD GREEN
ECU Student Todd Stilley
of No Vacancy in battle of bands
that owners and managers' of record
stores and possibly disc jockeys
would be selected to judge the finals
next weekend.
Some people complained of poor
directions to the park, just off N.C.
41 near Trenton. There were no
signs for people coming south from
Kinston or Greenville. Hill said
there were some problems with van-
dalism of signs.
If you plan to spend Easter Sun-
day listening to some fine local
music, here are the directions to the
park: Head south on U.S. 58 toward
Trenton, turn right onto U.S. 41
about three miles BEFORE Tren-
ton, and follow the signs (if they are
still up).
Admission is $5 at the gate, and
beer will be sold at the concession
stand, or you can bring your own.
By ROBERT ALBANESE
Assistant Features Kditor
Spring has arrived.
Every spring, the trees (which
everyone calls dogwoods, but are
not) in front of the Rawl and Austin
buildings on ECU campus litter the
shade beneath them with their
fragrant, pale pink blossoms � and
students from one end of campus to
the other have the growing leer of
lust in their eyes.
Yes, spring.
It conjures images of adventure
and excitement at sundry bars and
heathen dens throughout the greater
Greenville metropolitan area, of
warm nights filled with passionate
romance and fogged reason.
But who the hell ever gets to do
any of that?
Well, every Pirate should admit
to a little spring-time frolick, even if
he doesn't engage in any. We must
remember that we have an image to
maintain. Looking back at all those
truly epicurean fantasies which
entertained my more animal fancy,
though, I must confess that spring
has never lived up to her promise.
I have my own version of ECU
campus in the spring, and I wonder
how many Pirates can identify bet-
ter with it.
It's such a nice evening that you
can't resist the downtown Greenville
"call of the wild Youg et up with
a couple of your wilder and crazier
buddies, and you head out with the
same heart that must have beat in
Roland's breast when he set out
against the Sarazins. You know that
our there in that spring plunder is an
ECU co-ed (femina pirata dif-
ficultatis) for you. "Some ale, In-
nkeeper
Just as you're beginning to enjoy
yourself, a thought reaches your
consciousness and your palms begin
to sweat. You've got a test tomor-
row, a paper due next week, and
you been fartin' the last two weeks
away just like you're doin' tonight!
(paranoia incredibilis)
Ah, what the hell, you're only
young once, you say. You'll start
studying for the test, like really early
this morning, so don't worry about
it now. Enjoy yourself.
Two hours later you're standing
in exactly the same place at the same
bar. The girls are looking at you like
you've got the plague. Maybe they
think you're a narc.
One more hour later, the only girl
you've talked to is a Daughter of
Sapph.
It's time to go home, and there is
a bitter feeling in your stomach that
you've got a lot of work to do and
that you might've had a little too
much suds. No self-respecting girl
would be caught with you in a nine-
car collision, since your breath
(after hours of beer and cigarettes)
smells like industrial-strength
barnacle-remover.
You wind up in one of those all-
night coffee joints with one of your
less wild and crazy buds. You're not
getting anything done. You've been
dumping coffee down your chute as
if you had an asbestos lining. A per-
vasive sense of ennui comes over
you. You now feel as though you'd
eaten a hot coal on an empty
stomach. You start drinking Sanka.
Now it's three in the morning.
Your superego is somewhere high in
your head shouting epithets at you.
"Why didn't you study, idiot? You
see what you have to go through
now? You have no one to blame but
See SPRING Page 7, Col. 1
Communication Major Is Under Student and Faculty Scrutiny
Prof. John Warren
Bv KAREN WENDT
Staff Writer
Many journalism students feel
like they are in a state of limbo, and
it is a limbo that some may never get
out of.
Debbie Hotaling claims that the
English Department at ECU sent
her a letter saying that in two years
time there would be a journalism
major at ECU. When she enrolled at
ECU in the fall of 1976 she believed
them, and she scheduled her courses
accordingly.
Robert Benson, too, was told that
there would be a journalism pro-
gram at ECU well before he would
graduate. If the program is still two
years in coming, as is presently ex-
pected, then he must choose a new
major. As a consequence, he will
probably not be able to graduate
within the normal four years.
Bart Kennedy came to ECU ex-
pecting a communications major to
be available in the very near future.
After seeing how little progress has
been made by the program, Ken-
nedy decided to choose another
course of study.
All three of these students are vic-
tims of a plan that has been buried
in red tape, but it is thought to have
emerged once again, possibly to suc-
ceed.
The program in question is the
"Undergraduate Proposal for
Bachelor of Science in Communica-
tions
The proposal itself is only for per-
mission to plan the major, which
must then go through the actual
planning stage before a major in
mass communications will exist at
ECU.
The request outlines two program
tracks in both the print media and in
the electronic media. Subspecialties
in the print media category will in-
clude newspaper writing and pro-
duction and mass market publica-
tion writing. In the electronic media
category, the subspecialty categories
will include radio writing and pro-
duction and television writing and
production.
The proposed date of establish-
ment is the academic year
1981-1982.
Studens seem to be skeptical of
the latest plans and especially of the
latest planned date, but administra-
tion views range from cautious to
wholehearted optimism.
good a place to locate it as any
Ira Baker, head of the journalism
program, said concerning the pro-
posal, "We are not walking, we are
marching
Even Alvin Taylor, managing
editor of the Daily Reflector in
Greenville admitted, "I think it
would be beneficial to us
Overall, there seems to be support
for the program. According to
1 'Programs, like courses, must
go up the great chain"
"I think it could be it's possi-
ble but I don't have a crystal
ball were the words of Carlton
Benz of the broadcasting program
concerning the proposed date.
John Warren, a member of the
journalism curriculum, says that the
program is "back on the track
now However, he admits "the
ball is completely out of my hands
Dr. Erwin Hester of the English
department feels that JiCU is "as
Baker, "There is no opposition
from UNC Of ECU Chancellor
Brewer, Baker says, "Dr. Brewer is
sympathetic and interested in our
needs
Four staff members from The
East Carolinian found at a con-
ference of the North Carolina Press
Association that there seemed to be
strong support for the establishment
of a program at ECU which could
provide qualified writers for the
state's newspapers.
However, getting the program
from the permission stage to the
planning stage to the stage where it
will appear in the catalog is a long
and complicated process.
For the major to become a reality,
an interdisciplinary program must
be created between journalism
(under the jurisdiction of the
English department) and broad-
casting (under the jurisdiction of the
drama and speech department.)
This will involve an estimated
$100,000 and the hiring of two pro-
fessors (in addition to the positions
currently open in the journalism
curriculum.)
In the past there have been other
committees that have worked on the
possibility of developing a com-
munications major at ECU. There
are mixed views on the success of
the last committee to work on the
project "three or four years ago"
according to Benz.
Benz contends that the opposition
came from the English department.
"English did not feel it was the
proper time said Benz.
Hester has denied that his depart-
ment was opposed to the program.
He said that as far as he knew there
had been no opposition to the pro-
gram.
Warren contended that it was the
"unexpected departure" of Larry
O'Keefe and a temporary loss of
O'Keefe's records that set the pro-
gram behind.
The problem that has plagued the
current proposal is the apparent
mountain of red tape that must be
waded through to get the right
papers to the right channels.
"Programs, like courses, must go
up the great chain says Baker.
At the present time, the chain ap-
pears to have its current link in the
office of Dean Richard Capwell, of
the Department of Arts and
Sciences. As far as can be discerned,
the proposal has not yet appeared
on the agenda of the committee that
must next approve it.
If the proposal gains this commit-
tee's approval, it will proceed to Dr.
Robert Miner's office. From there it
will go to a state level board. After
that, ECU should receive permis-
sion to plan the major.
In the meantime, journalism and
broadcasting students are attemp-
ting to decide whether or not they
will adopt a wait and see attitude,
find another major and minor in the
area of their choice or scrap the idea
entirely.
The Squeeze Takes Rock Back To Pop
By PAT MINGES
Staff Writer
Rock music is becoming pop
music opce again thanks to new
groups that are returning the nice
melody to the rank and file of rock
tunes. . .
The trend that began with the
power pop influence that emerged
from the British group Brinsley
Schwarz is culminating with the
almost too-perfect sound as
manifested by Elvis Costello in his
last effort Get Happy. Certain new
groups are able, to blend these cat-
chy melodies with some pretty
powerful sound and lyrics to create
new sensations and bring a new
respect to the phrase "popular
music . t.
Ore of these new groups is the
Squeeze. The group first attracted
my attention with its unique logo in
the New York Times advertising
their premier appearance at the
Palladium last week Even more
unusual than their logo was the
somewhat amusing title of their first
album, Argybargy. But the most
pleasing aspect of the group is the
lovable music they create. It is
delightful in its simplicity,
fascinating in its complexity, and
should be the most refreshing new
sound to hit the popular music net-
work since you heard from me last.
The Squeeze is a group of five
young boys from old London towne
who are producing music that can
be appreciated by even the most
profound pop fanatic, yet its depth
could enthrall even the most die-
hard New Rock fan. The first single
from the album, "If I Didn't Love
You is a daffy ditty that oddly
enough starts off with "If I didn't
love you, I'd hate you And if that
does not grab you, then the catchy
melody surely will. The song floats
along propelled by a throbbing beat
and euphoric synthesizer, then
stumbles into a catatonic stutter of
expression, before it regains its in-
fatuation and paces along as
pleasantly as before, until the next
fall. Now if that ain't love, then
what is?
The album is superb, featuring
nearly half a dozen songs that could
easily be potential popular hits, and
those that aren't so catchy possess
some deep lyrical and musical
statements. "Pulling Mussels
"Another Nail For My Heart
"Wrong Side of the Moon and
"There at the Top" are dynamite
pop tunes, and "Separate Beds"
had me waking up in the middle of
the night singing:
Her mother didn't" like me,
She though I was on drugs,
My mother didn't like her,
Said she'd never peel the spuds.
Now you may laugh, but just wait
until you hear the haunting
melodies, they are the kind of tunes
that you take home to Mother.
As if the marvelous melodies are
not enough, some of the songs are
remarkably Intricate scenarios
about .modern life and the thin line
we walk between sanity and insani-
ty. The Squeeze paints surrealistic
lyrical portraits that are accentuated
by ethereal, almost ominous music
that resembles much that of the
Talking Heads, America's finest
rock group.
To fluctuate from one musical
form to another with such
remarkable ease requires a truly as-
tounding array of talent.
From the first bopping beat of
"Pulling Mussels" to the smashing
description of the new corporate
woman on "There at the Top the
splendid new sounds of the Squeeze
never let up. This is music like you
have never heard before and lyrics
that you won't soon forget from one
of the most dashing new groups to
emerge from the new British inva-
sion.
When is America gonna have a
new sensation that we can call our
own? Linda Ronstadt gave it a try,
but come on we can do better
than that. Don't let England put the
Squeeze on us.
1
a
jrjr
- jf� p tii �� .
Tr �
X
� '?'�-
"��tV'





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL I, 1980


- j
Grace Slick's New
Album 'Dreams9 Is
'First-Rate Quality9
By MARK KEMP
Staff Writer
It is going to be extremely dif-
ficult for me to review an album by
Grace Slick, former Jefferson Star-
ship vocalist, for 1 am undoubtedly
one of her most faithful fans. If this
review is infested with an abundance
of personal biases, please take it in-
to consideration and forgive me.
Grace Slick is a very powerful and
talented singer who has years of ex-
perience behind her. Dreams is her
first solo LP ever. This album
reveals Slick's mellower nature. Her
songs are not quite to cynical or so
tough, but her ideas are still present
as well as her determination. The
only thing lacking on this LP is her
longtime friend and ex-roommate,
Paul Kantner, of the Jefferson Star-
ship. But Slick does an adequate job
without him. A lot of her new music
is different than most of her past
material. Slick utilizes some or-
chestration as she did on her sound-
track album of the movie,
"Manhole But Dreams is superior
to Manhole in that there is less ten-
sion involved in this recording.
Manhole was recorded during one
of the Airplane's many splitups, and
Slick seems a lot more confident of
herself now. There is more fluidity
in her music, an important point
which was lacking on some of her
last material with the Starship.
Side two of Dreams is all Slick's
own material. All of the songs on
the album, two of which were writ-
ten by lead guitarist Scott Zito, con-
tain a great deal of lyrical value. The
music ranges from flowing or-
chestrations to tunes with a Latin
rhythm to outright rock 'n' roll.
Rock 'n' roll, however, is in short
supply on this LP. Her own lyrics
on this LP are, for the most part,
statements about Slick's life and her
past and present ideals. "Do It the
Hard Way" is an expression of her
personality. In this song, she seems
to be realizing her obsessions and
beginning to deal with them in-
telligently.
All of the music on this new LP is
of first-rate quality and is a step for-
ward for Slick. It is not, however,
progressive in the New Wave sense,
and I can already hear the critics
calling Slick an old '60s burnout.
But Dreams is an album of music
she wants to do for herself.
Although none of the old Starship
family appears on the album, in her
"Special Thanks" section, they are
given credit. Also thanked are some
deserving people, including her
daughter, China, San Francisco
concert promoter Bill Graham;
Mastercharge, Visa, American Ex-
press and God. With this kind of
support, how can you go wrong?
The East Carolinian
Serimx the campus �ommawtt
lur � WHIM
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday during
the summer
The East Carolinian is the of
ficial newspaper ot East Carolina
University, owned operated, and
published for and by the students
ot East Carolina University
Subscription Rates
Alumni J15 yearly
All others $?0 yearly
Second class p stage paid at
Greenville, NO
The East Caroliman atljces are
-WPBted in the Old So�th Buitdtrrff
on the campus of ECU. Greenville,
N.C. �
Telephone: 7 57 6366, 6367, 6309
STUDENT UNION
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Warren
Mixture
THE EAST CAROLINIAN APRIL 1, 1980
Warren Zevon's uni-
que brand of rock 'n'
roll combines various
aspects of quality
music, including good
lyrical value, good
composition, and a
good sense of humor.
even's songs are com-
plimented and given the
particular sound which
they require through
the use of several noted
musicians. Some of the
artists featured on this
IP include Jackson
Browne, David Lindley
(Browne's lead
guitarist), Joe Walsh,
Don Henley and Glen
rev of the Eagles and
Linda Ronstadt, just to
name a few.
Side One of "Bad
Luck Streak in Dancing
School" begins with a
classical introduction
and quickly kicks into
the rocking title song
with David Lindley rif-
fing out some fine lead
guitar work. "A Cer-
tain Girl featuring
Waddy Wachtel on
lead guitar, is a good
old rock V roll tune,
which Zevon executes
with first-rate quality.
"Jungle Work" is a
statement on war and
best exemplifies
Zevon's lylrical vantage
point.
"Play It All Night
Long" is a statement
on poor, rural,
redneck, southern life.
The song urges people
not to live their lives in
a rut, to always strive
for meaning and pur-
pose.
Side Two begins a lit-
tle slower with "Jeanie
Needs A Shooter
written by Zevon and
Bruce Springsteen with
Joe Walsh on lead
guitar. The second in-
terlude continues with
the same classical
melody that unifies the
entire LP. "Bill Lee" is
the story of
"Spaceman" Bill Lee,
a professional baseball
player who became a
personal friend of
Zevon's. The story is
expressed by lyrics like:
When I'm stan-
ding in the middle of
the diamond all alone
1 always play to
win
When it comes to
skin and bone
And sometimes I
say things I shouldn't
Like � har-
monica break
The implications of
these lyrics are obvious
to anyone who is
familiar with the world
of professional sports.
Lee is simply saying
that the professional
athlete is dehumanized
by the business and is
prohibited from ex-
pressing himself as an
individual.
"Gorilla You're a
Desperado" is pro-
bably the best cut on
the LP. It's a reggae
tune about a man who
switches roles with a
gorilla in a cage.
The last couple of
songs, "Bed of Coals"
and "Wild Age are
both well structured.
"Bed of Coals" is a
meaningful, slower,
country-sounding tune.
"Wild Age" is the
universal story of a
young kid during his
radical years.
"Bad Luck Streak in
Dancing School"
comes off much
stronger than his
previous LP,
"Excitable Boy
which was also a fine
album. Zevon is
definitely one of the
past decade's most in-
fluential songwriters,
along with his friend
Jackson Browne. With
this impressive new LP,
Zevon proves that he
will continue to be a
fine contemporary
songwriter throughout
the '80s.
Records provided
through the courtesy of
The Record Bar
(Carolina East Mall).
(o
fc.3
ffiaalim.
AMERICAS FAVOHTE P02A
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Mon. -Fri. 11:30 2:00
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STUDENT UNION
EAST CAROUNA UNIVERSITY
WESTERN
SIZZLIN
Spring Fever ph�'� �v jill adams
an ECU student bitten by the bug
Spring Fever Is A Bug
Continued from Page 5
yourself You realize
;your super-ego has
your father's voice.
You're sitting in your
jhair, waiting for the
irof to hand out the ex-
im. You know your
face could be used to
finish wood, as your
eard has gotten so bad
it's pricking the person
next to you. Your teeth
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film impervious to
bullets, let alone a
toothbrush. You are
having a reaction in
your gastrointestinal
tract between the coffee
and the lack of
breakfast that is mak-
ing you shift in your
chair. You fight to con-
tain yourself, as you do
net want to be held per-
sonally responsible for
breaking the Test Ban
Treaty.
It's an empty feeling
of relief you feel when
you find out that the
prof forgot about the
exam, and you'll have
to take it next class
meeting.
If you cannot relate
to this experience, you
Drobably have $500 a
month allowance, you
have a terrific social
life, and a course-load
about as demanding as
Playskool. You are a
superficial person.
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A






Sports
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Coach's We Hwrr
� Totedo Accident
Near-tragedy struck the East
Carolina football coaching staff this
weekend when the wife of defensive
coordinator Norm Parker was
seriously injured in an auto acci-
dent. . . . c .�
Ginger Parker was injured Sun-
day in a one vehicle accident as she
and her family were on the way to
Greenville for Easter.
She was listed in serious condition
Sunday following surgery at Toledo
(Ohio) Hospital. Mrs. Parker suf-
fered a spinal injury to the neck
when the mobile camper that she,
her three children and her parents
were traveling in hit a guard rail
near Toledo. No one else was m-
JUThe recently-named Pirate coach
is now in Toledo and will return
with the couple's children to their
home in Champagne, 111. It is not
known when Parker will return 1�
Greenville, said ECU head coach Ed
Emory. ,
"We hope he'll be back soon,
Emory said, "but we feel now that
his first priority is with his family.
I've taken over some of his position
responsibilities until he returns.
The Parker family had chosen to
remain in Champagne until the end
of the current school year.

r
Charles
Chandler
Spring football practice has been
underway for over a week now and
first-year ECU head coach Ed
Emory has begun making his initial
evaluations of the squad.
One of the major areas that
Emorv must concern himself with is
the quarterback position, held the
last several seasons by Leander
Green. ,
Green has completed his eligibi -
u and leaves a huge void to be till-
ed. According to Emory, there is a
frontrunner. .
"Henry Trevathan is running tirst
right now Emory claimed. "But
Carlton Nelson has shown great im-
provement this spring. He just
needs more game-situation ex-
perience. Both of them are running
alot better than they are passing
rieht now ,
Trevathan, a rising senior and
Nelson, a rising sophomore, were
the two QBs expected to battle it out
for the position. Trevathan has ex-
perience on his side while Nelson is
the quicker of the two.
Kathy Riley, ECU cage and soft-
ball whiz, has returned from Col-
orado Springs where she tried out
for the U.S. Women's Olympic
basketball team.
Though she did not make the
Olympic squad, the experience no
doubt was a helpful one for Riley
which is bad news for Lady Pirate
opponents next season.
Who would have thought that the
ECU baseball team would be getting
a super boost from a football player
who spends his spare time preten-
ding to be a boxer.
Well that's exactly what has hap-
pened in the case of John Hallow.
The grid nose guard, who shared
starting duties with super frosh
Doug Smith during the fall, is prac-
tically knocking the cover off the
baseball for first-year coach Hal
Hallow is batting a healthy .372
and has been a real key in the
Pirates' 13-2 start. He played in
rightfield while regular Macon
Moye was ailing and is now the
team's designated hitter.
Hallow is well-known for his
Muhammed Ali imitations, made
popular on the ECU assistant
coaches' television show last fall.
B
ii
d
�JfTsage (20) Rounds The Bases
WinS
The first annuai ECU basketball
banquet is scheduled for 7 p.m. on
April 10 at the Greenville Country
Club. . . - ,
The banquet should be a tirsi-
class affair with Clemson head
basketball coach Bill Foster schedul-
ed as the featured speaker.
Tickets sell for $10 each and can
be picked up at the ECU basketball
office or at The East Carolinian of-
?"e-or call 757-6472, 757-6309 or
752-9783 All interested persons are
cordially invited to attend and show
support for the fast-growing Pirate
cage program.
The trade last month that sent ex-
ECU cage great Oliver Mack from
the NBA's Los Angelas Lakers to
the Chicago Bulls has both its good
and bad sides for the 6-3 guard.
Leaving the mighty Lakers means
not making the playoffs but joining
the Bulls has meant increased play-
ing time and subsequently increased
scoring figures.
Mack has nearly doubled his
average, which now stands at 4.4
prints per game, and had a one
game high of 21.
Pirates Sweep Pack
Bv CHARLES C HANDLER
Sports Kdilor
The red-hot East Carolina
baseball team downed Fairfield 7-4
Saturday after sweeping a
doubleheader from N.C. State
Thursday to move its record to an
incredible 13-2.
"I'm very pleased with our play
thus far said first-year Pirate head
coach Hal Baird. "Liust hope it 11
stay like this. T would be Tess than
realistic to think we could stay this
hot, though
"Hot" is exactly what the Pirates
are as no less than six team members
post of a batting average above
.300. The team average is a sizzling
.301.
The big man with the stick for the
Pirates thus far has been Butch
Davis, whose triple secured the win
over Fairfield.
The Williamston native leads the
team with eight home runs (mst two
shy of the ECU season recordjand
16 runs batted in, has scored 21
times and is batting .368.
Davis is not the only Pirate on a
rampage, though. Rightfielder
Macon Moye, out early in the
season with an ailment, is batting
345 and almost singlehandidly
spelled out N.C. State's doom
Thursday.
���.
The 6-4 Greenville native drove in
four runs with five hits in the two
games as the Pirates downed the
Wolfpack 6-5 in the opener and 10-4
in the nightcap.
Moye's two out run scoring single
in the fifth was decisive in the first
game. In the second, he knocked in
three runs with two doubles and two
singles, scoring twice himself.
Also aiding the Pirates in their
early-season start, which includes a
present seven eame winning streak,
are desicnated hitter John Hallow, a
nose guard on the Pirate football
team who is batting .372.
First baseman Rick Derechailo is
hitting at a .340 clip while catcher
Ravmie Stvons is batting .333.
It's incredible that we have so
manv people hitting this well at one
time chirped Baird. "We know it
can't be this way all the time but we
feel that when someone gets cold,
someone else will be there to pick up
the slack
"We're playing really well
together now Baird boasted.
"Our hitting, defense, pit-
ching� everyting is clicking
But one aspect of the season that
must worry Baird is the number of
games the team has missed due to
inclement weather. The Pirates
were to have played 22 games by
now but have got in only IS,
The seven lost games could be
crucial also, claims Baird "Our
goal, of course, is to make the
NCAA regional playoffs, v an in-
dependent we're gome to have a
touch time. We must compete wii
clubs like South Carolina. Honda
State. Miami and Virginia Tech.
It'll be tough.
��Therefore he continued, we
not onlv need a good record but we
need to get a good amount ol
in also
At the moment, though.
Baird's mind is Thursdays mate
at Harrington Field with C
powerhouse North Carolina.
"That should be a great one he
said. "We usuallv sell out when we
play them. Our fans are up For it
and so are the guys. We usuallv
play really well against Carolina and
I certainlv hope ve do so this
week
Gametime for the Tar Heel-Pirate
matchup is 7:30 p.m.
Lady Pirates
Take Tourney
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
t
r
f
r
t
r
t
r
r
I
.t
t
i
The Lady Pirates suffered their
first loss of the softball season
Saturday at Cullowee, but rebound-
ed to capture the first place trophy
with a 4-2 victory over the host
Catamounts in the championship of
the Western Carolina Invitational
Tournament.
East Carolina had a chance to end
the tourney early, but the bats went
cold and Western Carolina survived
to a final showdown for the top
spot. .
The Pirates managed only tour
hits in the decisive contest, but
Western's six fizzled as ECU claim-
ed the championship.
East Carolina got on the board
first when freshman catcher Fran
Hooks reached base on an error in
the fourth inning and scored on a
two-out single by rookie outfielder
Terry Andrews.
The Pirates plated three more
runs in the fifth on three WCU er-
rors. Winning pitcher Mary Bryan
Carlyle reached base on a throwing
error by the second baseman,
followed by Yvonne Flea
Williams' erred grounder to short.
Carlyle scored as freshman Mitzi
Davis instigated the third error of
the inning. Both Williams and Davis
crossed the plate on a double by
Cynthia Shepard.
Western Carolina pitcher and
tourney MVP Cooke singled to
open the sixth and later scored on a
single by Barker. Pinch-hitter
Taylor came through with a single
and raced home as Green swatted
into a fielders choice.
The name of the game was
"defense" though, as the Plates
commited only a lone error and the
Catamounts gave up eight.
The only the blemish of the 1980
season thus far is a 1-0 defeat by
Western Carolina just prior to the
final showdown. The Pirate s
defense remained solid as they com-
mited only one error, but failed to
capitalize on their five hits of the
WCU's Barker walked to lead off
the first, advanced on a single by
Curtis and scored on a fielders
choice by Green as the entire scoring
of the contest was, completed within
minutes of hte opening pitch.
"Our defense was a whole lot bet-
ter than our offense all day says
ECU coach Alita Dillon. "That s
what kept us in the close games. We
didn't let poor hitting affect us on
defense. . , .
"I think maybe offensively they
were putting too much pressure on
themselves
Rain on Friday caused the tourna-
ment format to be changed from
round-robin to double elimination.
East Carolina advanced to the
semifinals with a 5-0 win over
Morehead State of Kentucky and a
2-1 victory against N.C. State.
Carlyle claimed the win, allowing
no hits after coming on in relief of
freshman starter Ginger Rothermel.
A senior from Kinston, Carlyle fur-
ther insulted the MSU by permitting
only three base runners throughout
the contest. Rothermel allowed only
a leadoff single up the middle by B.
Clay
ECU waited until the sixth inning
to cross home, but plated five to in-
sure the win. Andrews singled,
followed by Carlyle and Maureen
Track Team
Awaits Warm
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
I . p I
tfwtobv JIU. ADAMS
ECU Tennis Star Henry Hosteller Volleys
Buck who drove in Andrews.
Carlyle scored on a sacrifice by
Williams and Shepard tripled in
Buck and Davis who reached first
on an error. Shepard later scored on
a sacrifice by Hooks.
The Pirates victory over ts.c
State came as Davis singled in the
first and scored on another triple by
Shepard. Hooks added.the winning
run in the third as she singled and
scampered home on clinch hitting
by Davis who belted a two-out dou-
ble. .
The Wolfpack scored in the first
as Gina Mitter reached first on a
fielders choice and scored on a
single by Dianne Snook.
ECU, now 8-1 on the season,
travel to Chapel Hill today before
hosting N.C. State in a twinbill
Thursday.
The East Carolina outdoor track
team traveled to the Florida Relays
and came back with an idea of the
work that must be done in the next
few months.
The highlight of the trip for the
Pirates was the fact that triple jump
artist Herman Mclntyre qualified
for both the nationals and the
Olympic tryouts.
Mclntyre, a 1977 All-American,
placed fourth in the meet with a
jump of 533.5
"Herman was up against some of
the very best around said ECU
coach Bill Carson. "He did really
well considering this was our first
outdoor meet of the year. Heck,
that was his third best jump ever
Mclntyre has bettered the jump
only in the 1977 nationals.
Also placing high for the Pirates
was Otis Melvin, recently named an
All-American in the indoor com-
petition. Melvin finished second in
the feature 200 meter race with a
clocking of 21.0, just behind Florida
State's Mike Roberson.
"Otis time was super claimed
Carson, "when you consider that he
was rurning directly into a stiff
wind. Heck, I couldn't believe our
times all day considering it was win-
dy and the temperature never got
above 63 degrees
Stan Curry, another indoor A-A,
placed third in the 400 meter race.
The ECU mile relay team, third in
the nation during the indoor season,
finished third with a time of 3:13.4.
Florida State and Florida AAM
finished first and second, respective-
ly.
The third-place showing us both
disappointing and pleasing to Car
son.
"At first, 1 was really disap-
pointed said the longtime Pirate
coach. "But I guess I resting a little
bit too much on our indoor shoe-
ing. But with the wind and con-
sidering the leg speed we have now.
we did really well now that 1 look
back on it
The "leg speed" that Carson
spoke of is something that well
come, he said. "That's something
that, of course, you're either born
with or not. But it's also something
that you can improve. To reach
your maximum vou must work at
it
And, the ECU mentor says, that
can only be done on a limited basis
until Greenville temperatures rise.
"If its cold Carson explained.
"there is the possibility of a severe
injury if you go all out.
"It takes 70-80 degree days to
work out like we need to. That'
why I'm pleased with our showing
in the relay. The only teams that
beat us were Florida teams and
,with their weather, they have all the
leg speed in the world
Carson noted .though, that it was
somewhat frustrating waiting
around for the warm temperatures
to arrive so that his team could
reach its full potential.
"It's hard to take he said, "to
watch you team get beat by someone
that you know you're better than.
But by the end of April we'll be
riit. Most of the people healing us
now won't be heating us then.
Yep Carson said with grim
determination, "just give me a mon-
ih�and those warm temperatures





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 1.19t0
M Roller Hockey Comes To An End
By R1CKIGLIARM1S scoring Bruisers only 1S
points.
Congratulations
Intramural Correspondent
Roller Hockey
Race.
The Second Annual
to Greenville Road Race is
the Body Bruisers by sponsored by Bond's
After its most suc-
cessful season ever,
Roller Hockey ended as
the Body Bruisers
defeated second-seeded
Gola. Gola had been
defeated earlier in the
double elimination
tournament by the
H.R's but fought their
way back through the
loser bracket to face
the undefeated Body
Bruisers.
Outstanding skating
and ball control was
seen throughout the
match by Gola's Andy
Searles and Carol
Belcher and by Body
Bruisers' Lynn Barber,
Tim Fodrie and Sue
I ones.
Will Wilberg of Gola
was the defensive
leader with outstanding
display of goal tending
as he allowed the high
winning the title 15-10.
Last Chance!
The last Intramural
Council meeting for the
1979-80 school year will will be held Saturday,
be held Thursday, April 5 beginning at
April 10, at 4 p.m. in 9:30 a.m. The road race
Room 104 Memorial
Gym.
Please put this date
on your calendar and
plan to attend. Anyone
wishing to make sug-
gestions for handbook
revisions or intramural
policies should attend
this meeting.
Physical Fitness
Ken Murray, presi-
dent of the ECU
Physical Fitness sport
club, has been ap-
pointed as race director March 26 through Sun-
of the Greenville Road day, March 30. Ot the
twelve women's teams
and thirty-two men's
entries, the All Pro's
remained the only
undefeated team at the
conclusion of the four
days of competition.
Constance Mad-
docks led the Pro's at
the plate knocking out
three home runs in the
final contest and driv-
ing in 13 of the 15 runs
scored in their 15-7
championship victory
over W2. The All Pro's
Anyone interested in played as their name in-
running should par- dicates by gaining early
Sporting Goods, and
the proceeds of the race
will go to the Easter
Seals Society.
The entry fee for the
race is five dollars and
tributed four hits. gained revenge over the
Third place Tyler lost Ball Busters by a score
to the Ball Busters in of 11-3. The Ball
the first round of com- Busters won their
petition 10-9, but fourth place finish by
fought their way back narrowly winning over
to a third place finish Un Kappa Fifth by a
by defeating Jarvis and score of 8-7.
the Good, Bad and ??. In
In their second en- tion,
counter the Tyler team team
men's competi-
a little known
by the name of
Bombers defeated the
tournament .favorite
Roundtripped; and the
Dough Boys to take
home the hardware
Sunday i4igHt. The
Bombers defeated the
Tri-C's 6-2, Diamond
Dealers 18-5, and
fourth place Foul Play
7-6, before5 upsetting
the Roundtrippers in
the quarter finals by a
score of 7-2. The
Dough Boys gained vic-
tories over Dolemite A,
21-7; Where Did You
Get Those Shoes, 10-1;
Belk Bandits, 25-15;
and the Master Hitters,
11-8 on their way to the
semi-fanal game
against the Bombers.
gfcx2Z?Jji$&i& "�
V
M COM' �� �0�� C����J
is a 10 K o 6.2 mile run
through the streets of
Greenville
Classified
ticipate in the road race
and support the Easter
Seals Society.
Softball
By NANCY MIZE
The first annual In-
tramural Trophy
House Pre-Season
Softball Tournament
round victories over the
Widettes and the Ball
Busters.
Semi-final action pit-
ted the Pro's against
the W2, and displayed
a high degree of skill in
their narrow margin
victory of 10-9. W2 met
Tyler in the semis of the
losers bracket and
FOR SALE PERSONAL
Lady Tracksters
B JIMMY DuPREE
Xssistant Sports Editor
Despite continuous
rainfall and less than
Jerable temperatures,
East Carolina's women
iracksters posted three
arsity records and a
number of personal
best times at the
University of Virginia
Invitational at Charlot-
tesviUe.
Senior Linda Mason
claimed fourth place in
the 400 and 800 meters.
The speedy McPhatter
clocked in at :58.2 in
the 400m and 2:15 in
the 800m.
Eve Brennan
established a new varsi-
ty record in the 1500m
at 4:50
recorded
sonal best of 5:00 in the
event.
Roz Major placed
fourth in the long jump
was played Thursday, soundly defeated them
20-11, before losing
once again to the tough
All Pro team. Susan
Jeffrey led the winner's
efforts with five singles
and one home run;
while Faye Cromwell,
Vanessa Higdon, Cindy
Arnold, Vicki
Mewborn, and Candy
Wedemeyer each con-
t4I was pleased even
though we didn't do as
Marks
fOR SALE: If7 Cordoba fully
loaded Yellow wrth Landau top.
Mint condition. Will sacrifice for
WS00. Call l-(fl?W34-317t or
1-(�1)-73-7�. (Goldsooro).
CASSETTE DECK FOR SALE:
Sanyo brand with dolby, limiter,
and chromium oxide tape
capability In very good shape
and Sound. Will sell for $100. Call
752-7117.
NEED EXTRA CASH! for sale
Sewing machine with carrying
case. Excellent condition. S7S �
Call ?l�-793-3?� after 4:00 p.m.
FOR SALE: 1�74 Cutless,
sunroof,power brakes, power
steering, power windows and
locks, cruise controll. Call Brian
752-0373.
FOR SALE: one sofa and chair
one month old for $150 to $700.
Contact Larry Austin or Brenda
Vinson at 75J-IM1 after 3:00 p.m.
FOR SALE: 10 cubic foot
refrigerator with freezer and
vegetable compartment. Call
7S0-4W.
FOR SALE: 1970 Ford Galaxie 500
with air conditioning, $500. A good
car. 754-4817.
BEST PRICES: paid for clats
rings, gold, and sterling. Mep's
medium class ring $55 $70 Sterl-
ing fork $lt. Call John after 3:00
752-4013.
ARABIC BELLY DANCE
CLASSES: Call Donna Whitley
752 0?2i. Creative fun exercise.
REWARD $50. for the return of
Charter to Kappa Alpha order at
N.C. State missing since January.
No questions asked
REWARD $50: for the return of
l�7� composite and 17 Am men
Award to Kappa Alpha order N.C.
State missing since January. No
questions asked.
LOST: at Pi Kappa Phi Field Day,
Kodak Tele pocket camera with
initials RBB. Reward. Call
752-701.
WANTED: Rider(s) to and from
Newport News, Va. on Easter
Weekend. Share driving ex-
penses. Call 750 4225 after 5:30.
FOR RENT
FOR RENT: A one bedroom fur
nished apartment on Student
Street near campus; available
from May 17 until August 22; re
quire quiet non-smoker; call
752-3801 after 10 p.m.
APARTMENTS FOR RENT:
Duplexes and Townhouses $175 to
$370 per month Call 753-4415 9.00
til 5:00.
AVAILABLE APRIL FIRST:
Spacious room for non-smoker.
Near Jarvis Dorm $90. 752 5528.
SUMMER JOB OPENINGS FOR CAMP COUNSELORS at
comp Sea Gull (boys) ond Camp Seafarer (girls) on the coastj
3f North Carolina The camps feature soiling, motor
�boating, and steomship, plus all usual camping activities in I
�eluding a wide variety of major sports Eorly June throughl
lmid August Challenging work with young people, 7 161
lyears of age outdoors enjoyable stimulating Qualifica
tions include ability to instruct m one phase of the camp'sl
xogram, a genuine intrest in young people, ond excellent!
References Quick answer up: i receipt of letter of applica
lion which should include a brief resume' of framing and ex
enence in area(s) of the camp program in which you ore
�st qualified to instruct. Apply to Wyatt Taylor, Director
lamp Sea GullCamp Seafarer, PO Box 10976, Raleighl
vIC 27605
well as we would have
liked to said coach
Laurie Arrants. "When
Cookie ran the 800
meters it was 40
degrees, raining and a
15 mph wind and
and Mulvey everything just went
another per- down hill from there. It
was really horrendous
conditions to have a
meet.
of Richlands posted with a leep of 17.5 Teet.
new varsitv records in
the 3000 and 5000
meter events. Her
3000m time of 10:45
earned eighth place in
the meet and her 18:14
in the 5000m was also a
personal best. Debbie
Mulvey set a personal
best time as well at
11:10.
Cookie McPhatter
Riggan Shoe Repair
across St. from
Blount Harvey
Downtown
11 1 W. 4th St.
arking in front and Rear.
ATTIC
N.C. No. 3 I Nightclub
The 400 relay unit of
Dawn Henderson,
Catherine Suggs, Irdie
Williams and Lydia
Rountree clocked a
for their fifth best
of the season.
illiams placed se-
I in her heat of the
meters, but crossed
ils with officials
and missed the finals.
"Our relay team is
coming around and
things are really look-
ing positve for the rest
of the season
Maryland captured
first place in the meet,
with host U.Va. trailing
in second.
The Pirate's next
competition is Saturday
at the State Relays in
Columbia, S.C.
The STUDENT UNION
would lik to say
THANK YOU
for the following merchants
support for
BAREFOOT ON THE MALL
Pepsi
McDonald's
Apple Records
Wachovia
Attic
Book Barn
Jason s
Newby's
Elbow
Stuffy
UBE
Pipe Dream
Joe Hallow Distributor
Horizon's Records Unlimited
OVER 1000 FRAMES Mmo4m
TO CHOOSE FROM ay
Single Vision-White Glass Lenses$19.50
Bifocal Lenses-White GlassS 30.50
Single Vision Photo Gray Lenses$26.50
Single Vision Photo Gray Extra$30.50
Bifocal Lenses Photo Gray$38.50
Trifocal White Glass Lenses$37.50
Trifocal Photo Gray Lenses$47.
(1st DIVISION LENSES) Mm
CONTACT LENSES
Bausch & Lomb � .
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GUARANTEED FITTING OR YOUR MONEY BACK
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-VOfe 6PTICIANS
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Berkley Mall lAM-iMPM
1 GoWsbofO MOH -TUES THUftS -FRt
YiSA ,��.i�.� n�E Walnut
WEDNESDAY Ovjgrtown GoMsboro
AOJACENT TO IAST CAROLINA EYf CLmtt
Tues. At)
April Fools Bash
5 Degrees
South
Wed.and Thurs.
SUPERGRIT
EXCEPTIONAL
Management
opportunities
CURRENT OPPORTUNITIES
NUCLEAR ENGINEERING
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
AVIATION LAW NURSING
PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION
INTELLIGENCE
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SHIPBOARD OPERATIONS
Most liberal arts majors are also eligble
The Navy Officer Information Team will be in
the Lobby of the Student Supply Store or at the
Placement Office for interviews Thurs. April,
8 10.
Navy Officer Program, 1001 Navaho Or.
Raleigh, N.C. 27612 Call Toll Free 1 800 662 7568
or 919 755 4152.
Distributed
By
Taylor
Beverage Co.
Goldsboro
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mam&





i
10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 1,1980
Lady Pirates Win
Patronize
The East Carolinian
Advertisers
By EDDIE
WILLIAMS
Staff Writer
After being rained
out in an earlier match
with Atlantic Christian
College, the ECU
women's tennis team
provided their own bad
weather as they storm-
ed over ACC 7-2, when
the teams met again on
March 26.
The two teams had
met previously on
March 20. After three
singles matches, ACC
led 3-0. Then rain set in
and forced a postpone-
ment of the match.
A week later, the two
met again and the
match was started over
completely. The restart
proved beneficial for
the Lady Pirates as they
won the singles round
4-2. The doubles play
proved decisive as ECu
swept all three matches
to win going away.
"We looked like a
whole different team
than I had over there a
week ago stated ECU
Head Coach Barbara
Olschner. "They (the
ECU women) played
aggressively, they
played strong and with
confidence
Olschner cited the
reason for the improve-
ment to be related to
the N.C. State match
just a day earlier. The
Pirates played im-
pressively in a losing ef-
fort against the
Wolfpack.
"That could've been
the turning point in the
season she said. "1
though we did play
really well against
State, and the ACC
game proved I was
right
In singles play, Lynn
Grosvenor defeated
Tracy Eubanks 5-7,
6-1, 6-3; Laura Red-
ford defeated Yolanda
Rodriguez 7-5, 6-3;
Mercedes Giron of
ACC outdistanced
Karen Jefferys 6-3, 6-2;
Debbie Christine, the
Bucs winningest singles
player this season, won
by a 6-1, 6-3 count over
Karlynn Cotton;
ACC's Sandra Lamm
eased by Claire Baker
6-4, 3-6, 6-4; and Karen
Leggette won by a
decisive 6-2, 6-1 score
over Vicki Alexander.
Coach Olschner was
impressed by
Grosvenor's play.
"She showed a lot of
court maturity and
determination out
there she said.
"We needed to
win Olschner said.
"The performance with
State pushed them
(ECU's women) over
the edge. It showed
them what they could
do
East Carolina takes
on UNC-Wilmington at
home on April 1 at 2:30
p.m.
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2)
ECV vs. UNC
The Red-Hot Pirate Baseball
Team Takes On The Powerful
to
Tar Heels

yA
o �
�S3


See the 13-2 Pirates,
featuring leftfielder
Butch Davis (8 HRs,
16RBIs, .368), take
on the 19-10 Tar
Heels of the Universi-
ty of North Carolina.


FOR
I

Don't Miss A Single Pitch
Thursday, 7:30 p.m.
Harrington Field
SGA y aSs "fr
TREASURER JM&S
SGA Legislator
Executive Council Member XCJt
Sophomore Class President jL
Student Welfare Committee vT
Student Visitation Committee
Traffic Appeals Board Member
Student Scholarship. Committee
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5SP





Title
The East Carolinian, April 1, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 01, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.50
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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