The East Carolinian, February 28, 1980






�toe Saat Carolinian
Vol. 54 No. 41
10 Pages
Thursday, February 28,1980
Greenville, N.C.
Circulation 10,000
Lack Of Repairs
To Minges Roof
Causes Hazards
Pfwtc , by CHAP GURLE'
Damaged Classrooms In Minges
Classes being held in Minges have been periodically disrupted for the last two years due to the constant leaking
of the roof. The leakage has not only ruined ceilings, but floors as well. Trash cans which double as water-
catchers are not solving the problem.
By DEBBIE HOTALING
Assistant News Kdilor
Urgent requests from students
and faculty for action to repair the
roof at Minges Coliseum have pro-
duced no results, according to
reliable sources.
For the last two years, lack of
needed repairs has caused damages
to several classrooms, dressing
rooms, a handball court, and an of-
fice.
At the beginning of spring
semester 1980, the accumulation of
water on the roof resulted in severe
leaking in classrooms 142, 143 and
145, with as much as 50-60 gallons
of water collected and removed in
containers placed around the
classrooms.
One office contains &35-50,000
worth of books, films, and resource
materials in the coliseum which are
New Yearbook Editor Named
The Media Board screened and
appointed an applicant for the
editorship of East Carolina Univer-
sity's yearbook Wednesday, and ap-
proved the head of the photo lab's
bid to continue at his job for
another year.
The board also received a pro-
posal to reorganize the staff of The
East Carolinian.
Barry Byland was named editor
of the Buccaneer for 1980)81, and
will fake over for current editor
Craig Sahli in July. She was the sole
applicant for the $150-a-month
position, and has had two years ex-
perience with the student publica-
tion.
Byland will head a staff of ap-
proximately 20 writers, editors, ar-
tists, typists and assistants who will
be preparing the 1981 edition of the
yearbook.
Pete Podeszwa was also approved
as head of the photo lab for the
1980-81 fiscal year. Podeszwa, an
industrial technology major, has
held the job for the past year and
was unopposed for the position.
"It's been a good year for us
Podeszwa said Wednesday. "We've
redesigned the photo lab and
renovated most of our equipment.
The only real problem we've had is
keeping people on the staff
Podeszwa currently heads a staff
of three photographers whose duties
include shooting pictures for the
Buccaneer, The East Carolinian, the
ECU sports department and the stu-
dent government association.
"I hope to get a new
photographer position for us next
year. The problem with keeping
people has not been because of the
money, but because of time. The
media are using a lot more
photography, and the university is
growing, too. We've just had a pro-
blem keeping up with the work
load Podeszwa said.
The board also sent into a sub-
committee a proposal that outlines a
reorganization plan for the staff of
The East Carolinian.
Authored by Robert Swaim,
director of advertising and business
at the university newspaper, the
plan calls for the creation of a
general manager who would replace
the present position of senior editor.
Under the present organization,
the senior editor appoints all major
positions on the staff, such as adver-
tising manager, business manager
and the news, sports and features
editors. He is responsible for super-
vising all of these functions.
The new plan would reduce the
responsibilities of the general
manager. Although he would still
have the authority to hire any staff
employee, he would only be re-
quired to appoint the major depart-
ment heads.
"Most people are under the im-
pression that the editor of a
newspaper is the head man Swaim
said. "Nothing could be farther
from the truth. Editors do not
supervise production, business func-
tions, or advertising. All editors,
managers, production people and
advertising directors are on an equal
level with each other
The proposal is expected to come
back from the subcommittee in time
for the next Media Board meeting.
State A id May Mean State Control
Brewer Sees Trouble In N.C. Education
The chancellor of East Carolina
University predicts that as state aid
to private college and universities in-
creases, the independent sector of
higher education will fall more and
more under the influence of public
Chancellor Brewer
governing boards.
"The escalating funding level of
the state to the independent sector
eventually will reach a point where
taxpayers must and will demand ac-
countability Dr. Thomas B.
Brewer of ECU says.
If and when the goal of the state's
private colleges and universities for
additional state support is achieved,
Brewer said, "I believe it will be im-
possible for the independent schools
to remain outside the gravitational
pull of the (UNC) Board of Gover-
nors
He added, "If the independent
sector wishes to avoid state control,
they must be satisfied with the level
of state support low enough to
avoid taxpayer demands for accoun-
tability
"However, so many private in-
stitutions must have more public
money simply to survive that I do
not expect any changes in the cur-
rent pattern
Kennedy Campaign On
'Thin Ice' Near Home
By DAVID ESPO
Associated Press Writer
BOSTON (AP) � Though Sen.
Edward M. Kennedy claims to know
the thrill of defeat after finishing se-
cond once again, his top strategist
says "a considerable number of
changes" are in order to buoy a
campaign which found thin ice in
New Hampshire.
"We got almost 40 percent of the
vote Kennedy told several hun-
�dred supporters Tuesday night after
absorbing his third straight loss at
President Carter's hands.
"Four years ago, Jimmy Carter
got 28 percent of the vote and he
claimed victory in New Hampshire
and we're claiming victory
tonight Nowhere in his brief
speech did Kennedy concede the
president's triumph.
Actually, the final results showed
Kennedy with 38 percent, Carter
with 49. Carter's edge was
magnified by the fact that it came in
a neighboring state to Kennedy's
native Massachusetts.
Kennedy, campaigning outside a
Boston subway station today before
he flew to Alabama, vowed to stay
in the race and said he would con-
tinue to stress economic issues in his
challenge of Carter
The senator said the central issue
is whether the Carter administration
'has a program that's going to be
meaningful" to deal with inflation.
"I just don't believe that it is Ken-
nedy said.
"We continue the campaign and
we bring it right back to
Massachusetts and on to the
Democratic convention he said,
surrounded by family members.
Brewer keynoted a campus ECU-
Phi Kappa Phi symposium on
"Quality Higher Education:
Challenges and Problems and
focused on external social,
economic and political pressures
and realities.
At one point, referring to infla-
tionary pressures on higher educa-
tion, he said, "Indeed, our hope for
quality in American higher educa-
tion may be wrecked on the rock of
inflation He also predicted that
"if inflation continues higher
education will do extremely well to
keep up with the upward spiral
If enrollment declines, tuition and
fee revenues will drop, but Brewer
said "the most dramatic impact
would be the drop in state ap-
propriations "Although numbers
do not determine quality he said,
"enrollment levels impact budget,
which most assuredly affects the
ability to offer a quality educa-
tion
"To avoid serious deterioration
in quality, the 80's must bring more
sophisticated budgeting processes
which produce program formulas
derived from other types of
models Brewer said.
"The challenge of the 80's for
quality will be to develop a well-
articulated, well-understood pro-
gram driven fomuia he said. "The
task will be complex and consume,
in my opinion, the better part of the
decade
Brewer predicted an increase in
faculty-student ratio, dictated by in-
flationary funding patterns, and the
use of more part-time and tem-
porary faculty.
In the matter of state support to
private colleges, Brewer referred to
the recent endorsement by Lt. Gov.
James C. Green of legislative action
to provide state support at half the
average formula support for public
institutions. Actually, Brewer said,
"support varies within (the public
UNC) system
"Were the average half formula
support to be adopted, the indepen-
dent schools would receive almost
60 percent of the per student sup-
port provided for East Carolina.
And they would not have to account
for any of the money.
"Already the funding level of the
independent institutions approaches
the budget of Appalachian State,
which has an enrollment of 8,500.
The half formula would provide
more money than East Carolina
receives. If the independent sector
wishes to avoid state control, they
must be satisfied with a level of state
support low enough to avoid tax-
payer demands for accountabili-
ty
Fire Causes Minor Damage
being damaged because of the leak-
ing.
Dick Brocket Community
Development Consultant for the
Regional Development Institute,
said, "Students are really the ones, 1
feel, being cheated. Every time you
go over there, there's water in the
halls and on the racquetball court.
The trash ahsn't been emptied �
the whole situation is prettv
dangerous
Because the racquetball courts are
dangerous when wet, signs have
been placed around the floors warn-
ing people not to use the courts
under such conditions.
"There's a legal liability involved
here explained Dr. Edgar Hooks,
chairman of the department of
Health, Phyical Education,
Recretaion and Safety. "If someone
is injured because of these unsafe
conditions, the university has the
responsibility to see that action is
taken
So far, no classes have been
cancelled because of the uncomfor-
table and unsafe conditions in the
affected classrooms. "It's been a
big problem for the faculty
members and students because it's
hard to concentrate on holding a
By LARRY ZICHERMAN
Staff Writer
A minor fire damaged a small
area of floor in the Wahl-Coates
Building last night at about 9 p.m.
The fire was caused by a pile of
rags in a corner storage cubby, ac-
cording to Greenville Fire Dept. of-
ficials. Officials added that they
believe the fire was probably set in-
tentionally.
University police were notified of
the fire by Debbie Phipps, who
discovered it when she was entering
the first-floor room where the fire
started.
Greenville Fire and Rescue of-
ficials reported that there was some
confusion regarding the nature of
the fire. University police first
notified the fire deptartment at
about 8:55 p.m. and advised them
to send one engine to the drama
building.
A few minutes later, security
again called the fire deptartment
and advised that smoke was coming
from the building. The fire depart-
ment dispatched a full first alarm
response, consisting of two engines,
a Snorkel unit, and a rescue unit.
No fniuries were reported in the
incident, and damage to the floor
tile was estimated at less than $50.
class w hen there are gallons of water
leaking in Hooks commented.
"We've made the usual requests to
get something done, hut the money
has to be appropriated � it's not an
easy problem to solve
The roof has undergone various
repairs in the past, but the problem
of leaking still exists. Consequently,
Minges is deteriorating ai a taster
rate than normal because preventive
maintenance is not being nroform-
ed.
Mr. Cliff Moore, vice chancellor
of business at fairs, has been work-
ing on the problem tor the last two
years but has not been able to secure
the needed money from the
legislature in Raleigh.
"We've done all we can, .nd
we're still working on getting the
needed appropriations. lt just that
when one avenue is closed to us. we
have to go through other channels
to get it solved Moore said. "
couldn't personally attest to the fact
that that much water is being carried
out of Minges because I haven't
been over there to see it. but I have
received reports about the
damages
See REPAIRS Page 3, Col. 3
Tec�no4oqy Ft "�� r p
The Wheel Boot Is Simple To Use
and could eliminate towing.
Use Of Wheel Boot
Could Save Money
By TERRY GRAY
News Kdilor
Suppose you've just gotten your
third parking ticket and Campus
Security has placed you on the tow-
ing list.
If you get another ticket, your car
is supposed to be hauled off, and it
could cost you as much as $25, plus
the amount of the ticket. For most
students, this would be quite a
chunk out of their budgets.
Their is an alternative to this
practice, however, and it is a simple
device called the wheel boot. Instead
of summoning a wrecker to tow an
illegally parked vehicle, campus
traffic officers could immobilize the
car using this special lock.
Costing $312 per unit, the wheel
boot is nothing more than a large,
heavy duty clamp which can fit the
wheels of almost any passenger
vehicle.
According to SGA Vice President
Charlie Sherrod, Dr. Elmer Meyer
and Joe Calder will meet soon to
discuss the feasibility of adopting
the use of the wheel boots on the
ECU campus.
Meyer is the vice-chancellor for
student life and Calder is the direc-
tor of the university police.
Sherrod said Wednesday that
there would be several advantages to
using the locks instead of towing.
The benefits, according to Sherrod,
would be:
�A possible lowering of fines im-
posed on the parking violators. The
fine for removing the lock could be
as Sow as $10, said Sherrod.
�Students who normally would
have to hunt down their towed cars
would be saved the time and trou-
ble, since the vehicles would be im-
mobilized in the parking space.
�The risk of damaging the
students' cars while towing would
be eliminated.
�Money generated through wheel
boot-removal fines could be turned
over to the university for use instead
of being lost as profits for the
wrecker services.
�Use of the wheel locks might
deter people from parking illegally.
No one sees a car that has been tow-
ed, but the wheel locks would be a
reminder that the parking laws are
being enforced.
Sherrod noted that there would
have to be a time limit for students
to pay the fine on cars that had been
immobilized. After the limit ex-
pired, cars would be subject to tow-
ing. Vehicles that obstruct traffic
flow would also have to be towed,
Sherrod added.
According to John Brophy,
public parking administrator in
Washington, D.C the District of
Columbia has been using the boots
See WHEEL Page 2, Col. 7
Inside Today
New Wave Band la Gtetwtte
"Dnmria" FeaftmPace 5
Pfaitct Dews � � waKppk �
� � m - �
4
M






THE EAST CAROL MIAN
FEBRUARY 28, 1980
SGA Minutes For February 27
The eighteenth session of the
legislature of the Student Government
Association was called to order by
Speaker Mike Adkins at 5:0.1 p m A
moment of silence was observed, the
roll was called, a quorum was declared,
and the minutes were approved.
STANDING COMMITTEE
Rl PORTS:
Ms. Vollmer reported that the Ap-
propriations (. ommittee had reported
out favorably the Pi Omega Pi. tCU
Model Organization of American
States, and the SPAN bills
Mr Bernstein reported that the
Screenings and Appointments Commit-
tee approved Steve O'Gearj tor Day
Reptesentative and that no one had ap
plied lot the I letcher opening.
Ql t SI IONS l PftlVil I CIS:
Mi Melvm spoke on several topics
He said that the nest Board o' 1 uislees
meeting is to be March 2ih Board
members were to be touring various
aspects of campus and would attend the
March 24ih SGA meeting He said thai
in a meeting with the Student Welfare
c ommittee, he recommended smdent
fee increases be $1.00 lor SC and
l 00 fot 1 lansii n idea ot basing a
student classroom referendum concern-
mi: fee increases was also discussed He
said ihai since the Appeals Boaid had
ruled part of Ihe I lection Rules changes
unconstitutional, tw. amendments
would be introduced today He aid
that a resolution concerning Deal
Awareness Week was to be discussed
today, and he read a letter to the
I egislature from Coach Dave Odom.
Ms Bell commented on the Appeals
Board decision saying she was unhappy
that an act of the legislature had been
declared unconstitutional by a judicial
board She said that with a presidential
veto power, the matter did not need to
go to the Appeals Board.
Mr C.tbbs distributed a question-
naire for the Student Governance Task
force and asked the 1 egislature to com-
plete it.
Jane Biddev trom the Model
Organization of American Slates,
spoke on the organization and the bil'
lo come up today She noted that ECU
was the only school in the South invited
lo the conference at Georgetown
University; that the club was only re-
questing registration hinds; and that
after returning, the club would report
on the conference
Sieve NeKon, from Student Planning
Association Network, spoke on the
SPAN bill 10 come up today He said
thai their bill had been cut substantially
and the money left was needed to fund
a professional conference on campus.
He also noted that about 40 percent of
the budget would be recirculated back
into the university as payments
Barbara Woolard. from Pi Omega
Pi, also spoke on Ihe Pi Omega Pi bill
to come up lodav She said thai the
honorary sivietv is also a service
organization and had been rated the
number 1 chapter in the nation. The
funds requested are to support publica-
tion of the Beta Kappa ews.
Mr. Sherrod announced that another
towing company, Hastings ford,
agreed to lower oil campus lowing for
students to $15.00 day and $20 00
night He said that he had talked with
District of Columbia Police Depart-
ment concerning using wheel boots on
ears instead of having them towed. He
also asked that legislators remind
students lo write their home counties
for absentee ballots for the May
primary.
NEW BUSINESS
Mr. Bernstein made a motion to ap
prove Steve O'Geary as Day Legislator
Mr Bernstein noted that Mr. O'Geary
did not turn his application m until ihe
time he was screened, but that there was
no deadline set for Ihe applications
Question was called Motion passed.
Mr. Mann swore in Mr. O'Geary.
Ms. Bell introduced IB 18-1,
"Approval of Constitution
Mr Bernstein introduced IB 18-2,
"Appropriation to Ihe North C arolina
Student I egislature "
Mr. Patrick introduced 1 B 18 3.
"Appropriation lo Phi Beta Lambda
Ms Felbinger moved to suspend the
rules to consider I R 18-1. "Deaf and
Handicapped Student Awareness
Week Ms. Felbinger then read the
resolution and suspension passed. Mr.
Bernstein moved to accept Ihe resolu-
tion by acclamation. Motion passed.
Mr Gibbs introduced LB 184 and
18-5, "Act to Amend SGA Election
Rules
Ms. bateman introduced I B 18-6.
"Appropriation to the Wellington B.
Gray Art Gallery
Ol D BUSINESS:
Ms. Vollmer moved lo pass LB 16-3,
"Appropriation to the ECU Model
Organization of American States Ms.
Vollmer said this was for registration
fees, not travel. Question was called.
Bill passed.
Ms Vollmer moved to pass LB 17-1,
"Beta Kappa Chapter of Pi Omega Pi
funds Request Mr Hilhard noted
that the bill was cut to $.165.00 for the
publication of an "alumni book Ms.
Vollmer said that the book was not a
service and for the organization's per-
sonal use, and therefore should not be
funded by SGA. Mr. Francis stated that
the book goes lo alumni which in-
creases chances for alumni contribu-
tions back into the university Question
was called The bill passed on a division
vole of 20-13 with 4 abstentions.
Ms. Vollmer moved to pass LB 17-2,
"Appropriation to the Student Plan-
ners Association Network (SPAN)" as
amended by the Appropriations Com-
mittee to $917 00. Ms Bateman noted
that the bill had been cut to a minimum
and 40 percent of the funds would go
back into the university Mr. O'Geary
moved for previous question Motion
passed. Bill passed
NOTICES AND ANNOUNCE
MENTS:
Ms. Vollmer announced an Ap-
propriations Committee meeting for
Monday at 3:30.
Mr. Patrick announced a Student
Welfare Committee meeting for
Wednesday at 5:30 and an Executive
Council meeting for Thursday at 5:00
Ms. Bell said there would be a Rules
and Judiciary meeting Monday at 4:00
Mr. Bernstein reminded there is still a
Fletcher opening.
Mr. Sherrod reminded that there are
only two home basketball games left.
A motion was made to adjourn and
passed.
Respectfully submitted.
Lynn C alder
SGA Secretary
Mike Adkins
SGA Speaker
Wheel Boot Can Save Money
Continued from Page 1
for several years and has found
them effective. Five hundred of the
boots have generated over S5
million in revenues since they began
to be used.
Although the question of using
the devices has not yet been official-
ly introduced at ECU, Dr. Meyer
has expressed his support of the
idea.
"It looks very interesting, and I
hope we can follow up on it
Mever said Wednesday.
Four wrecker services who have
contracts to tow for the cits ot
Greenville recently lowered their
rates for towing student cars parked
illegally in off-campus spaces, but
19 other wrecker services voted
Tuesdav night to raise their rates to
S25 day and $30 night. Ihe use ot
wheel boots would not appl to stu-
dent cars parked outside the cam
pus, Sherrod said.
Since Director C alder is out ot
town this week, the propos-d
meeting with Dr. Mcyei will pro
bablv take place earl in March.
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V





Announcements
Essay Contest
The Department of English is pleased
to announce the fifth annual Paul Farr
Memorial Essay Contest. The contest is
open to all undergraduates enrolled in
English courses. Entries should be
essays of literary criticism, not research
papers, and should have been written in
partial fulfillment of an English course
since April of last year. All essays must
be accompanied by the recommenda-
tion of the isntructor for whom they
were written and must be submitted by
March 21,1980. The writer of the winn-
ing essay will receive an award of $50
and other recognition. Ask your in
siructor for complete details.
SCA
The Greenville branch of the Society
for Creative Anachronism, a nation-
wide medieval interest group, will meet
on Tuesday, March 4 at 7:30 p.m
place TBA Call 756-5109 for further
information.
BSPA
The Black Students' Psychological
Association will meet Thursday. Feb.
28 at 6:00 p.m. in the Psi Chi Librarv
on second floor Speight All member
are urged to attend Any interested per
sons arc welcome
Republicans
The ECU College Republicans will
meet on Wednesday. March 5 at 7:JO
p m in Brewster B-104 All interested
persons are urged to attend.
SNEHA
The Student Mational Environmental
Health Association will meet on Thurs-
day. Feb 28 at 500 p.m. in the En-
sironmental Health lab. All members
and interested students are welcome
MCAT
The new MCAT (Medical College Ad-
mission Test) packets have arrived in
the Testing Center. Speight 105. Test
dates for 1980 are April 26 and Oct. 4.
Deadline for the April 26 test is March
28, and for the October 4 test is Sept. 5.
Greek Sing
Alpha Xi Delta presents the 19th An-
nual All Sing, in Wright Auditorium.
Tuesday, Feb. 28 at 7:00 p.m. There is
no admission charge, so come see the
fraternities and sororities perform.
Rho Epsilon
There will be a Rho Epsilon meeting on
Thursday, Feb. 28. a 3:00 p.m. in
Rawl 130. The spring banquet and the
symposium planned for April 16 will be
discussed. The symposium will be
designed to benefit people seeking a
career in real estate. All members and
interested persons should attend.
Register
Freshmen who purchased Class of 1983
Freshman Registers should come by the
SGA office, room 228 Mendenhall. to
pick up their books. Deadline is March '
31.
Notary
Free notary service for ECU students is
available in the SGA office, room 229
Mendenhall.
Coffeehouse
The Student Union Coffeehouse Com
miltee presents New Vintage and
Mickey Skidmore, Friday and Satur-
day. Feb. 29 and March I. at 9:00 and
10:00 p.m. Admission is $.50. Free
snacks.
Road Race
Now is the time lo start getting ready
for the Second Annual Greenville Road
Race. This 10,000 meter (6.2 miles) foot
race through Greenville is scheduled for
Saturday, April 5. The race is spon-
sored by Bond's Sporting Goods. Pro-
ceeds will go to the Easter Seal Society.
Merchandise awards will be given to the
top finishers overall and to the top
finishers in each age division. The first
500 to enter will receive a com-
memorative race T-shirt. For further
information, call the Easter Seals Socie-
ty at 758-3230 or Ken P. Murray at
756-5475.
Scholarship
The deadline for the James B. Mallory
MRC Scholarship is March I. Applica-
tions can be picked up in dorm
counselor's office. Applicants must
have a GPA of 2.5 and live in the dorm.
Other criteria are listed on the applica-
tion.
Contest
The Most Beautiful Man on Campus
will be selected at a Disco party at the
Elbow Room on Monday, March 24.
Applications are now being accepted.
Call Freddy Jacobson. WOOW Radio
Station, 758-1171.
Fitness Club
The ECU Physical Fitness Club wil
meet Monday, March 3 at 8410 p.m. la
Room 104 Memorial Gym. There wil
be a guest speaker to talk on biking for
fitness. All students, faculty and staff
are invited.
Kissing Contest
The Kappa Sigma Pledges are having a
1 ,�ing contest at the Elbo Room on
Thursday, Feb. 28 from 74)0-9:30 p.m.
Five lucky guys will be rated by five
beautiful girls. First prize is a case of
your favorite beverage.
Twig
Theology
Twig fellowship, sponsored by the Way
Campus Outreach, will meet on Mon-
day, March 3 at 3:00 p.m. in room 247
Mendenhall. Here is an opportunity for
you to learn how to increase the power
of God in your life. His Word can't
lead you where his Will can't keep you!
Alpha Sigma Phi
The Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity win
hold its second annual pre-Spring
Break bash on Monday night, March 3
at the Attic. Admission by ticket will be
$1 and there will be $.10 draft beef all
night
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 28, 1980
The Unitariah-Univcrsalist Fellowship
invites you to attend the "Building
Your Own Theology" series. On March
9: "History: An Honest Backward
Look Meetings are at 10:30a.m 2nd
and 4th Sundays of the month in the
Community Room in the basement of
Planters' National Bank, Washington
and Third Street.
Russian
Russian anyone? Russian 101 will be
offered MWF 9:00 Fall Semester. Rus-
sian Literature (translated) will be
taught MWF 12:00. Interested students
contact Dr. Malby. office hours
2:10-3:00 MWF.
Sf
A 10
N.C. No. 3
2nd Annual
SPRING BREAK BASH
Monday, March 3rd
$1.00 Advance
$2.00 At Door
From 9pm - 1 am
LIVE BAND
10C DRAFT
(While it lasts)
Reduced Beverage Prices
Door Prize - Liquor Basket
5 DEGREES SOUTH
FREE
Pinballand
Footsball
All Night!
BIKINI CONTEST
Free Keg to most represented organization!
There's something for everyone Monday night!
SPRING BREAK
SALE
"You deserve a break
this week"
3

e
W
?
Sale Runs From
March 3rd
to
March 8th

K
-S
-Revlon
IPolish Ambers!
Professor Sings Praise To Youth
WINSTON-SALEM
(AP) � Ralph Amen is
51 � well into middle
age. But he still thinks
the world belongs to
the young.
"I would call a
moratorium on all
research that has to do
with the intent of in-
creasing human
longevity said Amen,
a biologist and pro-
fessor at Wake Forest
University.
Young people, he
says, are imaginative,
goal-oriented, vi-
sionary and ambitious.
Old people generally
are not.
"They have lost their
zeal, their vision and
either have achieved
their goals or had them
stripped away by the
Repairs Needed
Continued from Page 1
While the ad-
ministration is still con-
tacting proper
authorities about the
needed repairs and go-
ing through the proper
channels, the situation
in Minges worsens. The
electrical system has
been repaired twice in
the last year because of
damages by the water
leakage. Buckets placed
on the floors are not
enough to keep the
floors dry and safe.
"We seem to have an
emergency situation
here Hooks said.
"The unnecessary
deterioration is costing
the university more
money than it would
take to fix it. We'll just
have to keep reporting
it and hope that the
proper authorities will
do somethine
adversities of life he
said.
The country's
population now in-
cludes about 18 million
persons over the age of
65. If longevity were
extended by 10 years,
the over-65 population
would more than dou-
ble, having a potential-
ly disastrous effect on
American society.
"You would increase
the number of people
who aren't visionaries
anymore and thereby
dilute the number of
people who are he
said. "The first thing
that might go is the no-
tion of progress
He said a small, but
growing, number of
scientists share his con-
cerns, but most of the
warnings about the
dangers of longevity
research come not from
scientists bin from
philosophers.
Scientists, he said,
tend to take the narrow
view, not seeing the
issues outside their
fields of expertise.
The East Carolinian
� irlttl
PuO�isr�?o every Tuesday a"o
Th-jrsaAy ouirKj the acaoemsf
idr ana every Aeonesoay ourG
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o� Eas' Carolina university
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east!

���- - - �
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I S3 'f ft 3 � i-J i'j rj � � - f . J 0
rm-m - &'&' �S&3� ��





Stye �aat Carolinian
Serving the campus community for 54 years.
Marc Barnes. v��ri.i
Diane Henderson, itoi-n
Robert M. Swaim, ��!��� Um Richard Green. �,� m�
Chris Lichok. mm mm Charles Chandler, w i "�
Terry Gray, ��
i tin hi
Karen Wendt, i ���,��� i ,t,i�,
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28. 1980
PAGE 4
This Newspaper's Opinion
Minges Needs Repair
The recent disclosures of ceilings
caving in at one dorm and roofs in
need of repair at a sports arena
point to a definite need here to
revamp the policy concerning the
way buildings are inspected.
It is fairly obvious to even a
casual observer that the university
should keep a strict accounting of
the conditions of all buildings under
its jurisdiction. Original cost of con-
struction should justify this, if for
no other reason than to protect the
investment.
Even a spot check of some of the
older buildings on campus would be
good, to see if potential danger ex-
ists before someone is seriously
hurt.
One area in which officials seem
to have failed is in the response to
an existing problem, namely the
water damage at Minges. According
to one source, several complaints
have been made, both by students
and faculty members, to the ad-
ministration. So far, however, no
repairs have resulted.
Students should remain the
number one priority in the scheme
of things. This is why the university
exists. After all the research projects
and grants come in and all of the
faculty laurels have been accepted,
students are the reason behind the
entire effort.
In all this, legal action may be the
result should a student injure
himself. Is East Carolina willing to
take the chance? We would certain-
ly hope not.
An effort should be undertaken
to find unsafe situations that exist,
and the administration should take
whatever steps are necessary to cor-
rect them. Cost should not be an ob-
ject when an individual's health and
safety are at sake.
Vote Against WW III
Respect Your Professors
Having lived in a collegiate at-
mosphere for four years, one comes
to realize the ubiquitous lack of one
basic human attitude: respect.
Webster's New Collegiate Dic-
tionary defines respect as con-
sidered worthy of high regard.
Respect is an attitude, a personal
value, an esteem not unlike basic
consideration for others.
Respect is an attitude held by one
in admiration of another, like a
child feels toward grandparents,
and a student should feel toward a
professor. Professors at ECU are
worthy of respect. They have com-
pleted much work and difficult
study and are here to share that ex-
perience and knowledge with
students. They certainly are not here
to make money, as anyone in the
Department of Education can point
out.
Just a day or two ago, some
students in the library were express-
ing fervently how "damn tired"
they were of their professor "not
knowing what he's talking about
At the college level, there are many
times when professors will give
students two or three different ac-
counts of the same event, or
perhaps several different theories
concerning one subject.
This is not done out of "not
knowing what he's talking about
but rather knowing exactly what
he's talking about. The student does
not always know everything and is
frequently and unadmittedly
unaware that the professor remains
on a higher plane of intellectual
maturity.
Most professors impart a special
knowledge and experience that is
not found in any textbook or heard
about in any seminar. Greater
knowledge always deserves respect,
regardless of how it is obtained or to
whom it belongs. Without the
benefit of our professors' ex-
perience, there would be quite a few
of us graduating from the "School
of Hard Knocks" instead of from
ECU.
By PAT MINGES
All around us people are talking almost
casually about the prospect of going to war
as if it were something that is necessary,
legitimate and even desirable. Is the
apocalypse really so close that it has become
something we view very matter-of-factly?
The PBS recently reported that "at least
five normally sensible and reliable political
commentators" observed "that under cer-
tain far-from-inconceivable circumstances
the United States might shortly open
nuclear hostilities with the Soviet Union
(These commentators were Jack Nelson,
Hugh Sidney, George Will, Carl Rowan
and James Kilpatrick.)
Are we in the midst of the "most serious
crisis since the last World War or is this
more election year buffoonery designed to
whip intense feelings of nationalism into a
tide of political fervor that will determine
the outcome of the election?
Truly, the events in Afghanistan are a
tragedy and a travesty of justice, but the
Afghans are a tough people who have
resisted invaders since the time of
marauding barbarians. Is this "Russian ex-
pansionism" (that has been described as
territorial defense from the threat of
spreading Islamic independence) that will
spill the blood of our young people? Or will
it be a threat for the oil companies who
have the "vital interests" in the Middle East
and, as proven in the Abscam scandal, in
the very halls of Congress? We should have
learned from the horror of Vietnam not to
fight a senseless war. Will we fight to pro-
tect our oil supply which we should not
need to depend on 20 years from now, only
to prove that the major oil companies made
a worthwhile investment as they spent $4
billion lobbying Congress last year?
In 1956, Afghanistan appealed to the
United States for assistance to balance U.S.
support for Pakistan in the territorial
disputes between the two countries. When
the United States refused, Afghanistan
turned to the Soviet Union for support.
Once a??:n in 1961, the Afghans asked the look each other in the ee.
United b.ates for aid that would have made
them independent of the Soviets and
Pakistan, but once again their plight was
not considered very important. It was in
1977 that the dreaded SAVAK, with the
acknowledgment of the Shah, increased ac-
tivity in Afghanistan that led to the
downfall of then ruler Prince Daud and
established Mohammed Taraki as presi-
dent. Up until the time of his demise, and at
the hands of his cronies, Taraki accepted
the largest per capita amount of aid to any
non-communist developing country.
Speaking of the Shah, how can we
carelessly consider casting the seeds of our
future to the windy whims of support for
what Amnesty International the interna-
tional human rights organization � You do
remember human rights, don't you?) called
"one of the worst violators of human
rights" and a "violent regime?" The argu-
ment that it would be cruel to turn one
human being over to a sure death falls on get off our duffs and become involved,
deaf ears when one sees the scarred victims
of torture or gazes into the lonely eyes of
the hostages' relatives. This alone should
call on our dignity as human beings to ad-
mit that mistakes have been made in our
past relations with Iran, as we shall
ultimately have to do.
deplorable and from the legal point of
view, "violated the international rule
(Bani-Sadr). Desperate times ma call
desperate measures, and Bani-Sadr admits
that "we now see the consequencev ol such
lawlessness Why can two countries not
wallow their
pride, and bear witness to a promising
future by learning from mistakes that hae
been made in the past. Peace is wuhin our
grasp, yet we act like children
The religious principles that form the
foundations for the morals of both coun-
tries are deeply rooted in the principles
non-violence and passive resistance to
gression. Our Bible states that when we are
struck on the cheek by an aggressor, the
Christian ideal is to turn the other cheek.
but it seems that we are not paving
much attention to The Bible as of late e
are dashing headlong into apocalypse and
seem to be ignoring all productive channels
for positive change. I will be damned if J
can think of a single ream why we shoufd
want to destroy our world
Our last chance ma be the upcoming
election, and if we as voung people do not
big winners will be those proponents m
warmongering that see World War 111 as
the chance to improve the economic
outlook. Our apathy could bring a new
meaning to the century old phrase ol
"taxation without representation" unless
we realize that America's greatest resource
is the vitality of its people. For too long wt
Only a fool would believe that the Shah is have let this resource lie dormant, and if we
the major issue in this disagreement, for the do not take this chance to try and make a
seizing of our embassy was "from the new world, we may nod off into the sleep
humanitarian point of view, utterly that does not end.
There Is An Alternative To The Draft Program
By CHARLES GRIFFIN
National News Bureau
Suddenly, playing with fire is no good cause, whether peace or war
longer attractive. If Uncle S. is The fear of death, maiming, and
serious enough to begin registration pain is a matter of relativity. What
for the draft, then you are ready for would be your attitude if you lived
things to cool down. Yeah, it's okay in a country constantly at war? Qne
to shout, "Shoot 'em up" when you where every youngster, male or
don't have to do the shooting � or
be shot at.
But it doesn't work that way.
Wars don't go away just because through defensive and offensive
you are afraid to get shot. No, they techniques, teaches the operation,
come and get you � somewhere, maintenance, and resupply of the
somehow, when your country goes primary weapon, takes the student
to war, it changes your way of life, on actual combat patrols, and pro-
forever, vides them with rudimentary first
Examine your fears closely. What aid training,
do you resent about the draft? Let The answer is Universal National
me throw you some good choices: Service. No matter what your
might be different. Perhaps you are to 20 in some capacity as an unpaid one of the four military services,
simply a coward. Most of us, volunteer. You receive a subsistence 2. Civilian service in VISTA, the
however, would gladly give time to a allowance if you continue academic Peace Corps, hospital service,
female, was offered combat training you lose the right if you don't serve
one hour a day at school. The
course covers combat survival
or technical schooling after you get public construction projects, or
out. teaching aid programs.
If you can't take school, or don't Those indicating no choice would
have the aptitude for it, you can be assigned to the area of greatest
volunteer at 16. As soon as you need with consideration for those
enter, you are eligible to volte, but objecting only to military service. A
war, however, would prolong the
honorably. No one may hold a per- duration of service and could call in
manent job or run for public office those with military training from the
or obtain a professional license who civil options to the uniformed ser-
necessary for their advancement will
be paid for by their service.
There you have it. A fair and
equal program. One that costs the
taxpayer less, in the long run, and
provides the country with citizens
better able to contribute to society.
There are 13 million people in
that age category right now. Most of
them are weary of schook, have no
trade, and make up a great percen-
tage of the unemployed. The two
years immediately following high
school are the years when the fewest
has not honorably completed UNS. vices.
Upon entry, each 18 year old At the end of two years, each 20 are married or parents. When they
must take eight weeks of military year old would have the option of reach 20 they still are young enough
training or, if military training is getting out and becoming a normal
religiously objectionable, a survival citizen, or staying in and making a
and confidence course such as those career in the military or civilian ser-
now offered by Outward Bound. At vices. Only those who complete two
the end of military training or the years of basic service can compete
I. You don't get a choice. When education, physical capabilities, sex, survival course, each person will be for promotions, become officers or
you get drafted you have nothing to religious convictions, color, ambi-
say about how your life may be used tions, or wealth, you serve from 18
offered the following options:
1. Foreign or domestic service in
civil servants with normal salaries.
Further training and education
to become doctors, lawyers, or
plumbers.
And nothing creates ambition so
much as being forced to forego it.
You have a hand in making this
happen. The way is as close as your
typewriter and the post office. Tell
your congressman.
Letters To The Editor
The East Carolinian
welcomes letters expressing all
points of view. Mail or drop
them by our office in (he Old
South Building, across from
the library.
Letters to the editor must in-
clude the name, address.
phone number and signature
of the authorfs) and must he
typed, double spaced, or neat-
ly printed. Letters should be
limited to three typewritten.
double-spaced pages. Alt let-
ters are subject to editing for
brevity, obcenity and libel.
Letters by the same author are
limited to one each 30 days.
Personal attacks wilt not be
permitted. Names of authors
will be withheld only when in-
clusion of the name will cause
the author embarrassment or
ridicule, such as letters concer-
ning homosexuality, drug
abuse, etc.
or expended.
2. You lose X number of years to
your contemporaries who aren't
drafted.
3. It just isn't fair, which is a
large part of one and two. Your case
Absentee Voting Is An Important Responsibility
By JAY STONE
"Aspen is full of freaks, heads,
fun-hogs and weird night-people of
every description, but most of them
from past experience, that there is only about 37 percent of the na-
no point even trying to convince tion's populace voted for any of the
people to take that step unless they candidates running for office. This
can be given a very good reason, like deep rooted apathy is at the source
a unique candidate or free ounces of of our present malaise. A decade
would prefer jail or the bastinado to dope. ago America was a hot bed of
the horror of actually registering to The central problem with politics political activity ,and while this ac-
vote in the youth community is the gap tivism may have been, to some ex
Hunter S. Thompson that separates the Head Cultures
from activist politics. Somehow, in
Unlike the main bulk of burghers the nightmare of failure that went
and businessmen, the college stu- down in America between 1965 and
dent has to "make an effort" to 1970, the notion of beating the
tent, devisive and tumultuous, it
was, nevertheless, responsible for
some of the most progressive legisla-
tion that has been enacted to date.
It is virtually impossible for out-
In other words, if your parents do for applying for an absentee ballot
not live in Greenville and you have is April 30 at 5:00 p.m.
no plans to live in Greenville after The SGA is working to co-
graduating, then you must register ordinate a voter awareness cam-
in your home town. You are re- paign. They hope to publish a pam-
quired to register in your home town phlet concerning important facts
in person, but you may call the about voting laws pertaining to col
Greenville Board of Elections, get lege students. Anyone wishing fur
the home address and phone thcr information on voting pro-
number of the registrar in your cedure should contact the SGA or
home town, and register to vote on a the Greenville Board of Elections at
weekend even if the Board of Elec- 758-4683.
tions in your home town is closed.
vote. There is not much to it actual-
ly, no risk and no more than ten
minutes of small talk and time �,
but to the average college student
the idea of registering to vote is an
that was born in Berkeley of-iown college students to vote in After registering you need not go "The idea of asking young heads
and nourished by radical groups like Greenville. The North Carolina back to your home town. Either a to go dean never occurred to us.
the SDS and the Yippies gave way to registration laws are vague enough parent or an immediate relative may They could go dtrty. or even naked.
a sort of numb conviction that it to allow for a whole crock of confu-
made more sense to run and hide sion. Establishing residency in
odious and heavy ta�Tc. The psychTc than to fight the swine, at the polls Greenville, however, is primarily a
mplications of "getting involved or on anything even vaguely question of intent. Anyone who
with the system" are resembling their own terms. wishes to reside in Greenville tem-
foreboding,and I have learned, in the last presidential election porariiy cannot register to vote here.
?
make application for an absentee for all we cared. AU we asked them
ballot and mail it to you. to do was first 'register and then
'vote.
The deadline for being registered
for the North Carolina primaries � Hunter S. Thompson
April 8 at 5:00 p.m. The deadline - Aspen Freak !��- lfritiiimT
I
� � -
in -� .�� t
-� � m





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
FEBRUARY 28, 1980 ' Page 5
Joel Gains Top
Grammy Honors
Can Americans Survive?
menacing squirrels
Squirrels Harrass
Innocent Writer
By HUGH A. MULLIGAN
P Special Correspondent
RIDGEFIELD, Conn. (AP) � Bruce the Bold has
done it again.
T he puff faced little beggar is smiling his malocclud-
ed smile of defiance at me from a low branch of the big
maple outside mv window. Those shifty black eyes are
blinking ai me in puckish malice. Sometimes he even
does a complete turn about and wags his bushy tail at
me in rathr vulgar rhumba rhythms.
Bruce the Bold, an old adversary, has made another
raid on my bird feeder. The no-longer-scrawny gray
squirrel takes an obvious delight in his unprincipled
behavior. Even if I left some food out for him, and he
should live so long, he would prefer piracy to welfare.
I our or five times a dav he comes darting along the
telephone wires, grabs a vine like Tarzan in his prehen-
sile paws and does a flying high wire leap right onto the
lop oi mv cedar shake bird feeder which is suspeixJed on
a wire from a dogwood branch.
There he perches, greedily stuffing his jowls with
sunflower seeds and other delicacies procured at great
effort and expense for our feathered friends, until 1
devise some means of driving him off. It's getting more
difficult as the winter wears on.
sharp rap on the window pane once was enough to
send Bruce scurrving off. But not for long. This
unscrupulous predator soon realized that no affirmative
action would follow the warning rap, so he just clung
ther" unperturbed, grinning his toothy grin.
Next 1 tried yelling out the window at him, wild
primeval howls out of Edgar Rice Burrows. These had
no effect on Bruce the second or third time around but
almost flushed two linemen for the county out of a
cherrv picker down the road.
I think when 1 started beating a huge Chinese gong
and resorted to a water pistol I borrowed off a local ur-
chin, they were on the verge of calling for the men with
the butterfly nets.
The water pistol Bruce seemed to enjoy, even on the
few occasions when 1 zapped him with a direct hit. The
sport o it seemed to appeal to his cheating heart. He
delighted in playing the role of moving target, although
as the weather got colder he made his getaway as soon as
he heard the window being opened.
Vesterdav 1 tried lying in wait for Bruce in the bushes,
the wav the neighbor's cat crouches down to ambush the
birds from the pachysandra. Unfortunately, the man
from Connecticut Power and Light came by just then to
read the meter on the outside of the house near the bird
feeder.
1 mumbled something about hunting for a contact
lens, which 1 don't wear, and brushed myself off in
some confusion and embarassment. He seemed to be in
a hurrv to get about his business.
There was Bruce chortling from atop a fence post and
stuffing his high cheek boned face with my bird feed.
Somedav. feller, someday
LOS ANGELES AP� Vetran
performers Billy Joel, Dionne War-
wick and Kenny Rogers topped a
collection of music superstars
honored in the 22nd annual Gram-
my Awards Wednesday night.
Joel, a piano balladeer, had
worked long years in near anonimi-
ty, until he hit the top with two
grammys last year, for "Just The
Way You Are and two more this
year for the album "52cd
Street"�album of the year and best
male pop vocal performance.
Ms. Warwick, last won a Gram-
my in 1970 was visibly moved asl she
claimed her second Grammy of the
night on the two hour CBS telecast.
"Oh my dear, my dearshe said,
wiping away tears as she clutched
the victrola for best female vocal
performance, which she won for
"Never Love This Way Again
Earlier she captured best female
rythym and blues female vocal for
"Deja Vu Ms. Warwick was
something of a suprise winner. Her
award coming in two of the five
categories, at which Donna Summer
had also been nominated.
Ms. Summers won the Grammy
for best female rock vocal perfor-
mance for her energetic rendition of
'Hot Stuff but she lost to Gloria
Gaynor in the new disco category.
Ms. Gaynor won for her feminist
anthem, "I Will Survive �
In awards presented before a two
hour national telecast, the Doobie
Brothers won a Grammy for the
best pop vocal performance, by a
group for "Minute By Minute
Group member Micheal McDonald
also won an arranging award for
"What A Fool Believes
Singer Ricki Lee Jones was nam-
ed best new artist.
Bob Dylan, looking un-
characteristic in a tuxedo, perform-
ed his born again Christian
tuneYou Gotta Serve
Somebody and went on to win a
Grammy for Best male rock per-
former.
Kenny Rogers hosted the Na-
tional Academy of Recording Arts
and Sciences ceremony. He carried
off best male vocal performance
Grammy for "The Gambler
In other country categories, Em-
my Lou Harris won a female
vocalist Grammy for "Blue Ken-
tucky Girl and the Charlie Daniels
Band won group vocal performance
honors for "Blue Kentucky Girl"
and the Charlie Daniels Band won
group vocal performance for "The
Devil Went Down to Georgia
John Williams, who already has
six Grammy's, for his motion pic-
ture and special scores, won two
more for the movie "Superman
Earth, Wind, and Fire captured
their third Grammy in two years, a
best rythym and blues instrumental
award for "Boogie Wonderland
And a song performed by the group,
"After The Love Is Gone" won a
rythym and blues songwriters
Grammy for nonmembers David
Bill
Foster, Jay Gray don, and
Chamrlain.
In other awards:
Best pop instrumental: "Rise" by
Herb Alpert
Best rock vocal performance-
Female: "Hot Stuff" Donna Sum-
mer
Best vocal performance by. a duo
or group: "Heartache Tonight"
The Lagles
Best instrumental performance:
"Rockeslra Theme" Wings
Best rythym and blues vocal
performance-Female: "Deja Vu"
Dionne Warwick
Art Students Begin Work
on remaking interior
Design Majors
Rebuild House
Local Band Enjoys New Sound
By MARK KEMP
stall Writer
The times are finally changing.
Beyond all of the traditional rock,
blues, and southern rock that most
Greenville bands are known for,
there is "The Tour If a unique
sound is the sign of change in
musical expression, "The Tour"
has marked a fresh new beginning.
Mitch Bowen, 27, is the leader of
the band and writes most of their
music. The band members are:
Bowen, guitarist and vocalist; Bob
Patterson, bassist and vocalist;
Conrad Hunter, keyboardist and
guitarist; and Keith Strand, drum-
mer.
The majority of their music is in-
fluenced by rhythm and blues, early
rock and roll, and country, and it all
has a new wave sound. Bowen jok-
ingly refers to their sound as
"Country Punk
New wave music, as defined by
Bowen, "is a sort of spiritual rebirth
of rock and roll, like being born
again is to Christianity and for
him, that's exactly what it is.
A few years ago, he was in a band
called "The Os'ville Rainbow
Band playing folk-rock music
that reflected rural North Carolina
culture. Os'ville's style was definite-
ly rock and roll, but their country
roots were evident. With 'The
Tour " Bowen still acknowledges
his country roots, but the vehicle for
expressing his ideas is new wave
New wave is powerful music. The
messages are always clear and
distinc and no listener could
possibly avoid them. The musicians
who play this type of music never
talk down to their audiences. The
ideas are usually deep and
philosophical, but they are always
easily understood. Basically, new
wave is pure good-time rock and roll
without inhibitions.
.onrad Hunter said of inew wave
"it's not just the musk but it s the
way of life. It reflects your
philosophy. The music is just a part
of it. It's not so much dealing with
the qulality of musicianship, but it is
more or less a vehicle for lyrics
Many of Bowen's songs are direct
protests, very similar to songs which
could have easily come out of the
mid-sixties. "New wave is timely
says Bowen.
"It's something that will happen
every few years. You're going to
have people jump up and protest,
whether it be an atmosphere of
revolution, or an atmosphere of
having fun. Like during the 60s �
there was alot of rebel music popp-
ing up saying, 'end war' and 'end
hate
"The Tour" has played
nightclubs and bars around Green-
ville for almost a year now. Their
music is gradually gaining populari-
ty, and according to Bowen, it's
about time that something new was
accepted around here.
"The idea of new wave Bowen
says, "is to have fun and to say
what you want to say and do what
you want to do. It's a little less con-
servative and a little more in-
dividual.
"Why say with ten-dollar words
what you can say with just a few.
That's the way I like music. It gets
to the point and doesn't necessarily
go beyond that
"The Tour" is one band ten-
tatively scheduled to play at "The
Festival of Humanitarian
Renaissance a benefit concert set
for early spring. It will be sponsored
by "The Student Caucus for Pro
gressive Reform
"The Tour" condemns the bad
connotations of the term "punk
rock and if people are willing to
expand their knowledge of the new
wave, these connotations will die
out.
Many people associate "punk"
music with violence. Actually, it is
just the opposite. The Clash, a big-
name new wave band, defines their
motives: "Our aim is to shake au-
diences into channeling their
frustrations into creative outlets
So if you feel like loosening up
for an evening, throw all those nasty
inhibitions away and go jam with
"The Tour
By KAREN WENDT
Features Editor
Fifteen interior design majors are
working five days a week, from 8 to
5 daily, and only take time out for
their classes.
Take time out for classes?
The 15 seniors are involved in a
project to rebuild the entire interior
of a house.
The house is located behind
Mendenhall Student Center and is
redesigned each year as a project for
interior design classes.
Last year the house was made into
a study of levels and lights, called 'A
Step Above by the seven students
who worked on the project.
This year the students will design
the building as a residence for "a
married couple with no kids
"We killed off the kids said one
woman, laughing.
In order to complete the project,
the students will tear out most of the
interior of the building, leaving only
the middle wall. This wall must re-
main to support the roof.
The building is owned by the
university.
At present there is little in the
building other than debris.
However, the rebuilding process will
begin soon.
When the work is completed,
there will be a large bedroom, living
room, kitchen, bath and many other
features to make the building look
like a home.
The students will do all of the
reconstruction. They have torn
down the walls and will rebuild
them, arrange electrical outlets with
the help and advice of an electrical
contractor, put in new flooring, new
ceilings, and build all of the fur-
niture.
In order to pay for the project,
they have received student funds
from the SGA, from their own
fund-raising activities, and from
personal funds.
The cost is estimated at about
$5,000.
They don't have to worry about
some details though. There is no
water in the house, but there is
plumbing; at present there is no
electricity, no heat, and no working
bathroom. This is an incouvienience
to the workers, but they seem to
take it in stride.
They do have a phone for
emergencies which crop up occa-
sionally. Apparently some members
of the group haven't gotten the hang
of handling a crow bar, and things
have a tendency to fall out of unex-
pected places.
The project will also attempt to
conserve energy by using woodburn-
ing stoves and similar items.
See INTERIOR, page 7, col. 1
'Dracula' Features
Appealing Horror
Frank Langelia Stars In 'Dracula'
this weekend's free flick
By BEAU HAYS
Assistant Features Editor
Editors Note: The Student Union
will present "Dracula" at 7 and 9
p.m. on Friday and Saturday nights
in the Hendrix Theater.
After more than 40 years of low-
budget, B-movie, horror films,
"Dracula" has finally been reborn
into the stylish story of vampirism
created by Bela Lugosi in 1934.
In fact, even the most famous
original version of the movie pales
in comparison to the artistic drama
created in the 1979 re-make.
"Dracula" is no simple horror film
� it is an entertaining and
suspenseful telling of Bram Stoker's
reknowned thriller.
"Dracula" is set in 19th century
England. Against this Gothic
background appears Count
Dracula, a wealthy and powerful
man from Europe. No one realizes
;j

just how powerful until he begins
his demonic search for blood. Final-
ly, he is discovered and eventually
destroyed.
The rising suspense as the count
ravages the countryside is heighten-
ed by all of the sexual implications
in the story. Dracula seduces two
ladies, who are incapable of
resisting his wishes, to make them
part of his world of the undcad. The
style and romance of the story arc
beautifully done and enhance the
unfolding drama.
Sir Laurence Olivier is brilliant as
Dracula's nemesis, Baron Van Hels-
ing. It is Van Hclsing who first
recognizes the dangerous count and
sets out to destroy him. The con-
frontation between Dracula and
Van Helstng rates among the best
scenes ever filmed, subtly depicting
the count's dominance and Van
Set I ANCfrXI AS, page 7.
col. 4
w w
V
r





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 28, 1980
Bonnie Alexander and Micheal Reams
regional Billiards
champs
ECU Students
Enter National
Billiard Finals
I he eight ball was winner for a pair of HCVl
pool players at the Association of College Unions
International Regional Billiards Tournament Feb.
14-16 in Charlotte.
Micheal Kearns, of Philadelphia, and Bonnie
Alexander, of Plymouth, took first place in both
the men's and women's divisions of the collegiate
tournament which was held on the Charlotte cam-
pus o' the University of North Carolina. A total
of 54 biliards players form N.C South Carolina,
Virginia, Kentucky and Tennessee participated in
the competition.
"This tournament was more difficult than last
earssaid Kearns, a senior, who was the regional
champ in 1979 and placed third in the nation.
"We played "Fight Ball" this time instead of
"Straight Pool" and that is harder for m e
because I like to play defense he said.
Alexander, a freshman who began p;aying the
game two years ago. lost an early match with the
No. 1 seeded player. The double elimination rule
allowed her to continue in the women's division
and in the final round she won two matches in a
row for from the player who had beaten her at the
beginning of the competition.
Kearns and Alexander qualified for the regional
event by winning the all-campus tounament at
FCC. Fheir victoires in Charlotte place them in
the National A.C.U.I, tournament, April 27-30,
at Southern Illinois Universitv at Carbondale.
TONIGHT
PIZZA SPECIAL
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ALL NIGHT LONG
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758-7400
Watch for Super Spring Break
Specials in Tuesday's East Carolinian
i
Peking Palace
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Ot Greenville
Greenville Square Shopping Center
:or The Celebration Of Chinese New Year, We Are Of-
enng These Specials February 1 Through February 29
1980
Luncheon Specials
Monday Through Friday
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Symposium Speaker's Belief
Mystery Fiction Meaningful
Rex Stout, Dashiell
Hammett, Agatha
Christie, Raymond
Chandler are adept
writers of popular
erime yarns, but are
their works appropriate
texts for college
courses?
East Carolina
University Associate
Professor McKay
Sundwall believes they
are. Formal study of
mystery fiction can
heighten a literature
student's critical senses
while stimulating
thought on human con-
cerns and issues, Sund-
wall says.
Addressing the ECU
Phi Kappa Phi sym-
posium. Dr. Sundwall
defended his belief that
detective novels have
merit as the material
from which meaningful
classroom discussions
can be drawn and basic
human values offered.
"In a mystery, peo-
ple live in a moral
universe he said.
"Life in mystery fiction
has worth; human ex-
perience has meaning;
human thought and ac-
t i o n have conse-
quences.
"A mystery novel
yields all its possibilities
at the first reading,
unlike a great classic
he explained, outlining
the "formula" by
which the typical
mystery is constructed.
Plot in a detective
story is usually THE
essential element,
Sundwall noted; it is
"the rack on which
other elements hang
However well crafted
the characters of a
detective novel may be,
a relatively minor
character is usually the
evildoer, Sundwall
pointed out, with the
notable exception of
the murderer in Agatha
Christie's The Murder
of Roiier Ackroyd.
For the reader, the
final unveiling of the
evil is therefore far less
"painful" in a modern
mystery than in a great
classical tragedy, Sund-
wall said. The shocking
discovery of his own
evil deed by Sophocles'
hero Oedipus evokes
the reader's pity and
fear; discovery that the
chambermaid is the
guilty party generally
means the reader did
not interpret the clues
HEAPING
PORTIONS.
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price.
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Carolina East Mall
Serving continuously daily
from 11 a.m. till 8 p.m.
(8:30 Friday & Saturday)
along the way.
"Students are young
and lack the emotional
experience of living
said Sundwall.
"Mystery fiction makes
few demands on emo-
tions
Young people are at-
tracted to this form of
literature also because
even though the set-
tings in a crime novel
may be exotic, ranging
from the Australian
Outback to IV in-
dustry circles of Nevi
York, from the quiel
English village ot
Dorothy Savers' The
Nine Tailors to I he
complex, international
world of a spy thriller,
the world of the detec-
tive novel is not entirely
new.
"Students have a
tendency to choose the
familiar, and the term
'classic' suggests the
odor of dust and
mold he said.
However, Sundwall
believes traditional
texts can "speak as well
to students todav " as at
any time during the
past 2.(KM) vcars. an
opinion based on his
teaching classical
writers from Homer to
Dante at Columbia
Universitv and at EC I
Dr. Sundwall's own
experiment � develop-
ing a literature course
around "an unserious
kind of book" is still
in preparation He
hopes Ins class in
mvsterv fiction will
bcjin next yeai.
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Langella's 'Dracula9
Seduces Audience
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 28. 1980
ART&CAMERA PLAZA CAMERA
526 5. Cotanche St.
Down Town
PittPtaza
Shopping Center
Students Tear Down House
for art class project
Interior Rebuilt
For Art Project
Continued From Page 5 The seniors involved in the pro-
Overall the students seemed en- ject are: Leslie Jerrett, Debbie Seay,
thusiastic about the project, even Darwin Huffman, Scottie Sipe, Bet-
though it involves such a large sy AlFgood, Linda Austerlade, Lori
amount of work. Wilder, Donna Potter, Joni
The students entire grade rests on Wheeler, Molly Jordan, William
the completion of this project. The Owen, Stephany Honeycutt, Pam
students are separated into three dif-
ferent groups for the duration ,and
be working separately on dif-
i
ferenl parts of the house, though
ihe will help one another whenever
POM
ble.
THERE J� A
DIFFERENCE!
PREPARE FOR
VQE ECFMG FLEX
NAT! MED BDS.
HATL DENTAL BDS.
NURSING BOARDS
MCAT � DAT � LSAT � GRE
6MAT � OCAT � PCAT
VAT � SAT.
SAAD'S SHOE
REPAIR
'113 Grande Ave.
758-1228
Quality Shoe Repair
McLure, Patti Wells and Kathy
Pace.
The instructor for the project is
Melvin Stanforth.
Open house for the completed
project is expected to be during the
last week in April.
fttTTTTTTTTI�.
ARMY NAVY STORE
Continued From Page 5
Helsing's determina-
tion.
Kate Nelligari plays
Lucy, one of Dracula's
"victims She is at
first a free-willed,
liberated lady, then,
following her seduction
by Dracula, a determin-
ed follower of the
count. Her father
(Donald Pleasance)
assists Van Helsing in
attempting to save
Lucy and kill Dracula.
The key to Dracula's
success is Frank
Langella's chilling por-
trayal of the blood-
thirsty count. Langella
played Dracula in the
smash 1978 Broadway
play, and he has
brought the same
magnetism to the
screen. He masterfully
assumes the charisma
of Dracula, every line
and gesture dominates
the screen (so well that
the audience is swept
up with lust).
John Badham, direc-
tor of "Saturday Night
Fever builds both the
tension and roman-
ticism with excellent
staging and
cinematography. He
works particularly hard
at creating the strong
mood and magnetism
which surrounds the
count. Dracula's dinner
for Lucy in his castle,
which is lit by 1000
MPtfN
EDUCATIONAL
CENTER
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SPECIALISTS SINCE 1938
Visit Any Center
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for Information About
Ore' Centers Outside NY State
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800-223-172
ters m Major US Cities
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ARMY NAVY STORE �
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Jackets, Peacoats, Parkas, J
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across St. from
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III W. 4th St.
Parking in front and Rear' I
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op,ttP
Plaza Shopping Center
ville, North Carolina 27834
STUDENT SPECIAL
Cuts and Blow Drys
Reg. $13.50 $14.00
NOW ONLY $10.00
offer ends Mar. 8
candles, ,and several
artful chase scenes are
typical of the fine film-
ing and design that
went into the film.
The score, written by
John Williams, is very
successful in setting the
tone for each part of
the film: Gothic
romance, Dracula's
power, and the excite-
ment of the developing
climax. Williams, new
director of the Boston
Pops, was responsible
for the score ii
"Jaws "Superman,1
"Close Encounters'
and "Star Wars
"Qracula" contains!
all the elements of the
best horror films with
the latest in special ef-
fects (there's not a bat
on a wire anyplace). It
does have a few arm-
grabbing shock scenes,1
but the greater em-
phasis is placed on!
developing the story to
its compelling climax.
.bJSS0
Sunday March 2nd
8:00 p.m.
Capricorn Recording Artist
DELBERT McCLlNTON
With Special Guests
MOST WANTED
Delbert McClinton is the avatar ot southern rock, he put the bullets
in Johnny Ace's gun -Nick tosches,
High Fidelity
ot s w oheod of wholes ch�.ng h.m.
Phonograph Record Magazine

c�a6&r&'
ANNOUNCING BRAND NEW
12 Price Off Your Favorite
Beverage from the Tap Every
Thursday from 9 -12.
Also UVE ENTERTAINMENT for
your Enjoyment during this time.
JASON'S OFFERS DELICIOUS
Sandwiches
Salads
Pizza
Dinners
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EXPOSURE $97 5
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KODACOLOR
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Adjacent to Girl's High Rise Dorms
for Take-out DIAL 758-2929
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Starting March 3,1980
the beginning of an exciting new era in mid-
day dining.
Dimino's introduces a tasty alternative piz-
za for lunch. Great when your too busy to get
away because Domino's will deliver it to you,
hot and delicious, within 30 minutes.
So break up the routine have a pizza for
lunch!
Our drivers do not carry more than $10.00.
We reserve the right to limit our delivery area.
FREE PEPSI OFFER STILL GOOD!
4 cups for large pizza
2 cups for small pizza
OS
Q 0.
�Copyright 1978
Off any pizza
at Domino's Pizza
during the day shift only.
11.00-4:00 MonSun.
1 coupon per pizza
Expire 3-17-80
rasi. iimw ���'��
120�CW4�BrvtL
PSo�758660
1
Doors Open At 8:00
Tickets Sold At Apple Records and JJ's
AHvnnre-S4.00 DOOT-$4.50
HOURS:
I!KXkm- ItOOtonSunThun.
11:00km - 2Mkm Fn. � S.
.apy?





Sports
���
Despite Poor Showing
Pirates Edge Camels
Herb dru squares for shot
KIP
B CHARI I s( M i) K
Spurls t dilor
1 he Easiarolina basketball
team dodged two bullets last night,
one then opponent and the other
their own lackadaisical play, to
claim a 53 2 win oveiampbell
College.
I he heavily favored Pirates were
so stale for most ol the game that
they trailed by seven points, 40-33,
with ten minutes remaining.
I he first half was especially slop-
py, as the Pirates connected on a
mete nine field goals en route to
shooting $3.3 percent from the
floor.
"I have no answei for tonight
said I (I coach Dave ()dom. " At
the beginning ol the game ii was
almost as it we were saying 'Will.
alter this period we only have three
more halves to play this seat
(dom blamed his pre game
speech partially tot the pool perfoi
mance. I may have put them to
sleep
said hut ihe wa
"I totfS if i i, t - � st;vlVls remaining and his lean, but came awav with a mere three re
1 f"U h,m � d'd � agamto ahead 53-52. Ciibson missed the hounds. fai below his
a V , , m HC?m ' ' 0l 'hC lWr,l,nil - average of ei.h, M.keG.I
poke to the team and I m ampbell hurriedh signaled lot
w tien
not a calm person. I'm usually very
everted in hose situations. Bern
calm put me out ol character
i ed up the slack, (houuh with I ?
timeout. pulls,
rhe Camels watched a possible Mavnoi scored 13 and dished .
,� . fipsL �" thc wayside when a three assists while Krusen tallied 1(1
UK i vi team plaved out o! hook shot In U II center lorn B,
character also until a second half to fell shoi
i tin saved the game
t at the huer.
I oi theamels, it w.is the
plav ol guard Danell Mauldin thai
�� -�' � - - r;xr;r r Vt,
was a matter ol a not being ready to dished out e-ame hum live assits
plav.
l'u aies led 24 22 at the half, rhe se
cone
II scored only five points in the
first rune minutes. A jump shot by
Herb Krusen with 10:1 remaining
and the Camels ahead by seven
broke a 4 minute scoring drought
and began the Pirates on their wav
back.
A scrappy full court press
resulted in several steals that put the
Pirates up 52 47 at the 3:30 mark.
I he C amels were not finished,
though, as they battled hack and ac-
tuall had a chance to win the name
he said �� wasn't what I m thc lmal s�nd
aid it. I ddu
l( I s Mike (iibson had a chance tl
(assistant coach Pavne) told me later IO lcc ,ne gamc vvhen he had a one
and one opportunity with eight
SEC Rumors Silenced
For Now By AD Cain
I heaineU ! I
"Sure, we came out Hat ,aid al s 12
Krusen "Also, they In. most ol Ghosts Wiscon in 1
tneir shots ai first and thai carried Salurdav at "� p m in I
over to our defense. We just started finale. In, seniors Mas no, (
standing round Krusen, fony Bvles and I rank Hob
Krusen did s,i. though, that he son, u will be the
was proud that his (cam tallied to Minges Coliseum
win "We fought back and I'm CAMPBu (52,
glad. We got aggressive and uoi a Newtoi m - . !4. H
couple of crucial steals on ou. lull- 'In .
court press " east k n in
rhe Pirates, 15 11. were paced by tJT
the scoring ot three senioi stan ?VC Under v �' s"
� , lit, lls :i ii 23 53
aouts, Herb Grav, George Mavnor H�iftim m ;4 (dmphdl ,
and Krusen. Grav rallied s point- '�ldouK IM (�"
II las: in,
W hnl
BoiKt.m Alicndaiu.
'
PIK ! I IN H
Rumors hav iced
as arolina a restl ng team may
be entei 5 on
next season. I Athletic
Directot Billain silenced such an
idea yesterday, at least foi now .
I he M is in need ol a coup
(JiW
Charles
Chandler
11 u one team in particulat seems to
tocomp takcn rcal l&'m l0 u '
several schools .1
n
e contei
" It w vie5
( ain said "I
against
would K
Assistant lohn Wt �
agreed. " talked with Id (E I
wrestl,ng coach Steers) about it at
the first ol the year said W'elhorn.
t seemed like a supet idea at fust.
inebackei Mike Brewington.
1 ; f 's New ork lets are tlv
�n to theii he.id
Bi pple" this
'� ' ha ;� u ' edly
� � 1 �� .
�Si 1 I nuatl and i. . 1 k nov n
t'u uu la. . ell
' ; ' 'ughoul the league's
f I head football coach I d
Emory said yesterday that there
were a great deal of Pirate seniors
under consideration bv both teams
We've decided against it for now m !hc Ns ' and the Canadian foot
though, because we have a much bal1 l-�guc.
chance at makina tl u . h
as an independeni , ,nc an cxcellcm group
leaving this year, 1 morv said
"probably the best East Carolina
regu
Ihe atu
nai
draft is tu
11 months awav 1 pril 29)
has ever seen. I he
illy responding al
pro teams are
Promotions Director
Resigns, Joins Naegele
Bv CHARLES C HANOI KR
Sports I dilor
East Carolina Sports Promotions
Directoi Wayne Newnam has
resigned h.s post ol the past 25 mon-
ths to work w.th a Raleigh advertis
mg firm.
ewnam's resignation comes less
than one week alter thai Sports in-
formation Director Wall Atkins.
Newnam's resignation is effective
"ti I ebruary 29 He will join the
Naegele (hitdooi dvertising
late next week Ad will serve as art
directoi ol the company's Raleigh
�'cr. Naegele is commonh
wo. ' : ,� � �
ouidooi advettising firm.
U hc trading and Joint! art
w,k and desipns to, ,t��lc ol
billboards Newnam said.
Newnam said thai leaving his
alma mater was a difficult
t.
I
"But I'm getting a good raise and
will have an excellent
lor advancement
New turn credited h.s job at I c I
Newnam's Pirate
" I hey new exactly what tin
qualifications were
Perhaps Newnam is best known
hawing of the Pirate lo
now used on almost all novelties
related to 1(1.
"We decided sevei,1! vears
thai there needed
lhai everyone would

� � �
1 mie � iinc up
wanted
Newnam's dunes as promotions
.vluded the pi
also.
Herb Krusen takes aim
KiPSi OAN
maun was a uimcult step to ilt . , , '
take. "It was a hard decision thai . ! ' n , �T iJnC P
ondered for months he claimed h .ndlVnu J omotM Plus the
Handling ol television, radio and
newspaper advertisements ol 1(1
onnoi tiinit v .
11 ' lul sports events.
rhe 1972 1(1 , ,s
tor the opportune to 1 the new W" i� mc'
Potion. -I worked with,hem, 11 nT� �
as promotions director he sai '
as the coo
Pirate Spots V 1
-64 . -ass
-�������i.� 11 111 e 11 �o I s
Cage Seniors Bid Farewell
P(IH
ers
By CHARLES CHANDLER
sports Mitur
I "i five I ast Carolina basketball
players Saturday's game with
Wisconsin-Milwaukee has special
meaning. It marks the last time that
they will perform in the friendly
confines of Minges Coliseum.
And for one coach, namely ECl
head man Dave Odom, it marks the
beginning of a crucial recruiting
year.
" I hese guys are leaving a void
hai is teally huge Odom said.
"Golly, we'll have to replace our
top three scorers and two of our top
three rebounders. It ain't gonna be
easy
Ihe top three scorers, guard
George Maynor, posl player Herb
Gray and forward Herb Krusen,
with top reserves Kyle Powers
and frank Hobson to form the large
void thai Odom must fill.
"There's really something special
about this group ol seniors said
'he first year Pirate coach
because they've come from such
varied backgrounds. I hey came in
al different tunes but still are a very
close knit group
Powers, Krusen and .Orav were
recruited to the school out oi high
school fout vears ago then head
Patton while Hobson
and Maynoi were broughl in as
"� college transfers bv I anv
(iillman
"I've lm.i a lot ol respeel foi these
seniors claimed Odom. " rheyve
rough ,0 much since they've
' an vou imagine w hal
'his yeai would have been like .1
" : " 't'c whole thing a
ol yeai ago? rhen
'� ' ould have had
icre . n
a winning
Indeed, the senior fivesome has
been through some living tunes.
Krusen, Powers and Orav have
played under three head coaches in
their tour vears al II . All five
went through a terrifying year last
season as then Pirate coach I anv
(iillman was in his deepest trouble.
And up until this season, none had
ever plaved on a winning team al
ECU.
Krusen admits having thought
about leaving the Pirate fold at one
time and Orav actually did tor the
last halt o last season.
"I'd jusl taken all I could of
I arry Gillman Gray said. "I had
to get away from it all
When Odom took over the
Pirates one of his st measures ot
business was to get Orav bask on
board. "I'd begun to wonder if
E I was a jinx or something
Cray claimed. "Buioach Odom
impressed me and I though, 'hey,
this mighl be rhe guy to turn it all
around I was right and I'm really
happy thai I same back. I his year
has been great
Or eat u has been, both for the
Pirates, 15-1 I heading into the final
game, and lo, Gray, rhe 6-8 leaper
i averaging 11.7
points and eight
rebounds per con
test.
s tor his last
game. Orav says
it seems unreal
thai it could all be
ending "lv old
man told me
when I Lame here
thai n would go
last he said
with .1 anile
"Bui I ne
thoughi it would go bv this fast.
Odom calls Gray "one oi the top
detenders in the country
I or Krusen. his tour year career
lias been climaxed in this h.s senior
reason. "It all somehow seems
WOrth it now thai I'm plaving on a
winner he said, "it's a good wav
' go out. I ike Coach Odom has
told us. vou tend to remember your
lasi several games. I sure hope we
can win and end up 16-1 1. Of
course, I liked to personally have a
big game too
I lie 6-5 sharpshooter is called by
tiis coach "as fine a shooter as I've
evei been around Stats attest to
this too. Krusen averages . 4
points per game, and is shooting an
amaing 57.4 per cent from the field
and 88.5 pet cent from the free
throw hue.
Odom said perhaps one oi the
most pleasing aspects o this season
has been the play o Powers.
"When I got here they told me to
offei him a scholarship and not plav
him Odom said. "I was told that
he was fed up with the game. I
found him to be exactly the op-
posite, though. He works so hard
and is the most
versatile player on
our team
It was probably
easy for Powers
to lose interest in
basketball, as
Gillman allotted
hun virtually no
playing tune his
sophomore and
junioi seasons.
�As a freshman
mulct Patton, he
had started in
many games. his year, thoueh,
things have picked up and Powers
has seen action in every ECl game,
plav ing majoi roles in most ol them
"1 got really frustrated at tunes "
said Powers. "But thines are ok iv
now. I'll def.mtelv miss th,s Vea"i
more than the others. , wish thines
could have been this way all alone "
Ihe 6-8 Hobson has been
somewhat of an cinema as Pirate
playing superbly at times and not so
well at others. When he was on
though, ECl opponents had a hand
lull.
And. says Odom. Hobson has
been at his best of late. "In the last
few weeks he's really developed like
we'd hoped he would. On given
nights he's given us the bulk we
needed to plav some ol the unit:her
teams in the country
rhe loss ol Mavnor will be t
gigantic one for the Pirates, savs
Odom. '�His position is the one thai
will be the most difficult one lo
fill Odom sard. "He's one o the
two best guards m the state (had
Kinch (I NCC) the other one
"He's had nights when
shooting has been unbelievable
will definitely plav pro
somewhere
Mavnor. the Pirates' leading
scorei with a 16.6 average and thud
leading reboundei (4.1). was drafted
as a future bv thehicago Bulls last
year and expects 10 sign a fairly
lucrative ontract.
Now, though, what concerns him
is his last collegiate game. 'Mi
should he veiv emotional said the
6 Raeford native, it's hard 1
believe, the last eame in Minges
�It be importani to get thai' six
teenth win. We've all worked so
hard and really deserve 11 I'd jc
to go oul on a u noie like thai "
Hobson
Ills
He
ball
10





Orapplers Post Winning Mark
rt!U!AM.SByM),),f P�!ms; This results in power in the tour- Pertainin to th ����: C3
ui lumseodie
The East Carolina
wresilmg team finished
their regular season at
8-6-1, their first winn-
ing mark in three years.
The team now sets its
sights on the NCAA
Fast Regional Tourna-
ment that will be held
at Blacksburg, Virginia
on February 29 and
March 1.
The tournament will
consist of twenty-five
Eastern Independent
teams, according to
Pirate Coach Ed Steers.
The schools enter their
top wrestlers to com-
pete in individual mat-
ches. How an in-
dividual does in his
match will count
towards total team
points. This results in
iiKiivtduai wins as weti
as a team title. If an in-
dividual wins his weight
class, he will
automatically quality
for the Nationals.
"We're trying to,
you know, work things
so we have our guys
qualify for the Na-
tionals, " Steers said.
'That's the main pur-
pose of it. There's the
team title which we'd
like to win he added.
To get this far, Steers
commented, 'you
know, our best shots all
year have been (Butch)
Revils and D.T.
Joyner. That's still
about the way we're sit-
ting.
"The thing about the
season is, we've been
riding the crest of their
Gminski Leads
Classic Ballot
WICHITA, Kan. -
Duke Ail-American
Mike Gminski holds a
narrow lead over Ken-
tucky's Kyle Macy
among East squad can-
didates in early
balloting for the Ninth
Annual Pizza Hut
Basketball Classic,
while UCLA forward
Kiki Vandeweghe has
taken a slim lead over
Iowa's Ronnie Lester in
the est.
The Blue Devil center
has gathered 58,970
voles toMacy's 57,663.
The Kentucky guard
and member of the
U.S. Pan American
Games championship
team is being pushed,
however, by two more
centers: Joe Barry Car-
roll of Purdue and
Roosevelt Bouie of
Syracuse. Carroll has
53,558 votes and Bouie
51,000.
In the West a 6-10
forward and still
another center are very
near the top of the
voting. SMU forward
Brad Branson has
48,058 votes and Min-
nesota pivot Kevin
McHale, who started at
center for the winning
U.S. Pan Am Games
team, has 47.991
rfftafiWS
Cr�mwiU; H. C.
SAT. NITE: TOMMY
G.&CO.
are back
Customer Appreciation
Nite
Reduced Prices of
Your Favorite Beverage
LWiN i�i3Q 5
TONIGHT
PIZZA SPECIAL
Buy One-Get One
Free Same Value
ALL NIGHT LONG
Fast Free Delivery
Dine In�Carry Out
758-7400
Watch for Super Spring Break
Specials in Tuesday's East Carolinian
ABOHT'ONS UP TO
12tfc WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
176 00 "Ml UtcfttMvc"
pregnancy test birth cars
trot, and problem pregnan-
cy counseling For further
information call 132 0535
(toll free number
�00 221 2S between '�
AM. i PM. weekday.
Heeit Organ ianen
tiy West Merge St.
fteietgtt, MX. S7MS
Dependable Help Wanted
Hord work, posstote
MMfnatJflii
women will be
strong back ��
ASK FOR LJ
long hours. Port-rime or
, UptoSmenor
jr SprifiQ season of
. Jots aWmsrids both
mind, coH 756-2629
power in ihe tour-
naments, oui m the
dual meets, they're on-
ly a fifth of the team
he said. "They can't
carry the whole team.
So we need good con-
tributions from other
people to help us in
dual meets.
"The pivotal people
in whether or not we
have a winning or los-
ing record, I feel, were
guys like Scott Eaton
who won fifteen mat-
ches for us this year
he continued. "And
Charlie McGimsey who
was 11-3, and Grey
Sours who was 12-12.
"Our dual meet
season wouldn't been a
real painful experience
if those guys hadn't
come through for us
he concluded
-we. sSm s.id �le SE, �� 00rt lhi,N���' "epowl. bu. -
of the learns my enter Slter r�,i� .h- f'? comm�l �'� hopeful thai we're
only one wrestler, but wrestlers h.� L.�L? ir fef? ?nd a ,ack "oin '� do ���"
Ecnnn, ttjzjs arsnss sunssz
NEW YORK
and
PHILADELPHIA TRIP
Mav 10-17
Total Com $256.54
An unusual opportunity to w New Y.k in a cliHrrrn. pnfftiw.
Is�jn.r showroom lashi)H, Hrsisnrs. mm hamliso , enters plus
(.reenwuh Village, ftnadwav, mwewm drpart�� rtww, and the
World I lade Center.
A 9M tour through PhiLcHphu Ronaiwanrr Downtown. A
v,s,t �, Wm.er.hur. the most unusual collerlion nf rooms ,n this ,�,�,�.
rankd Butch Rr-vik commented thai Rui-
Steve Goode. and Scott eh hurt ankle is
Ealon Ja js "going to impede his
also ailing with a two- possibilities "
week long flu. The tournament will
On Revils, Steers be a double-elimination.
Sponsored Bi
Srnool ol Ho
Call 757-6929
Only a Few Seats I .eh
Deadline: March 6
me
E
ronomics
STEEPLECHASE
CAFETERIA
PITT PLAZA
MONSAT. CLOSED SUNDAY
11:00- 2.00 4:30- 8.00
TUE.26Febl980
$1.14 Franks& Beans
$1.49 BBQ Meat Loaf
WED. 27 Feb. 1980
$1.14 Chili&Macaroni
-e . $149Pork&Dressing
THUR.28Febl980
$1.14 Baked Lasagna
$1.49 Pork Chow Mein
FRI.29Feb. 1980
$1.14 Franks&Saurkraut
$.49 Turkey & Dressing
$2.50 Fried Trout&Hush Puppies
Cole Slaw,FF Potatos, Coffee or Tea
SAT. 1 Mar. 1980
$1.14 Turkey Casserole
$ 1.49 Smothered Liver&Mushroom Gravy
MON. 3 Mar. 1980
$1.14 Creole Spaghetti
$1.49Pork&Dressing
TUE. 4 Mar. 1980
$1 . MChili&Macaroni
$1.49 Chicken Chow Mein
LET HOLLOWELL'S HELP YOU
FIGHT YOUR WINTER COLD
prices effective
through March 9,1980
Tylenolioo's reg.$2.85 NOW $1.99
t4t�
She was married at 13.
She had four kids
by the time she was 20.
She's been hungry and poor.
She's been loved and cheated on.
She became a singer and a star
because it was the only way
she knew to survive.
�tkfpUnefj
SISSY SPACER TOMMY LEE JONES
"COAL MINER'S DAUGHTER"
also starring BEVERLY DANGELO LEVON HELM Screenplay by TOM RICKMAN
Based on the Autobiography by LORETTA LYNN with GEORGE VECSEY
Executive Producer BOB LARSON Produced by BERNARD SCHWARTZ
Directed by MICHAEL APTED a Bernard schwar ,�.� A universal hcture U
r-�I -sr� "��.iiuii riL.Mvr.iwrtLnuiKhU
Opening March 7 at a theatre near you
�MjBt"
NEW DORM ROOM
RESERVATION
PROCEDURES
Tylenol
�CtWWWPj�n
CoTylenol Cold Formula-
5oz. reg. $2.38 NOW $1.59
lOoz. reg. $3.82 NOW $2.59
SSfOENoc
Anacin 50's
reg. $1.60
NOW $1.19
INFORMATION
STUDENTS PRESENTLY ENROLLED AT EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY WHO ARE DESIROUS
OF RESIDENCE HALL HOUSING FOR SCHOOL YEAR 1980-81 MUST RESERVE ROOMS
MARCH 3-7 IN ORDER TO BE GUARANTEED SUCH HOUSING.
Procedure To Follow:
Bayer Aspirin 100's
reg. $2.08 NOW $1.49
BAYER
� � AST srsn
Maximirn Strength Anacin
ANACIN
reg. $1.60
NOW $1.19
Obtain housing application from residence hall office (Office of
Housing Operations, Room 201, Whichard Building for students
currently residing off campus).
Make $60 deposit in Cashier's Office, Room 105 Spilman Building.
Apply for room in office of preferred residence hall according
to the following schedule: (Exceptions: Assignments for Fleming
Hall will be made in office in Jarvis Hall and those for Slay
Hall will be made in office in Umstead Hall)
Monday, March 3 and Tuesday, March 4; Students who wish to
return to same rooms they presently occupy must reserve such
; rooms.
Wednesday, March 5 through Friday, March 7: All other
returning students will be permitted to reserve rooms.
The hours for room assignments will be:
ftft sw
8:30 a.m. to I2;30 p.i
1:30 p.m. to
Students who remrv rooms 1
reside will be required to i
"cards at the tie'they sign
i&a tm ernes in which they presently
their IS and Spring Semester ac:





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 28, 1980
IM Basketball Concludes!
s
Frat Division Changes
Prohibition is over . . .
Mr, Jack Daniels is coming
&




By FREDDIE
KRAZIER
Staff Writer
71-33 while the Belk
Pleasers demolished the
Jones Bucketeers
The ECU intramural 118-12 in setting new
basketball season is intramurals records
years and are all very
experienced handball
players.
Against ASU, ECU
lost a very close first
quickly drawing to an Cliff Williams led seven game on Saturday mor-
exciting finish. The Pleasers in double mng but came back on
top-ranked teams have figures with 30 points
advanced in most cases, ,n women's play, the
but the scores have got- games have been ex-
ten decidedly closer in citing and interesting to
the playoffs. watch. The top-ranked
1 he fraternity divi- Tyler Misfits had no
moms took unexpected trouble in defeating the
Umstead Playmates
70-12. Alpha Xi Delta
no. 1, the second rank-
Classified
changes this week as
both favorites were
soundly defeated. Kap-
Pa Siema defeated Tau ed team, posted trium
Kappa Epsilon 40-32 Pn over Chi Omega
and later beat Beta
rheta Pi to complete
their perfect season.
Phi Kappa Tau rolled
past Kappa Alpha
-24 to also cap an
undefeated season.
1 he independent
league has already lost
some good teams in the
playoffs but most of
the best are left. The
Super Light had little
trouble with the Jam-
mers HI as thev won
40-26 and Tri Sigma
39-8. The playoffs
should prove thrilling
to watch.
Team Handball
The ECU Team
Handball Club com-
peted in the Northwest
N.C. Team Handball
Tournament held in
Boone, N.C, on Feb.
23 and 24. Also par-
ticipating were Ap-
1-44. The Joint" EUht palachian State and
posted two impressive University of Tennessee
wins over the PRC
Ozone Airmen 79-25
and Murphy's Law
62-47. Various Artists
won two tough games
over the Free Agents
46-33 and In Your Face
44-43. The No Names
have had little trouble
thus far in cruising past
the Studs 49-26 and the
.olden Buds 45-32.
The dorm league has
good talent but is short
on good teams. The
Belk Stylons trounced
ycock Tequila Sunrise
at Chattanooga. ASU
and UTC both com-
peted in the nationals in
Colorado alst year
where UTC finished in
fifth place.
These facts did not
intimidate the ECU
team as they played
very aggressive and
competitive handball in
every game. ECU gave
UTC its two closest
games of the tourna-
ment. The players for
UTC have been playing
together for about eight
Saturday evening to
post a very impressive
overtime win. In this
game, ECU found itself
down 12-8 at halftime.
We came out fired up
and tied the score at
12-12 in the early
moments of the second
half.
The game had
various lead changes
after that and ended up
tied at 16-16. After a
scoreless overtime
period, the teams tried
five penalty shots each.
We went first and made
four out of five. ASU
made its first three, but
with a little help from
everyone there from
ECU, they missed their
last two.
The leading scorer
for ECU on the trip
was Gerald Hall with
16 goals followed by
Carl Karpinski with 10
and Joe Daas with 9.
Overall, it was a total
team effort from ECu
that made it such a suc-
cessful tournament.
The handball club
plans to travel to West
Point, N.Y. and Col-
orado Springs, Col-
orado for later trips
and tournaments.
FOR RENT
FEMALE ROOMMATE: needed
to share halt rent and utilities on
two bedroom apartment three
blocks from campus. Call
758 1074
FEMALE ROOMMATE: wanted
for two bedroom duplex tSS a
month plus half utilities. Must be
non smoker and reasonably quiet.
Call Elizabeth at 758 4874
FOR RENT: private room
(male), within walking distance
from campus. Call 75? 400 after
12:00
ROOMMATE WANTED: to share
two bedroom apartment at Village
Green. Call 757 6400 before 5:00
p.m. or 746 4481. Ask lor Brenda
SPACIOUS ROOM: for female
non-smoker. Quiet home across
from Jarvis. 590 mo. 75? 5528
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Scuba, complete out
fit, tank two regulators, Guages,
wet suit, 756 8793 evenings
FOR SALE: bass guitar and am
Case, strap and cord included.
Call Keith at 758 7878 after 5:00.
1973 Buick Centunan, AC, AM
FM. $800 or best offer 75? 9681
PERSONAL
SUNSHINE STUDIOS: offering
the following classes. Ballet, Jazz.
Belly Dance, Yoga and Drco. For
more information call 754-7235.
TYPING: for students and pro
fessors available, call 75? 749?
after 6:00 p.m.
5100 REWARD: for information
leading to the return of Rosie:
female gold cocker spaniel, 6 mon
ths old All calls kept confidential
75? 0?56
HORSEBACK RIDING Day or
Night, individual or groups. Tri
County Stables Gnmesiand. Call
752 6893.
TYPING done: Term papers.
Resumes, Thesis, Etc.
Reasonable. Call: Jane Pollock,
752 9719.
HELP WANTED: Louie's, 210w
10th street, needs weekend bar
maid. Call for appointment
752 1493.
TAKJ� A BREAK: beach it at the
King George Motel or Sand Pebble
Motel m North Myrtle Beach. Low
spring break rates start at S13.
Call 803 249 2721 for reservations.
SREWARDS for any information
leading to the return of a white
gold necklace with sapphire lost in
or around Chapter X on Thursday,
Feb. 21. Great Sentimental Value,
Substantial Reward! Please call
758 6260,758 2381 Or 758 5152.
PUTT PUTT: needs one part time
employee. Job requires painting,
recarpeting, landscaping,a lot of
cleaning, and much more. Appli
cant must be honest, dependable,
enjoy working with people, and be
self motivated Applicant also
must have car and phone. Hours
are mostly 2:00 6:00 weekdays. 3
or 4 days a week. If interested, br
mg a resume with you Monday
March 3rd between 2:00 and 6:00
p.m. to Putt Putt Golf Course, 10th
street extended.
NEED A TAN?
REGISTER
NOW
RoHw
Inc.
PIPE DREAMS
Moonlight Madness
thisThur. 11 am- 10pm
For two FREE
Tanning Programs
Drawing March 21
at
ROFFLER of
GREENVILLE
Distributed
By
Taylor
Beverage Co.
Goldsboro
r
IW1POWTEO
10 Discount on any
$ 10.00 or more purchase
with this coupon
offer good
Feb. 28, 1980
Hair Designers
Close Walking Distance to Campus
Across from Umstead Dorm
Call 758-0880 Open MonFri.
(Ss
Heineken
HOLLAND BEER
THE 1 IMPORTED BEER IN AMERICA,
IH-fLNiSuB 5
218-BE.5lhSt.
752-4811

SANDWICH
BONANZA
OPTICIANS
opticians
of amenca
CONTACT LENSES
Soflens
Bausch & Lomb
(Car Kit
Included)
Semi Soft $110 Hard $1.05
Guaranteed Fitting or Your Moriey Refunded
AVAILABLE
CLEAR-VUE OPTICIANS
GREENVILLE, N.C.
IYSICIANS QUADRANGLE
BUILDING A
1705W.6THST.
AOJACfHTTOEAST
CAMNJMAfYtCUMIC
Greenville Store unly
10 Discount To E.C.U.
Students On Glasses.
Friday & Saturday
opening til closing
"feed a friend
Buy any 2 Sandwiches
Get 3rd One Free
Same Value
�& SMUMMvIIkS
YP� bread bakeo fresh dailv
Short Loaf � $2.00
Long Loaf � $2.95
SUBMARINE
Salarrii,Ham.Sauca,Chaaaa,Bakad
HAM and CHEESE
� Muttrd,Ham,Lttuc�,Tom�to,Ch�Mt
HOAGIE
Muitard,Meyonnari�,Sa!ami,Ham,L�ttuc�
Tomato.Olive Oil
ITALIAN SANDWICH
Salami,Ham,Onion�,Pappr,Sauce.Ciaaea
Baked
VEGETARIAN SANDWICH
Onion.Green Pepper, Muehrooro,Seuce,
Cheeee.Bakeci
VERSUVIAN STEAK
Mutterd,Meyortr�aiee,Lettuee.Tamat�.
Hamburg Steak
THURSDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY
IT'S ALLAN
Playing your favorite Oldies, O nssic
Rock and Roll, and New Wave music
Friday Have a Happy starts at 3 30
This Week ! Be There
SOUTH SEAS
PET SHOP
Greenville Square
SALE
NEONS
BLACK MOLLIES
GOLDFISH
ZEBRA DANIOS
ALGEA EATERS
TIGER BARBS
4 for$1.00
2for$1.00
4 for$1.00
3 for$1.00
69t
69J
10 gal. AQUARIUMS $8.99
Gerbils reg.2.99 only 99c
Prices good thru Sat.
Complete line of pet
Supplies and Accessories
HfflffiTS
1830
Seafood
That's. Night
Specials
OYSTERS �4.95
FLOUNDER �3.50
TROUT
PERCH
�2.95
�2.95
all you can eat
No take-outs please.
M�l includes:
reneta rrlM,C�U �l�w
Hathpviettl.
752-1446
OFFICE HOURS
1A.M5:90P.M.
MON. TUES. THURS. FRI.
9 A.M. -1P.M.
WEDNESDAY:
AST FREE DELIVERY
Dine In�Carry Out
507 E. 14th Street
Greenville, N.C-
758-7400
We are proud to
announce that we
have added
one of the
AREAS FINEST
SALAD BARS
tor your
dining pleasure.
OPEN FOR LUNCH
Dally ZltSO
Sun. � Thur.
430-900
IFrl. and Sat.
430-1000
mimm
5 �TT � T "��, �� ��'�'��'� v- '
s;W�
t?t.��J
: v '��atfSKa�pV,�'VVV. V�.�rv�S" �.
S1





Title
The East Carolinian, February 28, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 29, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.44
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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