The East Carolinian, March 18, 1980






She
(Ear0ltmatt
Vol. 54 NoT
12 Pages
Tuesday, Mrirch 18, 1980
Greenville, N.C
( irculaiion 10.000
Student Election Chairman Appointed
Bv KARF.N YVENDT
Staff Writer
SGA President Brett Melvin ap-
pointed Nicky Francis the 1980 elec-
tions chairman, and the legislature
voted to spend $835 of student
funds for for the SGA banquet at
the meeting last night.
Francis told the legislature that
filing dates for the election will be
March 17 through the 24. Can-
didates will meet on Monday,
March 24, at 9:30 p.m. Expense ac-
counts are due at the SGA office
Monday, March 31, at 5 p.m. Elec-
tions are scheduled for April 2.
An amendment was passed allow-
ing candidates only seven days to fraternity brothers.
campaign. In the past, the campaign Francis also commented on the
period was ten days. seemingly endless problems that
Francis said that people presently plague the Spring Elections. He said
in offices will finish their terms on that candidates, legislators, cam-
April 3. President Brett Melvin paign workers and newspaper staff
pointed out that he will remain in members have received numerous
office until June 6. threats during past elections. "We
Francis stressed that his goal was plan to avoid any situations such as
to hold a "true honest election He
also expressed his hope that there
would be no controversy concerning
his choices for the members of the
committee, but one legislator in-
sisted on knowing if ary of the
members were his fraternity.
Francis said that three of the
four-member committee were his
that he said.
Speaking about election coverage
in The East Carolinian, Francis
said, "I don't want anyone to come
up with any controversy about what
they print
Francis wants to remind all ECU
students that they will be required to
show a valid I.D. and activity card
in order to vote.
SGA Vice President Charlie Sher-
rod commented later in the meeting
that Francis would be an
"outstanding elections chairper-
son and that he would be
"someone who we can be proud of
this year
Another controversial topic was
whether or not-student fees should
be used to finance the annual SGA
banquet.
A bill was presented before the
legislature that requested $835 be
spent for the banquet, campared to
$850 last year. It was expected that
the legislators would have to pay for
some of the meal themselves.
Sherrod said that due to ad sales
in the freshman register only $230
would be used out of student fees.
However this amount was subject to
lenghty debate as to whether the
legislators had the right to use stu-
dent fees for their banquet.
One of the legislators pointed out
that the SGA banquet was "the only
recompense you get" for serving as
an SGA legislator.
Another student said, "I don't
see whv we have to spend student
fees
One student attempted to add a
friendly amendment to the bill
See SGA Page 3, Col. 5
Nicky Francis
1980 elections chairman
Codes Violated At
Local Apartments
Photo by LARRY ZICHERMAN
Most Of The New Lots Were Paved During The Break
but rain prevented the job's completion (See story on page 2)
ECU Sociologist Cites Need For Information
By LARRY ZICHERMAN
Staff Writer
Omissions by Greenville building
inspectors resulted in a "safe" cer-
tification of an apartment complex
which does not meet state building
codes.
Bryton Hills Apartments on River
Bluff Road were built last year and
certified by Greenville building in-
spectors as being in compliance with
all applicable building codes.
However, an inspection after a
minor grease fire in one of the
apartments revealed that the ex-
haust vent pipes over the stoves end-
ed in the attics of the buildings, and
in some cases between floors rather
than extending outside as the state
building code requires.
According to a report by Green-
ville Fire Marshall Capt. Jerry
McLawhorn, the buildings were
constructed with severe fire hazards
that could "cause a considerable
amount of damage or loss of life
WNCT-TV newsman Bob
Hamilton reported that the
buildings were constructed by John
Causey Jr. and William Rogers
Construction Co. Causey built two
of the buildings, and Rogers built
the other eight. Causey has since
corrected the buildings he con-
structed, but Rogers has retired
from construction and has made no
corrections.
Alton Warren, director of
building inspection, told Hamilton
that inspectors usually do not step
back from buildings to look for
vents, and he added that they do not
usually inspect attics.
But Greenville City Engineer Ron
Sewell said that is not the case. He
told Hamilton that it has always
been city policy to check the stove
vents in the attic and that the error
should have been detected.
According to Emory Albritton,
chairman of the N.C. Code Inspec-
tors' Qualification Board (the agen-
Study Shows Peak In Savings Effort
By WILLIAM A. SHIRES
EC'l News Bureau
A "social phenomenon" study by
an ECU sociologist indicates that
the 35,000 people in Greenville have
reached a peak in their efforts to
reduce current levels of energy con-
sumption.
In the absence of more informa-
tion and new energy conservation
programs and policies, a majority of
Greenville citizens "do not seem to
know of any other way within their
means to reduce it (energy consump-
tion) still further the study says.
'There appears to be a need for
more energy information for all
classes of citizens says the resear-
cher, Dr. Avtar Singh of the ECU
Department of Sociology and An-
thropology.
"Most citizens do not seem to
believe that there really is an energy
shortage says Singh in a 67-page
report of findings and implications
of his six months socio-economics
attitudes study.
He said this may be "an impor-
tant factor in the generally negative
attitudes toward energy programs
and policies He felt that in-
crements in the "level of
awareness" about energy matters
may bring about a "greater cor-
responding change" in attitudes
toward local energy programs
among blacks than among whites.
Singh's study indicated that in the
matter of information, blacks and
lower income groups "may be serv-
ed best through radio and television
programs A multiple-media ap-
proach appears to be a "more effec-
tive strategy" for middle and upper
class persons, he said.
The India-born sociologist said he
found that people generally are op-
t
posed to mandatory energy policies
and fuel rationing. They expect that
future energy policies should in-
clude:
�stricter energy standards in the
building codes.
�laws requiring landlords to im-
prove energy efficiency in rental
units.
�more tax incentives for energy
conservation.
�greater efforts to develop more
economical sources of energy along
with steps to stabilize fuel prices.
In his research Singh sought to
identify and examine major socio-
economic factors tending to in-
fluence energy-related attitudes and
behavior.
"The findings of this study sug-
gest a number of implications for
energy action programs and
policies Singh said. "First, con-
trary to what some might believe,
energy conservation behavior does
not appear to be simply a function
of the availability of economic
resources and knowledge about the
pertinent techniques alone. This
analysis suggests that it is a social
phenomenon
Local energy officials believe the
Singh study is unique and in-
novative. Federal energy officials
have also commented "on the in-
novativeness of such an instrument
in the overall community energy
planning process said Reese
Helms, local manager of the Office
of Energy Conservation and
Management.
The study "will serve as an im-
portant instrument in the local
energy planning process Helms
said. "Our full utilization of the
study has only begun
Singh reported "great concern"
among people at all socio-economic
levels "about increased energy costs
and rising utility bills
In general, he said, people may be
expected to respond favorably to
energy programs "if they have the
needed resources and adequate in-
formation about energy conserva-
tion techniques, providing they
identify with the local community.
"Socio-economic status and com-
munity identity tend to have a
greater effect on citizen attitudes
and on their willingness to conserve
energy than the level of awareness
about energy conservation
methods
Singh said that communication
and adequate information are
"critical to the success of communi-
ty programs and that people tend
to be selective in seeking informa-
tion of greatest interest and benefit
and use different sources and media
to obtain it.
Government Debt
Rises Despite Cuts
ByJOHNCUNNIFF
AP Business Analyst
NEW YORK (AP) � True or
false: Since the administration has
concluded that government outlays
beyond income can produce infla-
tion, the newly revised 1981 budget
proposals will reduce federal
outlays.
False. Federal spending will rise.
The ;evised budget proposal would
increase outlays by at least $42
billion, from $568 billion to $569
billion in fiscal 1980 to $611 billion to
$613 billion in 1981.
If you thought federal spending
was to be cut you may have failed to
distinguish between the President's
proposals to spend, which are to be
cut, and actual spending, which will
not. The cuts are in proposals.
The distinction has been blurred,
but so has much more of the new set
of budget proposals.
Puzzling many people is how
higher oil taxes, borrowing costs
and wage guidelines can be anti-
inflationary. And, in the short run,
they cannot be. Many economists
now look toward even worse infla-
tion this spring.
Over a longer time such measures
conceivably can cut the rate of price
increases. That is, of oil taxes
reduce consumption, if interest rates
discourage borrowing, and if wage
increases encourage productivity.
However, the three items
shouldn't be grouped at all.
The oil tax is aimed at raising
revenues as much as it is intended to
cut consumption. Higher wage
guidelines are meant primarily to
ease the burdens of inflation rather
than to lower it. Only the higher in-
terest rates are aimed solely at cut-
ting inflationary demand.
And that presents another
puzzler: Why should a government
whose debts have risen from less
than $410 billion in fiscal 1971 to
nearly $1 trillion in 1981 presume to
tell people how to handle their
money?
See SPENDING Page 2, Col. 1
Census Workers Scheduled
To Canvass Campus Soon
By TERRY GRAY
News Editor
You can run, but you probably
can't hide from the 1980 census.
Census takers will begin
distributing the official ques-
tionaires on the ECU campus Mon-
day, March 21, and according to
U.C. Bureau of Census press
releases, they will be more determin-
ed than ever to count every man,
woman and child in America.
Most Americans will receive their
questionaires in the mail, but the
21-county census district head-
quartered in Greenville is one of five
districts in the nation where all ques-
tionaires will be delivered by hand.
The hand delivery is part of an ex-
periment to determine whether such
a method is less expensive and more
effective than using the post office,
according to William Hodges, direc-
tor of the Greenville Census Bureau.
According to Hodges, over 500
census employees in the Greenville
district began their task March 13,
and expect to be finished with the
distribution by March 27.
Hodges reminded ECU students
that they will be counted in Green-
ville, and not in their home towns.
Federal law requires everyone to
answer the census; it also protects
the confidentiality of personal in-
formation. The only people who see
an individual's replies are census
employees, who are sworn to
secrecy under threat of a $5,000 fine
and a five-year prison term.
The postage-free questionaires
are supposed to be mailed back to
the Census Bureau on April 1.
Those who fail to do so will be con-
tacted in person by census takers. If
questionaires are mailed in on time,
but are incomplete, the household
will be contacted by telephone from
the central offices to fill in the miss-
ing information.
By the time the last American is
counted sometime during the sum-
mer, the census bureau expects to
have reached an estimated 222
million U.S. residents and 86
million housing units, and gathered
more than three billion answers.
The 222 million residents, a nine
percent population increase since
1970, include some people who do
not speak English, people with
various political opinions, the rich
and the destitute, the educated and
the illiterate, and members of all the
earth's races.
The estimated nine percent
population growth is one of the
lowest in the nation's history, and
census officials expect that many
other dramatic changes in American
life will be revealed by the census.
Since the first census in 1790, the
purpose of the national head count
has not changed: to provide the
basis for fair apportionment of seats
in the House of Representatives.
Census data are also used to guide
the distribution of billions of dollars
in Federal funds to state and local
governments, and the distribution
of additional billions of dollars of
state funds.
By law, the census bureau must
provide the president with the
population totals for all the states
by Januiary 1, 1981, for purposes of
Congressional reapportionment.
See CENSUS Page 3, Col. 5
c that licenses bui
the code require- a .
spection to determine adherei
building codes. Th.
eludes cheeking ratter
insulation in the atl c
Albritton added thai "� e c
require- that all exhaust .
outside, and that even .
cheek for other attic comr.
would reveal the vent- e
through the roof
Sewell noted that the ne
pliance checklists call for the
to be inspected. Although the
spectors -aid the vent- were
ed. there were some vents tha
not. Four ot the ten build
inspected using the new checklist?
When the hazard was n
fall, the city notified the ow: .
correct the situation and ic .
reprimanded the inspc
ding to Sewell. The disciplinary
tion taken by the cit c�
oral and written warning
inspectors' personnel file- f
cond offense, the penalt) u.
termination of employmei
Five of the building- have
corrected and three arc k -
rected now. the owner- ol the Dther
two have until March lb to make the
corrections or legal action
See CODES Pae 2. Col. 5
Green Says
Anti-Drug
War Needed
RALEIGH (AP) North
Carolina should declare wj
drugs and drug-related crime
beefing up the State Bur
vestigation and considering I
drug penalties. I t. G
Green said toda.
In a news conference held ir fi
of Central Prison. Green sa c
would back a request by Al
General Rufus Edmisten to
tional SBl agents to combat drugs
Green said as man) as 70 percei
of the state's prison inmate-
there because of drugs or di a
related crimes. He said V
Carolina is fast becoming the ma
smuggling center for East Coas
drug traffic.
"Florida and New York,
other major entry points, have
cracked down by increasing their
drug agents and enacting tougher
laws Green said. "In Florida, for
example, drug smugglers can face
life imprisonment, whereas in North
Carolina they face a maximum
penalty of only five years
Green said he would propose to
the General Assembly in June that
25 new SBI agents be added to the
approximately 40 agents now work-
ing on drug cases.
He said he would also include
money for an improved SBI training
program in a SI million anti-drug
package
Inside Today
Toto Concert SlatedPage 5
Prof Cats Albumpatf
Dixie Dregs ReviewedPagr
Baseball Team WiasPace
Relay Tea
la NationPage I
� mm0 4 44 4 J 4 aVJhtitf Jf J 4 4 & � � Jt 4 � 4i V4f 4. A � 4 , �,�� � m � � s4-t 4 4 4
1 aj c E'





t
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 18,1980
Codes Violated
Announcements
Hearings
The General College Committee will
hold open hearings for students on the
General Education requirements at
ECU on March 19 and 20 at 3:30 P m.
in Brewster B-102 Students are invited
to participate.
Sci-Fi
The Science Fiction Fantasy Federation
of UNC-Greensboro is holding a 3 day
convention. STELLARCON V. for the
fans of science fiction, fantasy and
space exploration on March 21-23 on
the campus of UNC-G. Elliot Universi-
ty Center The guest of honor is George
Takei. It Sulu of "Star Trek Other
activities include: masquerade,
speakers and panels, dealer's room,
films and video tapes. D and D gaming,
SCA event, and an art show. Joan
Winston from the "Star Trek"
Vkelcommittee will also be in atten-
dance as our fan guest of honor. Ad-
mission is $8 00 For more information
write: STELLARCON V. Box 1712,
Shaw Hall. UNC Greensboro, N.C
27412. �� �
Learning
� new program for increasing learning
efficiency will be offered by Dr. George
Weigand beginning March 17, 1980
There will be two groups. One will meet
on Monday and Wednesdays at 100
p.m. and the other group will meet on
Tuesday and Thursday at 1 00 p.m. in
room 305 Wnght Annex. The class is
available to all students Attendance is
voluntary, no formal registration is re-
quired.
Happy Hour
The PRC 3101 students are holding a
Happy Hour on Tuesday. March 18
from 7:00-9:00 p.m at J J.s Dona
lions are $.50 in advance and75 at the
door. Many door prizes will be given!
You need not be present to win
Mini-Courses
Sign up today for a non-credit mini-
course now being offeied by
Mendenhall Student Center Shag Dan-
cing, Beginning Running, Clogging and
CPR Training are now available to all
ECU full time students, faculty and
staff MSC members, and their
dependents, spouses or guests.
Registration is at the MSC Central
Ticket Office through the day prior to
the first class meeting of each course.
There is a maximum and minimum
enrollment for each course and no fee
refunds will be made after the registra-
tion deadline. For more information
call 757 6611
AFOQT
NCSL
The EC L delegation to the NCSL will
meet Thursday at 7:00p.m. in Brewster
C-102 lo discuss plans for session The
meeting is mandatory for all members
who are attending session
Mascot
Men or women interested in trying out
for the Mascot for ECU are asked to
meet at Minges Coliseum on Thursday.
March 20 at 4:45 p.m More details will
be furnished at that time Interested
See you at Minges on Thursday
The Air Force Officer Qualifying Test
(AFOQT) will be administered on
March 19 at 8:30 a.m. in Wright An-
nex. Room 201 This test is open to all
qualified individuals desiring to enter
the Air Force ROTC program during
their last two years at ECU an all
AFROTC CMC cadets Those people
interested n taking the test or who
would like more information about the
test or the AFROTC program should
contact Captain Mover at 757.659" o�
6598. or stop by Wright Annex. Room
209.
Cheerleader
Men and women interested in trying out
for the 1980 81 Ft. I ars.tv
Cheerleadmg Squad are asked M meet
on Wednesdav. March 19 at 4 30 p m
in front of the ticket office at Minges
Coliseum Practice dates are set for
March 19. 20. 25. 26. 27 and 31 at 4 30
P m. Actual tryouis will take place at
Minges on Tuesday. April 1 at 7:00
p m. All interested persons should at
tend each practice Skills will be taught
and past head cheerleaders will be able
to help new interested men and women.
Get a lift Be a Cheerleader
Summer Dorms
Residence hall room deposits for Sum-
mer School 1980 will be accepted in the
Cashiers Office, room 105, Spilman
Building, beginning April 9. Room
assignments will be made in the respec-
tive residence hall offices on April 10
and 11 Thereafter, they will be made in
the office of Housing Operations, room
201. Whichard Building. Students who
wish to reserve rooms they presently oc-
cupy, provided such rooms are to be in
use this summer, are lo make reserva-
tions on Thursday, April 10. All other
students may reserve rooms on a first
come, first-serve basis on Friday, April
II. Residence halls to be used for
women are Jarvis, Garrett, and Greene
(floors two through six). Men will be
housed in Belk (floors one through
ILO
The International Language Organiza-
tion (ILO) will meet on Wednesday,
March 19 at 7:30 p.m. in Mendenhall
room 248. Final plans for the Soiree
Francaise (French wine and cheese
tasting party) and a discussion on
French culture with a slide show will be
included in the meeting. All interested
people are urged to attend. New
Members are welcome!
Tutoring
BSPA
The Black Students' Psychological
Association will meet in the Psi Chi
I ibrarv in Speight on Thursday, March
20 at 6:00 p.m. All members are urged
to attend Any interested persons
welcome.
Adventure
After three years of filming, Don
Cooper invites everyone aboard for a
fun and fact filled trip through some o'
the most spectacular natural beauty in
North America Cooper will appear in
Hendnx Theater on Thursday, March
20 .i 8:00 p.m to present his travel
adventure film, "Northwestern Adven-
ture " Tickets for the film are on sale at
the Central Ticket Office for $2 00 Ad
mission for ECU students will be by ID
and Activity Cards and by MSC
Membership Card for ECU faculty and
staff.
If you have or intend to declare a major
in a science or health related cur
riculum, you may qualify for COST-
FREE tutoring, counselling and other
Services through the Center for Student
Opportunities (CSO). If you would like
to be considered for participation in
any of these services, contact Dr.
Bridwell, Center for Student Oppor
(unities, 216 Whichard Annex, or call
for an appointment at 757-6122, 6075,
or 6081.
Homecoming
Planning for Homecoming 1980 has
begun, and positions of Student
Homecoming Committee Chairman
and Division Chairmen (parade and
halftime, decorations, entertainment,
bands, community relations, promo-
tions and publicity) are open. Applica-
tions are available in all residence hall
offices and at the Mendenhall Informa
tion Center. For additional informa-
tion, contact Dean Rudolph Alexander.
Remember
We wish to remind all
students and faculty that we
will not accept any an-
nouncements for the An-
nouncements column unless
they are typed doublespace
and turned in before the
deadline. No exceptions will
be made. The deadlines are
2:00 p.m. Friday for the
Tuesday edition and 2:00
p.m. Tuesday for the Thurs-
day edition. We reserve the
right to edit for brevity. We
cannot guarantee that
everything turned in will ap-
pear in the paper, due to
space limitations, but we will
do our best.
Continued from Page 1
taken by the city, and
the buildings could be
condemned.
Angie Humphrey, an
ECU freshman, told
The East Carolinian,
"The Fire Marshall and
the building inspector
came in our apartment
and found 21 major
faults
The East Carolinian
also discovered that the
stairs leading to the
second-floor apart-
ments were in violation
of both the building
code and accepted in-
dustry practice. The
code requires that the
combined height and
depth of one step not
exceed 18 inches, and
common building prac-
tice recommends that
the step height not ex-
ceed 7'2 inches. Steps
in Bryton Hills varied
between 21 and 24 in-
ches combined height
and depth, and 101:
and 13'2 inches high.
In a university town
like Greenville where
housing is at a
premium, students
must often take the
workmanship of the
builder for granted. As
Debbie Mullis, a textile
design major, put it,
"When you live in an
apartment complex,
you just assume it's
safe
Peace
Corps
For more Information contact:
Peace Corps Coordinator
Science Education Department
East Carolina University
Greenville, NC 27834
(919) 757-6586
frHENAMU
DROPPER
You Are Invited To Our
INC
Lots Paved Over Break
By LARRY
ZICHERMAN
Staff Writer
After a long wait, the
street behind
Mendenhall Student
Center and Joyner
Library,a portion of
the large parking lot
there, and the small
parking lot on James
St between 7th St. and
8th St were paved
during Spring Break.
Crews from Barrus
Construction Co. al, three areas before
prepared the areas for the students returned
paving Tuesday, Mar. from brea but the
ll, and did the actual rain Thursday
paving Wednesday, prevented the comple-
Mar. 12. Thev also ap- tion of the large lot.
plied a primer coat, to
act as a moisture bar-
rier,to a portion of the
large lot behind
Mendenhall and the
library.
A spokesman for the
contractor said they
had hoped to complete
Paving crews com-
pleted about two-thirds
of that lot Monday,
Mar. 17, however. The
west third of the lot
could not be paved
since it was too wet.
Another problem
was the cars parked in
the lot. The university
would not tow the cars,
and the construction
company chose not to
tow them, so they pav-
ed around any cars left
in the lot.
WE DELIVER
FAST, FREE,
FRESH, & HOT
DIAL
758-7400
Pass it on
Delivery Starts 4pm
Thursday, Friday & Saturday
March 20. 21 6 22
Moderate & Better
Sportswear
Sport Dress- ���� jner Jeans & 1 :
� v
30 o50
Off
Re'a-
FREE!
;200 Wardrobe
Reg.ster tor a FREE $200
Wardrobe during the
month of March No pur-
chase necessary You do
not have to be present to
win
Shop Monday thru Saturda .
10 A M To 9 P.M
756-4001
FAMOUS LABELS FOR LESS
GREENVILLE SQUARF
GREENVILLE. N C

Spending Jumps
In Spite Of Cuts
The East Carolinian
Serving the campus community
lor 4 years.
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dunnc
the summer
The East Carolinian is the of
ficial newspaper of East Carolina
University, owned, operated, and
published for and by the students
of East Carolina University
Continued from Page 1
Stated differently,
the rest of the economy
as a whole, made up of
local and state govern-
ments and private
enterprises, is relatively
weaker. Federal
government is the
growth industry; it's
budget has jumped
from $188.4 billion in
1971 to more than $600
billion in 1981.
The only way the
federal government can
continue to spend more
than it receives in
revenues is to dilute the
value of existing
dollars; that is, to
transfer money to itself
from others via infla-
tion.
The process has been
going on for years, and
recently it accelerated,
which suggests that the !
big problem has been
not so much with the
private sector, which is
slated to pay a bitter
rice, but government. �
Subscription Rates
AlumniSIS vearl
All othersS20 vearl
Second class postage paid at
Greenville, N C
The East Carolinian offices are
located in the Old South Building
on the carrous of ECU, Greenville
N C
Telephone: 757 6364. 6367, 6309
THE COMPLETE
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Greek News
By RICKI GLIARMIS
Greek Correspondent
The week beginning
March 22 will be very
special for fraternities
and sororities at East
Carolina. Greek Week
is celebrated every spr-
ing when all fraternity
and sorority members
join together for a
memorable experience.
Following is a
preview of the week,
and with everyone's
participation, dedica-
tion, and cooperation,
Greek Week 1980 will
be the best ever!
The festivities begin
Saturday, March 22,
with Pi Kappa Phi
Field Day. Events will
begin at noon at the Pi
Kapp House on
Hooker Road.
Sunday, March 23.
the Kappa Alpha
fraternity will present
The Mighty Majors"
at the Attic from 9 p.m.
to 1 a.m with reduced
beverage prices 8:30 -
9:30 p.m. Sunday night
activities will also in-
clude "Playboy's Pa-
jama Party" on a
seven-foot Advent TV
screen. Admission will
be two dollars. Admis-
sion price for those
wearing Greek jerseys
will be $1.50.
Panhellenic Greek
Games and Kappa
Alpha Track Meet are
exciting ways to start
the week off right. The
Greek Games will be
held on the field below
Minges and will begin
at 3:30 p.m. Monday.
The track meet will
take place on the ECU
track field and will
begin immediately
following the games.
Dr. John East,
Republican candidate
for the U.S. Senate and
political science pro-
fessor at ECU, will be
the guest speaker at the
IFC Greek Week Ban-
quet on Tuesday,
March 25. Dinner will
be served from 6:30 un-
til 7 p.m and the pro-
gram begins at 7:30
p.m.
Lambda Chi Alpha
"Raft Race" always
proves an exciting event
during Greek Week.
The rafts will assemble
Wednesday, March 26,
at Memorial Street
Bridge. The race begins
at 4 p.m. After the race
all Greeks can relax at
the Delta Zeta Ham-
burger and Hotdog
Supper from 6 until 8
p.m. at Green Springs
Park.
One of the highlights
of Greek Week, Kappa
Sigma "Funky
Nassau is on tap for
Thursday, March 27, at
the Kappa Sigma
House. The activity
begins at 3:30 p.m.
THE EAST C AROLINIAN
MARCH 18, 1980
with the chugging con-
test slated for 4:30 p.m.
The Phi Kappa Tau's
annual "Spring Fling"
is scheduled for Friday,
March 28, at the Phi
Tau house beginning at
3:30 p.m.
Mosier's Farm, the
climax of Greek Week,
will get under way at
12:30 p.m. and last un-
til about 5:30 p.m. on
Saturday, March 29.
Featured this year at
Mosier's Farm will be
"Brice Street" and
"Bruce Frye Tags are
required for admission.
Remember that every
fraternity and sorority
is responsible for sen-
ding five members out
to Mosier's Farm at
noon Sunday for clean
up.
The Alpha Phis
would like to welcome
Joan Hubbard and

Anita Gutierrez into
their Beta Delta Pledge
Class.
SGA Legislature
Discusses Transit
Census Is Useful
Continued from Page 1
which would only allow
freshman register ad
revenues to be used for
the banquet, but was
defeated after discus-
sion.
A measure which
would result in an
almost complete
reorganization of the
transit system was also
brought before the
legislature. With the
new system, rather than
having a transit
manager, there would
be an a Transit
Authority formed to
control the system.
The authority would
include an operations
manager, an ad-
ministrative manager,
the SGA president, an
appointee from the
legislature, a business
manager, an appointee
for the student life
department, and a
representative from the
Department of Driver's
Education. Funds for
the authority would be
set up by the board of
trustees.
Melvin spoke about
the bill earlier in the
meeting and attempted
to have it passed during
the meeting.
However, Sherrod
said that since the bill
had only been
presented that day, the
legislature should take
more time to consider it
carefully.
The bill was tabled
until the next meeting.
Continued from Page 1
Besides its legal pur-
pose, the census is
valuable in discovering
how Americans live
and work. For in-
stance, preliminary
census figures indicate
that:
�A majority of the
nation's population
now lives in the South
and West.
�Nearly half of all
children born today
will spend a significant
portion of their lives
with only one parent
; s i � for Student Governanci- is studying the effectiveness of
t ernance and student opinion is important to the pro ess
it ihis article, mark appropriate reply and drop in the
:� the Lobby of Joyner Library.
oefore they reach the
age of 18.
�The fastest growing
segment of the popula-
tion was the 25 to 34
age group, which in-
creased 35 percent bet-
ween 1970 and 1978.
�Mice and rats are
more likely to be found
in homes outside
metropolitan areas
'than in central city
areas.
�White female col-
lege graduates earn less
on the average than
males with only a high
school education.
The reason behind
the census bureau's un-
precedented concern
with cooperation from
the populace is not only
because of the need for
accurate information,
but also because of
money: for every one
percent of the popula-
tion that responds to
the questionaires, the
taxpayers vill save S2
million in followup
costs.
CLIFF'S
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
WESTERN
SIZZLIN
ALL YOU CAN EAT!
Monday - Thursday
rate tht overall effectiveness of student governance as
ellent Good Satisfactory Fair Foor no opinon
I"ne present qualifications for Student Government participation
.
remain the same?
be altered'
no opinion
List Student Governance areas which vou believe have been most successful
Crab Cakes
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List areas which you believe have created the most difficulty for
Student Governance.
I
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CLIFF'S SUPER
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WEDNESDAY
CRAB CAKE SPECIAL
2 Golden Fried Crab Cakes
French Fries, Slaw, and
Hush Puppies. $.99.
&
SPRING BREAK
SALE
CONTINUED
Due to snow,
sale continued thru
March 21 on selected items
INTRODUCING
GARDEN FRESH
fc
-Revlon
IPolish Ambers
-Shirts
-Art Supplies
I
-Discontinued!
Texts
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All you can cat
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Now thru March 31
$


Shop Students Supply Store
For Our Biggest
Sale EVER
Discounts up to
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5 Door prize given each day. &
STUDENTS
SUPPLY STORE
Wright Building
'
1.69
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GREENVILLE





Stye �a0t Carolinian
Serving the campus community for 54 years.
Marc Barnes, �&��
Diane Henderson, mmnmt
Robert M. Svv aim, m�w�i mwwmm Richard Green, � ,�
Chris Lichok, mm Charles Chandler, w &�
Terry Gray, �,�� ,��, Debbie Hotaling. tea,��$�
TUESDAY, MARCH 18, 1980
PAGE 4
This Newspaper's Opinion
SGA Needn't Know
Now that abortions are legal,
more and more women are choosing
this option rather than carrying
through with an unwanted pregnan-
cy. At East Carolina, an SGA loan
fund using student activity fees has
been established to help women who
choose this option. However, the
process by which a person is granted
this loan may be too difficult for
many college women to face.
When a young woman faces an
unwanted pregnancy, the last thing
she wants or needs is to be forced to
tell a fellow student, especially a
male, about her problem. Yet, the
SGA loan is set up so that the per-
son who applies must seek the
assistance of the SGA treasurer, a
position which has been filled by
males for the last few years. The
treasurer must see the applicant and
must sign the loan form.
Then the woman must get a doc-
tor's statement that she is pregnant,
visit the university counseling
center, and return to the treasurer's
office. Only then will she be
directed to the accounting office
where the actual check is written.
In what would almost necessarily
be a confusing and frightening
situation by itself, the woman must
go through additional trauma in
order to receive financial help.
Perhaps the worst part of the pro-
cess is that a student must admit her
pregnancy to a fellow student, so-
meone her own age, someone she
might well know. It would be a
great temptation for a female stu-
dent to turn and run rather than
divulge such personal information
to a male student.
The question this newspaper asks
is, if the money is put aside
specifically for the purpose of help-
ing these women, why is the
treasurer's signature needed at all,
unless, of course, it is because he
plans to refuse his permission,
thereby denying a student a loan her
fees have paid for. It would be just
as simple for a Student Fund Ac-
counting employee to provide the
signature.
If the treasurer's signature
represents his permission, certain
questions must be raised. What if,
for example, the treasurer happens
to be against abortions? He could
decide to allow just enough loans to
go through so that higher
authorities would not question his
actions. Also, we all know that not
all people are trustworthy. This
kind of confidential information
would be very damaging in the
wrong hands, particularly if one of
the women who received a loan
should run for campus office.
There are countless things that
could go wrong. But the most im-
portant problem lies in the woman
having to seek a loan from a fellow
student. It is degrading and em-
barassing for the woman. One SGA
officer who had to fill in for the
treasurer in signing the loan forms
admitted to being very embarassed
himself and said that he did not
want to see the girls and felt that he
did not have the right to know their
names. If the officer found it em-
barassing, it is easy to imagine how
the applicants felt.
No student should have that kind
of authority over another, nor
should any student be allowed ac-
cess to such personal information
about another unless that person
specifically seeks them out as a
friend or counselor.
If someone must be assigned the
duty of approving such loans, it
should not be a student. Someone
older, preferably a woman in a posi-
tion where confidentiality would
not be questioned, would be much
more appropriate.
While it must be acknowledged
that, as with any loan, a certain
amount of red tape is unavoidable,
we believe that this is a situation in
which red tape should be minimiz-
ed. Although designed to help
women deal with unwanted
pregnancies, the system seems un-
necessarily complicated.
An unwanted pregnancy is a
potential nightmare for the woman
involved, and the decisions to be
faced are not easy ones. There are
counseling centers for those who
need help, but there is no need to
humiliate a woman once she has
made the choice.
Don't Sign Away Your Privacy
Always read the fine print. If you
don't, you could end up signing
away something that should be very
valuable to you � your privacy.
Recently, the Office of the Vice
Chancellor of Student Life cir-
culated a form to all student leaders
which looked innocuous enough �
it asked each student to list his or
her organization, the management,
some of their addresses, and their
home telephone numbers. The form
was for the student life directory,
they said.
What they didn't tell us, obvious-
ly, was that they planned to
catalogue, design, print and make
this information available to all
students, faculty and staff.
This would upset anyone who is a
public figure. Even more upsetting
than the inevitable crank phone
calls late at night is that no home
phone numbers were given for any
members of the administration or
the Student Government Associa-
tion; however, the authors were
kind enough to let us know all the
OFFICE phone numbers of those
nearer io the pinnacle of creation
than we.
This means that any ECU student
leader has had his telephone number
printed for public distribution,
while the faculty and staff members
get to hide behind an office
telephone in a building on campus.
The problems of this invasion of
privacy are a constant disruption of
what little home life anyone still has
left. Student leaders have studying
and social activities to deal with,
just as administrators have their
homes and families. It is not asking
very much to make the two more
equal.
If student home telephone
numbers are released to the general
public, administrators should be
printed in the same directory right
alongside them. Administrators
should not hide behind their office
phones, unless students have the
same right.
Students who do not have office
numbers should not argue about
their home telephones being
publicized, provided that most of
the work done by the organization
originates out of a certain students'
dorm room or apartment.
Administrators must bear in mind
that in certain professions crank
phone calls are an accepted part of
the job. The student newspaper is a
prime example, and we can stand a
few calls at work � but not at
home.
Everyone has a right to privacy,
and no administrator should
deprive certain students of rights
which are granted to others. If a stu-
dent wants his phone number listed
for the public he can do so in the ci-
ty or cam pi , directory.
If a student wants to ensure his
privacy, then administrators should
respect that right. Fortunately,
phone numbers can be changed.

WELL,Vb TIGHTEN MY BELT IF I HAD ONE
3
American Journal
There 9s More To Shooting Story
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
Remember the shooting deaths of five
anti-Ku Klux Klan demonstrators in
Greensboro, North Carolina last
November? It exploded onto the front
pages, was routinely deplored, filed away
and forgotten. Just a few more victims �
and they were "crazy" commies, too � of
other crazies, the KKK and the Nazis. An
isolated incident. A closer look at that not-
so-distant event suggests there may be more
'o the story.
"Klan activism is being promoted by the
ruling class Johnson, a black 20-year
veteran of the civil rights movement, said.
"Given the severity and depth of this
economic and political crisis, the Klan is
playing the role that it has historically, to
focus attention onto scapegoats, black peo-
ple, usually. And there they were focusing
on the most advanced fighters, who were
communists, and that's how we see the
Greensboro killings, as planned assassina-
tions
The three activists ticked off several
reasons why they believe the attack was
premeditated and carried out with police
cooperation:
1. Greensboro police denied the
demonstrators the right to bear arms; thus,
they were virtually defenseless against at-
tack.
2. Police admitted showing a Klan
member a copy of the rally permit, sup-
posedly available only to demonstration
leaders and police. Since the site of the rally
had been changed at the last minute, this
tipped off the Klan to the new site.
3. The Klan drove directly to the new site,
in a black housing project, later claiming
that they were just passing through. But
why would the Ku Klux Klan be passing
through a black housing project?
4. The police allowed eight cars from the
nine-car Klan and Nazi party caravan to
escape, while they arrested several CWP
members who had returned their attackers'
fire with illegal handguns.
5. All five of the dead were CWP leaders
and were hit in the head or the heart, in-
dicating they were singled out for death and
hit by trained marksmen.
Dale Sampson will always remember the
morning of Nov. 3, 1979. Her husband, Bill
Sampson, was one of the five persons gunn-
ed down that day. So will Nelson Johnson,
the local head of the Communist Workers
Party, the organization that called the rally.
Fellow CWPer Jim Waller died in his arms,
just as Greensboro police moved in to arrest
Johnson for inciting to riot. And so will
Phil Thompson of the beleaguered group's
central committee. All three are traveling
around the country, telling their version of
the Greensboro shooting, and trying to
refocus national attention on the event.
I met with them recently for a wide-
ranging interview, where I learned of the
group's plans to file a massive lawsuit, their
attempts to get charges against their own
members dropped, and their efforts to place
what they believe was a police set-up into a
political context.
"1 was standing next to Sandy Smith (the
only woman killed) when she was first hit
with a stick Dale Sampson said. "The
guy didn't even attempt to do anything to
me. He had time, because I was leaning
down to pick her up, but he ran back to his
car Sampson added that videotapes of the
shooting by local television stations show
that "the Klan gunmen weren't even look-
ing over their shoulders to see if the police
might fire at them. They felt very secure
According to the three activists, loal
police took four minutes to get to the scene
of the shooting, even though a police
surveillance vehicle had followed the Klan
caravan to the site and other police carv
were as near as two blocks awa. A !
TV station timed a car driving that distance.
at the speed limit, and stopping tor siop
signs. It took one and a halt minutes
When police did arrive, "the) pointed
their guns at u$ Johnson said, and ar-
rested Johnson and two other C W P
members, who carried handguns. Thirteen
of the 14 Klan members arrested were
released on bail, one as low as $4,000, and
conspiracy charges against them were drop-
ped. "That means the state's line is the
same as the Klan's defense said Phil
Thompson, "that the killers were just
floating by, decided to see what was going
on, and were provoked
When the CWP sponsored a funeral
march the following week, many would-be
demonstrators were turned away from
Greensboro by police. Dale Sampson
almost didn't get through police lines, she
said, "and they knew who I was. And when
we finally did, the National Guard pointed
bayonets at us, the people they were sup-
posed to be protecting
The CWP plans to tile a major lawsuit
for deprival of civil rights and the right to
life. They have hired famed radical lawyer
William Kunstler to handle a cae the
estimate could cost a million dollars and
take 10 years to pursue. CWP leaders sa
they don't expect justice from the courts,
but they hope that publicity about the suit
will educate the public about rightwing ac-
tivity.
As for the legal charges against Klan and
Nazi members. Thompson said. "There's a
real possibility that they will be let o(. And
the implications of that are profound,
because if they can kill us there and get
away with it, that means they can do it
anywhere, to anybody who's speaking out
against them and what they represent
David vs. Goliath � A New Twist To An Old Story
By CHARLES GRIFFIN
National News Bureau
We are no longer the greatest power on
earth. Oh, we have enough nuclear power
to wipe out life as we know it, but so does
the Soviet Union. Our global strategy is to
keep the USSR from grabbing this place to-
day and that one tomorrow. Soviet global
strategy is to grab this place today and that
one tomorrow.
Since we live with a nuclear stalemate, the
only way left to influence friends and
enemies is the gradual application of
pressure. A push'here, a shove there, and
after a while, you have shouldered everyone
else into a corner.
Does that sound familiar? Now, who do
you know pushing and shoving � and who
do you know backing into a corner?
We Americans have always had a hard
time living with the idea that democracy
isn't suitable for all peoples around the
world. Communism was such a bogeyman
in the 20's and 30' s and gave us such a scare
in the 50's � all through our own self-
centered, power-hungry, short-sighted
politicians ravings during election � that
we never took any of the boundless oppor-
tunities to influence the communist
movements towards moderation. We
treated them like mad dogs � and we still
do.
What we should have done was to Coca-
Cola, Frigidaire, and Froot-Loop them to
decadency like us.
Even now, things don't always go their
way. Albania, Yugoslavia, and China prac-
tice their own independent form of com-
munism. Romania does not toe the Moscow
line. Egypt and a couple of other African
nations have kicked out Russian advisors.
Then there is Afghanistan. Wolves still
roam the mountains of Afghanistan �
some on two legs. The Russians have shown
their collective ass � ana the Afghan
wolves are chewing on it.
And it is a big enough ass. Discounting
support troops, of which the Russians use
fewer than we do, there are about six divi-
sions tied up in Afghanistan. Soviet strategy
calls for heavy reserves, so we can estimate
that 12 of the remaining combat divisions
assigned to the southern USSR Region are
committed to the Afghan operation.
There are six more divisions left to cover
the region. Now, for your information, all
of our total ground combat forces amount
to just 21 divisions. The Russians have a
side show involving ground forces that
number more than all our army divisions
with the whole Marine Corps thrown in for
good measure.
If that piece of information made your
day, then how would it strike you to learn
that our total Army reserves number
534,000, while the USSR can call up anyone
who has ever served up to age 50, giving
them a reserve numbering about
25,000,000.
The title of this column begins to make
sense. America is David and the USSR is
Goliath. Now I can retell the story the way
it is today:
Goliath is big. He is heavy into armor.
His main weapon is a double-edged sword
� simple to maintain and easy to operate.
Goliath's great weight makes it possible for
him to crush his opponents after he has
broken through their first defenses.
David is small. He has a minimum of ar-
mor. His main weapon is a selective-fire,
laser-aimed, multiple-delivery pea-shooter.
David's only hope of victory is to jump in,
make a quick shot, and jump out of the
way. It only takes one shot � according to
his instruction manual.
The SF-LA-MD-PS has been in operation
for just two months, It needs three types of
lubricating oils to be properly maintained.
One of them is back-ordered. David has
never used it in combat, so he has to be ex-
tra careful when he fires the SF-LA-MD-
PS. After all, he only gets one shot, right? �
The instruction manual lists four steps in
the selection of fire, ten steps in the opera-
tion of the laser sighting device, and three
choices of peas � single peas, three-pea-
pod, or 12-pea-pod � each with their own
special loading sequence.
Things are simplified for David in his
bout with Goliath. All the single peas were
used by his armorer in testing the weapon.
The 12-pea-pod has not been delivered by
the manufacturer yet. He has in hand one
load of the three-pea-pod, which has pro-
ven to be prone to malfunction.
A moment of truth approaches. The
ground trembles under Goliath's tread.
David has selected his fire, aimed his laser
beam, and is busy with the last step of the
loading sequence. A shadow spreads over
David. The last step completed, he pushes
the activation button. The SF-LA-MD-PS
fires! The three-pea-pod cluster blossoms
into bright stars dead-center on Goliath's
heavily armored chest and then fades away
leaving a mere blemish.
David is crushed by the whole experience.
You see, his technology-minded superiors
forgot to train him in some basic military
tactics, such as: find a weak point and ex-
ploit it, aim for the eyes, or hide until he
passes and shoot him in the back. Plus,
poor David wasn't physically fit enough to
run fast enough to keep Goliath from stepp-
ing on him.
The moral of this story is simple: We Are
In Trouble.
We aren't going to get out of trouble un-
til we start using our heads: enlarge our
ground forces; tighten, renew, and increase
our alliances, and get tough when our in-
terests are threatened.
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New Stylebook Buries Unisex
HUGH MULLIGAN 23 aur'ownhumbk S 5 5 ?" f�rma'
aps.kc.coo scribbings hL gTven �SeC"p�n f�r an of"
PERSON- decent burial in a mass
CHESTER, N H grave to the chairper- �.So' there n ,s' �e"
CAP) - State PoHce son' th spokesperson, JSCS ,Sh dead-
. ce the DunnArcnn �a �i Lon8 I've the chairman
British firm of Dunhill to have her title diluted Britain after a long and
. (purveyors by ap- by the feminists. regrettable strike.
If the Times had not
been out of publication
mounted a personhunt
today for two gunper-
sons wanted for per-
sonslaughter in the
fatal personhandling of
a local mailperson and
the foreperson of a per-
sondolin personfactur-
ing plant in Personhat-
tan.
the gunperson and all
those other an-
drogynous her-
maphroditic unisex
creations who have
been robbing the
English language of its
manhood.
or the chairwoman or
the chairgay, if there is
to be a further
breakdown of the
sexes.
This should come as
no surprise to the pipe-
pointment to Her Ma-
jesty the Queen) always
insisted on the title of
chairman of the board
and NOT, as she told
me in an interview,
chairwoman, chairlady
Ms unfortunately,
is still with us in The
Associated Press - for so ,
rharmaodweomah r,ehfers f�r true � ss
that mode - but there Queen,s E h)
or chairperson.
Mary Dunhill
had
revised style bible
"�PERSONS: Do
not use coined words
he newspaper prose of such as chairperson or
Relax. Such is not
started off as a book-
1 mint frnm n�r n� sming, very ladylike keeper in the family
�fflfilS.?" "eW Mary Dunhill of the firm, and when she
tobacco and pipe
dynasty, who when she
headed the august
finally made it to the
head seat at the board
table, she wasn't going
is hope. The prestigious
Times of London
recently buried Ms. as
an abomination, bann-
ed the ersatz abbrevia-
tion forever from its
distinguished news col-
umns, when it returned
to the newsstands of
ths, Ms. might never
have gotten a stiletto
heel in the door of our
language.
Ms according to the
new AP Stylebook, "is
the spelling and the
punctuation for all uses
of the courtesy title, in-
cluding direct quotes
the immediate future.
We are being rescued at
last from what
Vladimir Nabokov call-
ed "all that personure"
which recently has been
piled high over the
English language in the
name of sexual equali-
ty-
The new Associated
Press Stylebook (one
word), which is the ar-
biter elegantiae of the
prose style used in most
newspapers and broad-
Major
spokesperson in regular
text.
"Instead use chair-
man or spokesman if
referring to a man or
the office in general.
Use chairwoman or
spokeswoman if referr-
ing to a woman. Or, if
applicable, use a
neutral word such as
Homecoming
leader
tative.
or represen-
"Use chairperson or
similar coinage only in will be given a tremen-
direct quotations or dous responsibility in
Too early to plan for the planning and execu- The Student Com- Division chairpersons
Homecoming? tioh of the Homecom- mittee will consist of WH oversee all ac-
Not at all. We've on- ing activities. students interested in tivities. The success of
ly just begun! The Homecoming chairing committees for Homecoming will de-
Homecoming 1980 will Steering Committee parade and halftime Pend on the individual
be held on October will approve all sug- decorations, entertain-
18th against Western gested activities for ment, bands, corn-
Carolina, but the Homecoming. It will be munity relations, pro-
groundwork is already the responsibility of the motions and publicity,
being laid for the event. Student Homecoming There will also be a
The student body Committee, however, position open for a Stu-
"to plan, promote and
present a festival of ac-
tivities for Homecom-
ing
dent Homecoming
Committee Chairper-
chairpersons and their
willingness to work
with students and
faculty members.
Applications will be
available in every
residence hall office
and at the Mendenhall
son. Both the position Student Center beginn-
of Chairperson and ing Wednesday
Pizzaixui
AMERICAS FAVORITE PIZZA
Expecting Success
In Spring Concert IpizzA BUFFET
After cancellations
by Jefferson Starship
and the Allman
Brothers last semester,
East Carolina's Major
Attractions Committee
is looking to the April
'Toto" concert for a
major success.
"We feel good about
this concert said
Charles Sune, chair-
man of the Major At-
tractions Committee.
'Toto's new album,
Hydra, is selling
number 41 nationwide
and number 5 locally.
This will be the first
stop on their tour, and
their only appearance
in North or South
Carolina
East Carolina has
had problems com-
peting with larger
schools for the big
name bands, said Sune.
"It's primarily a ques-
tion of economics he
explained. "Bands
often lose money on
tours, because they do
them basically to pro-
mote album sales.
When a band is work-
ing for a guarantee plus
a percentage of the
receipts, they hesitate
to come here. Minges
only seats 6,000
The Toto concert has
been scheduled for
April 17, with tickets
on sale by March 31.
Tickets will cost $5 to
students and $7 for the
public.
ALL THE PIZZA AND
SALAD YOU CAN EATl
�2.59
Mon. -Fri. 11:30 2:00
Mon, fiP Tues. 6:00 8:00
758-6366 Evening buffet 92.79
Hwy 204 bypass Greenville , N. C.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN MARCH 18. 1980 5
Patronize
East Carolinian
advertisers
THE EAST CAROLINA PLAYHOUSE
STUDIO THEATRE
MARCH 19-23. 8:15 � MARCH 23 MATINEE 2 15
GENERAL ADMISSION $2 50 � ECU STUDENTS $1.50 � 757-4390
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
MARCH 18, 1980
Page 6
Carving Circus Figures
Local Baker Enj oys Whittling
By MARC BARNES
Senior Editor
Frank Diener doesn't make as
many elephants as he used to
because they are too big to carry
around in his pocket.
Diener, who operates a bakery on
Dickinson Avenue and who looks
more than a little like actor Art
Carney, carved his first circus
elephant out of wood when he was
in the fourth grade.
Diener learned his craft mostly by
doing. During his childhood, he
went to a lot of circuses and began
trying to carve circus figures.
For materials, Diener says he uses
blocks of wood he finds, but his
wife says that he uses "hand-picked
packing crates
Diener does his carving in his
spare time during his hectic days at
the bakery. He carries a half-carved
block of wood and a pocketknife
around, and when he has a few
minutes, he whittles a small circus
figure. He is one of only four
members in the state of the Circus
Model Builders International, a club
for circus memorabilia enthusiasts.
"Carving circus figures is a lot
more popular up north, where the
weather is not as good as it is here. I
mean, it blizards up there for a week
at a time, and what else can vou
do
To carve an elephant, you take a
block of wood and "cut everything
away that doesn't look like an
elephant Diener says with a
twinkle in his eye. "To carve a
clown, you take a block of wood
and carve everything away that
doesn't look funnv
A friend of Diener's in Raleigh
has reconstructed an entire circus on
a scale of one inch to the foot. The
model is so big that it has never been
set up completely.
"By the time he sets up his big top
and his sideshow tent and
everything, he has run out of room.
He has only set up parts of it at a
time
For this reason, Diener builds his
circus figures to a V inch to one
foot scale. "Houses have shrunk,
and apartments have shrunk, so 1
had to shrink down as well
Diener has seen circuses come and
go, but one he remembers n the
Greenville area was the Pete Chris-
tiani circus. That circus had evident-
ly failed to pay its printing bills, and
the result was a joke on the sheriff,
Diener recalled.
"The sheriff came to serve the
papers on the owner. Pete looked at
the sheriff and told him to go right
ahead and take the big top. The
sheriff says, 'hold on now, hows
about some help with this thing
here
The incident with the tent that
was taken away, a snowstorm in
.Greensboro and the time Diener had
a broken leg are the only times he
can remember missing a circus in the
area.
"David, my youngest boy, is 16,
and he has been to the circus 15
times
Diener has gotten to know some
circus people over the years. "Most
folks who go to the circus are
See WHITTLER Page 7, Col. 4
Woodcarver Frank Diener
"Just carve away what doesn't look like elephant"
Professor Releases A Ibum
By PAT MINCES
Staff Writer
Though it sometimes may seem to
the contrary, the American Dream
remains intact. An individual can
rise above humble beginnings,
realize that nothing is impossible
and through hard work and
perserverance establish himself as a
vital force in the daily proceedings
of human existence. He can emerge
unscathed, with his integrity and
ideals about success uncompromis-
ed from the struggle for national
prominence. It is this fact that rein-
forces the respect we have for the
American dream.
Dr. Richard Duane Logue, pro-
fessor of Speech, Language and
Auditory Pathology at ECU, is one
of those all-American boys who is
on the verge of national acclaim. He
is in the process of releasing his first
album, Words, and is living proof
that the boyish dreams of grandeur
have not been lost in the fast-paced
shuffle of modern life. Dr. Logue,
or Richard Duane, as is his stage
name, has risen from the rangelands
of Colorado to become a
phenomenon of modern music. Yet
he clings tenaciously to his ideals
about man and music.
Dr. Logue was born in the small
Colorado town of Monta Vista and
received his Bachelor's Degree from
Colorado State University. Having
received his doctoral degree from
Purdue University by the age of 26,
Dr. Logue has won recognition for
his distinguished teaching and
scholarship and has published
numerous papers dealing with the
brain, language and disorders of
human communication. Yet, he felt
driven by an even deeper desire to
communicate emotions and ideas to
larger and more varied groups of in-
dividuals across boundaries which
only one entity can span, the field of
music.
Logue has been many things in his
life student and teacher, father
and son, athlete and intellectual, but
his interest in music has never wan-
ed. He sang with a dance band in
college and lat summer he jammed
wtih the house band at the hotel
where a speech conference was be-
ing held, there he was observed by
individuals from the recording in-
dustry. They were impressed with
his resounding voice and pleasing
manner, invited him to Nashville to
record a demo tape for a recording
session. Now, a few months later,
ne has completed an album and
started on a second.
Logue had somewhat ambivalent
feelings about going to Nashville for
he had heard about unscrupulous
producers on Sixty Minutes, those
who offered little except disappoint-
ment. Nothing could be further
from the truth for Dr. Logue. He
became involved with Gene and
Allen Cash of Sounds Inc two
respectable individuals who have
done much to further the career of
Dr. Richard Logue
Richard Duane. Gene Cash has
worked a good deal with Richard
Duane, being the engineer and co-
producer of Words and assisting in
the penning of "If I Had My Way
The Cash's interest prompted the
professor into becoming a pro-
digious songwriter, having produc-
ed nearly twenty-five songs in ap-
proximately six months. Because
Dr. Logue can hardly read or write
music, he called upon pianist Walt
Cunningham to put his music to
charts and accompany him on
piano. Together they have done
most of the arranging for Words,
with Logue having the major role in
the production of his music.
Perhaps the finest aspect of
Richard Duane's musical career is
the fact that he refuses to com-
promise his ideals about music.
When compromise for commercial
gain is the watchword of the recor-
ding industry, Dr. Logue stands up
for the integrity and independence
of his music and has even been
known to refuse major recording
contracts in order to pursue his own
goals. Logue has created his own
recording label, Special Words,
whose logo descends from the Wer-
nicke area of the human brain,
which is distributed through Brandy
Music. Logue is in charge of pro-
duction, on Special Words, of the
album Words and of the singles
"Bright Eyes" and "Precious
Time
The impact of Logue's profession
is reflected by the area of music in
which he is interested most, the
communication of ideas and emo-
tion through meaningful lyrics
SGA Offers Funds
For A bortion L oans
By DEBBIE HOTAI INC,
Features Editor
You have either been in this situa-
tion or someone close to you has. If
it happened to a girl on your hall,
your girlfriend, or perhaps to you,
you know that some kind of a deci-
sion must be arrived at and carried
through.
What can a woman here at East
Carolina do when she finds out she
is pregnant, unmarried, and doesn't
want to "have to" get married? She
has a few choices: she can either
have an abortion or she can carry
through with the pregnancy. Either
way, she is very apt to go through
some rough times dealing with her
decision.
In recent years, women have
decided on abortion as opposed to
marrying someone for the sake of
giving a name to the baby. Some
women prefer to have an abortion
without telling the father of the
baby about the pregnancy. This, of
course, means she will have to find
the money for the abortion on her
own.
Here at East Carolina, students
can obtain loans specifically for
abortions or use the money in carry-
ing through the pregnancy. The
fund was set up by using a certain
percentage of student fees with ap-
proximately $5,000 in the fund.
In order to obtain this loan, there
are a few certain procedures which
need to be followed. First of all,
either the woman or the man involv-
ed can apply for the loan. The
woman does not necessarily have to
apply for the loan. The loan form
may be picked up in the SGA
Treasurer's office in Mendenhall or
at the Counseling center in the
Wright Annex.
Ricky Lowe, SGA treasurer, ex-
plained, "It's a very short form with
10 questions on it dealing only with
the most important information
such as name, address, etc
After the loan applicant has filled
out the information, the additional
signatures of a doctor verifying the
pregnancy and the counseling ser-
vice must be added. The infirmary
provides the test although the stu-
dent may prefer to visit her personal
doctor.
Dr. George Weigand, director of
the Counseling Center, explains why
the woman is required to visit the
Counseling Center. "It's true thai
many of the girls that come up here
have already made up their minds as
to what they want to do. Our job is
to make sure that they realize their
options and also that they get all of
the information concerning abor-
tions. Sometimes, if a girl is going
with a boy, he'll visit the counselor
with her. We've even had some
cases where the guy wanted a say in
the matter and the girl didn't want
him involved.
"All cases are different. It's ali
according to the individual as to
what kind of counseling thev
receive Weigand said.
See SGA Page 7. Col. 4
With the emphasis of disco and
mainstream pop being felt, Logue
feels that much of today's music
fails to communicate messages ef-
fectively, and this is a trend that
Richard Duane's music will attempt
to limit. Logue has an interest in
poetry, which is manifested best in
his strong ability to stir emotions
and thought among his listeners.
His music is full of potent and
evocative lyrics, so refreshing when
most of today's popular music is
propelled by psuedointellectual gib-
berish concerning the more mun-
dane aspects of our existence.
Yet the thing that first attracted
the Nashville executives still remains
perhaps the greatest asset of
Richard Duane, his remarkable and
resonant baritone. His vocal in-
fluences range from Johnny Cash to
Ray Charles to Neil Diamond and
Tony Bennett. If comparisons must
be made, his vocal performances
sometimes resemble Waylon Jenn-
ings with an occasional touch of
Elvis. His style is one without a
specific label or definition that
varies from country to jazz and
blues or rock, once again in-
vigorating, when today most of the
music industry demands a specific
approach or label which limits an
artist's freedom of expression.
I got a chance to hear a tape of
Words, which is due for national
release on or about March 31, 1980.
The most fascinating aspect is the
wide variety of styles incorporated
into a single endeavor, and the
album proves to be a stimulating
and enjoyable effort. Individuals
associated with the recording in-
dustry are assuring Richard Duane
that he is on the verge of tremen-
dous success, and I am sure that
Words will be a springboard for his
new career.
Words opens with the cut "Bright
Eyes released as a single on March
24, which is perhaps the most
dynamic song on the album. It is a
rocking blues number that features
Duane's powerful vocal rendition
supported by the ethereal blues
guitar of John Helms, a bluesmaster
See LOGUE Page 8, Col. 3
Dregs' Performance
Meets Expectations
Dixie Dregs' Andy West
Photo by RICHARD GREEN
By RICHARD GREEN
It wasn't quite 9 o'clock and the
line at the door of the Attic was
already around the block. Despite
spring break and the popular falacy
that Greenville closes with ECU, the
crowd was immense.
There was still a line at 10:30
when Buford T finished their set.
You would have thought Brice
Street was playing! (Just joking.)
The audience went wild as the
Dixie Dregs opened their second
show in Greenville with a cut from
their album What If.
The second tune was dedicated to
Twiggs Lyndon, late road manager
for the Dregs. Lyndon co-wrote
"Gina Lola Breakdown" with
guitarist Steve Morse. He also
designed the keyboard set-up for
Tee Lavitz and Sealevel's Chuck
Leave
About that time some of the amps
overheated. Actually, the whole At-
tic was overheated. As bassist Andy
West said, "And this is the place we
couldn't get to because of snow just
last week After a short delay the
show was underway.
If there had been any snow left
when the Dregs played, their perfor-
mance would have melted all of it.
The crowd was so electrified by the
performance that Morse and
violinist Allen Sloan could barely
quiet the crowd for the soft,
beautiful duet, "Northern Lights
from the Free Fall album.
From that brief, soothing in-
terlude, it was high-energy, prac-
tically flawless Dregs. The crowd
that was somewhat dumbfounded
by the band a year ago knew what to
expect this time. Everyone rocked
out.
The only real complaint besides
the extreme heat was the poor mix
for Lavitz. With the precision ar-
rangements the Dregs blaze
through, proper volume must be
See DREGS Page 7, Col. 1
and Allen Sloan






SGA Offers Funds
For Abortion Loans
THE EAST CAROLINIAN MARCH 18, 1980
Whittler Enjoys Craft
Steve Morse
Photo by RICHARD GREEN
Continued from Page 6
With the signature of a counselor
at the center, the loan applicant then
msut return to the treasurer's office
and obtain a requisition and to get
the the SGA advisor's (Dr. Thorn-
ton's) signature. The treasurer will
staple the form to the requisition
and hand them back to the applicant
who will then take it to the Student
Fund Accounting office.
Wait a minute, you're not finish-
ed yet. Upon presenting the form
and requisition to a secretary in the
accounting office, a check will be.
made out to the applicant in the sum
of no greater than $150.
Lowe explained the terms of the
loan. "We prefer that the loan is
paid back within three months but
we allow up to six months if
necessary. They pay the loan back
to the Student Fund Accounting of-
fice
A long, complicated process?
Maybe. But Lowe claims that
everything is kept very confidential
and this loan is open to all students.
"I want to stress the fact that the
loan is kept confidential. I can see a
problem where girls would feel em-
barassed about having to go to a guy
to get the loan. But we don't judge
the person. The person needs the
loan and we give it to them. I don't
ask any personal questions and I try
to make it as quick as possible. I
keep them in my office no longer
than five or 10 minutes � enough
time to fill out the form
Lowe added, "I think the
students should be informed that
this loan comes from student fees �
it is not state funded. As I said
before, we're not here o judge a
person's morals. The reason this of-
fice handles this loan is because it is
the students' money we're dealing
with
The money is available for so-
meone "in trouble True, you have
to go through a lot to receive the
help. Look at it this way, it's a loan
and as with all other loans, there's a
lot of red tape. The choice is yours.
Continued from Page 6
strangers from out of town. It
makes you feel good to hear the
fella selling the programs say, 'Hey,
how's the bakery business?"
"You don't get to know the per-
formers too much, because they
change their names so often One
performer Diener got to know was
originally a giant in a freak
sideshow, but when such shows
became unpopular, the man became
the world's tallest clown.
"He could lean his elbow against
the top of that refrigerator over
there, and he had to duck his head
under to come under that pipe
said Diener, pointing.
The performers that Diener seems
to like best, though, are the ones he
creates himself. He has carved all
kinds of circus animals, from lions
and tigers to camels, zebras,
elephants and llamas. He also carves
human performers, like sword-
swallowers, strong men, midgets,
fat men and fire eaters. He has done
model calliopes and an entire circus
band.
"One time, they said there
wouldn't be no more circuses, but
they are coming back stronger than
ever.
"As long as they make children,
they will make circuses
Dregs Impress Crowd
Continued from Page 6
delivered to each member at the pro-
per time. Tee just wasn't getting
what he deserved.
One brief burst from a pair of
flashpots produced the usual rush
for the audience, but Sloan looked a
little less casual about it than the
ret of the band. Before the Dregs
hired professional pyrotechnicians,
the flashpots were homemade, ac-
cording to Lavitz.
During a show last fall, a flashpot
exploded and a hefty chunk hit
Sloan in the leg, knocking him flat
on his back. Lavitz said he looked
down at Sloan and asked him if he
was alright. Sloan, still trying to
play his violin, said, "No
With a bloody, broken leg he was
carried out on a stretcher. But he is
fine now � said he's already been
skiing this year.
A pleasing mixture of songs from
the Dregs' previous albums and
their upcoming release made for an
enjoyable performance. The new
album, Dregs of the Earth, will be
released around April 1. The Dregs
produced this one themselves, but
Morse did most of it, according to
Sloan.
After the show Morse and drum-
mer Rod Morganstein disappeared,
but Sloan, West and Lavitz mingled
with the remaining fans to chat �
definitley not your typical rock
stars. But then what is typical about
the Dregs? Not much.
At a party after the show, so-
meone asked Lavitz's advice for an-
up-and-coming musician: "Don't
compromise In the era of com-
mercial music it isn't easy for a band
to withstand the pressures of the
recording business. Just take a look
and listen to the music being played
on most AM and FM stations and
that fact is obvious.
Both Sloan and Lavitz said that
they experienced some pressure to
"get a vocalist and write commer-
cial music" in the early stages, but
they don't face much of that any
more. �,
Sloan commented on the money
wasted by the recording companies
trying to make artists feel like stars.
He said the Dregs spent about half
as much on Dregs of the Earth as
the last album and it sounds twice as
good.
We can hardly wait to hear it.
And from the crowd response,
Greenville can hardly wait for the
next Dregs concert. Maybe next
time more students will get the
chance to hear them live, barring
any unforeseen blizards.
But from one student who did
hang around, it was well worth it.
HEAPING tiny
PORTIONS. priee
Break the junk food routine and get a good, hot meal with
vegetables.
WEDNESDAY FEATURE
March 19 ONLY $1.89
BEEFSTEWON RICE
with tossed salad and dressing
THURSDAY FEATURE
March 20 ONLY $1.49
BAKED SPAGHETTI
with tossed salad and dressing and
garlic bread
Come home to eat at S&S � we're located in the
Carolina East Mall in Greenville, at the intersection of
West Haven Road (U.S. 264 Bypass) and Hwy. 11. Plenty
of free parking too.
SAAD'S shoe
REPAIR
�13 Grande Ave.
7.S8-1228
Quality Shoe Repair
Carolina Eaat Mall
Serving continuously dally
from 11 a.m. till 8 p.m.
(8:30 Friday & Saturday)

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THE EAST CAROL1NI, NJ
MARCH 18, 1980
aiaiHaiBiaB
Logue Releases First Album
Martha Holder
Songwriter
To Appear
The Student Union
Coffeehouse Commit-
tee will present Martha
Holder, songwriter-
singer-guitarist, in con-
cert Saturday,March
11, from 9 to 11 pm in
Room 15.MendenhalI
Student Center.
Martha is an im-
pressive young musi-
cian who oversteps the
boundaries between
rock n' roll, jazz, blues,
and traditional music.
In addition to her own
jazz-oriented works,
Martha offers a pot-
pourri of songs by
Heart, Joni Mitchell,
I ed Zeppelin, Rickie
1 ee J ones, Dan
Fogelberg, and many
others.
Martha has been
playing guitar and
creating songs for eight
years and also acco n-
panies herself on man-
dolin and dulcimer. She
has performed at the
S.C. Folk Festival and
was honored at the Na-
tional Entertainment
and Campus Activities
Association's regional
convention in Atlanta.
Martha was three
years into a double ma-
jor in psychology and
art when she decided to
devote herself to music
full-time. Marhta has
don e extensive
nightclub and studio
work and is currently
on a tour oi colleges
and universities
t hr oughou1 the
southeast, where she
continues to receive an
excellent response.
George Fee, of WS.IS
radio in Winston-
Salem. summed up a
performance by saving,
"Audiences will be cap-
tivated by her charm,
warmth, sensitivity,
and, above all, her
ability
Continued from Page 6
who once played with
B.B. King, and the airy
tenor sax of Donnie
Saunders who has done
session work with near-
ly every major recor-
ding artist in Nashville.
The song is excellent
and unusual because of
a melodic transition
that occurs in the mid-
dle of the song and the
double entendre of the
lyrics. The combination
of vocal, sax and guitar
is accentuated by Cun-
ningham's superb
piano, and the single is
expected to be a com-
mercial success.
The next song is a
country flavored rocker
and seems to be written
with Greenville in
mind. It is entitled
"Just Another Night
Going Nowhere
Duane bellows out the
song that is highlighted
once again by Cunn-
ingham's keyboards
and pleasant backing
vocals (a la Asleep At
The Wheel) arranged
by Fogue.
Following is perhaps
my favorite song on the
album entitled "Oh,
How It Hurts Without
You a pensive ballad
about lost love in which
Duane's voice is at its
best. Cunningham's
string arrangements are
very moving creating a
congruence of emotion
that emanates from
within, and the song
possesses a subtle
lyrical strength as does
this beautiful ballad
with lyrical imagery
that details haunting
memories. It is a win-
ner.
"Social Phrases"
follows and was on the
back of the popular
single "From
America" This song is
a sheer rock tune about
"a bunch of social
phrases that mean less
and less" and the loss
of communication in
kind of a "push but-
ton" dialogue such as
"Hi, how are you?"
when we really do not
care. It also deals with
the descent for intellec-
tual pursuits that is be-
ing brought about by
our fascination and
dependence on the
technological state.
Gene Cash's "If I
Had My Way" is a nice
relaxing love song that
is propelled by Duane's
evocative singing and
Cunningham's Charlie
Richish" keyboard per-
formance. The song is
the backing cut for
"Bright Eyes making
the single a very inex-
pensive double dose of
pleasure.
The song "Wishing"
is a deeply personal,
dealing with Duane
Fogue's relationship
with his father. I wish I
could relate to you the
depth of the song, but
fine music is like im-
pressionistic art Its
contrast and context
comes from within.
The song is like a Tom
T. Hall classic with its
female vocal entrance
and ragtime keyboard
departure and its lyrics
yearn for the develop-
ment of a Utopian ex-
istence.
Did you ever hear a
song for the first time
and know that it is go-
ing to be a hit? Well
that is my job, and
"Precious Time" is one
of those songs. I could
tell you all about it, but
let's just wait till we
hear it on the radio. It
won't be long.
"Fove Is A Happy
Face" is a happy-go-
lucky ditty that seems
to start like "Social
Phrases" but develops
along different melodic
and lyrical lines. It is a
jovial love song that is
highlighted by pleasant
female backing vocals.
5 The gorgeous
"Fife's Unpredictable"
is the last song on the
album, a superb ballad
with music written by
Dr. Richard Shine, of
ECU's SFAP Depart-
ment. The lyrics were
composed by Duane.
Cunningham's piano
and strings make this a
mcving and emotional
ballad dealing with that
narrow tightwire of ex-
istence we walk and the
idiosyncracies involved
with such. It is a lovely
and apt closing to a
very remarkble
endeavor, one that is
sure to catapult
Richard Duane to na-
tional acclaim.
In conclusion, the"
American Dream" re-
mains. It involves rising
from humble beginn-
ings to create an impor-
tant role in the
historical perspective
without compromise or
sacrifice of one's per-
sonal ideals. Richard
Duane Fogue is the liv-
ing personification of
such in that he is on the
verge of musical history
through achieving ac-
claim by sticking to his
personal ideas about
music and refusing to
be lured by the com-
mercial dollar. Only
time will tell to what ex-
tent Words will become
a success, but Duane
Fogue's is a remarkable
story, and he a success
in himself. For the real
story pick up on Words
when it is released .
The Taming
Of The Shrew
9 p.m.
Wed.
March 19
MICHAEl HORDtRN
A
GINAb
L V E R
CORNET BAND
y
ELIZABETH
Taylor
RICHARD
Burton jp
mm
NOW
A delightful evening of music and theatre.
focused upon a gazebo, a thirteen piece turn
of the century small town band, and a
yarn-spinning PerfessorConductor
M
March 24 8 p.m.
Wright Auditorium
Student Union Special Attractions
STUDENT UNION
ItS' CMOUU UIBVtVT
4Jt Jot aoclfiMecl
TO BUY
2.
CHOOSE
A selection of 1 7 innovative
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ARTCARVED FEATURES MORE
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Man's: $99.00
Women's $50.00
Produced from a strong eweler's
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ARTCARVED PROVIDES AN
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All Men's Siladium rings
are on sale for $74.95
BONUS: ArtCarved's College ring specialist is on campus today
to assist with this important and meaningful purchase.
COLLEGE RINGS
.symbolizing your ability to achieve.
March 19,20, 21.
Student Supply Store
Lobby
30 day accounts
f at�nod tarmt

ftanhAmancW
Mart' Oarft
Ama�ao Eiprass
C,4t Monorad
9h
Carolina Eaat Mall
Qr�nvilla N,C, 27834
Student Supply Store
ABORTION
The decision may well be difficult
but the abortion itself doeshuhave to be
We do our best to make it easy for you
Free Pregnancy Test
Very Early Pregnancy Teat
Call 781-8880 anytime
The Fleming Center
Friendly
Personal Professions
at a reasonable cost
CHANELO'S
Pira Spaghetti
House
Dine In Or Delivery 758-7400
507 EAST 14th ST GREENVILLE. U.C.
��&�&��
FOSDICK'S
1890
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Tuesday Night
Specials
FLOIWDEK �3.50
TROUT 2.95
PERCH �2.95
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No take-outs please
M�al lncladcs:
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We are proud to
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e 1V80 ArtCcvvcd v JSje ��gs





HI I AS . KOl IM N
Sports
mm
M -
Pirates Down Richmond, Now 6-2
tf
Butch Davis is on
hitting rampage
BII KI IM II WDI IK
sports i dilur
Sophomore pitchei Mill Wildei
hurled a si hittei yesterday aftei
noon ! o lead I ,ii c ai olina's
baseball team to a 4 1 win ovei
Richmond on Harrington I ield.
ildei. now 2 o on the season
with a 0 56 earned run average,
went the distance a only a hist inn
ing solo home run by the Spiders'
Rick Bishop prevented a shutout.
1 eftfieldet Butch I)a is continued
to be the batting stai toi the Pirates
as his third inning two-run hornet
J the v ictoi s 1 he clout w as
Davis' sixth in 1 C I "s first eight
games, increasing his school record
careei total to l1 He is also fast ap
proaching the season record ot ten.
Shortstop Kelly Robinette went
three-for-foui at the plate, driving
in an insurance run in the eighth and
later scoring on a Spidei error.
Ihe Pirate win left both teams
with identical 6 2 records and
hi ought to an end a two game ECU
losing skein.
Foi hi si yeai Pirate coach Hal
Maud the win, and the season thus
tar as a whole, is veiv pleasant.
"Things are looking pretty good
he said. "We're a little behind
because of some ol the snow we
had, but I' m pleased w hen
everything is considered
Maud noted that the two Pirate
losses against stiff competition.
"We've lost to South Carolina and
Virginia he explained. "Virginia
is really tough and South Carolina is
ranked sixth in the nation
Impressing Maud was his team's
tout game sweep ot Connecticut!
last week "I hc went to the
c A A tourney last year and played
in the C ollege World Series said
Maud "They finished sixth so I'd
say we made quite an accomplish-
ment
1 hrough ihe lust eight Pirate
games Maud has particularity liked
his team's pitching and defense
"Moth hae been excellent he pro
claimed. "Out hitting has been a
little sporadic, but not bad considei
ing how early in ihe season it is
One bright spot foi the Pirates
has been the existence ol the long
ball. In addition to Davis'
astonishing total ot six home runs.
catcher I 11 si base ma n k u k
Derechaillo has lour clouts.
Derechaillo, by the was. holds the
ECU record w ith ten home i uns in a
single season.
I hough the II pitching has
been excellent thus tar. Maud feels
he must develop mote depth m this
area as he is using stricly six hurlers
at this tune
1 he ace ot the stal t is Mickey
Mritt. who holds nearly every Pirate
pitching record imaginable. Britt is
2-0 and sporis a 2.81 ERA.
In addition to Mritt and W ilder,
Pirate pitchers seeing extensive duly
include kiek Ramey, Mike
W illiams, Mill I )a is and the only
lefty on ihe staft. Mob Palter on.
A boost to the Pit ale can e has
been the addition ot football n e
guard lohn I fallow f h
Hallow has tilled in admirably in the
out field as star tei Macon M y
teied a bout vs,itIn scarlet fever.
Move b bask in the Pirate lineup,
but, says Maud. Hallow is not out.
lohn has ieally helped u
I le'll still see a lot ol time in the
held and a1 designated hitter
()n the season, I). i
th id ng Pirate batsman w ith a
87 aver a go alonside 1 .
homers and leu kMl
fieldet Billy Best is next at 385 V
a team the Pirates are hitting 264
I lie next II game
W ednesday when ihe Pirat
to W illiam and Marv
Lady Pirates
Finish 13th
In Nationals
Bn MMMN DuPRI I
wislanl �piriNdilur
� ft)
W D .ision II
on,
big

!1-
. omen
lite

I P u
Crimes

1:54 97 to
. . � t : ev � i d as
K ,�
D;
� on
. a
in-
am ot
� �
David-
Malcolm.
I: im tor a
reshman
d tor
' ' ee in
Putnam
First-year Kl coach
Hal Baird
ECU Tankers
Capture Third
In Eastern
( atcher-first baseman Rick Derechailo
Has 4 homers in first S It I games
IM
kvas nut no!
sal d ed Putnam. "Ihe
relay s v ent i acII. V e mov ed
up a few pla ' 4(K) 1 reestyle
was the only relay no! to make it. I
dividual think we .e done better
h i md 12th Clarion State claimed ihe I);
sion II cahmpionship, followed bv
(. al State-Northridge, C al Poly
Pamona, Aii Force and Villinova.
Ihe I ady Pirates complete the
season with an overall mark of 4-5,
with theit only losses against Divi-
sion 1 opponants.
'They all performed well said
coach kav Scharf. " I hev have to to
Jo so well as a team. It I ;aJ to the team was to be in the top 10 in
single out one girl 1 guess u would the nationals and we fell a 1
be Karen Davidson foi her overall short ot that. We won Region II
performance. championship; ihe girls had a good
"This is the best season the meet there,
women have had since I've been "I think it took them two or three
coaching them. One ot my goals tot davs to eel adiusted at the nationals.
Bv iiinDulKl 1
sislanl �)irK 1
ed - � � � -NCAA 1
l
434. �
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tvle ai I
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k
the 100-
show � 2
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lol � R ;1 .
: I Nien
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Hit tean
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1 Niei
the 100 and 500 ft
shei s in, ided-
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"We had
coach Ray v
some re-pc. t
ot out uoa

Only Cards In Top 10
Final Four Surprising
a ' I he
' �� irnament has turned out
ler tl an expected.
W .�. Mild have thought that
i 'atis" the regulai
. ould be among the I inal
Instead ot the DePauls, In-
Ohio States. Marylands,
what we have is
, UCLA and iihanks
; ten) 1 ouisv lile.
I �� fact oi the matter is that
the nly team among
p 19 teams in the I inal Four.
tied number 20 in the
i P poll.
a here did UCLA and Iowa
For starters, Iowa is a
tter team than its record
Ihe team lost all but one ol
gan es when point guard Ronnie
I ester was out with an injury. With
I ester the Hawkeyes are 14-1.
UCLA has done what so many
ms tail to do- make the utmost
'heir strength. I he Bruins are
blessed with awesome quickness and
have used this to the ultimate in
ipsets over Oregan State and Ohio
State and in a victor over a much
tallerlemson squad
Also in the Bruins favor is tradi-
tion I Cl A. ol course, has more
idition in basketball than any
team in the country, including Ken-
tucky. Super-motivator and coach
I arrv Brown has let his team know
Charles
Chandler
thai and has brought out the best in
it at jus! the right tune.
Purdue has stormed its way to the
Final lour, claiming impressive
wins over LaSalle, 13th-ranked St.
lohn's, and seventh ranked Indiana
before having to battle neck to-neck
with 14th ranked Duke.
What's been the Boilermakers'
iecrel ! Simple execution. loe
Manvarroll is a most intimidating
.enter at 7-1 and should be the
lumber one puk in this spring's
NBA drati. Purdue lias used Car
roll's talents and blended them with
those of the other players on the
team to form a neai perfectly
operating machine.
Boilermaker forward Drake Mor-
ris is a real unsung talent, as is point
guard Brian Walker (ex oi N.C.
State).
As for Louisville, their being in
the Final lour is no surprise. I he
C ardmals have been tanked in the
top five nearly all season and have
the best individual talent around in
Darrell (Dr. Dunkenstein) Griffith.
The Cards have faced their share
oi adversity, though. One of the
team's top players, Scooter Mc-
( lav. went down with an injury ear-
ly in the season. I his dimmed the
hopes ol a good season in the eyes
ol Lousville coach Denny C rum.
But what has happened since thai
injury has been more than even
C rum could have dreamed for.
I hanks to some excellent play
from Scooter McC ray's brother,
Rodney, the Cards have worked
together to become, in the words of
NIK I V announcer Al McGuire, a
"great team
I his was never more evident than
m the Cardinals impressive win over
I SI m the Midwest Final game.
Griffith, despite sitting out half of
the game, finished with 17 points,
two of which came on a super-
fantastic dunk by the Dr.
1 ouisv ille now finds itself the
overwhelming favorite to capture
the national title. After all, the
Cards are ranked number two in the
nation and have been playing their
best ball of late. But so has
everyone else.
For Iowa. Purdue and UCI A, the
road to glory is an uphill battle. But
hasn't it been for them all along?
The way this tourney has gone,
don't dare count anyone out. The
unexpected has come to be the ex-
pected.
Mile Relay Team Cops
Third In The Nation
By JIMM I hi PUFF
Assistant sp��rl dilor
After a grueling indoor season,
last Carolina's i rac k m en
culminated monthes oi practice and
training with a third place finish in
the mile relay at the NCAA Division
I Indoor Championships at Detroit,
Michigan.
Florida State took first place in
the event, followed by Maryland.
ECU and Oregon State
The team oi junior Stan Curry,
Carson
sophomore Carlton Bell, senioi Otis
Melvin and treshman Shaun I aney
posted at time of 3:17.1, qualifying
each as Ml Amei icans.
Curry's :49.3 stood a the best
lead leg oi the meet. Bell followed
with a :48.9 sprint, while Melvin
clocked in at :49.5 and 1 anev al
:49.3.
"W e led thai thing till the last 20
yards and we just couldn't hold off
the anchor from 1 lorida State
said ECU coach Bill C ai son. " 1 hev
flew the guv in as a replacement and
le didn't get there until a few hours
before the race. He was taster than
the guy they had (here to start
with
Carson explained that each of 26
relay teams ran two heats Friday,
with the best eight qualifying for the
final competition o anothei pair of
heats Saturday.
The ECU thinclads were grouped
with Oregon State. N.C. State and
Florida State, with lennessee,
Maryland, Middle lennessee State
and Washington State comprising
the other group.
Carson commented thai East
Carolina had lost each of the last
three outings with lennessee and
the last four with Oregon State, but
expressed pleasure with his athletes
this time around.
"We've been working all year
lone running on the boards building
up to this Cars - ' w
usually have
to pat
they all did well
I anev becomes the I
athlete at I Cl to S
American honors n Divis ot I coi
petition. Mel in also .
himself as ihe only dual spori
American, adding :o his 1979
door track status
"We gave it all we had says
Carson. "It's the highest finis . t
for an Fast Carolina team
Dual A-A Melvin





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 18, 1980

Final Four"Remain
STUDENT UNION
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
By
HERSCHEL
MSSENSON
AP Sports Writer
Question: Does
"Final Four" mean the
final four survivors or
the last four teams ad-
mitted to the crowded
48-team NCAA basket-
ball tournament?
Answer: Thanks to
the presence of second-
ranked Louisville it's
the former, but the lat-
ter wouldn't be too bad
a guess.
Joining the Cardinals
of Louisville in the
NCAA semi-finals at
Indianapolis next
weekend are � sur-
prise! � Purdue, No.
20 in The Associated
Press' final regular-
season rankings but on-
ly third in the Big Ten
standings; unranked
Iowa, the Big Ten's
fourth-place quintet,
and unranked UCLA,
once college basket-
ball's greatest dynasty
but only the fourth best
team in the Pacific-10
Conference this season.
"We've been crossed
off the list many, many
times Iowa Coach
Lute Olson said after
his 23-8 Hawkeyes eras-
ed a 14-point second-
half deficit and nipped
1 I th-ranked
Georgetown 81-80 for
the championship of
the East Regional at
Philadelphia.
The Hawkeyes oppo-
nent next Saturday will
be Louisville, 31-3,
which shrugged off the
loss of All-American
guard Darrell Griffith
for half the- game with
foul trouble and
stomped third-ranked
Louisiana State 86-66
with a blistering
second-half assault to
capture the Midwest
Regional at Houston.
only led
intermis-
semifinal
Purdue,
The winners
31-29 at the
sion.
The other
will match
22-9, and UCLA, 21-9,
which posted im-
pressive triumphs on
Saturday. Purdue won
the Mideast Regional at
Lexington, Ky bump-
ing 14th ranked Duke
68-60, while UCLA
ousted Clemson 85-74
in the West Regional at
Tucson, Ariz.
Next Saturday's win-
ner will meet for the
NCAA championship
on Monday night,
March 24. And just in
case you're wondering,
the most losses ever for
an NCAA champion
was Marquette's seven
in 1977.
Iowa trailed
Georgetown 42-32 at
halftime and only
Vince Brookins' 16
noints kept the
Hawkeyes that close. It
became 46-32 early in
the second half before
Iowa rallied behind
6-foot-10 reserve Steve
Waite.
He came off the
bench with the score
64-54 and scored 13 of
his 15 points in the last
11 minutes, including a
tiebreaking three-point
play � a basket from
underneath and a free
throw after
Georgetown called two
timeouts � with five
seconds to play that
gave Iowa an 81-78
lead.
"My first thought
was to pass the ball
back to a shooter
Waite said of his game-
winning play. For-
tunately for Iowa, he
thought better of it.
"I don't believe in
setting up a play for
one person at the con-
clusion of a game
Olson explained. "If
the other team goes in-
to a zone, we go into
our regular zone at-
tack. If they go man-to-
man, we attack that. I
just wanted a shot in
the last five seconds
Brookins finished
with 22 points while
Eric Floyd had 31 for
Georgetown, which
saw the nation's longest
winning streak snapped
at 15 games.
"Any time a team
comes out of its region
and plays like Iowa,
they deserve all the
credit said
Georgetown Coach
John Thompson.
Louisville's Griffith,
who picked up his first
personal just two
seconds into the game
against LSU, sat out 14
minutes of the first
half, scoring only four
points. But he ignited
the Cardinals' second-
half surge and wound
up with 17 points.
IM Swimming Crowns
Scott, Tri-Sigs Win
B RICkU.I IARMIS
Intramural I orrepondent
Ten meet records
were shattered on
February 26 in the In-
tramural Swim Meet
and as the 14 events
concluded, Scott Dorm
and Sigma S i g m a
Sigma emerged as team
winners of this exciting
activity. The men's 100
ard individual medley
was one of the most ex-
citing races as Alan
1 owe of the Greatful
Heads beat out Rick
Spencer of Scott Tide
by seven-tenths of a se-
cond.
Eve Brennan, Tyler,
turned in an outstan-
ding indiv idual perfor-
mance as she set three
meet records in the
three events she
entered. Another
outstanding swimmer.
Keith Wade, broke
records in both the 50
and 100 yard butterfly.
The following par-
ticipants broke In-
tramural Swim Meet
records: Mark Medei,
Independent; Scott;
Eve Brennan, Tyler;
Debbie Churchill, In-
dependent; Keith
Wade, Man Eating
Guppies; and Alan
Lowe, the Greatful
Heads. Congratula-
tions to these and all
swimmers who took
part in this exciting
meet.
Team Tennis
Get your tennis bud-
dies together and sign
up for the upcoming
Team Tennis season.
Each team will consist
of a minimum of three
and a maximum of
seven players. Come by
the Intramural Office,
Memorial, Room 204
and sign up now! A
Captains' meeting will
be held March 19 in
Memorial Room 104 at
4 p.m. Plav begins
March 20.
Innertube Water Polo
Severa' Innertube
Water Polo games were
rescheduled due to the
snow storm. New dates
and times are as
follows. Power Hitters
will plav Assorted Nuts
on March 20 at 6:15
p.m. Water Bugs will
meet the Sea Bisquits
on March 20 at 7 p.m.
All Star Players will
battle LnKappa Fifth
on March 20 at 7:45
p.m. while 505 Club
will play the Sinkers on
the twentieth at 8:30
p.m.
As of this week, the
top five water polo
teams are Power Hit-
ters, in first place
followed by Rip Tides,
All Star Players,
UnKappa Fifth, and
Sea Bisquits.
Co-Rec Frisbee Golf
Don't let Frisbee
Golf pass you by!
Registration ends today
with play beginning
tomorrow. Teams con-
sist of two men and two
women, so organize
your team and rush
over to the Intramural
Office and sign up!
Dates and Deadlines
All-Campus Basket-
ball Finals are being
played today.
Co-Rec bow ling
playoffs began yester-
day and will continue
throughout the week.
Volleyball registration
ends March 20 with the
Captains' meeting be-
ing held March 24 at 7
p.m. in Brewster B-102.
Plav will begin March
25.
The Intramural Golf
Classic is scheduled for
March 27 with registra-
tion closing March 25.
Wednesday Nite
at
Allan plays the Oldies
Everly Brothers, Elvis, Beach Boys,
plus your favorite Rock and New Wave
DOWNTOWN EASTERTIME GALA
POSTER CONTEST
March 28, 1980
2 winners in 6 categories
GRAND PRIZE
Best In Show Poster
The Poster Theme Is:
Shop Downtown Greenville
Turn All Entries In No Later
Than 6:00 p.m. Thursday March 27th
To D.A.Kelly's
(Posters should be no longer than
standard poster size)
A 16-point LSU run '
lifted the Tigers into a
29-21 lead before
Louisville reeled off the
last 10 points of the
first half. Wiley Brown
scored 12 of his 16
points in the first 20
minutes for the win-
ners. l.SU's big guns,
forwards DeWayne
Scales and Durand
Macklin, were held to
12 and nine points,
respectively, for the
game.
"Darrell wanted to
jump on them (LSU)
from the start. I think
he got too overanx-
ious said Coach Den-
ny Crum. "But our
team is not a one-man
show. We just stayed in
our regular offense and
worked harder. The
other guys picked up
for him
LSU Coach Dale
Brown called Louisville
"the best team we've
played. I don't think
anvone can beat them.
Mams
Win valuable prizes for your organizatioi
four U S National Sports Teams and gene -� I
funds for your school AH you do is collect empty r
Miller Brewing Company containers and re
for the points earned The top point irmng orgai zai
will win their choice of many valuable prizes
NO PURCHASE NECESSARY
Call your Miller Campus Rep today 1 i n1 rmat
$10FF
(ne �?� n et more)
20" Party P�ia
not good (luring any
other aperial
one coupon per person
CHANELO'S
Pizxa & Spaghetti
House
Dine In Or Delivery 758-7400
507 EAST 14th ST GREENVILLE. M.C.
CAMPUS REP
Joe Mims
PHONE NUMBER
758-4175
:
� � BrfcR BRt.MD IN U S A B MILLER BRr N . . V -V
There's a new place
to buy your swim suit
i�r
x
GET INVOLVED overton's of Greenville
SGASPRING ELECTIONS
President Secretary
Vice-President Treasurer
Filing date: March 1724th in the
SGA Office Mendenhall Student Center
Featuring a large selection
of women's and men's swimsuits
by DeWeese Designs, Crowd Pleasers,
and Beach Party.
Don't wait until July for a discount
NOW 33 OFF
OVERTON'S COMPETITION SKIS
located adjacent to
OVERTON'S SUPERMARKET
on Jarvis Street
� � V
� V Th� V-
K �V . V





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 18. 1980
11
J
ilHVJllVY CTO&E
Lady Bucs Compete
Carol Layton
By CHARLES
CHANDLER
Sports Editor
The East Carolina
gymnastics team closed
out its season last
weekend with a fifth-
place finish in the
AIAW Region II cham-
pionships at Radford
University.
The Pirates total
score in the competi-
tion was 119.8, a new
school record.
44We performed very
well claimed ECU
coach Jon Rose. "I
think we have set the
foundation this season
of a rising program.
Our accomplishments
this season have gone
beyond my expecta-
tions
William and Mary
captured the regional
title with a total of 129,
followed by Longwood
College at 127, Rad-
ford 121, and Western
Kentucky 119.9. Trail-
ing the Pirates was Fur-
man at 108 and
Western Carolina with
106.
Cindy Rogers was
the star of the show for
the Pirates as her 7.8
score on the uneven
bars was good enough
for seventh place and a
new school record.
Rogers also placed
seventh on the balance
beam with a mark of
7.7.
Susan McKnieht had
among the Pirates,
placing sixth in the
floor exercise with a
mark of 8.2.
Kim Lowe placed
seventh in vaulting with
an 8.1 score.
Classified
PERSONAL
S REWARD $300 in NYSE (blue
chips) certificates. Leading to the
arrest and conviction of those per-
son(s) responsible for the thieft
and vandalism of a l�� Chevy
Van on January 30, 1980 at 1:30
a.m. $100 bonus to the person(s)
who brings vandalism before the
appropriate com ittee.
HORSEBACK RIDING: Day or
Night, individual or groups. Tri
County Stables Grimesland. Call
7SI-M93.
HELP WANTED: Louie's, 210w
10th street, needs weekend bar
maid. Call for appointment
7SJ-U93.
BEST PRICES: paid for class
rings, gold, and sterling. Men's
leuium class ring tSS $70. Sterl
ing fork Sit. Call John after 3:00
75? �013.
TYPING: disssertations, theses,
and term papers. Excellent skills
and reasonable rates. Call
752 7.724.
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE WANTED: to Share
two bedroom apartment at Village
Green. Call 757 6400 before 5:00
p.m. or 746 4481. Ask for Brenda
SPACIOUS ROOM: for female
non-smoker. Quiet home across
from Jarvis. $90 mo. 752 5528
NEED FEMALE ROOMMATE:
to share three bedroom apartment
at Eastbrook Apartments. $80
month plus one third utilities. For
summer and tall. Call Rhona at
758 6053.
ROOMATE WANTED: To shre
two bedroom Apt at Eastbrook
Apts. Starting at end of this
semester. Call Will 752 4759
FOR SALE
KING SIZE WATEJRBED with
thermostat controlled heater and
custom built frame. Practically
new. $100 or best offer. 56 6339.
FOR SALE: 2 pair of Ohm 3-way
Speakers, Like new, still under
warrentee value of $475, for sale at
$300 Call Will 752-4759
AMPEX GRAND MASTER"
State Post Still Open
JE2SPLUpX
SI FREE
RALFIGH, N.C.
(AP)�A North
Carolina State Univer-
sity .spokesman said
Monday that it may be
two eeks before so-
meone is named to
replace Norm Sloan as
head basketball coach.
Sloan resigned to
reclaim his old job as
basketball coach at the
University ot" Florida.
selection commit-
tee at the school
reportedh is wading
through dozens ot ap-
plications, but the com-
mittee has kept quiet
about the progress of
the selection.
That was not the case
at first, however, as
word slipped out that
Morgan Wootten of
DeMatha High School
near Washington was
the early choice. But
Wootten decided not to
accept a reported
$700,000 package.
Although officials
have not admitted it
publicly, no one has
denied that the school
does not believe it
needs to act hastily
because all but two of
its performers,
Hawkeye Whitney and
Clyde Austin, return
next season.
"1 really can't tell
you much about it
Sports Information
Director Ed Seaman
said Monday. "They
have conducted inter-
views, but how many I
don't know
He did say that nor-
mally the committee
would interview six to
eight applicants before
making a decision.
G
m
dMa
stfr
Complete package (2 cassettes and storage rack) in your
choice of normal or high bias.
GRAND MASTER I (normal bias) .$7.19
GRAND MASTER II (high bias) $7.95
ECU Netters
Set To Open
1980 Season
DELI
SANDWICHES
(on your choice of bread)
Roast Beef
Reuben
Corned Beef
Pastrami
Turkey or Ham
Salami
DELI SUBS
Roast Beef, Turkey, Ham
Meatball, Sausage
Cheese, Peppers, & Onions
Hot or Cold
SPECIALTY
SANDWICHES
Kielabasa on a Kasier
Egg O-Bagel with Ham or Bacon
Creme Cheese Bagel
, BEER ON TAP
' and more
Beverages, Salads, Soups, Chips, Sausage
Biscuits, Ham Biscuits, Kosher Pickles c9
Pastries Served Anytime
ifiWiOa s
Pfifir
� II

:enter
B JIMMY DuPRKK
silanl sports r ditor
When East Carolina
opens ihe 1980 mens
tennis season with a
road trip to UNC-
Wilmington today,
there will be a few
changes in the lineup
from past campaigns.
Senior Kenny Love
takes over the number
one slot from junior
Curt Tedesco, while
sophomore Keith
Zengel will play second
flight, senior lienry
Hostetler third and
freshman Ted Lepper
fourth.
Tedesco, who drops
to fifth tlight for the
opening match, took
eventual NCAA
runner-up John Sadri
it N.C. State to a tie
breaker in the opening
set of a match in
Raleigh is his freshman
season.
Sophomore Norm
Bryant holds down the
final singles spot, while
coach Jon Rose lists
Barry Parker as the
alternate. Rose added
that doubles pairings
would not be known
until just prior to the
match.
"Everyone will have
the opportunity to
move up said Rose.
"We can only carry
seven on road trips and
that leaves another
seven trying to break
in
Featured home op-
ponants on the 1980
slate include N.C. State
on Wednesday, UNC-
Charlotte on April 13
and Old Dominion
April 18.
March 18�at UNC-
Wilmington; 19�N.C.
STATE; 20� ATLAN-
TIC CHRISTIAN;
21�at N.C. Wesleyan;
23-GREENSBORO
COLLEGE; 24-at
Campbell; 26�ST.
AUGUSTINE'S;
28-at N.C. Central;
30-SLIPPERY
ROCK STATE;
April 3�at Atlantic
Christian; 4�WEST
LIBERTY; 5�at
Guilford; 6�at North
Carolina A&T; 9�at
St. Augustine's;
1 1 �N . C .
WESLEYAN; 12�at
North Carolina;
1 3 -U N C -
CHARLOTTE;
14�N.C. CENTRAL;
16�CAMPBELL;
18�OLD DOMI-
NION, 25-UNC-
WILMINGTON.
Home
CAPS.
matches
For Pizzas and Sub:
Spaghetti
& Lasagna
507 E. 15th St.
or as close as
your phone
Fast Free Delivery
Starts At 4pm
758-7400
107Trade StGreenville
'The Place where you can buy more stereo for less money every day
STEREO SALES AND SERVICE
Deli Meat & Cheese For Take-Out Availalbe
185 Carolina East Mall
756-8412
BRING THIS COUPON FOR
10DlSCOUNT. Offer good
thru 3-31-80.
Deli Meats & Cheese For Take Out Available
185 Carolina East Mall
756-8412
�CU Student Union ftlojor Attractions
present
ROFFLER of
GREENVILLE
HAIR
DESIGNERS
NEED A TAN?
REGISTER
NOW
For two FREE
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Drawing March 21
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ThunvAprlT 6pm fringes Cohtum
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TICKETS GO ON SALE MARCH 31st!





12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN MARCH 18, 1980
Wfykk 6 C
GflAMO
OPEMIM6
WE' V� A0V�D TO OUR
NEW WCJdlOki AM D TO
CELEBRATE OUR EMTlE
larch W
HhruZ255
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phc&o
applies � dteCfttXX f5
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HINT: MEW LOCATION ft W&HT MEYT
TO THE. OLD LOCATION - -





Title
The East Carolinian, March 18, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 18, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.46
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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