The East Carolinian, February 19, 1980






e la0t (Earnltttian
Vol. 54 No
4L
8 Pages
Tuesday, February 19, 1980
(Greenville, N.C.
Circulation 10,000
Registrar
Announces
New Forms
By DEBORAH HOTALING
vis!anl Nes Kdilnr
Pre-registration will be a little dif-
ferent this semester. The registrar's
office is putting a new system into
effect next week.
Gilbert Moore, ECU registrar,
stressed the fact that most students
will have to pay strict attention to
the directions given on the back of
the new form in order to fill it out
correctly.
"The blue forms will be used by
undergraduates and the red forms
will be used by graduate students
he said. "Make sure you use a
number two pencil, not a pen, to fill
out this form. Include your correct
ID number, name and department.
"And please don't fold the form.
Just turn it in immediately as done
in the past in the Whiehard Building
upon completion Moore said.
The form will be processed only
after all of the forms are checked
over by hand to make sure they have
been properly completed.
"We'll try to correct any mistakes
we find before they (the forms) go
into the terminal. We'll have five
people checking these forms for two
weeks explained Moore.
Most institutions have already
switched over to this system, in-
cluding UNC-Chapel Hill, Ap-
palachian, N.C. State, and UNC-
Charlotte.
'The cards were just too rrchaic
and very cumbersome to handle
Moore said.
The new system was tested on a
group of freshmen last summer. "It
prosed very effective. The students
had no problems adjusting to the
new forms.
'The whole purpose of these
forms is to make registration more
efficient. If it proves effective this
semester, we'll continue to use it,
and we'll et ihc registration take
place later on in the semester
Moore said.
The forms will be available during
the week of pre-registration and
students can obtain forms from ad-
visors or department offices.
"Just read the directions on the
backs of the forms. They're not dif-
ficult to follow Moore said. "Just
take the time to do it right
Gov. Jim Hunt
Photo by CHAP GURLEY
Gov. Hunt came to Greenville Friday to speak about vocational
education in North Carolina (See story page 2).
"Kissing Bandits'
Caught At ECU
By MARIANNE HARBISON
Staff Writer
Two out-of-state men, one using
several aliases, were arrested in
front of Jones Dorm Wednesday,
Feb. 13, on charges of fraud,
larceny, writing worthless checks
and trespassing, according to
Greenville Police Chief E.G. Can-
non.
James Dale Christian, 17, of
Durant, Okla was arrested on five
counts of fraud involving the illegal
solicitation of magazine subscrip-
tions, larceny, and three counts of
writing worthless checks.
Christian was working with a
partner who went by several aliases
� James Wesley, Charles Randall
and Larry Gregory. He was arrested
on five counts of fraud and one
count of trespassing. This man used
an address from Ohio.
Cannon stated that the two men
were called the "Kissing Bandits
because they used that sort of ap-
proach to solicit subscriptions from
young women "The two dealt
mostly with young girls because
that's probably who they could in-
fluence the most easily
One person who encountered
Christian stated, "He came into my
apartment, and he was really getting
nervous about everything. When he
had finished his spiel and I was get-
ting ready to write the check, he
gave me a really big hassle about it.
He didn't want me to put any name
on it � just the amount and my
signature
Cannon said the two were caught
when the checks were investigated.
The same witness stated, "He
told us he was a UNC med student
trying to win a contest by selling 15
subscriptions per day which would
get him a free trip to Hawaii. He got
real nervous when I went to write
out the check and didn't want to tell
me the name of the company, but he
finally did. After I wrote the check,
he took off real fast
Another witness said, "He push-
ed himself in the door without being
invited in and started giving a real
vivacious and practiced speech
about these magazine subscriptions.
He showed us a license which allow-
ed him to sell magazines for the pur-
pose of winning this trip to Hawaii.
It looked really legitimate with
authorization and his picture
This witness also said that Chris-
tian became very nervous when per-
sonal questions were asked. "That
fake salesman facade left him quick-
ly when we started to change our
minds about writing the check at all.
He got serious and said. Must sign
the check The minute you started
to question him, he wasn't friendly
anymore
Cannon said the two were usually
demanding cash payment for the
subscriptions, and when they took
checks, they were made out to them
personally.
"The two men were staving at any
place they could until the rent was
due, and then they would skip out
stated Chief Cannon.
Assistant Security Director Fran-
cis Eddings said he had not received
any complaints from students about
Christian or the man with the
aliases.
One witness ended her statement,
saying, "After I told the police that
Christian had said he was a UNC
med student, they took me back and
showed me just what he had been
studying � there were all kinds of
books about how to be a con artist,
how to appear sincere in selling, and
several others. He had apparently
studied how to rip people off
Melvin Attends White House Meeting
By TERRY GRAY
News Kdilor
After attending a White House
conference Friday with more than
200 other student body presidents,
SGA President Brett Melvin said
Monday that his colleagues from
around the nation showed no
general agreement on the issue of
draft registration.
President Carter defended his
decision to renew the registration in
a 30-minute speech to the group,
saying that it was a "symbolic
gesture" to the Soviets and that he
did not expect it to result in an ac-
tual draft.
Melvin said that when National
Security Advisor Zbigniew Brzezin-
ski asked the group if they thought
the volunteer army was a success,
about half of them said yes. But, ac-
cording to Melvin, only two hands
were raised when Brzezinski asked
how many of the students would
volunteer to join the army in a
crisis.
The conference, the third of its
kind since Carter took office, allow-
ed the administration to explain
foreign and domestic policies and to
hear the opinions of student leaders.
Brzezinski and Domestic Policy Ad-
visor Stuart Eisenstat spoke to the
group Friday morning, and other
White House aides held discussion
sessions in the afternoon.
"I didn't learn anything that I
didn't know before, but this time I
got it straight from the administra-
tion said Melvin.
Although the issue of draft
registration was stressed in the talks,
Melvin said there was also discus-
sion of President Carter's education
bill, his youth employment pro-
gram, the economy, energy, and the
administration's response to the
Soviet push into Afghanistan.
Melvin noted that the Iranian
situation, did not figure
predominantly in the discussions,
except in reference to Afghanistan.
Melvin said there were differences
between what Brzezinski said about
the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan
and what Carter said in his address
to the students.
"Brzezinski said that the ad-
ministration had known for weeks
about the Soviet build-up on the
Afghanistan border, and that they
had even had a meeting about it the
week before it happened. Later on.
Carter said that the whole thing had
taken them by surprise said
Melvin.
Eisenstat told the students that
the primary goal of the Carter ad-
ministration was to restore faith and
trust in the presidency. He outlined
some programs the White House
has undertaken to clean up the civil
service, increase government effi-
ciency and set up priorities in its
energy, employment and urban
policies, said Melvin.
Sitting almost directly in front of
the president when he gave his
speech, Melvin said Carter looked
"aged" and "frail
After Carter's speech, each of the
student body presidents had his
photograph taken with the Presi-
dent.
Campaign workers for Sen. Ed-
ward Kennedy were in front of the
Executive Building when the student
presidents arrived for the con-
ference, but their invitations to a
similar meeting with Kennedy sup-
porters did not get much response,
according to Melvin.
"i don't believe that Carter's
main purpose in the conference was
to campaign for reelection Melvin
said. "I think it was just another
part of the 'open door policy which
he has been conducting ail along
"I didn't come away with the
thought that I was going to vote for
Carter in 1980, but I came away
reassured about the administration
we have right now he said.
SGA Legislature
Tables Co-ed Dorm
Issue Until Spring
The SGA legislature passed a
resolution Monday recommending
that administration officials wait
until 1981 to make Jarvis and Belk
dormitories into co-educational
residence halls.
The proposal was debated and
subsequently amended before being
passed. Introduced by Sam Berns-
tein, the resolution stated that
although the SGA legislature
recognized the desire among
students for additional co-ed dorms,
any action on the matter should be
postponed until the problems in-
volved in moving students could be
worked out. .
The change to co-ed facilities
wouid be difficult now, Bernstein
said, because dorm students must
sign up for their rooms in the next
few weeks.
ECU Foot bail Coach Ed Emory
and ECU Athletic Director Bill Cain
addressed the legislators and
responded to a wide range of ques-
tions about East Carolina's athletic
programs.
Emory noted that of the 25
seniors who wiii not return to the
football program next year, 18 were
starters. Calling the upcoming
season a "great challenge Emory
said that the team must "work a lit-
tle harder and be a little more
dedicated but added that he was
looking forward to the new decade
of ECU football.
"We feel that we have the greatest
chemistry that a football staff can
have Emory said. The new coach
ahc saki that he will keep the
wishbone offense, but wiU pass the
ball more than his predecessor, Pat
Dye, did.
Most of the questions directed to
Athletic Director Bill Cain concern-
ed the problems ECU has had in
scheduling games.
Cain said that ECU will play
UNC once more before the contract
with them expires, but that N.C.
State is scheduled for another five
games. Duke University is scheduled
for one more game, but that con-
tract could be renewed, Cain said.
Wake Forest is definitely out of the
picture in the future, Cain added.
"We had Five more games on
schedule with them, but evidently
they don't believe in written con-
tracts Cain said.
Cain also noted that the athletic
department is "exploring several
avenues" toward forming or joining
a conference. The football team
would not necessarily be included in
any possible agreement, Cain said.
According to Cain, all 17 sports
at ECU were sponsored by a budget
of SI.7 million last year, compared
to UNC's athletic budget of $6.2
million. Cain attributed the large
gap to the longevity and tradition of
UNC football, but noted that ECU
is growing yearly in its budget.
Symposium Looks At Quality Education
Dr. Thomas Brewer
Dr. John Howell
The Fifth Annual Phi Kappa Phi
Symposium will be held Wednesday
and Thursday, Feb. 20 and 21, on
the ECU campus.
The symposium, "Quality in
Higher Education: Challenges and
Problems will feature several
educators, including Dr. Raymond
H. Dawson, vice president for
academic affairs, UNC; Dr.
Thomas Brewer, ECU chancellor;
and Dr. Robert Maier, ECU vice
chancellor for academic affairs.
Dr. Fred Broadhurst urges all
students and faculty members to at-
tend as much of the symposium as
possible. "We'd like to see everyone
there because it is for them he
said. "I think everyone will benefit
by coming to the symposium, and I
would like to see a lot of people
there
The symposium will begin at 8:45
a.m. Wednesday in the Nursing
Building Auditorium, room 101,
with Vice Chancellor Maier giving
the welcome address. Chancellor
Brewer will speak on the "Quality
Education: The Challenge of the
80's" at 9 a.m.
Dr. Marie Farr, assistant pro-
fessor of English, will speak on
"Quality in Teaching: Quality in
Evaluation" at 10 a.m. Dr. John
Longhill, associate professor of
business, will speak on "Student
Evaluations: How They Affect
Quality Education � Negatively"
at 11 a.m.
Session B will begin at 1 p.m. with
chairperson Dr. Rosina Lao, direc-
tor of the general graduate program
in psychology.
"How to Effectively Teach the
See QUALITY Page 3, Col. 1
Students Evacuate In Robes and Slippers
False Fire A larm Clears Clement Dorm
In other business, legislators re-
jected a $2900 appropriation request
from a School of Musk student
group. SGA Attorney General
Drake Mann also notified the
legislators that the Appeals Board
would meet soon to consider the
constitutionality of a recent SGA
legislature decision to alter certain
student government election rules.
Hundreds of Clement dormitory
residents, many of them clad in
robes and slippers, evacuated their
ten-story building at 11:10 p.m. last
night after someone set off a first-
floor fire alarm.
Several policemen responded to
the alarm shortly afterwards. Then,
as Cape. Earl Wiggins was preparing
to take an elevator to the ninth floor
to follow up a possible lead, another
alarm sounded in the building.
According to Lt. Rose of the
Greenville Police Dept informa-
tion received from Clement
residents indicated that three maks
who had been seen in the dormitory
just before the first alarm west off
may have been responsible for the
initial disturbance.
To be certain that there was in
fact no fire in the dormitory, notice
checked for smoke and found no
evidence of fire, said Lt. Rose.
According o Jackie floyce, the
hall representative on the mmk
floor, there were four males
wandering around unescorted on
her hali minutes before the alarm.
Miss Boyce said that she warned
them to get out of the building, but
that they continued to make noise
by kicking trash cans around.
When Miss Boyce opened her
door again to repeat her warning,
she found that they had written an
obscene message on her note pad,
hanging outside. Boyce said she saw
them running down the hall and
around the corner :� the stairwell.
about 6'3 with curly hair and
glasses, and wore a blue jacket
Boyce also said that she
remembered seeing another mate
who was "short, about 5'8 with a
heavy build and dark hair, with an
orangish-colored coat on She ad-
ded that she could not describe the
two other males.
students in the
returned to their rooms or to the
lobby to talk about what had hap-
pened.
"It might have been something
different said one student, "but
nobody gets thrilled about going in-
to the cold at night
Inside Today
Tanya Wafl, a
cond floor of
had seen three
toward the
on the
off.
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Exhibits In
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The East Carolinian
SPORTSWORLD
COLLEGE NIGHT
Tuesday Night
6:30- liMH)
Br ing I. I I. Mud
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Greek News
Arabian Highway Patrol
THE EST C ROI IMN
HHRURY 19, IWO
B KK'kl GLIARMIS
l.rrek CwWpMil
The Panhelienic
Scholarship Banquet
wts held last Tuesday
nigh at iiic MiHfM;
1 OdSjC
Some of the award
winners include Martha
Ferguson, Alpha Delta
Pi. pledge with the
highest scholastic
average, and Hope
McMillan, Alpha Delta
Pi, who won an award
for the sister with the
highest average.
Kappa Delta received
honors for the highest
overall scholastic
chapter, while Alpha
Omicron Pi was named
most improved sorori-
ty.
The Best Pledge
Class Award went to
Chi Omega, and the
Junior Panhelienic Par-
ticipation Award was
presented to Alpha
Delta Pi. Alpha Xi
Delta captured the
Philanthropic Award.
The Panhelienic Par-
ticipation Award first
place winner was Chi
Omega. Sigma Sigma
Sigma ranked second in
the overall scoring
while Alpha Omicron
Pi placed third.
Eva Pittman, Sigma,
out-going Panhelienic
president, was given the
Most Outstanding
iGreek Woman Award
During the banquet,
housemothers and
chapter advisors were
honored for their work
and contributions dur-
ing the past 20 years.
Special recognition was
given to Mrs. Myrtle
Robbins, house
mother, and Mrs.
Virginia Minges,
chapter advisor of
Sigma Sigma Sigma for
being with the sorority
for the whole 20 years
of its existence. The
two were honored with
plaques.
Other members of
Chi Omega to be
recognized at the ban-
quet were Cathy
McLean and Tammy
Whiteside, Greek Hall
of Fame; Lisa Herr,
Debi Gooder, Lianne
Ractliffe and Tami
Whiteside, Rho Lamb-
da members.
The Combined Delta
Zeta and Phi Tau roller
hockey team, Sam the
Slam and the Ham-
merheads, are having
an excellent season.
They are 3-1 thus far.
The basketball team is
standing with a 3-4
record.
The Chi Omega
basketball team now
shows a record of 3-2.
Another winning team
is the pledge class, who
received the Best
Pledge Class award at
the banquet Tuesday.
In fraternity news.
Alpha Sigma Phi little
sisters will have their
rush this week. Tonight
at � p.m. the little
sisters will have a keg
party at King's Row
party house, and
everyone is invited to
attend.
On Wednesday at 8
p.m they will have a
wine and cheese party
at King's Row party
house. For rides and
more information, call
752-1073 or 758-4290.
The Alpha Sig little
sisters are really look-
ing forward to meeting
interested girls.
Lambda Chi Alpha is
enjoying a visit from
Mark Bauer, a national
chapter consultant.
Brother Mark will be
with Lambda Chi from
Wednesday until Satur-
day and will attend the
formal Saturday night
at the Greenville Coun-
try Club.
The Lambda Chis
urge all Greeks to at-
tend their Happy Hour
at Chapter X Tuesday,
9 p.m. � 1 a.m.
The Sig Eps are hav-
ing a Happy Hour
Tuesday night at Pan-
tana Bob's with reduc-
ed beer prices.
The Pi Kappa Phi
pledge class is having a
Shag Contest and Hap-
py Hour at Chapter X
Wednesday, Feb. 20, 9
p.m. � I a.m. Thanks
from all the Phis to
everyone who sup-
ported their Singing
Valentine's Project. It
was a huge success.
The Alpha Phis are
selling lollipops for
their Philanthropic
project, the Heart
Fund. . They can be
bought from any Phi.
The Alpha Phi's took a
break from all this
work to relax at their
Forget-Me-Not-Ball
last weekend, which
was held at the Green-
ville Country Club.
This weekend the
Sigmas -will be visited
by Ruth McCreery, a
national advisor. Ruth
will hold several
workshops with the
girls.
The brothers of Pi
Kappa Phi would like
to thank Brother Clay
Edmunds for all his
time and hard work
shown toward the
fraternity this past
year. He has
represented Pi Kap as
vice president of IFC
and is now working
with the national head-
quarters.
Saudis May Train Lawmen Here
UNC System Told To Prepare
WASHINGTON
(AP) � The University
of North Carolina has
been told to be ready by
May 19 for a hearing
on the school's
desegregation dispute
with the U.S. Depart-
ment of Health, Educa-
tion and Welfare.
Administrative Law
Judge Lewis F. Parker
denied UNC's request
late Tuesday that the
hearings be delayed for
the third time.
"Another delay
would be uncons-
cionable said Larry
Velez, a spokesman for
HEW. "Our case is
ready. We don't think
another delay would
serve any purpose
Jeff Ciampagne,
HEW's attorney handl-
ing the case, told
Parker that the govern-
ment wants it heard this
spring.
UNC requested a
90-day extension, but
Parker gave the school
only 60 days.
Quality Is Topic
Continued from Page 1
Unmotivated Student"
is the subject Dr. Paul
Varlashkin will address
at p.m. Dr. McKay
SundwaW, associate
professor of English,
will speak at 2 p.m. on
"The Laboratory of
the Mind: Quality in
Teaching the
Humanities
Ms. Stacy Wor-
thington, a graduate
student in political
science, will speak on
"Quality and Equality
in Higher Education:
Competing or Com-
Kilpatrick, Librarian
IN, ECU Library Ser-
vices Department, will
both .speak on the
"Quality of Student
Research Enhanced By
Librarian-Faculty Part-
nership" at U a.m.
Session D will begin
at 1 p.m. with Dr.
Oscar Moore (Business
Dept.) as chairperson,
Mr. Edward Reep, pro-
fessor and artist in
residence, will speak at
1 p.m. on the "Quality
and Teaching Effec-
tiveness in the Profes-
sional Schools; Em-
plementary GoalsA" at phasis upon the Age-
3 p.m.
The evening session
will be held in
Mendenhall Student
Center, room 244, with
Vice Chancellor Maier
as session chairperson.
At 7 p.m Dr. Ray-
mond H. Dawson will
speak on "The Quality
Academic Programs:
Perspectives of the
General Administra-
tion and the Board of
Governors There will
be a reception in honor English,
of Dr. Dawson at the
home of Chancellor
and Mrs. Thomas
Brewer at 8 p.m.
On Thursday, Feb.
21, Dr. Fred
Broadhurst
(Technology) will chair
session C. Vice
Chancellor Maier will
speak on "The Facul-
ty's Role in Developing
Quality University
Education" at 9:30
a.m. Dr. Raymond
Martinez, professor of
health, physical educa-
tion, recreation and
safety; and Mrs. Janet
Experience Factor of
Teacher and Student
The symposium will
conclude after the 2
p.m. session by Dr.
James R. Wright. He
will speak on t�
"Quality in Language
Development'
Challenges and Pro-
blems Dr. Wright is
an associate professor
in the department of
mm
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The Ease Carolinian
Serving the campus community
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Published every Tuesday and
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University, owned, operated, and
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SALEMBURG,
N.C. (AP) - Saudi
Arabia is looking at the
North Carolina Justice
Academy as a possible
!raining facility for the
country's newly formed
highway patrol.
Other training sites
under consideration are
in Texas and Missouri,
Perry Powell, director
of the 6-year-old
criminal justice training
institute, said Wednes-
day.
State Attorney
General Rufus Ed-
misien, who as head of
the Justice Department
would make the final
decision on whether to
provide the training,
said it was an honor for
North Carolina to be
considered.
But he said, "the on-
ly way I would agree
for us to do the training
would be if it did not in
any manner whatsoever
diminish North
Carolina's efforts for
its own criminal justice
personnel and if it br-
ings us some concrete
monetary benefits.
"We haven't talked
figures, but it is my
understanding we
would be making North
Carolina some
money Edmiston
said.
There have been
discussions about the
Saudis providing equip-
ment to a new building
at the academy as part
of ihe payment for the
training, Edmisien
said.
The project is pan of
a planned S900 million
program by the Saudis
to develop, train and
equip a patrol similar
to those in the United
States, Powell said.
Besides training the
patrolmen, the state
would be responsible
for English language
lessons and cultural
trips.
The academy was
contacted last year by
Sanders Associates, a
consulting firm in
Nashua, N.H that is
handling the training
program for the Saudi
government, Powell
said. The firm's
representatives -visited
the academy in January
and have given a report
to Saudi officials,
Powell said.
The training is not
expected to begin
before late this year.
Patronize The East Carolinian Advertisers
ABORTION
The decision may well be difficult. . .
but the abortion itself doesn'thave to be.
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Oprj,
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comment on his deci-
sion. UNC officials in
Chapel Hill also refus-
ed comment.
Proudly Presents
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Coming March 5fti and 6th
HANK WILLIAMS Jr.





3Uf lEaat (Earfllttrian
Serving the campus community for 54 years.
Marc Barnes,
Diane Henderson, Mm�mn
Robert M. Swaim, am Richard Green, � m
Chris Lichok, ��� ttm� Charles Chandler, sp
Terry Gray, w �,�r Karen Wendt, mm-
TUESDAY. FEBRUARY 19, 1980
PACE 4
7Vi.s Newspaper's Opinion
Values Are Needed
Don't open that door, unless you
know who's behind it.
These are crtain words for an
uncertain age.
Several young women, some of
them students here, reportedly have
been ripped off by two men, whom
the police and others have dubbed
the "Kissing Bandits
According to police reports, the
men would approach a woman
ostensibly to sell magazine subscrip-
tions. The subscriptions were
allegedly a cover to get personal
checks written to the two men. The
magazines, of course, would never
arrive.
It is a sad commentary on our
times when we cannot trust the door
to door salesman. This is an area of
American life that is steeped in
tradition. Salesmen of the past have
offered products and services with a
good deal of convenience. The
American homemaker of years ago
was able to do a good part of her
shopping without ever having to
leave her front door.
We are less spontaneous than we
used to be. There was a time not too
long ago that anyone and everyone
was welcomed into the American
home. It was taken for granted that
strangers only wanted to use the
phone or sell a vacuum cleaner.
Nowadays, we lock our doors tight
and hope that no one will try to get
in.
This is too bad because students
and other people of limited income
still earn extra money by selling en-
cyclopedias, garden seeds and even
magazine subscriptions.
News stories about the men who
were recently arrested make us wary
to let anyone in the door. Perhaps a
college student who really does need
the money is standing on your front
porch. Whether or not you let him
in will probably be tempered by
what you have heard.
We have been told not to get in-
volved. This lack of involvement
sometimes surfaces in newspaper
stories, such as the one several years
ago about how a motorcyclist lay
critically injured on the side of the
road near Raleigh for several hours
before someone stopped to help
him. Hundreds of cars went by, but
they evidently all assumed that
"someone else will take care of it
This lack of involvement is pro-
bably caused by such things as
newspaper accounts of things like
the "Kissing Bandits Trust is lost
to our society and with good reason
if people believe what they read in
the papers.
The truth of the matter is that the
world has changed, and somewhere
along the line, our values took a
wrong turn. A national trend has
developed in this country which im-
plies that money is the only thing
that has value, and if you have to
steal to get it, well, that's okay.
The obvious solution would be to
impose strict criminal penalties on
those who break the law in terms of
cheating people. This would,
however, only fill an already crowd-
ed penal system to the breaking
point.
What we truly need in this coun-
try is to find some way to teach our
children that money, and the ac-
quisition of it, is not the most im-
portant thing in the world. We have
to make them understand that
humans have importance and worth
and that we should help our fellow
man anywhere and anyway we can.
It may be an idealistic thought,
but if we can accomplish a retrain-
ing of values, there will be less
likelihood of events such as those
surrounding the recent visit of the
"Kissing Bandits" in the future.
We all might just sleep a little
easier.
How It Gets Done
t
By MARC BARNES
Senior Editor
This is my first attempt at writing a col-
umn. I hope students will bear with me, as I
am not altogether sure about what 1 am do-
ing � a fact which will, no doubt, become
painfully obvious to those of us who know
more about column writing than I do.
The East Carolinian is often
misunderstood, and it is too often the fault
of the people who work here. We have the
responsibility, therefore, to explain to the
students what they can and cannot expect
from their student newspaper.
Let's say you are a student from the
Future Basket-weavers of America. You
are interested in your organization, and
you have been appointed chairman of
publicity for it.
You approach The East Carolinian of-
fice, figuring that since you are a student,
and this is a student newspaper, you should
have a story written and run specifically for
your event. You probably expect the better
part of the front page. You certainly expect
a picture.
If it's not interesting to a wide segment
of students, you may find that your story
will be relegated to the "Announcements"
section.
You may notice that some student
groups always get a lot of publicity. A good
example of this is the Student Union.
The Student Union receives more
coverage because it is for ALL students. A
campus group whose activities are for all
students will receive more publicity than
more exclusive groups.
We have a space problem like all
newspapers. We have been leaning heavily
on our advertising department to sell more
ads to help support operations.
We are deliberately trying to keep from
using any student fees in the production of
The East Carolinian. At present we are
about 70 percent self-supporting. In the
next year or so, we hope to become totally
self-supporting, which means that student
fees will be returned to the student body.
This might mean that there will be more
movies. It might mean another concert or
two. It might mean funding to buy
albumns for the new radio .station. The
money that would have gone to the student
newspaper will be returned to students for
other purposes. But you might have to put
up with having a few more advertisements
in your newspaper.
With less space, therefore, we have to be
careful about what we print, and how
much of it we print. We can now only af-
ford to print those things that we think are
the most important.
Our belief is that we should pull our
share of the load. We cannot very well con-
demn financial irresponsibility and suggest
that other groups raise money when we do
not do it ourselves. We believe that we
should support ourselves.
Some people say that we have something
against the SGA. This is not so. We love
the SGA. They provide us with a lot of our
brighter moments.
Seriously, we have been accused of runn-
ing down the Student Transit System, the
legislature, and even President Brett
Melvin himself.
We don't have anything personal against
anyone over in the Exalted Halls of SGA.
By each news article and editorial we do,
we are merely trying our best to tell the
students what is going on With their govern-
ment.
This is good for two reasons. First, it is
good because the members of SGA know
that the campus newspaper is active in
reporting everything that happens. This
means that better government is possible,
due at least in part to our efforts.
Secondly, the same way the SGA trains
its members to be responsible citizens, this
newspaper trains its reporters to be respon-
sible journalists. News stories which center
on coverage of the SGA are invaluable in
teaching young newspeople how to deal
with government officials. Their dealings
with a student government president now
will help them learn how to deal with the
major of a city later.
If you have waded through this copy (as
it is called), ! hope that you have a clearer
understanding about what we do and how
we do it. We Have made, and will continue
to make, a serious effort to get better and
� better.
With your help, we can make it.
I promise to get better at writing col-
umns.
V.V
'�!����" 'OvX
I DONT CARE IF f ANNIN& CENTERS ARE DANGEROUS AS
LONG AS J LOOK BEAUTIFUL
3
Letters To The Editor
'Brian' Still Getting Reviews
To the Editor:
I missed the editorial, "See For
Yourself" which Mr. Hudson ranted
about in his letter of February 12.
First, let me say that I agree with much
of what Mr. Hudson says; we don't have
to experience each and every thing in life
to be qualified to comment upon them.
On the other hand, we need to exercise
considerable caution in relying on the
word of others who report to us about
what they have seen. One good example
of this is the rabid criticisms of a recent
state law, called by some, the "New
Generation Health Bill Articles and let-
ters appearing in the newspapers led me to
suspect our legislators had lost their
minds and were going to invade our
homes, snatch up our children and hustle
them off to state-run "homes" where
they would be ruined forever.
I called Raleigh and got a copy of the
law. It is tame and well-intended. Really.
. Another thing I have learned along the
way is to try not to be intimidated every
time someone gets irate on behalf of
Jesus, or God, or whatever particular dei-
ty.
I didn't see "Life of Brian" and I
doubt I missed anything of great conse-
quence. But whether 1 saw it and hated it,
missed it and loved it, or saw it and loved
it, you still have your right to freedom of
speech and opinion.
I believe in God and in Christ; I also
believe it's serious business to make fun
of God. It's equally serious for me to
judge you and put you down because, for
better of worse, we are his creation. Then,
too, I think He is better qualified, having
had a lot more time to observe us and hav-
ing lived, loved and died for us.
The Ayatollah believed he was dead
right in executing several hundreds of Ira-
nians. Beware of a state-run church or a
church-run state!
William C. Byrd
Professor
Department of Community Health
To the Editor:
I was very much offended by an article
in the February 5th East Carolinian,
which defended "Life of Brian" and cut
down many Christians.
You say that this film is not
blasphemous, but then you state that the
film has certain Biblical parallels. This is
enough proof to me that this film is
blasphemous. Maybe the movie's purpose
was not to criticize the life of Christ, but
anything that takes Biblical passages out
of context goes against the very nature of
the Gospel of Christ. The Scripture says
that Jesus Christ is "the Way, the Truth,
and the Life John 14:6. There is no
such thing as a parallel to truth.
Also, I was very much offended by
your caricature of Jesus Christ
represented by Graham Chapman. Talk
about blasphemy! Webeter's states that
blasphemy is "the act of showing con-
tempt or lack of reverence for God, or the
act of claiming the attributes of deity
Both of these definitions apply to this pic-
ture. Not only does the picture take the
scripture in Luke 23:34 out of context,
but it portrays Brian as Christ.
You say that "it is wrong to judge
something that you have not experienced
yourself. Have you experienced the
abundant life promised to us through the
death and resurrection of Jesus Christ? In
John 10:9-11 Jesus States:
I am the door; if anyone enters through
Me, he shall be saved, and shall go in
and out, and find pasture. The thief
comes only to steal, and kill, and
destroy; I came that they might have
life, and might have it abundantly, i
am the good shepherd; the
shepherd lays down His life for the
sheep.
1 hope you will take this into considera-
tion.
Marv Jack Hinnant
EC Is Pro Carter
To the Editor:
This letter has been a long time coming.
1 find it somewhat disturbing that sup-
posedly litera te, intelligent college
students can suffer from being plagued
with a ten year old mentality, if you will
pardon the pun. Last Thursday's editorial
cartoon was the straw that broke prover-
bial camel's back, for nor only was it
somewhat misinformed, it seemed to be
this newspaper's intent to jump on the
political bandwagon by kicking a man
when he is down.
I, better than many, realize that the
purpose of the editorial page is to present
ideas and opinions about current events,
and that it is perfectly within the
legitimate bounds of journalism for a
newspaper to support a candidate for
president. It is also the responsibility of
the press to try and present both sides of
an issue, and that is where I feel that this
newspaper is falling down on the job. The
East Carolinian has been so blatantly pro-
Carter that I have been tempted to step
from the music page and attempt to offer
some objectivity to the editorial page by
presenting my highly subjective appraisal.
It is very easy to take some dirt from so-
meone's past, put it under a magnifying
glass and blow it up into a boulder. This is
the crux of the issue, for if we are going to
assault Kennedy, let us at least do it with a
degree of intelligence by debating on ma-
jor issues, and not by capitalizing on an
issue that does not relate directly to the
crises that confront us as Americans.
Twice, recently, there have been stories
accentuating the issue of Chappaquid-
dick, and last Thursday there was an
editorial cartoon that was at the least bit a
premature and at the worst very poor
taste. There is an old saying "If you can
not befuddle them with brilliance, baffle
them with bullshit Is this responsible
journalism?
Truly, the incident at Chappaquiddick
was a tragedy, and there is no justification
for such. The foundation of our country's
morals states "Let he who is without sin
cast the first stone
It would be all too easy for me to list
the mistakes that Carter has made during
his tenure as president (?), but then I
would be no better than those I accuse
The logical thing seems to be to debate the
issues on intellectual terms, and not on
emotional ones. The main issue seems to
be one s ability to steer the country on the
right track, and what is at stake is the lives
of millions and the future of the country
Let us learn from the past, and not delve
m it, and concentrate on our future That
is where the challenge lies!
Patrick Minges
Cheering Helps
To the Editor:
Phis is in response to "Crowd Miim �
Confused people tend to contradict
themselves a lot! You said it sourstff
order to help encourage the team, more
students need to come to the games. More
noise has to be generated cutty the
students can do this The din&m
are doing their damsest to$� ifadr mn kt
the sports program at K I I
the countless hours ot pru:tia
individual studies, I know foi
they hae gone wav out ot lh
at as many events as possibk idinc
swim meets and girls basketba
just to mention a few;
straight boys!
Yes, the siudents muM do the
but the cheerleaders can'
miracles.
rei !) Sn
Pirate Pride
To the Editor:
I am getting reports on EC! I
basketball and I've never beet
the fine Pirate players I kecr.
posted outside my door on a injep
People up here are very imprct
the Purple and Gold.
Everyone that can shoulc : m
see Pirate Basketball. Don't rr abou
the view you have: the won
Minges is better than at leas; 12,00
at Indiana.
f-nc S n ilfiaoK
-Xiurnni
Btoomington, IN
Adopt A Roach Today
To the Editor:
I read with some dismay your article
"Guide to Roaches The author seems
to want to portray roaches as a dangerous
nemesis to Homo Sapiens. Not so M
family and 1 adopted a strav roach back in
1973.
Omar, as we affectionately called the
arthropod, promptly grew fond of us and
chased all of the roaches, dogs and small
children off of our property. Loyal hi'
cuss!
He was still at pup at 263 pound
(incidentally, the heaviest recorded roach.
domestic or wild, was 672 lbs (Montv
Python's Book of Lies) not 12 tons).
He was a playful pet, chewing up all
our D-con cans, and we could teach him
to retrieve things; logs, Toyotas and such
And if ever our car would not start, well.
Omar could do a cruel 72 on the high�a
or in town.
He only had one serious problem. He
enjoyed munching out on 50-lb. bags of
Purina dog chow. Whenever he got tired
of that, he would just wander in and steal
some sugar and beer. Fortunately, he lik-
ed the cheap brews. Once a roach Still.
he was a great pet and friend, and Til
never forget Win.
Please, after this, I wish some of your
articles could be more sympathetic
towards these creatures that hey that
HEY! Cut it out with the eggs! Agh
Larry Graham
Letters To The Editor
The East Carolinian welcomes letter
expressing ell points of view. MaH or drop
them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from the library.
Letters to the editor must include the
name, address, phone number and
signature of the authorfsj anq must be
typed, double spaced, or treat tv muted.
Letters should be limited to three
typewritten, dmhle-spaceit pages. All let-
� �r subject to ettiting for hrexitv.
obcemiiy ami met. letters bv the same
mtimv to �we each M davx.
u�1 wMma bejH-rmimtt
��ff of authors wiit be withhehl oalr
X8" ' � -itlauM- the
M� �vt kmmmr. drug
�� � -f he wirMvtd tmh
-nmeM�





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
HI-BRl RY l�. I�M( l�;�j:c 5
Klansman Has
Faith In Students
Bv JOAN CUCCIO
(PS VAriler
NORMAN, OK (CPS) � John
Clary looks just like any other col-
lege student in Oklahoma. The
20 year-old dresses casually in
I evi's and t-shins, and prefers to
wear his cowboy hat in the house.
He's not a bad student, either. As a
political science major at Oscar
Rose Junior College, he earns A's
and B's.
But sometimes, he says in an ac-
cent that's west of Georgia but
definitely east of California, people
gie him trouble. They stop him in
grocery stores and shopping centers
to question him, jeer at him, and �
from time to time � compliment
him.
The reason is that Clary is state
recruiter for the Knights of the Ku
Klux Klan. His organization, based
in Denham Springs, La under the
direction of Imperial Wizard Bill
Wilkinson, is one of about 15
groups that call themselves the
Klan.
It's the group, moreover, that has
begun a revival campaign in part
aimed at college students. Clary, it
turns out, claims to be adept at
recruiting. His knack for publicity is
uncontestable. Beginning with a
dramatic announcement last Oc-
tober of a new recruitment drive to
"make a conservative move into the
political arena he was making
headway even before a January con-
frontation between blacks and
whites in Idabel, Ok raised ten-
sions to a new peak in the state.
Since then Cleary has become the
center of renewed interest in the
Klan, and the target of a number of
anti-Klan campus demonstrations at
the University of Oklahoma.
The protests were against Clary
moving his recruiting sights onto the
campus. Most of his attention had
been on recruiting members for the
Klan Youth Corps, a sort of junior
Klan for 10-to- 17-year-olds from
high schools. He claims "more than
20 but less than 100" have joined
the Klan Youth Corps chapters at
six Oklahoma City high schools.
Response on colelge campuses has
been "about what I expected
Now his movement will increas-
ingly center on college campuses, he
says, because "the Klan is looking
for educated people.
"Those who don't have an educa-
tion won't understand the issues.
An educated person is more able to
relate to the problems of affirmative
action and forced busing he ex-
plains.
He adds, "I consider myself an
educated person
He believes campuses will prove a
fertile recruiting ground, and plans
to step up efforts there. The reac-
tion so far has been generally
"fair he says.
Specifically, "I've received
favorable response from the Univer-
sity of Oklahoma
OU Student Association officials,
however, can't find evidence of
favorable response.
"I don't sense any interest in the
Klan Richard Wintory, student
association president, observes.
In fact, he terms the turnout of
300 students at a January anti-Klan
rally "astounding" for a "generally
apathetic" student body.
"I think that if a serious attempt
to organize (the Klan) were made on
this campus, the reaction would be
violent, hostile and strong he
adds.
Although OU students are "less
stridently conservative" than
students on other state campuses,
Wintory doesn't think Clary will
have any better luck elsewhere.
"The students are more
educated he says. "Madmen,
fools and children � that's what the
Klan is aiming for
Officials at Oklahoma State
doubt they'll find them there.
OSU student government Presi-
dent Lyndon taylor dismisses the
Klan threat on campus as minimal.
"Nobody's really worried about it.
The Klan doesn't have much of a
chance at this university. Nothing
will happen
John George, a Central State
University professor in political
science and sociology as well as an
expert in extremist groups, isn't tak-
ing the Klan too seriously, either.
The organization, he predicts,
"will find the greatest sympathy in
rural areas, less in urban areas, and
even less on college campuses
The education level on campuses,
he explains, is too high for the
Klan's ideas to scale.
But Clary dismisses such pro-
gnoses as readily as his opponents
dismiss him.
Anti-Klan rallies around the state
have already accomplished one of
his goals, he says. The demonstra-
tions have significantly increased
the amount of interest in the Invisi-
ble Empire in the state, where tr�
Klan has been virtually nonexistent
for 50 years.
"People realize the race war is
getting closer, and it's time to join
the Klan he says. While protesters
shouted "Ban the Klan" at OU and
at the state capitol, Clary claims his
people were out recruiting more
followers.
He's also confident of gaining
support because of tne nature of the
people he says oppose him.
Civil rights groups, he says,
"dont have the number. People
aren't gonna put up with a lot of
communists and niggers and queers.
Oklahoma is the Bible Belt of the
nation
"Beware of a Holy Whore
This Wednesday's free flick
A Cinematic
A utobiography
The Student Union Films
Committee is presenting "Beware
of a Holy Whore directed by
Rainer Werner Fassbinder,
Wednesday night at 8:00 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student Center's
Hendrix Theater. The film is in
German with English subtitles.
Admission to the film is by
Mendenhall Student Center
Membership or student ID and
activity card.
"Beware of a Holy Whore" is
set in a seaside hotel where a
movie crew is residing while mak-
ing a film. It focuses on the group
as they pass their free time abus-
ing each other verbally and sex-
ually.
Fassbinder has painted an
autobiographical portrait of the
movie industry as it is seen
through the scandalous reports
which reach the Viewing public.
All of the characters are trying to
make themselves complete by
coming in contact with the "holy
whore" � the cinema.
Vincent Canby of the New
York Times called it "fascinating
it leaves the kind of wounds
one receives in a knife fight
"Beware of a Holy Whore" is
typical Fassbinder genre, and it
depicts the spirit of the director
himself. Fassbinder works at a
relentless pace � "What other
would call working fast, I call
working harder � eighteen hours
a day Working at this rate, he
has made some 30 films since
"Holy Whore" was released in
1970.
"Fassbinder, unlike Bergman
or Fellini, is not a masterpiece
director said Horizon. "You
have to acquire a taste for his
Teutonic pessimism and his
stylistic mix of earnestness and
campy aestheticism
Time slated that Fassbinder
"dares in different and equally
bold ways. Instead of seeking
stories in the strange and the ex-
otic, he Finds the strange and ex-
otic in stories he knows
Pot Law
May Ease
Penalties
EAST LANSING, MI (CPS) �
Even though Michigan State
University officials say they don't
look too closely at felony convic-
tions for marijuana use when con-
sidering applications for enroll-
ment, a Michigan Senator has in-
troduced a bill that would prevent
any Michigan university from deny-
ing entrance solely because of dope
convictions.
"Most felony convictions for
students involve marijuana com-
plains Michigan state Senator
William Sederberg (R-La-t Lans-
ing), sponsor of the bill. "This bill
will keep universities from using
that as a basis for denial
Sederberg, an active proponent of
marijuana decriminalization, told
the MSU Stale Sews that the bill is
part of a "piecemeal" approach to
decriminalization in Michigan.
But university officials, at least at
MSU, maintain that marijuana con-
victions are not much of a concern
to admissions officers.
"We have a special university
committee that reviews convic-
tions says Charles Sceley, MSU
admissions director. "The commit-
tee looks at the whole picture, in-
cluding the crime, the seriousness
and reports from the parole board. I
don't think if the bill were passed
there would be any change in our
procedures he added.
While he is concerned about
resistance in the Michigan House,
Sederberg says support for the bill
in the Senate is secure. He doesn't
think that jdecriminauxation will
cause a drug problem on campus.
"I don't think this bill is going to
encourage anyone to smoke, and I
don't think anyone believes that
he declared.
Music Evolved Into New Art Form
By PAT MINGES
It is a difficult task to accurately assess the previous
decade in music because music does not change abruptly
according to human time sequences. It is forever in the
developmental period, formulating and regenerating a
fresh new face, just when we had grown accustomed to
its old visage.
The music of a priod reflects the political and social
forces which were present during the time span, and
music in the 70s seemed to sooth the savage beast of an
America in transition. We emerged from the tumultous
60s, a time of strife and revolution, and turned our
search for meaning from more socially oriented goals to
those more personally satisfying.
The 70s were a time when the social forces which
usually guide our behavior began to break down, and
hedonistic maximumization of personal wealth began to
take prominenceAmerica became known as The
Culture of Narcissism (Christopher Lasch), and the
decade became known as the "me decade While the
60s offered us a glimpse of a perfect world, the 70s
showed us our personal Hades. Those who resisted the
trend towards compromise for private gains and stood
up for the integrity of themselves and their music, were
the ones who ultimately emerged from the decade in
triumph.
The biggest temptation toward self sacrifice came
from the takeover of the recording industry by the
multi-national conglomerates which dominate the
political and social scenes of the United States. The
primary impetus of these organizations was to market
musical endeavors the same way they sell anti-perspirant
or hair spray. Stars were pressed to produce a smoothly
saleable commercial item where artistic freedom took a
subordinate role to the potential for appeal to
mainstream America.
The recording companies and FM radio stations
worked hand-in-hand to influence the tastes of succepti-
ble individuals into purchasing albums by artists which
the companies favored. If you did not produce
mainstream music, you were not substantially backed
and promoted, and if you did not sell according to com-
pany guidelines, you were canned. This is evident when
looking at albums � they are packed with popular hits,
even before the discs are released.
This mainstream or commercial outlook on music by
the recording industry very seriously affected all types
of music, from pop, through soul and rock, even to
predominantly self-sufficient jazz. Soul music was the
most seriously compromised because of popular music
that came to be known as disco, but popular music was
also dominated by this particular foot-swishing appeal.
Out of the soft rock sounds of the early 70s (America,
Bread, J.T Loggins and Messina, and Ronstadt) came
the multi-tracking and studio sophistication that was to
give birth to disco, which first emerged in the mid 70s.
From the early disco funk sounds of Kool and the Gang
and Ohio Players came the more sophisticated swing of
"The Hustle" (Van McCov) and "Love Theme" (Barry
White), and finally culminated with Donna Summer's
"Love To Love You, Baby" and the very sophisticated
"When Will I See You Again?" by the Three Degrees.
The movement catapulted to national prominence with
The Bee Gee's Saturday Night Fever, but has waned
toward the end of the 70s.
Rock in the 70s endured, though some have said it is
on its last legs. The genre is starting to come back strong
with the primal sounds that are emerging within the new
wave. The corporate influence is evidenced within
groups such as the Eagles, The Knack, The Cars,
Foreigner, Kansas, and Firefall. All represent
mainstream-ism and the advanced musical marketing
that became the watchword of the recording industry of
the seventies.
Ask Frank Zappa about the corporate control over
most of rock � from the soft rock sounds of the early
70s, to the almost total domination of the market by the
dinosaur rock groups toward the turn of the decade.
Those groups and individuals who have resisted the
temptation towards commercialization of rock have laid
the foundation for musical growth in the 80s.
Jazz, which has traditionally been anti-mainstream,
has even succumbed to the clasp of commercial hands,
and has for the large part, at least recording-wise, been
reduced to little more than anotner form of FM
melodrama. Truly, there is still traditional jazz being
recorded, largely on Warner Brothers and ECM labels,
but the market is dominated by such saccharin-flavored
Muzak as Bob James, Chuck Mangione, Tom Scott,
Maynard Ferguson, and the Crusaders.
The corporate jazz influence also took control over
fusion jazz and reduced what was once a powerful and
vital force to so much more stuff that would please your
high school football coach. Chick and Herbie bit the
hullet as did John Klemmer, Billy Cobham, George
Duke and almost Weather Report. Artists like the Art
Ensemble of Chicago, Trio of Doom, Lester Bowie, An
thonv Braxton, Chico Freeman, David Murray, McCoy
Tyner, and New Directions made progressive jazz a
reality.
As around them fell numerous former stars who
sacrificed their art for the lure of the comercial dollar,
many resisted the cries of the sirens of Circe (Hollywood
sound) and lashed themselves to the mast of their per-
sonal ideas about the true role of music in modern socie-
ty. These were the survivors, those who produced music
of enduring quality, full of streef wise toughness, yet
revealed the battered persona of individuals attempting
to cope with an increasingly complex world. Perhaps the
most representative concept of the 70s is the fascination
and glorification (sometimes bordering on self mockery)
of the ego, surviving even in irony the temptation of
material wealth, for satisfaction must be derived from
within.
There were many general categories of musk that
sprung up out of the previous decade that bonded
together individuals who revolted against the selling of
their art. In black music, almost the antithesis of the
See SEVENTIES Page 6, Col. 1
grace �pfi�f�tee
1t Cfckag� Aft Essembie





I ST("ROI INIW
I I HKl KN y. 1MS0
f
Recital Was ' 'Pure Enjoyment

Help Prevent Illness
19S0 March of Dimes
SIKPHAMKK.
MM.I KR
Mail Uniir
It your Valentine's
Da lacked passion and
emotionally charged
episodes, you have no
one to blame bul
yourself. Paul I ardif, a
member of the piano
faculty in the School of
Musk at Easi Carolina,
presented an evening o
pure enjoyment in A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall
Thursday, Feb. 14.
lardit opened with
Meet Inn en's Sonata in
I) Minor Op. 31, No. 2
("Tempest"), a piece
that exhibits many of
the bridging
characteristics w hich
foreshadow the
Romantic period. I he
slow, hesitant introduc-
tion interspersed with
rapid allegro snatches
immediately puts the
listener on guard. Tar-
dif's rendering of the
work was phenomenal.
The exhilaration of
watching and hearing a
master performance
cannot be related to
anyone who was not
present; such was the
case with Tardif's con-
cert. It was clean, crisp
and correct: the largos
were largo; the Allegros
were allegro, and the
Allegretto was indeed
allegretto.
Selections from
Ravel's "Miroirs"
followed: "Oiseaux
rristes" (Sad Birds),
" A I b a r a d a del
gracioso" (Morning
Dance of the Jester)
and "La Vallee des
cloches" (Vallev o
Bells).
"Oiseaux Tristes"
contains reproductions
of actual bird calls and
employs them as major
features in the piece.
44 A1 borada del
gracioso" utilizes the
Spanish flavor of which
French composers were
so fond. It contains
guitar imitation and
obvious dance rhythm.
Ravel says "La
Vallee des cloches" was
inspired by the many
church bells which toll
in Paris each day at
noon.
The most impressive
o these pieces could
likely be "Oiseaux
Tristes
1 he entire evening
had a warm and infor-
mal parlor atmosphere,
personified in the artist
himself. Paul lardit
holds degrees from
Eastman School ol
Music, Peabody Con-
servatory and an Ar-
tist's Diploma from the
Mo.arteum.
Seventies Show Changes
Continued from Page I
smooth, refined, com-
mercial sound that
epidomied disco was
created b those who
went back to the basic
dt iv iii i hv thnis. lames
Mi own invented funk
and developed it into
almost a line art that
w as large unap
preeiated. funk was
picked up on by Sly
Stone, who influenced
eat Iv 70s groups such as
kool and the Gang and
mio Players. Herbie
Hancock attempted to
revitalize a career by
mixing jazz and funk,
but ii was George C'lin-
Album
Review
I he weekly feature
"cw Album Releases'
will not appear this
, eek due to cir-
cumstances beyond our
control. I he column
should return in the
I ebruarv 26 issue ol
he I asiarolinian
ton and Parliament
who really brought
lunk to its apex. It is
the most vital force to
emerge out o black
music in recent years.
Funk music's white
cousin sprung out of
the working class bars
in the major
metropolitan areas of
the United States and
the United Kingdom.
Punk was primarily a
revolt against the
superficial, commercial
music and elaborate
facades that
characterized the
mid-70s appeal.
Punk rock bcame a
revolting phenomenon.
CAMPUS FM RADIO
STATION MEETING
There will be a
meeting of all persons
intrested in working
for the campus FM
radio station, on
Thursday evening at
6:00 sharp, second
floor of Old Joyner.
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and that was the theme
of its musical form.
Punk takes roek 'n' roll
to its limits, both in
musieal appeal and in
social affirmation.
Disgust breeds disgust.
at
ARMY NAVY STORE
Backpacks, BIS, Bomber,
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Peace Corps
A WORLD OF OPPORTUNITY
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
11 imi rn. ts. wxo
Pa�c 7
Pirates Downed By Seahawks, 71-62
ECU's Frank Hobson (L) and Mike Gibson (R) battle for rebound
Photo by KIP SLOAN
By C H ARLES CH ANDLER
Sporls r dilor
WILMINGTON UNC-
Wilmington jumped ahead early
and fought off a late Fast Carolina
rally to defeat the Pirates 71-62 last
Saturday night.
According to Pirate coach Dave
Odom, ECU plaved a very
lackadaisical first half.
"In the first half, we just played
uninspired Odom said. "I must
admit that I was very surprised. 1
thought we would have been
ready
The Pirates' unreadiness was
capitalized upon to the maximum by
a very "ready" UNC-YV club.
"They had us scouted well noted
Odom. "They changed defenses
each and every time we came down
the floor. That really confused us
The changing defense and a pa-
tient offense propelled the
Seahawks to a quick 28-14 lead and
10 an eventual 34-22 edge at
halftime.
Things began in the second half
much as they had ended in the first
as the Seahawks held the Pirates lo
but three points in a six-minute span
to take a commanding 44-27 lead
with 14:21 left in the contest.
ECU then began to settle down
and literally exchanged baskets with
the Seahawks for the next ten
minutes.
Down 62-48 with three minutes
remaining, FCU made a ferocious
run at their opponents. A pressing
defense cut the lead to 62-56 with
1:30 left in the game.
It was then that the Pirates fell
prey to tneir most feared enemy this
seasontheir own foul shooting.
ECU missed five of its last six free
throws while the Seahawks canned
the crucial ones en route to the 71-62
victory.
"We dug ourselves a hole in the
first hall Odom said. "We were
almost lethargic at first but I was
proud of our effort in the second
half when we showed renewed deter-
mination.
"We made a game of it he con-
tinued, "and could have won it. Of
course the missed free throws at the
end hurt us again
Pacing the Monarchs to victory
was the double-figure scoring ot
four starters. Dannv Davis led the
way with 17. John Haskins chipped
in 15, Ciarrv Cooper 14 and Barry
Taylor 12.
Only two Pirate finished in dou-
ble figures. Herb Krusen tallied 18
and Cicorgc Mavnor 10.
The Pirates, now 14-10, faces a
difficult task this week as thev must
travel to Norfolk, Va. lo take on
Old Dominion, a team with a 20-4
record and post-season play ahead
The Monarchs are led hv the for-
ward tandem of 6-7 senior Ronnie
Valentine and 6-6 sophomore Ron
nie McAdoo. They average 18.8
and 12.8 points per game, respec-
tively.
Though Valentine and Mc doo
are the big guns for ODU, the thing
that Odom fears most about the
Monarchs is pressure from the
guards.
"In our last game with them (a
70-65 ODU win) thev really tired
our guards out he said. 'Tony
Byles (6-3 ECU point guard) was
literally whipped after the game.
We must keep fresh people in the
game at all times at guard this
time
Gminski, King, Whitney To Make All-ACC?
Though this is the land o' the In-
dependent East Carolina Pirates,
there sri looms in the air constant
discussions of Atlantic Coast Con-
ference basketball.
Year in and year out the ACC has
proven to be perhaps the toughest of
all the nation's conferences. Each
year the quality of players seems to
improve.
Also each year there must be
chosen an All-ACC team. And, of
course, each year many worthy
players are left off this all-star cast.
This vear is no different. Choos-
ing an All-ACC team for the
1979-80 season is a task that most
writers who are asked by the con-
ference to decide dread, as criticism
o the final selections is surely to
come.
Everyone, though, must take a
stand. This column has decided to
do just that.
The all-conference team this
season will be selected on the basis
of the top five players, period,
rather than the top five by position,
lust think of all the players eligi-
ble. Duke center Mike Gminski will
surely be named to the first team, as
will Maryland forward Albert King.
Another sure bet should be N.C.
State's Charles "Hawkeye"
Whitney.
After this, though, the players
become a bit more difficult to
distinguish. The two final first team
spots should come from between the
foursome of North Carolina for-
Charles
Chandler
ward Mike O'Koren, Virginia guard
Jeff lamp, Cavalier center and
freshman sensation Ralph Samp-
son, and Duke forward Gene
Banks.
Which two of these four will ac-
tually make the first team is
anyone's guess. Another guy not to
be counted out in the running for
the first team is UNC's Al Wood.
The Gray, Ga. native has not
received the publicity he got last
vear, but only because everyone has
become accustomed to his super
outside shot.
That's eight players. Two more
to go, right?
Easy. One of them has to be the
remarkable Buck Williams. The 6-8
Maryland center is possibly the best
center in the league, but has only a
limited chance of being named to
the first team because of Gminski's
reputation.
The tenth player on this All-ACC
team is Clemson guard Billy
Williams. This Raleigh native is
averaging over 19 points per game
against ACC competition and has
been simply the best pure guard in
the conference (Lamp is actually a
true forward).
These ten should be the guys that
make up the all-conference team,
but there are others that could sneak
in.
Maryland's Ernest Graham and
Greg Manning could make it as
could Clemson center Larry Nance,
Georgia Tech's Brooke Steppe and
Lenny Horton, and Virginia's Lee
Raker.
An injurv that occured several
weeks to UNC's James Worthy
prevented the All-ACC team from
having two freshmen as members.
The Gastonia native was no doubt
among the top ten players in the
conference before a leg injury crip-
pled him for the season.
So there it is, the All-ACC team.
Gminski, King, Whitney, O'Koren,
Banks, Sampson, Lamp, Wood and
the Williams .boys. Buck and Bills.
Remember, though, the names
are in no particular order. We'll
leave lha up to the guys who have
no choice'but to narrow them down.
When they do, they surely will
"catch it" from all angles.
Oliver Mack, ex-ECU great, was
recently traded by the Los Angelas
Lakers to the Chicago Bulls. Mack
must like the move because he is
sure to get more playing time now
that he has left the loaded Lakers.
This is already evident as the 6-3
Queens, N.Y. native scored an NB
career high eight points in a Sunday
same with Indiana.
Blown Out A t State
Lady Pirates Dump WCU
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Kdilor
After being up by 25 points with
less than five minutes elapsed in the
second half, the ECU women's
basketball team outlasted stubborn
Western Carolina 82-63 in the
Pirates' final home game of the
season.
ECU jumped ahead 24-12 in the
first 10 minutes before the Cata-
mounts could establish an offensive
scheme. Rosie Thompson provided
10 points in that spurt, finishing the
contest with 19 points and a game-
high 10 rebounds.
Western Carolina fell behind
66-43 midway the final half, but us-
ed hot outside shooting from Beth
Crisp and Glenda Harris to cut the
margin to 10 with 3:30 remaining.
ECU coach Cathy Andreuzzi
returned her starters, and the
Pirates rode Lydia Rountree's 12 se-
cond half points to their 18th win in
27 outings. Rountree tallied 18
points in the game.
Forward Kathy Riley pumped in
14 points and hauled down eight re
di Saltz contributed 16 and Harris
14. Western Carolina drops to 14-12
with the loss.
"We played a great transition
game on defense said Andruzzi.
"1 think we caused about 10 tur-
novers in our halfcourt zone press. I
think maybe in the second half we
weren't as intense on defense as we
were in the first.
"1 don't care what combination
was in there, I think we had good
movement and team work
bounds while guard Laurie Sikes ad-
ded 10 points and seven assists. Western Carolina (63): Fox 2,
Crisp was the game's leading Crisp 22, Hams 14, Barker 4 Saltz
scorer with 22, while teammate Cin- 16, Thompson, Curtis 2, Kasch,
Lady Pirates Win, Finish 19-9
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Kdilor
Forward Kathy Riley bucketed cent.
16 and freshman Mary Denkler ad- ECU coach Cathy Andruzzi
u i lAMQRtiRr, VA - The ded 12. Each grabbed eight �e- capitalized on the opportunity for
WILLIAMbBUKO, va bounds as the Pirates dominated the her freshman to gam experience,
Lady P�rat� of If"1 �wohna K �-38. with much of the second half handl-
ed out their 1979-80 campaign wun a . combirtations
a 79-59 romp er William and Nwcy b
Mar7,� Th itd 10 4 less unan Holder contributed 13. ly said Andruzzi. "We knew a
flt Point uard LauHe SikCS Win imPOrtant SO,ng t0 lHC
retaliated with 13
points as the Indians y.�- � second as she picked up her
momentum collated. h b managed to dish off
,SSS SSS HCr nati�naUy
the purple and gold provide"I9 ranked �a. �
first-half l�ml� � tJUdy But bJhmght 0Vf the season at the chari-
crursed to a 9'�J����25 ty stripe, connecting on each of nine
I hompson led �� orcJhdi�g tempts. William and Mary missed
po.nts, and claimed rebounding a a(eps for
honors with 11. ,
, Mine but Point guard Laurie Sikes was win was important going into the
'unanswered forced to the bench midway the first state tournament. We played a very
�c offensive half with three fouls and again in good defensive game, keeping them
IS uiiw�'v " . , ��i u I�.l ��� I ihA.mkl ijt hart a
under 60 points. I thought we had a
fine performance from Lillion
Barnes who came in for Laurie Sikes
when she got in foul trouble
William and Mary drops to 8-12
with the loss. The Lady Pirates open
competition in the N.C. AlAW
tournament Thursday in Chapel
Hill against Appalachian State.
Eichhorn 3. I
East Carolina (82): Thompson 19,
Riley 14, Girven 4, Sikes 10, Roun-
tree 18, Owen 1, Ranieri 2, Barnes,
Brayboy 3, Moody, Hooks 2,
Denkler 9.
Halftime: East Carolina 47,
Western Carolina 30.
yV.C. State 84
ECU 47
RALEIGH � Nationally ninth-
ranked N.C. State built to a
17-point lead midway through the
first half and continued to add
throughout the final stanza as it
pounded East Carolina's women
84-47 last Thursday at Reynolds
Coliseum.
Seniors Genia Beasley adn June
Doby set out early in the contest to
make their final appearance on their
home floor a memorable one, with
Beasley connecting on five of seven
in the first half and Doby five of
eight.
Beasley continued to capitalize on
her height advantage, finishing the
game 10 of 12 from the field with 21
points and seven assists. Doby saw
only limited action in the second
half due to foul trouble, but finish-
ed with 12 on the night.
The entire Wolfpack squad en-
joyed what Coach Kay Yow describ-
ed as one of its best shooting nights
of the season.
"Obviously the shooting percen-
tages show the difference in the
score Yow said. "We shot 54.8
percent and they only hit 27.6 per-
cent. They seemed to be forcing
shots �
p. bV KIP M OA
Lady Pirate forward Rosie Thompson
hollows up against mighty Half pack
V
f �r r r r r
, f ��
�� ��u-�m�n�,p�yiyM�� tyjrimrym





f
THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 19, I
980
IM Tourney
Set To Begit
By RICKI Gl IARMIS
Intramural Correspondent
The Intramural
basketball season has
reached its grand
finale, the playoffs!
Teams with records of
.500 or better are now
engaged in the divi-
sional playoffs.
The top teams from
these tournaments will
advance to the All-
Campus champion-
ships to be held later
this week.
As is true with every
playoff, the experts"
gather to predict the
top finishers. Accor-
ding to Fox's Fearless
Prognostication, in the
men's division, the
Various Artists will
come in first followed
by Joint 8, Belk
Stylons, Belk Pleasers,
and Kappa Alpha
"A For the women,
the Tyler Misfits will
place first followed by
Tyler Trotters, Alpha
Xi Delta I, Rippers,
and Alpha Delta Pi.
Frazier's Forecast
places Belk Pleasers on
the top followed by
Super Eight, Various
Artists, No Names and
Joint Eight. The Tyler
Misfits are also rated
number one in Frazier's
poll followed by Alpha
Xi Delta I, Tyler Trot-
ters, Rippers and Alpha
Delta Pi.
All we can do is wait
and watch and wish
good luck to all teams
participating in the
basketball playoffs.
Softball
A unique opportuni-
ty to find out what your
team looks like before
the season starts will be
offered in the form of a
Pre-season Softball
Tournament.
A small entry fee of
five dollars per team to
cover umpires and balls
will be charged for the
weekend tourney.
32 men's teams and
16 women's teams will
be accepted on a first
come, first serve basis,
with entries opening
February 25.
tries for innertube
water polo has been ex-
tended until Wednes-
day, Feb. 20. The Team
Captains' meeting will
be held Thursday, Feb.
21 at 4 p.m. in 104
Memorial Gym.
Innertube water polo
will be played by a team
of three girls and three
guys who will be seated
in innertubes. Scoring
will consist of throwing
a ball into a soccer-type
goal.
IM Council Meeting
The next Intramural
Council meeting is be-
ing held Thursday,
March 6 at 4 p.m. in
Room 104 Memorial
Gym. Teams, please
send a representative to
�his meeting.
Swim Meet
Don't forget the In-
tramural Swim Meet
coming up February
26. Entry deadline is
5:30 p.m. on the day of
the meet. Thirteen
events are planned in-
cluding medley relays,
t-shirt relays, and in-
nertube relays. Come
on over to Minges for
the swim meet.
Physical Fitness
The ECU Physical
Fitness Club will meet
March 3 at 8 p.m. The
meeting topic will be on
biking. Discussion will
center around bike
maintenance, bike
riding, bike camping,
and bike racing. Spr-
ingtime is coming.
Learn how to use an
energy efficient vehicle.
Come on over to
Memorial Gym, Room
104, Monday, March 3
at 8 p.m.
READ
A Special
RIBEYEor
CHOP STEAK
'64 ByPass�Greenville mmm . mm. .
FOR 2
PLUS ALL THE SALAD YOU CAN EAT
IS
13 3
Classified
FOR RENT PERSONAL
FEMALE ROOMMATE: needed
to share half rent and utilities on
two bedroom apartment three
blocks from campus. Call
753074.
RESPONSIBLE FEMALE
ROOMMATE: needed to share
two bedroom apartment at Village
Green. Half rent and utilities.
Call 7SI-alM after 6 00 p.m.
FEMALE ROOMMATE: needed
to share large two-bedroom
duplex. Furnished except for
bedroom. Call Sara at 756 8406
after 6:00 or 756-1744 during day.
ROOMMATE WANTED: to Share
two bedroom apartment at Car-
riage House. S7S month plus one-
third Utilities. 756 4447
SUNSHINE STUDIOS: offering
the following classes: Ballet, Jan,
Belly Dance, Yoga and Disco. For
more information call 756 7235
TYPING: for students and pro-
fessors available, call 752-741
after 4:00 p.m.
$ REWARD$300 in NYSE (blue
chips) certificates. Leading to the
arrest and conviction of those per-
son! s responsible for the thieft
and vandalism of a 140 Chevy
Vn on January 30, I9M at 1:30
a.m. S100 bonus to the person(s)
who brings vandalism before the
appropriate committee.
$100 REWARD: for information
leading to the return of Rosie:
female gold cocker spaniel, 6 mon
fhs old. All calls kept confidential.
752 0256
BEST PRICES: paid for class
rings, gold , and sterling. Men's
medium class ring $ss$70. Sterl
�ng fork $10. Call John after 3 00
752 4013.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: 173 Datsun 240 Z.
Excellent condition. Strait drive,
new paint(white), A.M. F.m!
� track, new seats. $3500. Call
752 954
FOR SALE: TR 4, 1973, Light Blue
with Black Interior. 50,000 miles,
excellent condition, must sell.
Call 756 6038 anytime arter 3:00.
1 BONANZA'S
CHOP STEAK
I
tor u I
Offr good with coupon only. I Offor good with coupon only
Coupon .xplr�35M , Coupon�pkot 35tl '
STEEPLECHASE
CAFETERIA
MONSAT. 11:00-2:00
4:30 - 8:00
PittPLza
SUN. 11:30- 2:00
WE'VE GOT MORE
FOR YOU
This Thursday
Buy One Pizza
Get One FREE
( same value )
CALL 758-7400
Phi Kappa Tan
Little Sister
RUSH
IKT Fraternity would like to extend an
open invatation to all interested young
ladies, and encourage you all to attend.
Tues. Feb. 19th. come on by and
to J&& with the Phi Taus U
Wed. Feb. 20th. we will be having
more fun at the House
409Eliabethst.
SAT. 16 Feb. 1980
$1.14 Ham � Noodle Casserole
$1.49 Fish Cakes wTarter Sauce
SUN. 17 Feb. 1980
$1.14 Creole Spaghetti
$1.49 Turkey wDreuing
MON. 18 Feb. 1980
$1.14 Chili wRice
$1.49 Chicken Chow Mein
TUE. 19 Feb. 1980
$1.14 Franks wSaurkraut
$1.49 Pork wDressing
W 20 Feb. 1980
$1.14 Baked Lasagna
$1.49 Stuffed Peppers
THUR. 21 Fdb, 1980
$1.14 Beans wFranks
$1.49 Meat Loaf
FRI. 22 Feb. 1980
$1.14 Chili � Macaroni
$1.49 Tuna Casserole
THE SPECIALTY OF THE DAY IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE
The tournament will
be played by ASA-
Intramural rules and
has been scheduled for
the weekend of March
20-23.
Don't miss the action
� get your team
together now!
Official's Clinics
Softball and
volleyball officials are
needed and clinics are
being offered for both
sports. The softball of-
ficials' clinic has been
scheduled for March
18, 19 and 20. Tuesday
the clinic will be held in
Brewster B-102, while
on Wednesday and
Thursday, the clinic
will be held in
Memorial 104. The
clinics will last from 7
p.m. until 9 p.m.
Pizza inn
AMERICAN FAVORITE PtZZA

PIZZA BUFFET
LL THE PIZZA AJVL
SALAD YOU CAIV EAtI
Mon. -Fri. 11:30-2:00
758 62�� M ' . � 6X-&00
758-6366 Evening buffet H.79
Hwy 864 bypaaa Greenville , If. C.
The volleyball of-
ficials' clinic will be
held Wednesday and
Thursday, March 19
and 20 in 104 Memorial
Gym from 7 p.m. until
9 p.m.
The pay for both
sports is about $3.10
per game depending on
clinic attendance, past
experience, test scores
and the display of abili-
ty to call correctly nd
with authority.
Softball games il
be played on the IM
fields Sunday through
Friday from 4 p.m. un-
til II p.m. Volleyball
will be played at
Minges Coliseum,
Mondays through
Thursday from 7 p.m.
until II p.m.
Water Polo
The deadline for en-
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
I
I
i
I
I
I
I
I
I
l
l
i
l
l
I
l
HAVE
ON US ANYTIME!
OPEN
MON-SAT 10-9
SUN 12-7
OVERTON'S SUPERMARKET
located on corner of 3rd and Jarvis
Morrell Pride
T-Bone or Sirloin steaks $2.09!b.
GRADE A Whole Fryers 43clb.
GWALTNEY Bacon or Franks
12 oz. package 99�
LOOK AT WHAT A DIME WILL BUY
Yellow Onions 10clb.
Crisp Carrots 10clb.
White Potatoes 10clb.
Juicy Lemons 10� each
Florida Oranges 10C each
CLIP THESE COUPONS
and SAVE $$
FAMILY AMUSEMENT CENTER
��SOE STEEPLE CHASE CAFETERIA
PITT PLAZA
Suprr rtv.1l kM . In
ICHARMIK TOILET TISSUE - 4 roll
Ipack 68c with this coupon and $7
food order excluding specials. Limii
'Jone per customer. Expires Feb. 23
I
KRAFT Orange Juice - 12 gallon jt
l98c with this coupon and $7.50 food
order excluding specials, Limit one
customer. Expires Feb. 23.
-�? "�jr � ��� m m-M- �������.�,�.
" " -�-?-��. . � m ��
Wta ��� mm





Title
The East Carolinian, February 19, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 19, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.41
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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