The East Carolinian, February 12, 1980






�he Rust (Earnltman
Vol. 54 No. p �TA
10 Pages
Tuesday, February 12, 1980
Greenville, VC
Circulation 10.000
Proposed Amtrak Route May Serve Greenville
Amtrak Train Service
may soon serve Greenville
By TERRY GRAY
Staff Writer
State officials are currently study-
ing the feasibility of an Amtrak
route that would connect Greenville
with cities in the Piedmont and
Mountain regions of North
Carolina, according to Larry Sams,
head of systems planning at the
N.C. Department of Transporta-
tion.
The proposed railroad service
could carry passengers from Nor-
folk, Va. to Memphis, Tenn and
would link Greenville, Raleigti,
Greensboro, Winston-Salem,
Asheville and other North Carolina
cities along its 1000-mile route.
Sams stressed that the plan is still
at an informal stage.
"We're trying to look at some of
the technical aspects of it�what
type of track will it require, the cost
of operation, the number of people
that may ride it�that kind of
thing said Sams.
The idea originated from the ac-
tion of the Greenville Chamber of
Commerce Railroad Task Force,
whose chairman is former Green-
ville Mayor Percy Cox. Three task
force members travelled to
Washington, D.C, last year to talk
with an Amtrak official. According
to W.C. Cobb, a retired trainman
now working with the transporta-
tion board, the meeting was
"encouraging
After the meeting, members of
the task force drew up a rough plan
for the proposal and submitted it to
the N.C. Dept. of Transportation
for further study.
One of the chief concerns of the
DOT study will be the cost of main-
taining the line. Congress created
Amtrak in 1971 to rescue the na-
tion's ailing railroad passenger
lines, but in recent years, the
federally-subsidized system has been
attacked for its expense.
In 1978, Congress passed a new
law allowing state or local groups to
propose new lines if they agreed to
help subsidize them. North Carolina
would have to underwrite half the
losses of the new Amtrak route.
Cobb believes that the rising price
of gasoline and the lack of east-west
Needed Repairs Are Inconvenience
Maintenance problems in the
dence halls arc becoming more
minent with the bad weather
season. Broken windows and heat
regulation are more notieable in
d and wet weather and have
become a growing problem.
hese a re not t he on I v
ntenance problems in the dorms.
- dents also complain oi burned
oul light bulbs, vandalism, roaches.
or locks, broken water
lins, and other malfunctions.
, even create securit) problems
men's dorms. These situa-
ild be taken care of as
;kl as possible or, in some
vaes. immediately. Students argue
� maintenance problems are not
tended to quickly enough.
When asked how long it usually
es to get things in the dorms
aired, ban Woolen,
housing, -aid. "We like
terms of three davs. This is what
we're programmed for He said
n in emergenc) situations, depen-
dine on what the problem is, they
usuallv get thing- done within a
matter ol hours. "The most press-
situations are broken water
director of
to think in
Wooten also emphasized that
Maintenance can get behind
schedule because they handle all
repairs on campus. Often it may
take a little longer than two or three
days to get small problems repaired.
Steve Shelton, o' Aycock Dorm,
complained of a broken water foun-
tain on the fourth floor. "We have a
water fountain up here that's been
broken for about three months.
We'e called the maintenance
department about tour or five
times, and they haven't come to fix
it vet. Ihev're alwavs rather slow to
come fix anything He also com-
mented on the roach problem in the
dorms. "Thev practically pull the
covers off of you
Jenny Watson, resident advisor
of Tyler Dorm, commented on the
amount of time it took for the heat
to be fixed in her dorm. "Last
weekend our heat went off. There
was a room that the heat went off
on a Tuesday down here and they
didn't get it fixed until a week later,
and you know that was part of our
coldest time. Then gradually over
the weekend, the whole first floor
lost their heat
Broken windows in the dorms are
es and small fires.
"If it is a security problem, and ajso a hjg problem. Not only does it
the people involved know it is a affccl the students directly because
security problem, they should get in o- lne cojd ajr but jt aiso wastes
touch with this office within a lew
hours
enemy
The abundance of broken win-
dows cannot be blamed solely on the
maintenance department. It is
usually the occupants of the dorms
who break these windows. If
students wouldn't vandalize things,
maintenance would have more time
to repair the unavoidable problems.
This would benefit all dorm
students.
Not only do windows get broken,
but other property is destroyed.
Wooten said that "it is a constant
thing, an ongoing problem He
also said that vandalism is worse
when it snows. Vlany students get
rowdy and lots of snowballs are
thrown. When this happens, many
windows are broken and property is
destroyed. Other acts of vandalism
are also committed, including
damage to bathrooms, lights in the
halls, and convenience machines in
the lobbies. This problem keeps the
maintenance department busy
throughout the year.
Wooten added, "If it is an
emergency, we urge them to call this
office during office hours On the
weekends, students should report
emergencies to security. Wooten ad-
ded that, on the average, when
students do complain about
maintenance problems, they are
legitimate problems. "I think the
students use very good judgement
SGA Helps Lower University Exxon's Towing Rates
The resolution passed last week
bv the SGA student legislature to of-
ter "favorable business" status to
Greenville tow-truck operators who
cut their rates for ECU students met
with a small success Monday as
I niversity Exxon lowered its rates
to Sl.v
1 xplaining the costs involved in
buving and operating a tow-truck,
owner Jimmy Jones told legislators
that tow-truck operators "are not
trying to rip off students � we ap-
preciate your business
Jones also told the students that
they "didn't realize the power they
had when they acted in a positive
and united way
Of the 14 tow-truck operators
who were contacted by SGA Vice
President Charlie Sherrod about the
matter, Jones was the only one who
responded.
The legislature also approved a
$188 request from SGA President
Brett Melvin to pay air transporta-
tion and lodging for a trip to
Washington, D.C. Melvin reported
that he had received an invitation
along with 200 other SGA
presidents to go to the White House
to discuss foreign policy issues with
President Carter. Melvin will fly to
Washington Thursday, Feb. 14, to
attend the meeting.
Sherrod announced that the un-
finished parking lot behind
Mendenhall student center is now
open to all university-registered
vehicles. The paving of the lot has
been postponed until later in the
year when warmer and dryer
weather will make the job quicker
and easier. Sherrod commended Dr.
Elmer Meyer, vice chancellor for
student life, for his help in getting
the lot opened.
In other business, the Student
Welfare Committee reported that
Sonny McLawhorn, the university"
lawyer, believed there may be legal
problems in getting ECU students
registered to vote in Pitt County.
The committee will continue to look
into the possible problems, accor-
ding to the chairman.
It was also announced that there
are two vacancies in the legislature,
one for day representative, and the
other for Fletcher Dormitory,
f
ECU Prof
Will Travel To
Budapest
Dr. David L. Beckman, professor
of physiology at the ECU School of
Medicine, has received a grant from
the National Research Council to at-
tend the International Congress of
Physiological Sciences in July in
Budapest. Hungary.
Beckman will present a paper
dealing with the effects of stress on
the development of respiratory
distress syndrome, particularly
pneumonia. The grant provides air
travel to Budapest and Milan, Italy,
the site of a major conference on
respiration also being held in
Europe this summer.
According to Beckman, car ac-
cidents, major burns and some
surgical procedures cause general
stress which may stimulate the ner-
vous system in a way that produces
pneumonia. His data indicate the
condition is caused by stimulation
of ihe nervous system and not ac-
tivity of ihe adrenal gland previous-
ly thought to trigger the syndrome.
Nurse Practioners
Sponsor Seminar
Icicles Are A Sign
the snow is finally leaving
About 100 nurse practitioners
from various North Carolina loca-
tions will gather here March 5-7 for
a two-day seminar sponsored by the
N.C. Nurse Practitioner Conference
Group and ECU.
Speakers at public sessions in-
clude physicians, family nurse prac-
titioners and other health profes-
sionals who will speak on topics of
interest to health care providers. Dr.
Robert Rhyne and Michael Magill
of the Duke University Medical
Center will speak on "Screening the
Asymptomatic Disease: Useful or
Useless?" at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday.
On Thursday morning, Dr.
Walter Pories, Dr. Andre Van Rij
and Diane Mulheim, FNP, from the
ECU School of Medicine will
discuss the patient with breast
disease, covering aspects ranging
from early detection and treatment
through post-surgical care.
Thursday afternoon's session will
focus on stress: identification and
management, stress and families
and stress in the nurse practitioner.
Speakers include Lon Gilbert,
psychologist at the Pitt County
Mental Health Center; Mary Louis,
social worker at the ECU Family
Practice Center; and Jennifer Lang
of the ECU School of Medicine.
Friday's events are a discussion of
depression, recognition and treat-
ment in a primary care setting, by
Dr. Charles Ravaris and Mary Ann
Browning, FNP, both of the ECU
School of Medicine, and an address
by N.C. legislator Patricia Hunt,
"Political Issues and the Nurse
Practitioner
Session are scheduled for the
Ramada Inn and are open to the
public.
rail service in the state will make the
proposal increasing attractive to
North Carolina residents.
"Because ot the cost ot fuel. Am
trak has brought about a
renaissance in rail transportation.
Passenger service is reallv spirall-
ing Cobb noted.
The number ot rail passengers has
doubled since Amtrak went into
operation.
According to government studies,
passenger (rams are the most effi
cient form of transportation. - lull
tram could cam 400 people TO mile-
using the same amount .t Crii
diesel fuel that it would lake
refine one gallon of gasoline.
Cobb added that the route wou
benefit students in the state, rherc
are several major universities ah
the line, including 1 liabeth Citv
State. last Carolina, Atlantichris-
tian. N.C. State. Duke. C hapel Hill.
LNC-Greensboro and Wake forest
No details have been worked oul
about possible fares, bui mtrak
ticket prices are held down in order
to be competitive with other forms
of transportation. In October IST9.
a round-trip ticket from
Washington. D.C. to Orlando Fla
cost SI32.
"If enough people would
patronize the service, it would he a
See AMTRAK Page 3
Infirmary
Diagnoses
Incorrectly
A Greene Dorm resident received
treatment for a broken arm at Put
County Memorial Hospital on
Saturdav, Feb. 9, after having been
told Friday b Dr. Harr Mel can at
ECU lnftrmar that she V�aO �KtSMn-
ed a toad bruise.
Terrv Lynn Walters fell down the
steps of the Placement Center Fri-
day morning and went to the Infir-
mary to get her arm examined bv
McLean.
"Dr. McLean told me that I had
bruised my arm very, badly atid to
use it all I could Miss Walters
said. "He gave me some aspirin-like
tablets for the pain. Nothing was
said about getting my arm x-rayed
When Miss Walters awoke Satur-
day morning, she said her arm had
swollen badly during the night, and
a large knot had formed. It was then
she decided to go to the emergencv
room.
On Feb. 9, Miss Walters went to
the Pitt County emergencv room.
Dr. Randolf Williams told Miss
Walters that her arm should be
x-rayed. After the x-rays,1 she
said, "Dr. Williams explained that I
had broken my arm and that I
would have to have a cast put on for
two weeks. I was to come back
again in two weeks and see him
When contacted, Mel ean said.
"I have no comment. 1 cannot tell
you anything
Dr. Fred Irons, director o EC!
Health Services, stated that the
policy was to x-ray if there was an
suspicion of broken bones
"Evidently Dr. McLean didn't have
any suspicions Irons concluded
Williams stated. "Many times
fractures are overlooked or not
recognized if thev are not obvious.
It is not really harmful to let these
fractures go for a week without
treatment, although it would not be
comfortable to do so
When consulted about ordering
of x-rays, Williams said, "When
this is done, it is a result o a doc-
tor's clinical judgement Williams
indicated that because of the lack ol
seriousness of some fractures, the
patient will not make the fracture
worse from using it because it hurls
too much.
"I have not told the infirmary oi
Dr. Mel ean that my arm is
broken Miss Walters said,
"although many of my friends think
I should
Inside Today
i.rrrk Nc��
Nmm Krtir�
Piratearr





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 12, 1980
Announcements
Creek Skate
Mph.i i Delia and Sports vvmld arc
sponsiHinfl .in Ml (.KIIK Skll
on l ih 31 from 7 id in n in viihin
sum is niih 2 111 t iunc umii the tun
and lei's .ill do soiiKthini; diltcrcnl im
.1 sIl.lllLV ItLint.ili.ilt with ihc llltisl
members wins .1 Ircc kc
Valentine
IVCF
KCA
Send .1 silmi Ijnvuau'c valentine In your
sweetheart' I .i the lee .t S2.0.I sou
s.in have yiHtt pcTstmal messajtc ol k�ve
(Sl II Olds III less) sclll to soul
sweetheart in sien lanauaee Wc speak
liKi'tOtu pi.ilisvii.ii.il interpreters will
(Jetivet vintr mess.ice X1! son,illv on
Valentine's dav Vm vjhmIv ihc place
(inside (ireensilte .m limits imlsl .11 id
lime ist .1 in 7 p in 1, tMi.it.iiiKciin .1
m.isl incill.il.ihlt .ilclilmc's d.iv i
i.inicincnis in.iv he in.idc in Itrvwslei
10111 I 4 dlirinu business ll.Hils, i.i .ill
77 ft-Sg () IMori. lll.lll
Ihc Inici S.iisiin (. hnstiaii Icllovvship
niccis even I'tlici Wcdncsd.iv starling
Ichruars H .11 7:W .11 ihc McthndiM
Siudcni (. cnlci lot siiiyiiic. Ihhlc studs .
Icllovvship and prayei I vctvunc is in
vilcd'
EAC
Ihc Idkwship "i hristian itilelcs
! I I t � : iVllHl v.llllllv .111.1
. I , s�las at M '11 hi (he
1 I) Hall located under
I Km 11 Itoals liu I Ik I . arc
lontmunitv mvoKemeni .ind sianinc
I diddle 11 nips in area I I I '� ils
tune o( shai mu and .1 � Inini 1 he
pail "i each iiKciinv i Mlicets
. . (iconic trump, treasurer: dant
Sv m.i president and Kskv
Itmlci. pic- .
Ihc I 11v11011111cnl.il dvisoiv I oninnl
ice will incci I iK-sd.iv. I eh 12 .11 7
p in in ihc onlcrence Room .11iiv
II ill
KCCiC
(in I uesdav It i .11 i�i p in the
I ast i aroliru 1 � 1 nmroumiv will
Icaturca disviission uroup as nan ol ihc
week I v mcctine 1' "is I 9th M . the
S.wni.iii Hottt Voil III.IV hone VOUI
t.ooi iic hew 1 .lev
Recital
Sea Mester
1 in pril N l"so. Si lhoiii.iv. kircin
I S I kii: Schooner Harvcv
. �nh stud
cpresen � . 14 collci.s 011
�Sea Mi . I1 lull
supervised and
mnlk-yc lacul
1 I I-I.tn.I I mi
-null - Ahtlse
iiend .it ih
Sew I aland
s 1. . , � -i ' pro
1J11.IIC -111
� mod h Ihv ph�ii
I , nor 111.11 itimc
� �:� V w 1 iu'I.iii.I to the
lent sailors aboard
Man iv 1 iainaut
, n .lu.l isonien in v
' . rcdits 111 a total
tmal . vpci "� idint in
J acad ences vhish
. ' omparablc
, 0111 .1 tevtboo 01 in a
i nlvii matton.
II � alei - di
. i 1 �mm ia�ii
v.s
SINK A
I here will he a Student National
I ducalors Vssocialion meeting on
wedncsdav. I eh I al -�" in
Mcndenhall 11 244 rhcrc will he a
speakei ll members and in
led people are 111 ced 10 all end
Sasophonisi Kol.uulolsen ol Virginia
Ite.i.h. a . senioi student in the I - 1
School ol Musk, in II pei form in recital
here Wednesday. I eh ! al 7:W p m
in 1 I letchei rcviial hall His pro-
�lain will include Ihc I .mv.111111 Plain
Sonata in v. Major, mo works bv
Koheii Schnmann, Paul Honncau's
"Caprice Ro Noda's
"Improvisation I the lacqucs Ibeii
"( onccrtino da amera" and Vmono
Monti's �( anlas " His accompanist is
pianisi Catol Wolle olsen is a sludenl
ol Hi.1.1 I olei ol the II School ol
Mum. la. nits and is a candidate loi the
Hachcloi ol Musi, I ducalion decree
Fencing
Phsical Fitness
Ihc nest meeting ol the It. I Physical
I iiness 1 lub 1- Monday I eh l t s
p 111 I lu meet me will si at t m room liu
l. 1noM.1l cism and then move to the
pool urne null plans t� swim Ml
indent . Ilv tit are mviicd
I cneinu is eoo.i exercise and an in
Icrcstinit spun 1 he I astarohna I en
sine l lub meets escry Viedncsday al 4
p m in tooin ins. lower level.
Memot 1.1I (mil
Bake Saie
Pi Sigma Alpha
Pi Sietlia Vlpl 'ionot
1 ' � nt on
� � .1! the
v steei Steal Hi N' I
1 . . He .nest
ill be Sjm Bun
her and eiiesis are
K will � Hal Sale on
I eh 14 horn V a m 10 I
1
Dance Auditions
udinons lot liaiKe Kesiisal" held
eseri spring mil he held soon Must
h.oe sun.lav and Nkednesdas nights
t rehearsal C all 756-72? lor
tilormafion
Riny Found
Hol Communion
n I ;� s, upa Holyommu
nion will be celebrated Wednesday
cscnine. I eh I' al ft i�i p m in the
M � Sludenl l cnlci
I idh S Cartel 1 IXwml
i �: opal hapla 1 the Rev
H Ha Men . I� King ippei will
the
k Bible S

I � II I � S
� . t . 1
Phi F.ta Sigma
Phi I la Sigma honot fratcrmly vsitl
have a siaWei and tWI' Will inee-lmjr al
'mi p 111 on Iruiisckis. Fefc (4 in 2-1
Mendenha i leaKei will be I 1
I I ad lock , chau
at I I H

VI s .uid III
Racquetball Club
Ml tluvse intcresi ung the r.u
.nieih.ill . lub it ask to meet in room
KM Memorial (.ism on Ihursduv, I eh
14 at im p in I addei and match vvith
N l Slate will be div isscd
Car Wash
Phi I psilon Kappa will he holding a u
wash at the Etna (.as Station on Circen
ville Blvd on Saturday, I eh 2 from
H' 00 a m until daik ost will be
SI 50 in udvaiivc and $2.00 dav ol
w.ivh
remember
We wisl tind all students and
faculty that we will not accept any an
nouncemenis lot knnouncemenls
column unless thev are tvveJ
doubtcspace .mJ turned in before the
deadline No cxscpitons will he made.
Ihc vicitdluics arc 2 00 p in, I uda lor
ihc luesd.iv edition and 2:tM pm.
I uesdav lot rhe Ihuisdav edition. We
reserve the right 10 edit lot brevity We
cannot guarantee iliat everything turn
ed in will appe.it in the papei. due to
space limitations, hui we will do our
Win valuable prizes for your organization, help support
four U S National Sports Teams, and generate scholarship
funds for your school All you do is collect empty recyclable
Miller Brewing Company containers, and receive a receipt
for the points earned The top point earning organizations
will win their choice of many valuable prizes
NO PURCHASE NECESSARY
Call your Miller Campus Rep today for information!
CAMPUS REP
Joe Mims
PHONE NUMBER 758-4175
Summer Jobs
Representatives ol at leasi eiuht sum
mcr camps in the area will he at II 's
Mcndenhall Sludenleniei on I eh s
lor a Sunimciamp I luplovnient Dav
Interested students arc invited lo the
event to talk to camp represen(a(ises
and team more about the camp I he
OH ICC ol C imperative I ducalion iv
coordinating appointments loi inter
views lamp tohs available include
counselors, water saiciv insiruclorsand
hleguaids. cooks, nurses, .tails dues
lois and program directors Ihc eveiu
is being co-sponsored hvo op I ihiv.i
lion. I areei (Manning and I'laccmcnl.
the III I ouiischne I eniei and ihc
Parks, Recreation and onscrialion
ptoe'l am
SCA
Ihc Canton ol the lioldctt leal, the
lov.il branch ol the s.kiciv loi i realise
kn.iihionivin. will Iricvl al 7 'n p in .
I uesdav. 12 I chinarv. at 705 I 1st
Street, Shore Drive pi II. to discuss
ollicet selection and Ihc coming
I out nev ol i nut
Planning Commission
Ihcie will be screenings loi student
positions on the Planning I ommtssion
on I eh IX I torn 4 h p in in the S.
s.ihinet tooin. Mcndenhallall lot an
appointment. 757-6611. el ?1 Com
mtllecs ate (.encial (duration. Inter
disciplinary Degree Programs, Suh
commission lor Puhltv Services. VI
nunisiralie CoordinalKNI and Sup
port. Consulting. I .ivilute loi Publit
Services. Institutes, Non keademic
Continuing I ducalion Programs,
Public I .vi Mills. PublK liiloitiialion.
Public Recognition Programs, and
I'uhllv Set v i.os
SNA
l arol I ov will he presenting a program
and a film on the issues ol luld buse
at lite nest Student Nurses kssocialion
meeting I his meeting will he held
Wednesday, r-eb lai"pin in room
101 m the NuisiiiL- Building Ml are in
vued to attend
Six Persons
Wounded
SGA Minutes
February 11, 1980
CHARLOTTE (AP)
� Six persons were
wounded Saturday
when an argument in a
Charlotte boarding
house.turned into a gun
battle.
Three persons were
admitted to Charlotte
Memorial Hospital.
One was in stable con-
dition in intensive care
with a chest wound.
Details of the 3 p.m.
shooting in the house
I Vi miles northeast of
downtown Charlotte
were sketchy.
"Six people are
shot one police in-
vestigator said. "That's
all we really know right
now. We don't know
who shot who or how
many shots were
fired
For a while Saturday
afternoon, one police
spokesman said, in-
vestigators were check-
ing the possibility the
gun fight began after
someone knocked over
a snowman either in
front of the boarding
house or at another
house two blocks away.
But later in the day
other officers dis-
counted that report.
"They'd all been drink-
ing in that house one
investigator said. "And
we've got about five
conflicting reasons for
why it happened
Admitted to
Memorial were Reles
Bennett, 28, Perry
Booker, 59, and James
Springs, 35. A hospital
spokesman said Ben-
nett was in intensive
care with a gunshot
wound .in the chest.
Booker wasKot in the
groin and left leg and
Springs in both arms,
the spokesman said.
James Owens, 22,
Juanita McLendon, 23,
and J e I v ester
McManus, 30, were
treated for minor ab-
domen, neck and arm
wounds and released.
Investigators
tramped in and out of
the boarding house
Saturday afternoon try-
ing to piece together the
sequence of events that
led to gunfire.
"I was inside when
they were shooting
said boarding house
resident Willie Luke,
62. "I heard at least
five shots but I
didn't see anything. I
was sitting in bed when
it happened
One police source
said at least two men
pulled small-caliber
pistols and opened fire
in the boarding house
living room.
Following the
shooting, one of the
wounded men, James
Springs, either ran or
was carried to his home
two blocks up Allen
Street.
The fifteenth session of the
I cgislature of the Student Government
Association was called 10 order bs
Speaker Mike Adkins at 5 05 p m A
moment of silence was observed, the
roll was called, a quorum was declared,
and the minutes were approved
STANDING lOMMITTfrt
Rl PORTS
Ms Stanforth reported that the ap
propnations Committee had passed the
Al and Political Science class bills
out favorably with amendments
Mr Pairtek reported that the Student
Welfare had met todav and sontinued
discussing voter registration
QUESTIONS AM) PRIVIl U.IS
Tim Apperson. President of the FC l
Sign I anguage I lub. spoke on ihe slub
He asked for I egislature support loi a
hill to be introduced today asking tor a
loan ro use as a deposit on I I ove
-ou" I shirts the slub plans to sell
The total deposit is to be 1SNW W). and
the club wants to borrow SKtHi H) to be
repaid alter the VX) shirts are void
Mr Melvin reported that the meeting
.1 Nl ASli and lett I hampaign ol
HI va went relatively well Mr I ham
paign explained the historv ol the pro
blem and court procedures tor ihe I Nl
svstem Mr Melvin said that he hopes
HfW reahes more that it is dealing
with humans as well as figures In
sneaking on a student tee tnsrease Mr
Melvin said ihe total sould be more
than S20 (K) per student per semester to
divided among many areas He hopes,
there can either be a .ampu. paper
referendum or campus survey to tind
out the students' feelings on the sub
test
Mr Sherrod said that he had tjlked
w ith the Barrus I onstrustion I ompanv
about the Mendenhall Parking I ot and
� hat they uri waiting tor a warm drv
spell to finish the paving He also spoke
on a resolution to be proposed today
concerning oft campus lowing of
students cars The resolution will ask
for city contracted towing services to
reduce their rates to the ampus eost of
towing for students
Nl VA Bl SIN! SS
Mr Triplet! moved to suspend the
rules to consider 1R 15-1. "lower
Rates lor Oft I ampus Student Tow
ing " He ihen read the resolution and
suspension passed A motion was made
on the resolution, question was .ailed.
and the resolution passed
Mr White introduscd IB 11
"I oan to ECl Sign I anguage I lub
Mr Triplet! introduced IB 12
"Appropriation to the Sshoul ot
Musis and IB 15-3, Approval ol
I onstnuiion
Ol I) Bl SINf SS
Ms Siantorth moved lo pass I B
14 I. Appropriation to Al a�
amended hv Ihe Appropriations I om
mittee The total amount would be
MftOOtlO for Interior Design project
and :�) INI tor I hrarv Mi Irani -
moved lo (aMc ihe h,ll vo thj-
with individual line cms could he
distributed IO Ihe I eislaturc V
passed on a division ictte ot 21 4f with
I abstention
Ms Siantorth move 'o pu 1 B
14-5, ' Appri � a �' Ih n i
Model Organization . � Mrican I m
tv Ms Stanforth explained that ihe
hill �as in ihe amount ot IJ50 �
fund OUT 'ation .os
political science students lo a'tend a
conference in Washington, I)Mt
I raneis said thai since the group Jid not
have a constitution, it -hould n.t be
tunded unttl it dins Mr Trans is called
lor previous question and ItM
on a division vote ot Ii 2 mill
abstentions
Ms Stanforth moved :o pass l H
I4i " Approbation W the National
Model Organization ol American
States and explained that the bill was
cssentiailv the same as I B 14-S o
different conference and different
political science students It �as noted
thai this group alsi did not have .
stituiion Bill failed
NO III IS Nl VNNIH N( I M! NT5
Mr I 'ancis announced at I �
I ommntee meeting toi fh.iiscUv at
� 0 p Bl
Mr Pair I a J
Student vAeitate CoaMM
follow M I .
3' 4
Ms 8 i .ouiiced a ��
� v t oinn.ii'ce met
dav at 4 VI r in
Mr sherhj noted 'a
piopr a '
Monda
l)i M

axe He

. he w
Ms K
-
I Kan I
itchelTs Hair Styling
pr put pi.
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t





Amtrak In
Greenville
Continued from Page 1
break-even proposition
for the state said
Cobb.
The proposed train
would utilize tracks
already in existence,
but would require a
large investment in
diesel engines and
passenger cars. The
Seaboard Coast Line
would operate the
trains for Amtrak.
At best, it will take at
least a year for the plan
to be submitted to Con-
gress for approval.
Meanwhile, the Green-
ville Chamber of Com-
merce and other in-
terested groups in the
state will be gathering
additional data on the
public's response to the
idea.
Sams said that he ex-
pects the DOT study to
last at least several
weeks. When it is com-
pleted, he and others
will "sit down and kick
the idea around, and
try to determine if it is
worth pursuing fur-
ther
Recital Held
THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 12, 1980
Greek News
linda Vance, of
McLean, Va flute and
Stephen Morgan of
Wilmington, trumpet,
senior students in the
ECU School of Music,
performed in recent
campus recitals.
Both are candiates for
the Bachelor of Music
Education Degree.
Ms. Vance performed
Three Preludes for
Unaccompanied Flute,
Opus 18 by Robert
Muczynski, Faure's
"Morceau de con-
tours the Johann
Joachim Quantz Con-
certo in D. Major and
Benjamin Godard's
Valse, Opus, No.3.
Her accompanist was
Diane Kolwyck.
A student of James
Searl, Morgan per-
formed a Fitzgerald ar-
rangement of Handel's
"Aria con Variazioni
the Wahl-Berg Concer-
to for Trumpet and Or-
chestra and "B'Bye"
by Chuck Mangione, In
an original arrange-
ment.
He was accompanied
by pianist Michael
Regan and assisted by a
student instrumental
ensemble which includ-
ed trombones, piano,
guitar, bass, drums,
horns, and tuba.
Power went off in downtown Greenville last night at about 7:30. Parts of Fifth Street were dark for
approximately 22 minutes according to a spokesman for Greenville Utilities Commission. Mac
Ross, a troubleshooter for the utilities company, stated that the blackout occurred when transformer
on West Third Street went bad.
Tutors Found For
Kids
ECU News Bureau
Applications are be-
ing accepted for this
semester's afternoon
reading tutoring pro-
gram for children in
grades one through ten
offered by the ECU
School of Education.
Patronize
The
East
Carolinian
Advertisers
The clinical pro-
gram, to be directed by
Drs. Patricia Terrell
and Dorothy Muller,
will begin at 3:30 p.m.
Feb. 19.
The program is
designed for students
who have reading pro-
blems or want to im-
prove . their reading
skills. Sessions meet on
Tuesdays and
Thursdays, 3:30-4:30
p.m or 4-5 p.m.
Participating
students are given in-
dividual instruction
based on the results of
initial testing, and will
be directed in techni-
ques designed to help
increase vocabulary,
comprehension and
work-study effec-
tiveness.
Tutors in the clinic
are education majors
who are candidates for
reading certification.
Since enrollment is
limited to 50 children,
early application is ad-
vised. Further informa-
tion about the Reading
Clinic is available from
the Department of
Elementary Education,
ECU, telephone
757-6833.
There is no charge
for participating in the
program.
The East Carolinian
Serving the campus community
for 54 years.
Publahed every Twwfcy tad Thmcky rfvr-
" e academe year and every VWdnndiv
Airing the wmmrr
The Em Caroriman � rhr official newspaper
of Em� Cambman Univenrty. owned, operated,
�nd publnhed for and by die studento or Lui
Carolina University.
Suhmptkm Rate,
�? $15 yearly
llodSMyearfy
Se�nd dan poatage paid at Greenville. N.C
The Kan Carolinian office are located in the
Old South Buddma on the casual ol ECU
Greenville. N.C.
Telephone: 757-6366. 6367, 6309
By
RICK1 GLI ARM IS
Greek Correspondent
The Alpha Phis
celebrated their 20th
anniversary on the
ECU campus Feb. 6.
To celebrate the occa-
sion and Sorority
Recognition Week,
District Governor Mary
iane Jung visited for
the week.
Congratulations to
Lynne Scott, Alpha Phi
sister, who was chosen
fourth runner-up in the
Miss ECU Pageant.
The Phis are proud
of Peggy Davison, who
was elected to the office
of Public Relations on
the Panhellenic Ex-
ecutive Board.
The Beta Gamma
pledge class of Alpha
Phi had a Turnabout
Day and a Lockout
Feb. 8. These girls are
working hard, and the
sisters are proud of
them.
Congratulations go
to the newly-elected of-
ficers of the Alpha Phi
Big Brother organiza-
tion: Eddie Walters,
president; Clyde
Johnson, vice presi-
dent; Bob Debnam,
treasurer; Bill Shipley,
secretary; and Charlie
Sherrod, sergeant at
arms.
The Sigma Sigma
Sigmas were pleased
and honored to have as
�reir guest Mary
Hastings Holioway
Page, former national
president of Sigma, last
�veek for the celebra-
tion of their 20th birth-
day on campus.
Sigmas would like to
congratulate Sky Lar-
son for being elected
Panhellenic Correspon-
ding secretary. Con-
gratulations to all of
the new Panhellenic of-
ficers, and good luck in
the new vear.
ECU Honor Roll
Students
Rooert Steve Gondek
of Smith field, Edith
Lang of Ayden, Bonnie
Sue Rank of (Qrandyr,
Pamela C. Thomas �
Ne Bern, Katherine L.
Russin of En-
dicott.N.Y all
students at ECU, earn-
ed places on the Honor
Roll last semester.
Also, earning places on
the Dean's List were
Angela Rose Cashwell
of Faison, and Richard
Belthoff, Jr. of Green-
ville. Mindy F. Miller,
f L.umberton, earned
a perfect 4.0 average
during the fall
semester.
To qualify for the
Honor Roll a student
must achieve a B
academic grade point
average with no grade
below a C.
To qualify for the
Dean's List, a student
must achieve a solid
B-plus grade point
average, with no grade
below C.
These students were
among approximately
3136 ECU students
from 28 states, the
District of Columbia
,and five foreign coun-
tries who were cited on
the official fall univer-
sity honors list.
For Valentine's Day,
the Alpha Phis will
serenade your
sweetheart with a sing-
ing Valentine. Orders
are being taken this
week.
Congratulations to
the Alpha Xi Delta's
ten new sisters who
were initiated Jan. 27.
A warm welcome is ex-
tended to Alpha Xis
Alpha Psi pledges who
were inducted Feb. 7.
Alpha Xi Delta is still
tanked number one in
intramurals for the
sorority division.
Alpha Xi's province
director was a guest this
past weekend for a
chapter review.
.�-�.linir ;nB;r
yp y v
Distributed
By
Taylor
Beverage Co.
Goldsboro
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HOLLAND BEER
THE 1 IMPORTED BEER IN AMERICA,
VALENTINES
DAY DANCE
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JOHNNY WHITE &
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(Best in Top 40, Disco,
and Beach Music)
at the
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(across from Beef Barn)
on
r�. 4,1980
Call 758-9959 For Tickets
$2.00 in advance $3.00
at door
INTRODUCTORY
OFFER
ATTENTION PARTY
GIVERS
Overtoil's is now offering a wide selection of draught
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Buy your draught beer at Overton's low, low prices
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?
HALF BARRELS $39.99
PONY BARRELS $23.99
We also have tubs to hold your keg
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QUANTITY DISCOUNTS AVAILABLE
Overt on s
The Sigmas would
also like to thank Eva
Pittrnan, outgoing
Panhellenic president
and Sigma sister, for all
of her hard work and
commitment to the
sororities on campus
this year.
The brothers of
I ambda Chi Alpha ex-
perienced their most
successful rush ever this
year alter adding 13
more associates for the
spring. The brothers
made a great deal of
sacrifice during the
year and have expand-
ed their brotherhood to
50 members. Con-
gratulations go to rush
chairman Dave "Bun"
Merrian, the new
brothers and associates
for their hard work!
The Lambda Chi's
are having their formal.
Crescent Girl, on Feb.
23, where they will
crown their new
sweetheart. The dance
will be held at the
Greenville Country
Club. The following
weekend will be the an-
nual Founder's Day
celebration.
The Lambda Chi's
are also sponsoring a
raffle this month with
many prizes. The
money from the raffle
will be used to build a
basketball court in the
backvard.
The lambda Chi's
would like to urge all
Greeks to support the
TKE's Annual Bovine
Tournament.
The Sig F.ps arc pro-
ud to announce the in-
itiation of seven new
brothers Sunday. The
Sig Fps arc also holding
their annual Valen-
tine's Dance honoring
their sweetheart, Jayne
Hatcher, on Feb. 15 at
the Tar River
Clubhouse.
The Alpha Sig"ma
Phi's arc having a hap-
py hour at the I Iho
Room 7-9:30 p.m
Thursday, Feb. 14
Everyone is welcome at
the Alpha Sig Valen-
tine's Day Massacre
Party.
The Alpha Sig little
sisters will be holding
little Sister Rush dur
ing the week of Feb. IS.
HHMflr�
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Stye �aat QIaralfnian Serving the campus community for 54 years. Marc Barnes, seme, ��� Diane Henderson, ����,��woo, Robert M. Swaim, aor �AdtrtLuK Richard Green, cw �,� Chris Lichok, ���,� mmw . Anita Lancaster, production Mam, Charles Chandler, spom mm Marianne Harbison. � &�� Karen Wendt, f�M �
TUESDAY. FEBRUARY 12, 1980 PAGE 4
This Newspaper's Opinion
Greeks Help ECU
In the February 7 issue of The
East Carolinian, a letter to the
editor was printed under the
heading "Pro-Greek Letter Rebut-
ted and the author took the
Greeks to task expressing "some
feelings that I think are held by the
majority of students here at ECU
It is hard to imagine that someone
appointed the author to speak for
the student body, but that is not the
point.
The author said he was tired of
seeing advertisements in this
newspaper promoting Greek-
sponsored events, a practice which
he called "gaudy self-promotion
There is also some whining and
wailing about Greeks running
everything from SGA to this
newspaper, and a plea that the
t4non-voting majority" put "Greek
life in proper perspective on this
campus. The final charge is "that
energies used in politicking , party-
ing, and promoting far outweigh
those used in humanistic and
academic pursuit
The author should have done his
homework before speaking for the
majority of the student body.
Advertisements for Greek ac-
tivities are not paid for by the Inter-
fraternity Council. Since most of
the proceeds from these events com-
prise contributions to this campus
and the community, the Greek ad
space is donated tree-of-charge by
The East Carolinian. Other
orgamzaUons tKat receive free ads
include the MRC, WRC, "SGA,
Mendenhall Student Center, Stu-
dent Union, and other charitable
organizations.
That transit system buses were us-
ed to transport students to and from
rush is true, but the IFC paid $400
for this service; however, that has
nothing to do with this newspaper.
The vocal minority has nothing to
do with choosing members of the
newspaper staff, and only two of
the eight-member editorial board
are "brothers
To say that Greek energies, other
than humanistic endeavors, are con-
centrated on partying, politicking,
and promoting is a very subjective
statement.
Each year Greeks provide gifts
and sponsor Christmas parties for
about 500 Pitt County under-
privileged, school children. Some
individual fraternities even adopt
underprivileged children and pro-
vide them with food and clothing.
Greeks recently raised $40,000 in an
alumni telethon for the university.
Greeks take an active role in rais-
ing money for the American Cancer
Society, Heart Fund, Red Cross,
Easter Seals, etc. Greeks have
donated more blood to the Red
Cross than any other group on cam-
pus. During the Viet Nam War,
ECU was second in the nation in
blood drives, thanks to the efforts
of the Greeks.
We do agree with the author of
the letter in one respect: We
"appreciate and applaud all.
charitable efforts by Greek
organizations But it must be said
that if it were not for Greeks, it
would be hard to find people as will-
ing to put forth that special effort
needed to make things work. You
don't have to agree with the Greek
way of life to appreciate that.
Will Carter Hear
It can now be said that the Stu-
dent Government Association has
m the words of News and Observer
columnist Dennis Rogers, assumed
the "rarified air of big-time euv-
ment
Brett Melvin, our noble look-out-
for -the-students-at-all-costs leader
has decided to take yet another
junket, his second in two weeks to
Washington, D.C. He says that he is
going up there to talk with President
Carter about American foreign
policy because he feels that East
Carolina University should be
represented in the rather large group
who will be meeting with the Presi-
dent.
Melvin's reasons seem sound, and
the amount expended inconsequen-
tial, but we are wondering if Carter
is sincere in his supposed desire to
ask college students what they really
think about American foreign
policy.

The sad fact is that Carter and
Congress will make up their own
minds about whether or not we will
go to war. No amount of talking or
pleading will do any good at this
stage.
There is some concern, however
that these students will sit around
and listen to Carter's pap about the
foreign policy situation. We should
attempt to influence legislation and
work to elect leadership which will
not lead us into World War III.
The electoral process is where we
should make our voices heard. It is
the only place we can effectively br-
ing forth change.
THE PRESIDENTIAL RACE
Letters To The Editor
Film Is 'Ridiculous, Absurd
Washington Merry-Go-Round
To the Editor:
The assertion in the editorial 4,See For
Yourself" (February 5, 1980 - page 4) that
it is necessary to have seen the film "Life
of Brian" to be able to express an
authoritative and constructive criticism of
the film is ridiculously absurd. I am amaz-
ed that such a level of mentality and life
philosophy even gains a hearing, much
less sympathy, in a civilized intellectual
community. Just think about the logical
implications in such a statement as, "We
should not criticize something that we
have not seen or experienced for
ourselves
In all honesty that is one of the dumbest
Unes of thought I have ever encountered
as a rational human being. It is difficult to
believe that a serioud-minded person
could be ib agreement with such a state-
ment. Just think about it � if a person ac
cepts that philosophy where does it leave a
blind man? Is he condemned to silence on
issues or opinions simply because he has
not seen a film? Is it not possible for so-
meone to tell him what the film is like and
on that basis form an honest opinion and
give a critical evaluation?
But wait a moment � suppose that
same man cannot hear � thus he is
unable to have someone tell him via
spoken word what the movie is about Is
that deaf and blind man doomed to a
responseless muteness on issues Absurd
- you might say? I think not - not as
absurd as the idea I have to go into a
heater and view a movie to be able to in-
telligently and accurately criticize and
evaluate that movie. Are you trying to tell
your readership that no serious reception
should be given to the criticism offered bv
someone who has not seen a movie even
though that person has talked to in-
dividuals who have seen it and read exten-
sive reviews from knowledgeable first-
hand viewers?
Surely you are not that naive or
deliberately dishonest.
Surely you are not proposing that a per-
son has to "experience" the mind-
bending effects of illegal hallucinatory
drugs, or the inebriating effects of ex-
cessive alcohol consumption, or the
destructive effects of a venereal disease
like Herpes Simplex I to speak critically
of drug abuse, drunkenness, or sexual
promiscuity. Must I jump into a garbage
pit to know what it contains? Must I light
the fuse to a stick of dynamite and hold
the explosive in my hand until it ignites to
have a good idea of what it is designed to
do? Must I pay money to enter a theater
and view a film to know what the film
contains? Don't be so silly, Mr. Editor.
Being made the object of satire, com-
edy, profanity, sarcasm, hate, ridicule,
misrepresentation, neglect, or rejection is
nothing new to Jesus � He has experienc-
ed all these and will continue to know
them until the day when He returns, as He
promised to do. Heap it on Jesus � He
� to Him. That's �hc way He �?, An in-
comprehensible love is His
Of course, along with His love for those
who spurn Him there is His attribute of
divine wrath which will necessitate the
ultimate and just punishment of all
wrongdom if , had never seen a
wou d firmly believe in the just punish
ment for wrong, simply because so much
of it goes unpunished in this life
ThfTFnr W?Uld d�lhe ma"asement of
I he East Carolinian good to not use the
material of the editor who wrote the "See
For Yourself" too often lest the papeT
rightly gain the reputation of limited men-
al and social competence. And I suppose
� is a good idea for the paper io �
dispensed free of charge, because I can
magine anyone spending money to
recene ,t anymore than 1 can imagine
anyone buying a ticket to see "Life Sf
Bran unless they are as sick and unar-
tistic as Monty Python.
Van Dale Hudson
Pastor, Trinity Free
Will Baptist Church
Are Students Of "Less Value'
To the Editor:
I would like to pose a question to
Chancellor Brewer, the administration
and the student body. Are ECU students
of less value to you than SGA buses? This
is the conclusion I am lead to believe when
-
the administration persists
classes in session but will
buses to transport student-
students to drive or ualk or: . .
unsanded, unsalted roads ar
inhumane
Will it take another Rar sci
dent in which two girN lost the
convince the administration to
their decisions more carefuiK f
If the decisions to maintair . ass tj
usual inspite of such adverse we
ditions that force local businesvc
is indicative of the concern of
ministration for the student, the
for the student at East Carolina I
ty. Callous, dictator-like edicts
cfcanceUor office do not arouse �
of awe or admiration within me
Instead, these decisions evoke
of helplessness that ihe governing -
the university is willing to sact
lives of students and facultv
classes on schedule. I feel it is time
ministration should start listening
voices of the people whose lives rho ;
trol.
Janet Reee
Letters To The Editor
The East Carolinian welcomes let-
ters expressing all points of new.
Mail or drop them bv our office in
the Old South Building, across from
the library.
Letters to the editor must mrtmk
the name, address, phone number
and signature of the authorise and
must be typed, double spaced, or
neatly printed. Letters should be
limited to three typewritten, double-
spa� Pages. All letters are subject
re editing for brevity, obcemtv and
libel.
Pe20nai attacks not be per
�lt,L�?JSfames �f authors will be
withheld only when inclus.on of the
name will cause the author embar-
rassment or ridicule, such as letters
loncermng homosexuality, dru?
abuse, etc Names wi� j
only on the author's request
Carter Fears Russian Bear Is Ready
By JACK ANDERSON
and JOE SPEAR
WASHINGTON - Some of
President Carter's top policymakers
are giving him controversial advice.
They want him to recognize the
Palestine Liberation Organization.
The presidential advisers believe
this is the only way the United States
can stop the Soviet squeeze on the
Persian Gulf. Their advice is based
on intelligence coming out of the
Middle East.
The reasoning goes like this: The
invasion of Afghanistan has put the
Soviets within easy air-strike
distance of lhe Persian Gulf. They
now have the military power to
choke off the jugular vein which
carries oil to the Western world.
And the industrial nations will be
absolutely dependent on Persian
Gulf oil for at least two decades.
Meanwhile, the Soviet invasion of
Afghanistan has shocked the
Moslem world: It is stark evidence
that the Soviets are willing to devour
their allies. So the Moslems have
become extremely wary about
Soviet, offers of friendship.
Thus, White House advisers are
telling Carter that the Afghanistan
conquest gives the United States an
opportunity to rally the Moslem
world to its side. But this cannot
possibly be accomplished without
solving the Palestine problem.
One of the president's associates
was almost poetic in his assessment.
"The Saudis he said, "are like
gazelles in the jungle. They're sur-
rounded by hostile powers. They
need the United States for protec-
tion. But they have a deep emo-
tional commitment to the Palesti-
nians. They will never join in com-
mon cause with the, United States
until the Palestinian question is set-
tled
Since the United States is depen-
dent on Saudi Arabia for most of its
overseas oil, the advisers argue, the
president should recognize the PLO
now, before the Afghanistan issue
cools off.
There is, however, a fly in the
ointment. PLO leader Yassir Arafat
was in the Soviet Union huddling
with Kremlin leaders on the eve of
the Afghan invasion. And other
PLO leaders have announced their
support of the Russian move into
Afghanistan on the grounds that the
Soviets were repelling
"pro-American elements One
PLO official even went so far as to
praise the Soviet presence there as
"an important asset" to the rest of
the world.
In sum, the president is being urg-
ed to recognize the PLO in order to
offset the Soviet presence in
Afghanistan at the same time the
PLO is supporting the Soviet move.
You might call it a diplomatic puz-
zfe r
THANK VOU, CIA: The Cans-
t
dian government has received a lot
of favorable publicity � and
deservedly so � for helping six
American diplomats escape from
Iran. But a much maligned
organization right here in the States
also deserves some credit � the
Central Intelligence Agency.
The six Americans who escaped
are not talking about their dramatic
adventure because they don't want
to say anything to endanger the lives
of the brave people who helped
them or the hostages who arc still in
Iran.
But our sources say it is safe to lift
the veil of secrecy just a bit. We
have learned that State Department
officials turned to the CIA as soon
as they discovered that half a dozen
diplomats had escaped the U.S. Em-
bassy takeover last November.
Some CIA operatives put their
own lives on the line to save the six
diplomats. At various times, the
escapees were hidden in CIA "safe
houses that were still maintained
" Te5ran- Trhe CIA also helped
prov.de the false Iranian visJTand
Sic? ;�Tents th?1 wcre 2
trick the Iranians into letting the
Americans leave the country.
STING SCENE: In its r��,
"tf �!��� e FB?ne�ana
half-dozen prominent congressmen
who allegedly accepted bribed
agents posing as wealthy Arab
sheiks. But it has upset some prom?
nent Arab Americans The
mfiuincf�dd,in8 P10 w� code!
named ABSCAM, which stoodfor
Arab Scam And the Art?
Americans say the name enhances
the stereotype of the whedina-
oeahng petroleum potentate anxious
to buy favors with bribes.
NAP OF LUXURY: U.S. con-
gresstnen are permitted to furnish
their well-appointed of fices virtually
any way they like � and the tax-
Pounce
Wers, of course, pick up th u
nionethm month period last ar,
member,oHHo,ofRep�.
Sr'ru' !ry $35.�� on �
2 �bn? ,h� Uvished c,ose
plushrSf00 �� 10,000 yards of
Plush new carpeting. The legislators
carnenn! l� Purchase as much
��&� Lhs, "ifcrhcy ap;
S3 n the office on Cpito) Hill.
"� lo. CMcJ�my Carlcr �� ,n
Eir� (old ilJfiJSzI f5 �"
'c,i
2'TMwai.ffa,
�Mlf fc:j. �
��,
����Mi�agag
4Hfc
; -�. �� �. �f��m,i��gj ,
�? � ,
S �� � - a. v.� � -





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Op-Ed 2!?lL2Pi5to5
FEBRUARY 12, 1980 PHe 5
Civics Has Declined In Recent Years
sZT f?T the Wilmington
Star-News, February 10, 1980.
Besides their failure lo teach
students to read and write and com
Pute very well, North Carolines
Pubhc schools have now been charg!
ed w.th gross neglect of civics. (In
case you ve forgotten, civics is the
study of government - local, state
nafiolT ' 3nd S�metimeS inter"
,n 'he d,stant Past, civics was a re-
quired course in North Carolina
high schools. Although it hasn't
gone the way of Latin � a dead
language in every sense in most
schools these days � civics has
declined steeply in recent years.
Some schools made civics an elec-
tive; others allowed it to fade gently
away out of disuse. School officials
said the novel emphasis on reading
and writing and math was largely
responsible for civics decline. Folks
ought not to expect schools to do
but so much.
(To their credit, North Carolina
schools, bucking a national trend,
Tough Choice
ote: The Jolowing editorial is
pruned from The Charlotte
�5rW' Charlotte- Nc Feb. 10,
UNC President Bill Friday and
the governors of North Carolina's
ugher education system faced a
'ough choice in picking a new
chancellor for the university at
hapel Hill. Three nominees had
survived an earlier screening process
Joel L. Fleishman, vice
chancellor at Duke University Ed-
ward T. Foote II, dean of law at
Washington University in St. Louis
and Christopher C. Fordham III'
former dean of the UNC medical
school. All had excellent creden-
tials.
There were indications that much
of the Chapel Hill faculty favored
Mr. Fleishman, who holds
undergraduate, master's and law
degrees from Chapel Hill. His ap-
poinlmenl would have maintained
the tradition that the university's
loaders come from the liberal arts
the heart of the institution.
But university insiders predicted
the choice would be Dr. Fordham a
Greensboro native and a Chapel
Hill graduate who has demonstrated
extraordinary skill as scientist,
teacher and administrator. During
the tight over the East Carolina
University medical school, he
established warm working relation-
ships with Dr. Friday and the UNC
Board of Governors.
His selection, then, came as no
surprise Friday. As UNC's vice
chancellor for health affairs, he
already knows and works with many
of the deans and department heads
He has taken an active role in trying
to strengthen relationships between
the arts and sciences.
Nevertheless, he knows he faces a
challenge in winning the allegiance
of the university's faculty, students
and alumni who look to the campus
at Chapel Hill as the highest expres-
sion of the state's liberal arts tradi-
tion.
He says he plans to work to build
more bdges between the profes-
sions and the humanities. He says
the university will continue to em-
phasize scholarship, but he thinks it
also should put more emphasis on
the teaching of ethical values.
Dr. Fordham is a soft-spoken
man with an informal style and a
touch of eloquence. He will be an
effective spokesman for the univer-
sity. But he also has a reputation for
directness and toughness, qualities
he will need. The job has taxed the
health of three predecessors. He
may need all his physician's skills to
succeed in it.
have continued to require courses in �;nn f ,u0
U.S. history. Most states have e T'0" �f P�WerS in
bought the notion that the study of Acknlf �ovlfrnm�t-
history is of little practical use to the siudcmnor?n? fC W,despread
student, and so it has lost out to ffsEteES JkF"?�?'
social sciences, consumer education, asked hL5h schnnk Educa�n nas
career education and the like � � g schoo,to renew the em-
Possibly as one result of the fc� ffJ" the
failure to teach civics anymore, ion said ' Th. I P T
many North Carolina high schoo Z 'iitWr mgred,enl ,n
students haven't the vaguest idea of ioL li, education. Being a
what city councils and coumy 'S�dJSS .V � WvJ? h
boards of commissioners do or how �� a"�" fnhlgMl USeful sk,M- ,f
to distinguish between the two. gressman it heln y�Ur ,C�n"
They couldn't under threat of arrest cssman is "
contribute to an informed discus- ThpRmrHnfc. .
I t ne Board of Education stopped
The Tragedy
early Yet many mills don't provide
regular checkups. When checkups
show brown lung, workers have a
right to know it. Yet many mills
,n�HrV,hem�and "�ther dic
industrial commission in eithr state.
short of mandating civics as a re-
quired course. That would have
been as authoritative and impulsive
as, say, suggesting to high schools
that they consider of ferine Greek
and Latin as electives.
But the board did agree to start
The Albert Coates Citizenship
tducation Program Albert
Coates, incidentally, founded North
Carolina's Institute of Government
at Chapel Hill and practically in-
vented the state's modern system of
county government.
The Coates program will develop
teaching material for civics courses
and try to encourage teacher rain-
ing in civics, on the sound theory
that a civics teacher oueht to knovv
something about civics. It can be
taken for granted that with the
decline in civics courses the educa-
tion of civics teachers has declined
apace.
Given the renewed emphasis on
civics and a lot of luck, young high
school graduates in North Carolina
might even start voting in substan-
tial numbers and, bevond that have
a ta.rly good grasp of what they're
voting on.
Note: The following editorial is
Xmted Ar�m Tne Charlotte
?98TVer' Charlotte NC b. 10,
Wild Bunch
The tragedy of brown lung has tit-
le o do with the difficult questions
that are causing legal and legislative
battles, though settling those con-
rovers.es is essential. The tragedy is
that industry and government
� VuT things that obviously
should be done to reduce the suffer-
ing. ICI
Some examples:
in kerr comPensation systems
�nthe Carolinas are so slow and so
often inconclusive that workers may
wait years, even die, with their
sholS n� Sett'ed- Legislators
should speed up that process.
'Mills that defiantly violate cot-
ton dust standards should be given a
clear choice: Clean up or shut down
No null m the Carolinas has ever
been told th t Mos( North
mills haven't even been inspected
the legislature should provide
money for more inspectors
�Smoking and brown lung seem
to be deadly companions. Keeping
smokers out of work areas where
cotton dust levels are high is a sensi-
ble precaution. Yet nobody does it.
�Regular medical examinations
Jld detect breathing problems
�Mills are required by law to
report findings of brown lung Yet
many don't, and the lack of concern
by the industrial commissions en-
courages flouting of the law.
Leaders of the textile industry
complain bitterly about the
Carolina Brown Lung Association
It is, among other things, a political
pressure group, and it sometimes ex-
aggerates and makes questionable
charges. The charges are particular-
ly irritating to companies that have
worked hard to make mills safe. But
the harm done by the association's
irresponsibility is miniscule com-
pared to the harm done by mill
owners who wail about federal in-
terference instead of providing basic
safeguards for their workers.
The Observer has recounted the
history of neglect that has meant
suffering for many mill workers.
W e hope this will spur new efforts in
government, medicine, industry and
labor to remedy that neglect. In the
coming weeks, we will report on
those efforts and offer more pro-
posals of our own.
Read The
East
Carolinian
Note: The following editorials were
reprinted from the Wilmington
Morning Star, February 8, 1980.
The N.C. Association of Chiefs
of Police, possibly inspired by Gov
James B. Hunt's plan for in-
filtrating the state's "wild and
crazy" bunches, has called for use
of undercover men and electronic
bugs in criminal investigations.
The police chiefs want legislation
from the General Assembly permit-
ting such surveillance. They said
conventional methods of investiga-
tion have not been successful.
Electronic surveillance (bugging)
is needed, the association said
because the sale and delivery of nar-
cotics and dangerous drugs has
reached extremely alarming propor-
tions. Bugging would be permissible
"only upon clear and evident pro-
bable cause presented in writing and
under oath" to a Superior Court
judge.
Reports from the state attorney
general, the U.S. Drug Enforcement
Administration and other law en-
forcement agencies leave little doubt
that drug traffic in North Carolina
is brisk, and in some areas largely
unimpeded. The police chiefs con-
cern is well-placed. However, the
resolution calling for new methods
in attacking the problem is puzzling
in one respect and ill-considered in
another.
The puzzling par. of the rcsoJu-
ton is the call for use of undercover
men. Police departments all over the
state have been using undercover
men for years as a matter of course
No additional legal sanction seems
to be needed.
Sanctioning electronic
surveillance is another matter. Some
police departments in the state have
used bugs to gather information in
criminal investigations and in
several bizarre circumstances to ob-
tain information having nothing
whatever to do with law enforce
mem Either way, the practice was
illegal.
Law officers certainly should not
have their hands tied in combatine
crime. Most law-abiding citizen;
want, just as much as The police
chiefs, to see law enforcement suc-
ceed; they happen to have a heavy
stake in the maintenance of law and
order.
Among all law enforcement tools
though, bugging is probablv the
most susceptible to abuse The
St-fUard Pr�P�sed by the police
chiefs � presenting probable cause
under oath to a judge � might
discourage abuse but it would not
eliminate the ever-present potential
The possibility of violating constitu-
tional rights would be substantial
SAAD'S SHOE
, REPAIR
H3 Grande Ave.
758-1228
Quality Shoe Repair
Coming to
ABORTIONS UP TO
mil WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
$175.00 "all inclusive"
pregnancy test, birth con
trol, and problem pregnan
cy counseling For further
information call 832 0535
(toll free number
800 221 2568) between 9
A.M. 5 P.M. weekdays.
Raleigh Women's
Health Organization
917 West Morgan St.
Raleigh, N.C. 27603
SUNFIRE
IVP
Live Reggae music this
Thursday, Friday, and
Saturday nights
SPORTSWORLD
COLLEGE NIGHT
Tuesday Night
6:30-10:00
Bring I. D. and
Get In For Only $1.25
WESTERN
SIZZLIN
STEAKHOUSE
Tuesday Night
Family Night
SIRLOIN BEEF TIPS
$1.99
Complete with Idaho King Baked
Potato, Texas Toast and Margarine
S90a E. lOth. St. 7SS-H71 ft
CLIFF'S �s
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
w�M�atanMt�Nmr in c atmt i MMK Ntrt CmMt
mmmm-tm
ALL YOU
CAN EAT $2.95!
MONDAY-THURSDAY
TROUT, CRAB CAKES
FLOUNDER. $3.25
CLIFF'S SUPER
SPECIAL
WEDNESDAY
CRAB CAKE SPECIAL
A FUNNY,
FUNNY,
VALENTINE
2 Golden Fri Crab Cokes
French Fries, Slow, and
Hash Puppies. $.99.
Studio Theatre
(Office
Ticket
Drama Building
Students 1.50 Pubic
�-�





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
FEBRUARY 12. 1980
Page 6
Novelists Predict
New Colleg
Life
Bv HELEN CORDES
(PS Writer
Let us imagine the possible
educational career of a young
man entering college in 1980.
During the first year he will do
an independent study project,
take a course in Western Civiliza-
tion and another on the
philosophy of science and
religion The next summer he
will go to South America to live
in a village where he will spend
his time helping the villagers
adapt new technology to old ways
of doing things
Returning, this student will
take a year-long course in
mathematics, one in psychology,
and will do an independent study
survey of the history of China
Stanford Professor Lewis
Mavhew published that vision ot
college life in 1980 back in 1964,
when post-World War 11 Baby
Boom babies were lined up in record
numbers at campus gates, federal
funding seemed limitless, and
golden visions of higher education's
future weren't considered outlan-
dish at all.
In fact, Mavhew's vision was only
one o' 15 other happy speculations
bv academics included in a 1964
book called Campus 1980. Op-
timism was mainstream thought
back then, when the book's pro-
fessors and administrators � while
mindful of faint student "troubles"
� were all confident that the
geometric enrollment increases, the
students' humanitarian bent, and
the keenly-felt "enthusiasm" for
college would continue and flower
through the next 16 years.
Obviously, things didn't quite
work out that way.
The varied and socially-active
curricula Mayhew envisioned have
been largely replaced by "hard"
majors that promise employment
after graduation. Many schools
have been forced to trim the aux-
iliary programs they initiated during
the sixties, bowing to the scarcer
funding of the seventies and the ex-
pected enrollment declines of the
eighties.
"Sure, we were wrong about a lot
of things cedes Dr. Alvin Eurich,
who edited Campus 1980. "And it's
due mostly to the changes,
economically, that have occurred
The biggest change may be in at-
titude. The blithe, expansionist,
buoyant, mood of 1964 is replaced
� almost with a vengence � by a
crave pessimism when educators are
asked to speculate what the next
decade will bring.
"Problems, even severe pro-
blems, lie ahead mourns a just-
released report from the Carnegie
Council on Policy Studies in Higher
Education. A five-to-fifteen percent
enrollment drop will parallel a
"downward drift in quality,
balance, integrity, dynamism, diver-
sity, private initiative, and research
capability
But the Carnegie study, called
Three Thousand Futures: The Next
20 Years in Higher Education, of-
fers the hope that colleges can turn
adversity into opportunity by taking
advantage of better teacher-student
ratios. Consequently, its dire predic-
tions appear almost sunny in com-
parison to some of the other recent
literature.
Indeed, a great deal of the 1980
literature on higher education ques-
tions the very value of college,
something only heretics discussed in
1964.
Boy Meets GirV
At ECU Playhouse
The ECU Playhouse will present
"Boy Meets Girl" beginning on
Feb. 16 and running until Feb. 23.
"Boy Meets Girl" is, ostensibly, a
farce about Hollywood in the 1940's
which concerns itself with two
scenario writers whose plot for any
play upon any occasion is "Boy
meets girl, boy loses girl, boy gets
girl The writers, played by Gary
Carter and Eric VanBaars, find
themselves hard pressed for ideas
for a vehicle in which to cast a pom-
pous fading star. An idea is born
just before the birth of a baby, who
is christened "Happy" by the
writers.
"Boy Meets Girl" is a fantastic
chronicle of studio politics, brazen
schemes to put contracts on a secure
basis, noble reproaches, and general
madness.
The play is full of frantic action
and the sole purpose of its frivolous
humor is laughter.
"Boy Meets Girl" was first
presented at the Cort Theater on
November 28, 1935 in New York Ci-
ty to receptive and laudatory
reviews. It was written by Samual
and Bella Spewack, who, among
other things, also wrote "Two Blind
Mice" and "My Three Angels
Edgar Loessin will direct the ECU
Playhouse presentation. Showtime
on all dates will be 8:15 in the studio
theater of the Drama Building.
Tickets may be purchased at the
ticket office in the Drama Building
and will cost $1.50 for students and
$2.50 for the public.
Gloomiest of all is a book called
Campus Shock. Author Lansing La-
mont interviewed some 650
students, teachers, administrators
and parents at a dozen liberal arts
universities that he thought would
"represent the best in higher educa-
tion. Historically, they have produc-
ed a majority of leaders in public
and professional life Lamont
chose the eight Ivy League schools,
Stanford, and the universities of
Michigan, Chicago, and California-
Berkeley.
Though the book is laced with
sensationalism and hobbled by its
curious conception of
"representative" campuses, La-
mont's conclusions aren't all that
different from those of other
observers.
He finds that the commonality of
a college diploma and its resultant
loss of status and value have confus-
ed and disillusioned students. Ac-
cordingly, pressures to become the
best in the class have intensified.
The results: increasing com-
petitiveness among students, less
trust, and more sophisticated
methods of cheating.
Those pressure, Lamont adds,
have not made for happier students.
The economic considerations that
lead to "high payoff" majors like
business, engineering, medicine and
law have frustrated thousands of
closet liberal arts enthusiasts.
The troubles continue. Lamont
sees racial and sexual tensions on
campus exacerbated by what many
students see as "unfair" affirmative
action measures. He sees increased
traffic at campus mental health
facilities as evidence of the lonliness
and sexual problems caused by life
at large, impersonal multiversities.
And the quality of college life is fur-
ther depressed, he says, by student
financial pressures aggravated by
the inflation of college costs to
nearly-intolerable levels.
While Campus Shock's disturbing
analysis of college life reflects a
general despair among educators,
two other recent books get right to
the heart of the matter by attacking
the mythology of higher education:
that access to and completion of col-
lege is the "great equalizer" that
oils upward mobility in America.
Small Futures, by Richard H.
deLone, the former associate direc-
tor of the Carnegie Council on
Children, suggests that neither col-
lege nor social dynamics are "likely
to produce more equality of oppor-
tunity unless there is more equality
to begin with
Perhaps such despair and dread
should be taken skeptically if only
because, as Campus 1980 showed,
even the most thoughtful predic-
tions are inevitably rooted in the
conditions of the time in which
they're made, and can easily end up
as just a good laugh for the Class of
2000.
Po'o 0 RICHAHO G.S
ECU's spring plants
must wait for the thaw to find the ground
In Washington, D.C.
ECU Students Attend
Entertainment Seminar
Four East Carolina students will
be in Washington, D.C. this week
for a meeting of the National Enter-
tainment and Campus Activities
Association. The association will of-
fer 99 sessions, seminars and
showcases to help students and ad-
visors find talent for the upcoming
summer session and the following
year.
The"students � Student Union
President Karen McLawhorn,
Special Attractions Chairman Hugh
Johnson, Art Exhibition's Lewis r
Johnson and Assistant Program I
Director Wanda Yuhas � will be at-
tending workshops and educational
seminars dealing with many forms
of entertainment.
"The sessions will concern impor
tant parts of campus entertain
ment said Program Director Ken
Hammond, "such things as lecture,
concert and film programming, and
how to handle contracts.
"There will also be live entertain-
ment showcases which give the
delegates the opportunity to view
first-hand up and coming acts.
There should be a number of ex-
hibitors with displays showing peo-
ple that agencies handle
In addition to the talent
showcases and seminars, the con-
vention will also feature 25 hours of
film screening and 25 hours of ex-
hibits.
" think the must helpful part will
be the workshops said Johnson.
"They're offering advice on pro-
moting and publicizing attractions,
how to book effectively for an au-
dience, and how to promote and
handle outside concerts.
"There is going to be a special
session that will go to the Smithso-
nian Institution. There people can
take a behind-the-scenes look at
how to cather material for exhibits.
We are also interested in fii
acts for our 'Barefoot on the M i
festival on pn V Phis, we hat
budget for pc'ormers
summer sessions V e are looking i
to block booking, where an
doesn't iust come to I a-Tarolina
but to schools in Virginia, N
Carolina and North Carolina 1 hat
way it is less expensive
Approximately 750 other mem!
schools are sending delegate
convention.
A cademician
Saw Incorrect
Future Forecast
Art Exhibiton Opens At Gray Gallery
By DAVID NORMS
Staff Writer
Four new shows are now open to
the public in the Wellington B. Gray
Gallery on the East Carolina
University Campus. Gallery Direc-
tor Randy Osman has arranged
what is being called one of the
gallery's most elaborate exhibits.
The 1980 Graduate Exhibition in-
cludes works by over 30 graduate
students in the ECU School of Art.
The works cover a wide range of
media, including fabric design,
painting, sculpture, ceramics, prints
(intaglio, lithography, and
silkscreen), wood, mixed media,
and drawings.
"Perspectives" is a show of 64
works by 56 North Carolina
photographers. The works were
purchased in November of 1978 by
R.J. Reynolds Industries, Inc
through a statewide photography
competition.
A collection of medieval and
Renaissance art is on loan from the
North Carolina Museum of Art in
Raleigh. These works include
sculpture, furniture, and 17th cen-
tury paintings from Flanders, Spain
and France. There are also il-
luminated manuscript and printed
woodcut book pages from the 15th
and 16th centuries, "� -iti ' - works
by Holbein and Durei
A collection of works bv student
of the Universitv
an exchange of student work ar-
ranged by the ECU Print Group, is
also on exhibit. The three dozen
works include drawings,
photographs, and various types of
prints.
The exhibits will be on view until
March 7 (the medieval and
renaissance works will be here until
April 30.) Everyone is invited to
visit these shows. The Gray Gallery
is in the Leo Jenkins Fine Arts
Center, and is open Mondays
through Fridays from 9 to 5 and
Sundays from 1 to 4.
On Saturday, Feb. 23, the
Carolinas Chapter of AS1D has
scheduled a workshop on campus in
the Jenkins Fine Arts Center. The
principal speaker for the day is Ray-
mond Grenald, a lighting designer
from Philadelphia.
ASID students from UNC-
Greensboro, Randolph Tech, and
Winthrop College will also attend.
The day will begin at 9:30. At a
noon luncheon, awards to student
winners of the Carolinas Chapter
student design competition will be
presented. A late afternoon recep-
tion at the home of Chancellor and
Mrs. Brewer will conclude the day.
toy JILL ADAMS
Has the snow come for the last time
we can only hope and wait for Spring
College Press Service
In 1964, Alvin Eurich, then and
now the president of a consulting
service called the Academy for
Educational Development, asked 16
eminent academicians to write what
thev thought life on campus would
be like in 1980. Eurich collected the
essays in a modest paperback called
Campus 1980, which stands today
as a testament to just how hard it is
to predict the future. Among other
speculations in the book, quoted
here verbatim:
The Student Mood, 1980
The college generation of the
1950's was the last "quiet" one we
will see in a long time. (Alvin
Eurich, the boon's editor).
Enrollment in 1980
(Enrollment) will rise sharply un-
til 1980, and will continue upward
thereafter, but at a slower rate.
(Federal and state aid) will increase
substantially. (Sidney Tickton of the
Academy for Educational Develop-
ment).
Curricula in 1980
Secondary schools will have
enriched their general-education ef-
fort, and students will come to col-
lege with a firm command of
American and English literature,
American government, and interna-
tional affairs. . Vocational train-
ing will gradually cease being a ma-
jor preoccupation of undergraduate
schools. . (There will be) a shift
from disciplinary courses during the
first several collegiate years to
courses designed to help students ex-
pand their impulse life. (Lew s
Mayhew, a professor at Stanford
then and now�.
The Draft, The World, and Slue
Activism in 1980
(The war in Vietnam) wiH hae
quieted down. . .owing to the ef-
forts of a Republican president who
argued that the war was fine, but
too expensive, and that in an case
the boys should be brought home
(Nevertheless) a revolutionary situa-
tion will continue. . This means
that some kind of draft. . .will pro
bably still be in effect.
The whole universe of students
will have moved, and will be mov-
ing, in the direction pointed to bv
the student activists. . who are in-
tending to major in social sciences
and the humanities in increasing
proportions, and declining to major
in science, engineering and business.
Business may have increasing!)
great difficulty in recruiting the
most talented young people. .
Student activism will flourish in
1980 not only because more students
of the new breed will have been pro
duced, but because it will have main
of the features of a successful social
movement. A great interest in
humanistic education will be touch
ed and realized. . .(the late Prof
Nevitt Sanford of Stanford).
The Economy
The price level for goods and scr
vices will average out to levels c
isting in the fall of 1967. (Tickton ol
the Academy for Educational
Development).
&iw. ���� � ��� ?��





THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 12, 1980
New Album Releases: The Buzzcocks
By PAT MINCES
The Buzzcocks � 4 Different Kind Of
Tension
The Buzcocks' first album, ingles Going
Steady, sas a collection of singles that were hits
in the United Kingdom and was the best material
from three previous albums. This release,
however, is an album of studio material that was
recorded last year and has only been released last
week I his release is not as potent as their last,
hui thai is not to say that this album is not totally
without redeeming social value. It is a fine album,
hut some of the material is just not that great.
I hen again, perhaps I expect a bit too much from
the bos.
Side one is nicknamed "The rose on the
chocolate box" and is composed of six
somewhat-love songs full of disillusionment,
paranoia, and sardonic glimpses of modern life.
1 he most outstanding tunes on this side are those
penned b Steve Diggle. with Peter Shellev's
material lading into obscurity. Shelley really
shines on the second side, called "The thorn
beneath the rose he composes all of the
material and it far eclipses the first side. The
songs are excellent, both in musical and lyrical
worth, tor they blend powerful rock music with a
superb scenario of the intricacies of modern life.
1 he Buzcocks are suffering from the second-
album blues their first U.S. album was so
sparkling that it was ver difficult to follow up
with an effort of equal worth. Peter Shelley has
moved to the forefront of the band, even though
Diggle contributes the more significant cuts of the
release, with the exception of the title cut and "1
Believe If you like new wave, you will really
like 1 Different Kind Of Tension, but this is not
the kind of tuff that will win over new throngs of
nerts. It receives a mixed recommendation.
The Brides of Funkenstein � ever Buy
Texas From A Cowboy
The two most innovative forces to emerge from
the previous decade were punk (now new wave)
LrJRNItfCr .BOUT CouXGt
Tr)T (JAM WMt
)f)TT0 HIGH SCHooc 0,
TMSOOTHij&to 06
&ur Drt� MtOUMD Tr
VcP0fsi)LD5 fWfClAiG LOT?
and funk, and the prime purveyor of funk is none
other than George Clinton, the "Funkmeister
The Brides of Funkenstein are a spin-off of
Parliament Funkadelic, featuring Dawn Silva,
Sheila Horn and Jeanette McGruder as the vocal
force through which Clinton presents his musical
ideas.
All the songs on this album are composed by
Clinton, with help from William Collins and Ron
Dunbar, in an attempt to highlight the astounding
vocal capacities of the Brides. The finest is the ti-
tle cut, "I'm Holding You Responsible" and
"Didn't Mean to Fall In Love a beautiful
ballad that is the exception to the funk epics that
dominate the album. Some of the songs, such as
"Party Up In Here are not so hot � more of
Clinton's humdrum dance fillers.
This album features most of the players usually
present on a Clinton endeavor, such as Bernie
Worrell, Collins, Michael Hampton, and Cleaves
and Ray on backing vocals. As always, the em-
phasis is on vocal strength, surrounded by syn-
thesizer fills, and powered by that infinitessimal
funk. I like this one, but it is not as strong as most
of Clinton's, and of course the Brides efforts.
Steve Howe � The Steve Howe Album
Steve Howe is perhaps most famous for his
harmonic guitar chords in the opening of
"Roundabout one of the English rock group
Yes's most famous pieces. Howe was perhaps the
centerpiece of this group, with his phenomenal
guitar performances from albums that spanned
the last decade. It seems like everyone from the
group has released a solo album, but Howe's is
the classiest of the lot. It is an excellent album.
The album reveals strong influences of Yes, yet
it remains detached, certainly an individual
album. The compositions are all by Howe, except
"Concerto in D (second movement) by Vivaldi,
which is performed by Howe on electric guitar
with assistance from a full orchestra, conducted
by Andrew Jaekman. Howe's "Double Rondo
with orchestra, and "Look Over Your
Shoulder featuring a beautiful vocal perfor-
mance by Clair Hamill, are evidence of Howe's
development into an excellent song composer. All
of the songs are superb and show influences rang-
ing from American Country to Italian Classical
music.
Howe's performances are splendid as he plays a
variety of isntruments, 14 in number, from man-
dolin to electric sitar. This is primarily an in-
strumental album, with two exceptions, and
Howe moves easily from slow, acoustic ballads to
lightning-fast, electric guitar virtuosity. He is aid-
ed by Patrick Moraz and Ron Leahy on syn-
thesizers, Clive Bunker on piano, and Alan White
and Bill Bruford on drums, but the album is at its
finest with just Steve and the orchestra.
You can't miss the album � it features more of
Roger Dean's fantastic cover art, reminiscent of
his early days with Yes. Howe's journey through
the past is one of the finest efforts released amidst
the throngs of material from Yes. Love at first
sight.
Steve Walsh � Schemer Dreamer
Steve is the vocalist from Kansas, sort of the
"American Yes and this is his first solo
endeavor. Steve's voice is nice, and he's sup-
ported by several members of Kansas and by
SUve Morse and Allan Sloan of the Dixie Dregs.
Walsh's finest capability is his elaborate lyrical
wanderings, and his compositional skills are
rather nice, also. If you like Kansas, you will like
Schemer Dreamer, though it is more laid back
than any Kansas effort.
What bugs me is the megalomania Steve seems
to suffer from, because it would be great if he
were as good as he seems to think he is. On the
cover are several caracatures of Steve shooting
two huge pistols, Steve singing, Steve wearing his
skateboard duds as he plays and sings, Steve just
being cool, Steve surrounded by mobs of fans,
Steve Steve Steve Aaaahhh! Inside are
many more pictures of Steve, always shirtless,
with the address of the Steve Walsh Fan Club, as
if we all were aching to join. This pretentious
egoism alone is enough to turn me against this
relatively nice album.
The Rockets � No Ballads
It's only rock and roll, but 1 don't like it!
be a
S
Albums courtesy of the Record Bar, Pitt Plaza
and Carolinu East Mall, except for the Buzz-
cocks, from Apple Records.
3
I
SUPPORT
MARCH
OF DIMES
AOVCRTISCO
ITCM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be reedity svaiiabis tor sale st orN,
below the advertised price in seen A4P Stors eicept � specifically noted
in this ad J
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We have
THE SOUTH AMERICAN
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Bringing Bogota s prime crop to Greenville
The most beautiful roses in the world!
For that and much more�
JEFFERSON FLORIST
752-6195
c�sj
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west fifth street, memorial drive
intersection near hospital


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For more information, cal 757-6611, Ext 266.
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I HI IASTt AROl INIAN
Sports
I I BKl k
Pirates Win Trio In Hectic Week
Get Magic
Number 14
ByII KI KSC'HANDI IK
Sports I itilor
Guard George Maynor and For-
ward Herb Krusen combined for 51
lead I ast c arolina to a
"ii victory ovci Delaware State
in Mingcs c oliseum, giv-
the Pirates hew first winning
nee 1975.
I he win, the 14ih of year for
I i 1 was one that first year eoaeh
loin has waited for all
season Ion 1 his is what our goal
been all season long said
mii "I can't tell you Inns much
I'm laid awake al night thinking
W e wanted this very badly
out seniors Odom con-
"Ye wanted them to go out
winners because they've been
h since the) 've been
�� those seniors, Krusen,
la I Herb Gray, led the way
y last night. Maynor,
� 2 points. Ki usen 24 and
I ii ay :
S v �'ira 's points came on slam
l v hich as a powerful
i steal. I he 6-S post
11 loci down seven re-
ked three shots.
Ma �: � i v ime through with a
�us effort, as his
n.st one dA
ft ; Raeford native
d hall points and
i assists and three
i big second half,
en route to a 12
�rmance
' �. u am seemed to catch
ki usen as the Pirates
. 1 per cent tor
;ame, including 4.2 percent in
ihe second half alone.
V sat led slowly and actually
tiled the small Delaware college at
l-poini the first half,
n Gray in less
iti �pt ned the game up
he lJ � ahead 29-2d with
� �
- Ho ei got closer than
id went into the
in down 37-27 at the
ame away in the
ol the second half
� points bv Maynor,
ates a 57-38 lead,
'in substituted freely for the
' he game, allow ing the
mned I lornets to narrow the
: 'in to ten.
dom felt the Pirates did
Gamecocks, ISU
Both Fall In Upsets
i s
aid I
The Slammin Jammin' Herb Gray
the 6-S ICt forward dunked 3 en route to f7points last night
OGAN
not pla near their best basketball. in the books
"But he said. "I think our met- "I was proud of our up and down
fectiveness was expected by effort, though Odom said, "and
everybody. We've played so well we got the points we needed when
B CHARIJKSt H-XMH I K
"sports t dititr
The 1 asi arolina bask
team took two big step- low
winning season, and respectability
with upset wins at Sour u
and at home against lllino Sta
last week.
The 70-67 overtin ��� i
linois State came only � :
an 86-84 v:jur
Gamecock �. B i-
coach Dave Odom,
come al a bettei tin
' I hey w ere - t�� �
Odom claimed. I he b
against nationally -kn w i
You nist wouldn't belie
amount ol congratuiai i
we've had
Vt ith a schedule that has -eci
Pirate- go up against � .
Duke. N. Stal . i. n I
Roberts. Odom � : -
bound to upset son
way.
I 'lie'ss u �
both those ea weekend
said "Bur I've been expect i . .
upset somebody,
sometime
Both games cnt d
w ire, The Southarolii �
ing decided b B ,
throws, and the IsI
beyond regulation
V South � ;
found themselves dowi 55 42
17:30 lefi I rhe I S
w as cut to tei -
mark.d
I he si
ed to be the . � '
(iamecocks.
following the time
came out in a pressing, trappii
defense that caught the Gamei el
off guard. With the sticky dt
leading the way, ECt outscored
USC 17-5 in the next six minutes to
take a 64-62 lead on a Herb Ki
jumper.
The Pirates nevei tra ed
that bucket, but were I
nect from the tree throw lii e I
the ictor Connect they did,
ing seven of their las; nine
charitv strike.

11 . .
� ' ine. onK
Double Score, 106-53
lately.
Odom no doubt was speaking of
the fact that his club was coming ol t
upset wins over South Carolina and
llinois State. Another super per-
we needed them
rhe Pirates, 14-8, now must
travel toollege Park. ld. to face
seventh-ranked Maryland Wednes-
dav and to L'NC-Wilmington for a
formance, he said, simply was "not Saturday matchup.
Lady Pirates Romp
Relayers A Success
C arolina track team
1 gain publicity stemm-
ts excellent mile relav

-
pasi weekend the Pirate
iveled to New York to
in the Melrose W anawaker
nes m Madison Square Garden,
hai I riday meet, the Pirate
finished second with a
o I 3:17 ;
I h.ti time bettered such schools as
Maryland, Villanova, Florida State,
I oledi � and Northarolina, and fell
only I owsen State.
Foil the New York meet.
Pirates immediately took to the
drove 490 miles to
Ohio to participate in
Nights Colombus
earn tunshed third here,
the Philadelphia Pioneers
and I oledo with a time o 3:18.9.
It is truly amazing thai the team
could do so well considering the
long day ol travel that it experienc-
ed.
Nevertheless. ( coach Bill
( arson had his complaints. "We
made some running errors he
.aid. "But overall I guess it's a real
achievmenl to tmish so highly
rhe track rankings are due out
soon and the I! mile relay team is
expected to be listed among the na-
iion's top ten.
- JJL.
tomm
Charles
Chandler
le eland,
Saturday's
meet. 1 he
I i Silcott, the WBL's leading
scorer with a 33.0 average, was
suspended indefinitely last week bv
the Streak's owner alter she had
allegedly been trying to talk another
W Bl team into trading for her.
Why did she want to be traded?
Why else She's been at odds with
Gillman all season long, stating on
several occasions that she could no
longer play for him.
Gillman doesn't take a liking to
such things and may have just made
it impossible tor Miss Silcott to
return to YVB1 play, ever.
He'll never give up, will he?
Ciuess who's up to his old tricks.
Here's a hint: He is infamous tor
having his players quit his team.
V ep, it's I arrv Gillman in the
news again, that real honey of a
c �ach.
Ihe ex II mentor has really
done n this time. He coaches the St.
I ouis Streak ol the Women's
Basketball I eague and, thanks to a
�iipei 4ar, was taring pretty well.
I hai s until last week .
Oliver Mack, the ex-ECU sensa-
tion that unfortunately had to play
under Gillman is still sticking it out
with the NBA's Los Angeles Lakers.
The 6-5 guard has played in 25
games and is averaging 2.0 points.
Mack has also dished off 19 assists,
pulled down 22 rebounds and con-
nected on 42.9 per cent of his field
goal attempts.
Of course, there are major
obstacles holding Mack back.
Namely, Magic Johnson and Norm
Nixon, the two great I aker guards.
Pity Ed Emory. The new Pirate
head football coach will have his
work cut out for him next season.
I he Pirate schedule reads as most
likely the toughest in the school's
history.
Road trips are scheduled to
Florida State, a team that finished
11-0 and played in the Orange Bowl;
Miami, I la North Carolina, North
Carolina State and Duke. Whew!
Phofo by KIP SLOAN
Thompson goes up strong angainst Mason
By JIMM1 DuPKK.K
ssistant spurts tditor
After launching an awesome first
half offensive which saw the I adv
Pirates build a 31 point halt time
margin, last Carolina's Lady
Pirates cruised to 106-53 trouncing
of George Mason Saturday at
Minges Coliseum.
I aurie Sikes' twenty-toot field
goal with less than ten minutes
elapsed gave the hosts a devastating
24-6 lead which the expanded to
35-10 with Marv Denkler's follow-
shot with 6:30 to intermission.
Had the Lady Bucs failed to score
in the closing frame. Mason's final
tally would barely have been enough
to send the game to overtime, as
ECU set a blistering 53 point pace in
the opening siana.
"You can come into a game like
this and make a lot of fouls and tur-
novers and cause yourself to lose
momentum offered ECl coach
Cathy Andruzzi. "I was proud o
our girls tonight. They kept up the
intensity on offense and defense
Freshman sharpshooter Marv
Denkler netted 17 points in just 17
minutes played, while junior (Cathy
Riley pumped in 16 points and grab
bed 10 rebounds Junior I sdia
Rountree added 14 points and
center Marcia Girven and point
guard I aurie Sikes chipped in 10
each. Sikes also added six assists to
her nationally ranked total.
Mason's Lavon Jones fired in 16
points after scratching only four in
the first half, and grabbed 10 re-
bounds. Forward Carol Shemansky
added 12 points and reserve nn
Johnson 11.
The hit movie "10" opened
recently at a local theater, but
ECU's old number 10 has been do
ing her thing for quite some time
and Saturday was her night to
remember and be remembered.
Rosie Thompson, the fifth-year
senior from nearby Mounts Creek,
was bestowed the honor of being the
first female athlete in ECU hisiorv
cerert . -
hi - v
Letters � .
c S. S
lesse Hi
1st District
lont
! ;
witness
tory in 25
Vshley ;
pub s L
i m and
ECU Board
rhompson s
day's spev
newspa .
lohn D (
opt � -
presented i
ball sha
sta; sties a i
promise
end ol ihe cui
Cham,
and Dire
officially
jersey, conv
1 hompson �
been cvns
ward leading tru v
ing in each ol
and currently eu
Hei career lota !
op, among all r
and women
I hompson has been chosv
Nc l foi three vears
tournament V l v x
Tournament at the lvso i
Invitational and was i
Greenville Sports ub i
thlete ol the eai ilws - x
from basketball, sheleiierv
years as a menibci ol iiu i
volleyball scuad
"Where do you get ano k
1 hompson .�" mahened Viulru
1 "hmk ihe people here u,lK
prcciatc k, cN (
characiei





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 12. 1980
Wrestling Set To Begin
Basketball Participation Up
B
KK'kl GLIARMIS
Intramural 1 orrrpondt'nl
Intramural basket-
ball participation this
season reached an all-
time high with only
: foi feits in approx-
!cl 200 games
,ed Mote than 13(H)
men and women are
,1 on the 167 team
Several outstanding
nances b teams
individuals were
,J hist week. Super
ised a lull court
.sure defense and
� a I spectacular
dunks b K.
son, 2 points, to
their opponents,
tidividual per-
jrs were I om
o I c o c k
m ngcK. 32
luan Burge and
. - Mat Ins of Jam-
Ill with 32 and 24
i especth ely.
Russ of Chi
Ginger
el of I ler
tnd Sherrill
Ri ppers all
16 points
respective
enable scores
rer were the
" team, over-
a the Delta
earn, 77-13.
and Corn-
ed the Belk
ies, 40-39, in
death" over-
I ad Rippers
VII "n All,
. Bonds of
' was the top
scorer vith
and K. Man-
15 for her
Delta "A"
i 30-15 win
a Delta Pi.
Roller Hockey
Excitement continues
to mount with teams
battling for a place in
the Roller Hockey plav-
offs.
In the past few
weeks, Unkappa Fifth
defeated the Wrong
Numbers 12-6 and was
been defeated bv
Rollers, 8-6.
The Chubniks had
one o' their best weeks
ever when they rolled
past the Rollers, 18-11,
and later in the week
slipped past the Skater
Daters, 6-4.
Another winning
team, the Dole Sigmas,
defeated the H.Rs,
13-12, and the Wrong
Numbers, 21-2. Games
that were snowed out
last Tuesday will be
played at the end of the
season.
Notable netters for
the week were Mike
W ise. Chubniks, 14
points; Darrell Jones,
H.Rs, 12 points; and
Ed Kearns, Dole
Sigmas, 9 points
against Unkappa Fifth,
and 14 points against
the Wrong Numbers.
Ko-Rec Bowling
The Co-Rec Bowling
season began today
with 12 teams par-
ticipating in the event.
Within the league, two
divisions will be
established for round-
robin competition.
The top three teams
in each diision at the
end of the competition
will advance to the
playoffs. Co-Rec
Championship t-shirts
will be awarded to the
winning playoff team.
Certificates will be
awarded for the follow-
ing accomplishment
during the season, in-
cluding the playoffs:
high game (men and
women); high series
(men and women); and
high team series.
The preseason
favorite has to be last
year's champion SSS,
but they could en-
counter some stiff com-
petition from the other
entries before the
season is completed.
Games will be played
M o n d a y - T h u r s d a y ,
4-10 p.m in the
Mendenhall Bowling
Center.
Wrestling
Intramural wrestling
is almost underway, so
pay attention,
gentlemen, here are the
weight classes: 126,
134 142, 150, 158. 167,
177, 190, and
COUPON
ciliated Pearl
gs with Any
Purchase
Riggan Shoe Repair
across St. from
Blount Harvey.
Downtown
111 W. 4th St.
Parking in front and Rear
The Pierced Ear
Pitt Plaza
756-9466
our Diamond.
Lxirnn Stoic
ffiUhillrr
Wed.
Ladies Night
Blues with
Mike Wells
ABORTION
lecision may well be diilicult . .
the abortion itself doesn't have to be.
1 o our best to make it easy for you ,
Free Pregnancy Test
Very Early Pregnancy Teat
Call 781-8880 anytime
The Fleming Center
noly
Personal . . Professional Care
at a reasonable cost
Featuring
"Today's World Values:
Can we pay the price?"
Wedresdav - Feb. 20th
Jenkins 'Vuditorium - 9'00pm
(ART BUILDING)
Admission Free
Door Prize Music
Spo��or�d bf C.mp�. Crwwd tor Chrft
unlimited. A partici-
pant must weigh at
least 177 pounds to
compete in the
unlimited class.
All wrestlers must be
present for the
preliminary weigh-in in
the men's locker room
of Memorial Gym in
order to be officially
entered in the tourna-
ment. Participants will
he weighed again 30
minutes prior to their
first match.
Each wrestler will be
allowed to enter one
weight class above the
class in which the
preliminary weight fell.
Stop by the In-
tramural Office, 204
Memorial Gym, for
rules and entry dates.
All Campus Swim Meet
The All Campus
Swim Meet is scheduled
for Wednesday, Feb.
26.
Team entry forms
must be properly com-
pleted and turned in to
the Intramural Swim
Meet director no later
than 5:30 p.m. on the
day of the meet. Early
entries will be taken at
the Intramural Office,
204 Memorial Gym.
freestyle, 100 yard
medley relay, 50 yard
backstroke, butterfly
and breastroke.
Other events include
the 100 yard t-shirt
relay, the 100 yard in-
dividual medley and an
innertube relay.
Remember, entry
forms are due no later
than 5:30 p.m. on the
day of the meet, and
the meet will begin at 6l
p.m. in Minges. Good'
luck swimmers!
WANTED
ELECTIONS CHAIRPERSON
The Student Government
Association Executive Council
is in the process of selecting a
responsible, hard working, and
reliable student to oversee the
Spring Elections.
For more information contact the
SGA office at 757-6611 extension 218.
The swim meet will
begin promptlv at 6
p.m. The divine tank
II r� , �. T ARMY NAVY STORE T
will open for warm-ups
-� . ,� ,1 � Backpacks, BIS, Bomber,
30 minutes prior to the � �
- . , m Field, Deck, Flight, Snorkel
start of the meet and ; ;
r Jackets, Peacoats, Parkas, T
vvi remain open to J Bfc
Shoes, Combat Boots, Plus

1501 S. Evans Street
remain open
participants
throughout the even-
ing.
Some of the events
on schedule for the
meet are 50 vard
w
Classified
FOR RENT PERSONAL
FEMALE ROOMMATE: needed
to share half rent and utilities on
two bedroom apartment three
blocks from campus. Call
758 3076.
STUDIOUS MALE ROOMMATE:
needed to share rent and utilities
in one bedfroom apartment at
Kings Row. Call 752 7325 after
11:00 p.m.
RESPONSIBLE FEMALE
ROOMMATE, needed to shart
two bedroom apartment at Village
Green. Half rent and utilities
Call 758 6184 after 6:00 p.m
NICE TWO BEDROOM apart
ments for rent Heat and water
furnished Call 756 1015.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: 1973 Datsun 240 Z
Excellent condition Strait drive,
new paint( white), AM F M.
8 track, new seats S3S00. Call
7 52 9564
ANYONE INTERESTED, in for
ming a weekly Bible study group
please call 754 4443 after 5:00.
DANCE AUDITIONS: for Dance
festival held every spring. For
more information call 756-7235.
SUNSHINE STUDIOS: offering
the following classes: Ballet, Jaiz,
Belly Dance, Yoga, and Disco.
For more information call
756 7235.
COUNSELORS for western North
Carolina coed 8 week summer
camp Room, meals, laundry,
salary and travel allowance. Ex-
perience not necessary, but must
enioy living and working with
children. Only clean-cut non
smoking college students need ap
ply. For application and brochure
write: Camp Pinewood, 1801
Cleveland Rd Miami Beach, Fla.
33141
HELP WANTED: I am looking for
two friendly, outgoing people for
weekend and holiday work. Job
pays well for the right individuals.
Must be intellegent, quick-witted,
and enjoy happy people. Travel
involved, transportation furnish
ed. Job is ideal for educator or
student seeking extra Hi Not
sales work. Interested4 Call
758-6449 for application.
TYPING: for students and pro
fessors available, call 752 7492
after 6:00p.m.
DISCOURAGED or LONLEY:
join Bible study and fellowship.
Call 756 4443 after 5:00.
LOST on Avery Street, large white
cat. with three black spots and no
tail. 752 8089
i REWARD S S300 in NYSE (blue
chips) certificates. Leading to the
arrest and conviction of those per
son(s) responsible for the thieft
and vandalism of a 1948 Chevy
Van on January 30, 1980 at 1:30
am. SI 00 bonus to the person) s)
who brings vandalism before the
appropriate committee.
S100 REWARD: for information
leading to the return of Rosie:
female gold cocker spaniel, 6 mon
ths old. All calls kept confidential.
752 0256.
264 ByPass�Greenville
A SPECIAL
RIBEYE STEAK DINNER
FOR 2
PLUS ALL THE SALAD YOU CAN EAT
Tuesday
ISKEET KELLEYI
Wed. & Thur.
Valentine Special
JESSE BOLT &
The Fabulous
Knobs
BONANZA'S TENDER RIBEYE
$C99
for
(Dinner includes steak, potato,
toast & all the salad you can eat.
Offer good7 with coupon only.
Coupon expires�580
BONANZA'S TENDER RIBEYE
$C99
for J
Dinner includes steak, potato.
toast & all the salad you can eat.
Offer good with coupon only.
Coupon expires 3580
Fri. & Sat.
PEGASUS
r
THERE J� A
DIFFERENCE!
HAVETWOON US ANYTIME!
Pizza inn
AMERICAS FAVORITE PIZZA

PIZZA BUFFET
ALL THE PIZZA AND
SALAD YOU CAN EAT
MonFri. 11:30 2:00
Mon. & Tues. 6:00-8:001
758-6366 Evening buffet �2.79
Hwy 264 bypass Greenville , N. C.
STEEPLECHASE
CAFETERIA
EDUCATIONAL
CENTER
TEST PREPARATION
SPECIALISTS SINCE 1938
Visit Our Centers
And See For Yourself
Why We Make The Difference
Call Days, Eves & Weekends
For classes in your area, call:
9194898720
Suite 102 Crost Bldg.
2634 Chapel Hill Blvd.
Durham N.C. 27707
919-489-8720
WUdlUC HI JlOlC UI1LI
CALL TOLL FREE
800-223-1782 -
MON-SAT 10-9
SUN 12-7
FAMILY AMUSEMENT CENTER
BESIDE STEEPLE CHASE CAFETERIA
PITT PLAZA
Limit One Coupon Per Customer
o
TU
:y t
MONSAT. 11:00-2:00
4:30 - 8:00
WED.
SUN. 11:30- 2:00
Pitt Plaza
13 Feb. 1980
$1.14 Beans wFranks
$1.49 Chicken Pastry
THUR. 14 Feb. 1980
$1.14 Chili & Macaroni
$1.49 Choice Chicken
FRI. 15 Feb. 1980
$1.14 Spaghetti & Sauce
$1.49 Stuffed Peppers
SAT. 16 Feb. 1980
$1.14 Ham & Noodle Casserole
$1.49 Fish Cakes wTarter Sauce
SUN. 17 Feb. 1980
$1.14 Creole Spaghetti
$1.49 Turkey & Dressing
MON. 18 Feb. 1980
$1.14 Chili & Rice
$1.49 Chicken Chow Mein
TUE. 19 Feb. 1980
$1.14 Franks wSaurkraut
$1.49 Pork wDressing
All meals served w 2 Veg. & roll
Try Our New Fried Vegetable Plate
FINANCIAL
ADD
Did you receive a questionnaire in the mil on how you are financing your
EDUCATION? THE SUCCESS OF OUR SURVEY REQUIRES YOUR RESPOND WETHER YOU
ARE RECEIVING FINANCIAL AID OR NOT. WE NEED YOUR HELP! THE THREE KEYS
TO IMPROVING FINANCIAL AID ARE:
1 - nil OUT THE QUESTiaittlFE
CompUXaJbj and acauAaX'tiy. InclutU any otktA conmtnCA you.
vnuZd Ukt to Mkt.)
2 - RETURN IT r
Do not xtmovt tht cave U&UA. Keep idtnti�yJi4 codtA
intact.)
3- COLLECT YOUR COO
Upon x&ctAjpt oi yowt completed qutstlonnaAJU, Applied
tkutaqtmtnt Science mJLL mlL you a cn&ca �o4 $5.00 u
aompeittcXioft io you ZLmt and a&u.ttanct.)
if ycu have any questions or need a new questionnaire, please call:
Wendy Dellefield at: 800-638-278 or 800-638-2785
- & -0 ��
'Wtti ilHEJl.iiM�i �'�-





�� k ���.� nwi. �� h q
.�
f 1 1
10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 12, 1980
Joyner Draws Forfeit
Goode, Pirates Pin ODU
Rosie displays stats trophy
Photo by KIP SLOAN
ECU Gymnasts Fall;
Spring To Victory
ast Carolina's lady
ate gymnasts suf-
J a pair of losses
over the weekend but
managed to slip by
another opponant as
t h e c o in p I e t e d a
weekend tour of" South
c arotina.
ECl dropj . a
120.2-112.9 decision at
Columbia as the
Camecocks tumbled
their way to victory.
Junior Susan McKniehr
claimed one of two first
place finishes lor the
1 ad Bues. posting a
7.95 in the floor exer-
cise. Elizabeth Jackson
took top honors on the
balance beam with a
7.6.
Annie Loeschke tied
for second with an even
7.0 and Kim Lowe
posted an 8.0 second in
vaulting.
East Tennessee State
scored 114 to top
ECU's 112.3, but the
Pirates' total was
enough to edge host
Furman who tallied
112.1.
Cindy Rogers
brought home the only
first in the tri-meet,
landing a 7.7 on the
balance beam.
Mcknight netted se-
cond with her 7.7 vault
effort.
The Lady Pirates
travel to Williamsburg,
Va. to face the Indians
of William and Mary
Saturday.
By
EDDIE WILLIAMS
Staff Reporter
Steve Goode lived up
to his last name's
reference, as he and the
rest of ECU's Pirates
defeated Old Domi-
nion, 20-13 in lihges
Coliseum Friday night.
Goode, wrestling in
167 pound division,
handily defeated Larry
Corry, to bring the
Pirates from a 13-9
deficit into a 14-13
lead. It was one that
ECU never relinquish-
ed as Butch Revils and
Jay Dever comman-
dingly beat their op-
ponents to secure the
victory.
The dual match
began as an uphill
climb for the Pirates as
ODU took the first two
individuals matches to
lead 7-0.
Grey Sours (134)
came on to put the Bucs
on the scoreboard as he
defeated David Bunch
6-2.
Sours started out ag-
gressively taking a 4-0
lead after only 1:30 had
elapsed in the first three
minute period.
In the second period,
Sours worked his way
out of a good hold to
go up 6-0, before
Bunch finally gathered
two points.
After three in-
dividual matches, ODU
led 7-3.
Scott Eaton (142)
continued the Pirate
comeback with a con-
vincing 9-1 win over
Mike Clark.
In the match, Eaton
came close to pinning
Clark in the first
period, and settled for
a 4-0 lead after two
periods.
Frank Schaede (150)
then wrestled QDU's
Roger Randall to a 7-7
standoff in the next
match. The match
featured an exciting
finish which saw Ran-
dall score a controver-
sial point with only 16
seconds left to earn the
tie.
"The referee was in
position to see said
ECU assistant coach
Vic Northrop, "and he
made the correct call
The score between
the two teams remained
tied at 9-9 until ODU's
Tim Davidson defeated
Curtis Sendek 11-2, to
put ODU back on top
at 13-9.
The stage was set for
Goode's excellent per-
formance.
Goode scored on a
takedown with 1:28 to
go in the first period to
lead 2-0. The next 18
seconds produced three
quick points which
found Goode on top
4-1 after one period.
Corry broke Goode's
hold to come within a
point at 4-3, to start the
second period. But that
was as close as he got as
Goode continually
scored points on
takedowns to convinc-
ingly out-point Corry,
16-5.
Goode's win seemed
to inspire the Bucs as
nationally-ranked
Butch Revils
methodically defeated
John Nowland 7-3. The
win lengthened the
Pirate lead to 17-13
with two individual
matches left in the con-
test.
ECU's Jay Dever
then out-hustled Mark
Calder 6-2 to ice the
Pirate victorv.
With the score 20-13
and nationally-ranked
D.T. Jovner up next
for ECU, ODU
forfeited the final
match.
Goode's perfor-
mance drew praise
from Northrop as he
claimed, "That's the
best I've seen Steve
wrestle since
Christmas. To score
that many points on
takedowns is a hard
feat to do he said.
Goode was more
modest about his per-
formance. "Credit has
got to go to
everybody he said.
"It's important to be
good, but you must
have somebodv to work
with
Northrop seems to be
that somebody, accor-
ding to Goode.
"I could find a bag
of money, then pin
D.T then Vic comes in
to wrestle and I'm on
m back looking up ai
the ceiling he said.
He
l
for
gives me
something (() uork
The work is paying
off tor the Pirates s()
i lar this season. I heir
record is now 6-3-1,
while Old Dominion
fell to 5-3.
I
Grappler
Ptoo by CHAP GURLCV
Steve Goode goes for pin
The ECU Media Board is
excepting applications for the
following positions:
1) Senior Editor of The East
Carolinian
2) Editor of the Buccaneer
3) Editor of the Rebel
4) Head Photographer for the
Photo Lab
5) General Manager of
WECU
6) Editor of the minority
publication
Deadline for applying is
February 15, 1980. Apply in
person at the East Carolinian
Office, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.
Applications must be full time
students with an overall GPA
of 2.0.
.W-Ni&jG S
ANNOUNCING
Chanelo's Pizza and Subs
ItfRNlK) 5
VALENTINE'S WEEK MASSACRE
Nothing
Beatsa
Chanelo's
Pizza
Tues.
Wed.
Fri.
Sat.
BUY ANY 2 PIZZAS YOUR CHOICE
GET 3RD PIZZA YOUR CHOICE SAME VALUE
FREE
Tues.
FREE
Wed.
FREE
Thur.
FREE
Fri.
FREE
Sat.
Nothing
Beatsa
Chanelo's
Pizza
Special Good For � Dine-In � Fast Free Hot Delivery� Carry-Out
ftEUIXE SietUAN PIZZAS
"THICK CRUST. EXTRA CHEESE'
10'
14"
16'
CHEESE $3.60 6.20 6.25
ONION 4.10 5.96 7.20
GREEN PEPPER 4.10 5.95 7.20
PEPPERONI 4-10 5.85 7.20
FRESH SAUSAGE 4.10 5.96 7.20
GROUND BEEF J � J-g J-gj
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ANCHOVY 4.10 5.95 7 20
MUSHROOM 4.10 5.95 7 20
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ADDITIONAL ITEMS .60 .76 .95
SICILIAN SUPREME 6.10 8.60 10.46
P�pporor�i,lt�l�n Sauug�,Muihrooms, Onkxi.Grmn I
Gr�n Oliv Anchovy on roquoat.
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CHEESE
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FRESH SAUSAGE
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3.60
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ANCHOVY 3,50
MUSHROOM 3.50
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ADDITIONAL ITEMS .60
CHANELO'S SUPREME 6.60
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�� V - � V
� � H� ( �� . S
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jfips� AtJMJSNbtffOfeftUfc'





Title
The East Carolinian, February 12, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 12, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.38
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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