The East Carolinian, February 7, 1980






I
I
�hc iEaai Carolinian
Vol. 54 No. &
s.
S
8 Pages
Thursday, February 7,1980
(Greenville, N.C
Circulation 10,000
Unfinished
Parking
Lot Open
By KAREN WENDT
The unfinished parking lot behind
Mendenhali Student Center is now
open for parking until until the lot is
dry enough to complete construc-
tion.
The decision was made at a recent
chancellors meeting to help relieve
the parking shortage near campus.
"1 conferred with the engineer of
the parking lot said SGA Vice
President Charlie Sherrod. The
spokesman for Barrus Construction
Company said that until the weather
is "dry and warm they will be
unable to work on the lots.
Until now the lot has not been
open for parking.
Because of the large amount of
wet weather that has plagued North
Carolina in recent weeks, it is
doubtful if the lots will be com-
pleted in the near future.
According to Vice Chancellor
Elmer Meyer, the construction com-
pany will have to re-grade the lot.
Sherrod thought it made "good
sense not to close the lot for months
until the conditions get right. It will
certainly ease the parking crunch
Photo by JILL Adams
Jarvis Students Won't Be Left Out In The Cold
Local Man Runs For President
Pofo Oy JILL ADAMS
Willis Stancill
for president
By TERRY GRAY
Staff Writer
With so many presidential can-
didates running around these days,
it's getting hard to remember all the
names: Baker, Bush, Reagan, Ken-
nedy, Stancill, Anderson
Stancill?
Willis Stancill. It might be in-
teresting to remember his name, for
this 40-year-old Greenville native
says he is going to make mincemeat
out of President Carter in New
Hampshire's Democratic primary
on Feb. 26.
"It sounds preposterous, me run-
ning for president, but I've talked to
thousands of people in eight dif-
ferent states who have pledged their
money and support said Stancill
Wednesday.
Stancill has no working ex-
perience in government, but claims
to have read enough books on
economics, politics and science to
hae earned several doctorate degrees
by now. He said he got his Master's
at ECU in 1962, and has since
taught high school science while do-
ing various other jobs on the side,
including stockbroking and real
estate sales.
Although he plans to run on the
Democratic ticket, Stancill
represents the philosophy of the
Clean Government Party. The party
line is not hard to guess � clean up
the waste, the corruption and ineffi-
ciency in Washington. Stancill isn't
sure how big the party is, but said
there are "thousands of members all
over the country
Stancill said he went to observe
the candidates in the Iowa caucuses
last month and came away with the
belief that he could win in New
Hampshire.
Stancill on Carter: "Nobody real-
ly likes him, he just doesn't have
any competition On Kennedy:
"He's already been eliminated, and
won't even carry Massachusetts
Reagan: "Over the hill Bush:
"He won in Iowa mainly because of
a lack of Republican candidates
Conally: "No chance
"I didn't do any campaigning in
Iowa because I didn't want to an-
tagonize any of them, I just wanted
to wait and let them fight among
themselves Stancill said.
The first impression one gets is
that Stancill can't be serious about
this. How can an unknown who has
never held public office come up
against nationally known, ex-
perienced politicians?
"How? I'm going to convince the
voters by telling the truth said
Stancill confidently. "Everybody
NCR Considers License
First Nuke Since Three-Mile
KNOXVILLE, Tenn.(AP)�The
Nuclear Regulatory Commission's
staff is ready to license a new
nuclear plant for the first time since
the Three-Mile Island accident last
March, officials said today.
Frank Ingram, an NRC
spokesman in Washington, said the
commission's Office Of Nuclear
Regulation has concluded that the
Tennesee Valley Authority should
get a restricted license to load fuel in
one of two reactors at its Sequoyah
plant near Chattanooga.
"The commission presently has
time scheduled for Monday to hear
a staff review of Sequoyah In-
gram said. "It is the staff's inten
tion to recommend that the commis-
sion offer a license for low-power
testing
Officials said NRC's staff has
concluded in a 150-page report that
Sequovah satisfies exisitng license
requirements and all new recom-
mendations made by various task
forces since the Three-Mile Island
Inside Today
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nuclear plant accident last March
28.
If the five-member commission
approves the recommendation, In-
gram said, Sequoyah would become
the first nuclear station to receive
any sort of license from NRC since
the Harrisburg, Pa accident.
NRC had a team of inspectors at
the Chattanooga plant three days
last week making a final check of
the safety measures implemented by
TVA since Three-Mile Island. .
Denwood Ross, director of pro-
ject management in the NRC's Of-
fice of Nuclear Reactor Regulation,
said the commission could impose
some conditions on Sequoyah's
operation, "but they'd be benign
"There are no unresolved issues
as far as we're concerned, and the
only bad thing that could happen
would be for the commission Thurs-
day to adopt some new policy in ef-
fect requiring us to put Sequoyah
off he said.
The commission is scheduled to
hear a staff briefing Thursday on
the impact of a 2,000-page report by
a special inquiry group into the
Three-Mile Island accident.
The NRC commissioned the in-
quiry, directed by Washington
lawyer Mitchell Rogovin, as part of
its own investigation of Three-Mile
Island. The Rogovin inquiry is in-
dependent of a study by the Kemeny
Commission appointed by President
Carter.
"The briefing Friday is focused
on the impact of the report in terms
of licensing Ingram said. "It
would be premature to speculate
now how that might effect Se-
quoyah. As of this moment, it is the
staff's intention to recommend Se-
quoyah's licensing
TVA has contended since Dec. 3
that Sequoyah meets the Kemeny
Commission's guidelines for new
licensing requirements. The NRC
placed a moratorium on licensing of
all new nuclear plants after the
Kemeny Commission issued its fin-
dings last Oct. 31.
Larry Mills, TVA's manager of
nuclear regulations, said that even if
Sequoyah gets a limited license
Monday, it will likely be mid-
summer or later before the plant
begins commercial operation.
Corrections
In last Friday's issue, two names
were left off of the visitation com-
mittee in the Visitation Survey
Story. MRC officers belonging to
the committee are: Grady Dickerson
and John Quinn.
In the Tuesday, Feb. 3 issue, a
headline was incorrectly placed with
an article. On page 3, a headline ar
peared reading, "Nazi Leader Calls
For Right-Wing Demonstration
The article following this headline
concerned eight additional staff
members being hired at a center for
mentally retarded children. We,
apologize for any confusion this
mistake may have caused.
knows that politicians never tell the
truth. I'm going to be all over New
Hampshire, in the schools, the col-
leges, in town halls � wherever I
can speak
His comments on the ills of
America are simple and straightfor-
ward. To stop inflation, he proposes
a battle against the monopolies that
are part of the "international cor-
porate power structure that is break-
ing the back of the middle class
The Iranian crisis was "staged by
some of Carter's people to help cut
Kennedy's throat says Stancill,
who also thinks we should cut
defense spending because "most of
it is wasted
He added that the Russian inva-
sion of Afghanistan was the "major
boo-boo of the century � they
think we're pussycats but he is
against any military moves. Instead,
the United States must convince
world leaders that "the world has
become too small for war
Stancill, who said he has already
spent $3,000 of his own money on
the campaign trail in several states,
has a unique proposal for fund-
raising. He only wants $5 from each
contributor, and suggests that they
offset the expense by selling old
clothes or by cashing in on bottle
refunds and the like.
As the snow was covering Green-
ville and Interstate 95 Wednesday,
Stancill wondered whether he
should go ahead and drive to New
Hampshire or wait.
He's anxious to go. Whatever lays
in store for him there, he doesn't
betray the slightest hint of doubt
about his seemingly impossible
quest.
"A lot of people think I'm a
crackpot said Stancill, "but if I
can get just a few delegates to the
convention, I'll have made a
mark
Jarvis Co-eds
Given Option
By DEBBIE HOTALING
Assistant News Editor
Jarvis Dormitory is going co-ed,
and some students are now wonder-
ing where the women from Jarvis
will go.
Dr. Elmer Meyer, vice chancellor
for Student Life, assured the Jarvis
women a place to live. "We are
planning, and we had always plann-
ed, to find equal housing for those
girls who are losing their rooms in
Jarvis
The Residence Life Committee
will meet in a closed session Thurs-
day, Feb. 7, to discuss options for
the women being moved out. Thurs-
day, Feb. 14, an open meeting will
be held to discuss the different op-
tions and to hear any new ideas
from students.
"Everyone is welcome to give
their opinions and speculations on
the decision to be made Meyer
said. "There are several questions
that need to be answered: What's
fairest for the girls in Jarvis concer-
ning places open for the girls? Who
will have the first choice of rooms in
Jarvis? Which girls will have to
leave Jarvis?"
Title IX calls for equal housing
with no discrimination in facilities.
Brett Melvin, SGA president, is a
strong supporter of Title IX on the
ECU campus. "I worked for mak-
ing Jarvis co-ed. This was mainly
because I wanted to represent all of
the students. Why was there a dorm
substantially better than the others
limited to only females?"
Two dorms on the hill have been
named as possible solutions for the
co-ed problem. Belk and Scott are
the only two dorms with suites. At
the open meeting next Thursday,
students will be able to voice their
opinions on which dorm should be
made co-ed.
"I think Belk Dorm is the best
choice Melvin said. "The
facilities are more appropos to the
females' needs in Belk rather than in
Scott. I think the girls will like living
in suites.
"To live in a co-ed dorm, one
must be an upperclassman, so those
students living in a co-ed dorm will
have already become accustomed to
living on campus and away from
home Melvin said.
Virginia Carlton, president of
Jarvis, commented, "As a
spokesperson for the Jarvis girls, I
can say they want some sort of com-
promise. They want suites � mavbe
first floor Scott. The girls on first
floor (Jarvis) should be given top
priority on the rooms coming open
in the dorm on the hill which will be
made co-ed. The girls have never
been given a chance at suites before
and Title IX says equal facilities
There was much confusion last
week concerning the placement of
the Jarvis women. Many women
were under the impression that they
had to find their own place to live
without the administration's
assistance. They also didn't realize
that a fair exchange of dorm rooms
will be made.
"The girls were not informed ap-
propriately Melvin explained.
"The problem came in the way that
the situation was handled and not in
the situation itself.
See JARVIS COEDS Page 3, Col. 3
Pnoto by RICHARD GREEN
Snow On The Tracks
New Iranian President Sadr
Denounces Militants' Actions
By The Associated Press
Iranian President Abolhassan
Bani Sadr yesterday angrily de-
nounced the Moslem militants
holding the U.S. Embassy hostages
in Tehran as "dictators who have
created a government within a
government
Bani Sadr's attack, his strongest
yet on the embassy militants, came
after they broadcast allegations that
the minister of information and na-
tional guidance, Nasser Minachi,
had "close links with the CIA
Minachi was arrested by revolu-
tionary guards without government
authorization at about midnight
Tuesday,
The minister had denied the
allegations before being seized at his
home.
The new tension between Bani
Sadr ami the militants arose as Ira-
nian officials gave conflicting
signals on whether the establishment
of a U.N. investigation of the ex-
shah's regime would lead to the
release of the approximately SO em-
bassy hostages.
It was announced Tuesday night
that Bani Sadr had been chosen
chairman of Iran's ruling Revolu-
tionary Council, strengthening his
position and raising hopes among
those who expect him to try to get
the American hostages released.
The new president, stung by the
arbitrary arrest of Minachi, told the
Tehran daily newspaper Kayhan
that although the militants may not
realize it they are paving the way for
lawlessness in the country.
"How could you expect a govern-
ment employee to go to work feeling
secure he said. "When there is no
legal or judicial security in the coun-
try, that will undoubtedly lead to
disorder
Bani Sadr also attacked the state-
owned television network for acting
without prior government approval
in giving the embassy militants air
time Tuesday night to broadcast
their allegations.
The militants found documents in
the embassy files "proving the ex-
istence of close links between Nasser
Minachi and both the U.S. Em-
bassy and the CIA Tehran Radio
reported in a broadcast monitored
in Kuwait.
Until today, Bani Sadr's criticism
of the militants had been confined
to statements to the effect that the
new government alone must make
decisions for the country.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 7, 1980
Announcements
remember
We wish to remind all students and
faculls that we will not accept any an-
nouncements for the Announcements
column unless they are typed
doublespace and turned in before the
deadline No exceptions will be made
The deadlines are 2 00 p.m Knday for
the Tuesday edition and 2:00 pm
Tucday for (he Thuay edition We
reserve the right to edit for bresitv We
cannot guarantee that everything turn
ed in will appear in the paper, due to
space limitations, but we will do our
best
Poetrv Forum
1 he I .isi Carolina Poetr Forum will
hold a regutai workshop and meeting
I hursday, Feb " at X p m in
Mendenhall, room 24X I he puMk is
cordiallv united
Rho F.psilon
1 he Htn Epstlon meeting was
rescheduled tor Ihursdas, I eh 7, at
4 mi p in in room 221 Mendenhall Ml
members and interested persons are
urged to .mend
Chem Society
I he I astern North t. arolnia Section of
ihe American Chemical Society will
hold its I ebruary meeting al 7 p m on
Wednesday, February 1' .ir ihe Cap
Iain's Table Restaurant in -den Ihe
speakei foi the evening will be lit
Rishard N I eppk of the I noersitv
ol Missouri (. olumbia During his talk,
entitled "Nitrosamine Cat
cinogenesis he will explore the
chemical .md biological ramifications
of the question, 'Are nitrosamines
causative agents in human cancer?"
Dinnei reservations should be made
through the Department ol Chemistry
lest (s'lll bv Mondav. I eb I!
SU Chairperson
Ihe application deadline tor Student
I mon chairperson positions has been
extended lo feb S Anyone interested
in seeking one of these positions should
pisk up an application Irom the student
I mon Office, room 2'4. Mendenhall
studententer, or call 757-6611, exl
210
Draft Registration
Interested students arc invited to torn
the Greenvilk Peace i ommittee
sidenng tin upcoming draft reg
. begins with a potluck
; � "� I J.iv night at hill S
Fim S blocks east of campus
call 4h or
. with I dith Webber in 218 Austin
ECGC
On Tuesday, Feb 12, at 5:00 p.m the
East Carolina Gay Community will
feature a discussion group as part of the
weekly meeting at 608 E. 9th St , the
Newman House You may bring your
favorite beverage
Phi Eta Sigma
Phi Fta Sigma honor fraternity will
have a speaket and business meeting at
s (X) p m on Thursday. I eh 14 in 221
Mendenhall The speaker will be I I
I olonel Car! I Tadlock. chairman of
aerospace studies at ECU His topic
will be "Communication techniques
before Groups Members and in-
terested persons are invited
Study Help!
1 he lust ot a series ol studs techniques
and methods tor improving vour GPA,
sponsored bv Delta Sigma Phi Iraterni
tv on Monday, I eh II downstairs in
Ihe Methodist Student (enter
Small cookies without messages will
also be sold in the Student Book Store
lobby.
Allied Health
The Allied Health Professions Admis-
sion Test will be offered at ECU on
Saturday, March 8. Application blanks
are available at the Testing Center,
Speight Building, Room 105. Registra-
tion deadline is February 9.
SNEA
There will be a Student National
I ducators Association meeting on
Wednesday, I eb I' at 4:M) in
Mendenhall room 244 I here will be a
guest speaker. Ml members and in
terested people are urged to attend
GMAT
Ihe Oraduate Management Admission
Test will be ottered at ECU on Satur
dav, March I Application blanks arc
available at the Testing Center, Speight
Building, Room 105 Registration
deadline is February 22
Discount Day
(iet one third oft regular prices al the
Mendenhall recreation centers on
"Discount Day "
Wednesdays, 3 00 p.m -6:00 p.m. �
Billiards "and Table Tennis, one-third
off
Fridays, voo p.m. 6.00 p.m �
Bowling, one third off
Bowling Specials
Kl NT A I ANF: Every Saturday from
12 noon-6:00 p.m you can rent a lane
$3 00 for one hour
REP-PIN-BOW I ING- On Sundays
win a FREE GAME by making a strike
when the red pin is the head pin from
7:00 p.m 10:00 p.m.
SU Flashes
The Student Union Travel Committee
is sponsoring a trip to Ft. I auderdale
and Disney World for Spring Break
(March 7 16) Only $175 for quad oc-
cupancy. For more information, call
757 6611, ext 266.
The Student Union Minority Arts
Committee will be sponsoring a Jewish
Arts and International Festival. Feb
3-9.
The Art Exhibition (ommittee an
nounces the showing of the ludaic col-
lection of the North Carolina Museum
of Art (Feb. I 28)
Women's Soccer
Help support women's spo.is at ECU
by joining the newly formed Women's
Soccer Club The team needs well over
20 members, so anyone who is in
terested in playing soccer should con
tact Kris Soil al 7S8-5756 or Will
W'iberg at 752 4553 as soon as possible
An organizational meeting will be held
Wednesday, Feb. 13 at 2 p.m. at 922
14th St. (the brick house behind Belk
Dorm) Practice will begin when all the
preliminary work is completed, which
should be within the next couple ol
weeks. Come out and give soccer a try!
Car Wash
CSO
1'hi Fpsilon Kappa will he holding a cat
wash at the Tina Gas Station on Green
ville Blvd on Saturday. Feb 23, from
10:00 a.m. until dark Cost will be
SI 50 m advance and $2 00 day of
w ash
UFDC
LSAT
iw Scl admission lest will be
i I i l on Saturday. April 19
Regi ration deadline is February II.
1980 pplication blanks iwhich must
be completed and mailed lo I ISi may
be obtained from the III Testing
� Room 105 Speight Building
Notary Service
1 ree notary public services are available
� -III students at Mendenhall StU
dententer, room 22s). the S( office
The East Carolinian is
not responsible for any
meetings which are
cancelled due to
adverse weather condi-
tions.
Ihe I mversitv Folk and Country
Dative slub would like to invite all who
are interested in tolk and country danc-
ing lo attend meetings of the UFDC
Ihe meetings are everv Wednesday
night from seven to nine p.m. in
Brewstcr D 109 It you're interested.
come on over or call "52-0826
Faculty-Staff Night
1 very Monday from 5 00 p m. until
s on p m is I acultv Ntatt night at the
Mendenhall Bowling (enter Am II
faculty or stall member with proper
identification may bow! two games and
get a third game I Kl I Relax alter
work and take advantage ot the savings
al Mendenhall
Moonlight Bowling
"Moonlight Bowling" is bask al
Mendenhall Student (enter. Bowl in
ihe moonlight plus get a chance to win a
1 Kl I GAME ot bowling Every Sun
day from 5:00 p m. until 00 p m
Alpha Sigma Phi
Ihe Alpha Sigma Phi little sisters are
sponsoring a Happv Hour at the I Ibo
Room on Thursday. Feb Irom
p m. until 9:30 p m Bestnest con-
ies! will be held for male contestants
All men who wish to put their bodv
where their mouth is are united to
enier'
It you have or intend to declare a major
in a science or health related cur
nculum, sou may qualify for COST-
FREI services made available through
the (enter for Student Opportunities
K SO)
CSO currently has openings for
students wishing to receive tutorial ser-
vices There are also openings for
students to participate in individualized
or group speed reading, notetaking and
lesttaking techniques, effective
organization of lecture notes, and Ac-
tive Reading - knowing more about
what vou read in a shorter time
Counseling services include career plan
ning assistance, academic, personal.
financial, test anxiety, and-or group
counseling.
If you would like to be considered lor
participation in any of these COST-
FREE services, contact Dr. Bridwell.
( enter for student Opportunities. 216
W hichard Annex, or call tor an jp
pointment at 757-6122, 6075, or 6081
Tutors Needed
The (enter tor Student Opportunities
( St M currently has openings tor tutors
in the following atcas: medicine,
premedu.ne. nursing, allied health.
biology, chemistry, physics, and related
science and health professions You
may earn an income at standard cam
pus rates Contact Dr Bridwell. CSO,
216 Whichard Annex, or call 757-6122,
6081. or Mi's tor an appointment
Gameroom
It sou like pinball. pool or foosball. the
place to go is the MRC gameroom.
1 ocated in the basement of Aycock
Dorm, it is open from 10 a m until
midnight 1 he gameroom also serves as
the checkout area lor tents, canoes, car
racks and life preservers Remember.
the Men's Residence Council provides
these services
Valentines
Personalize your valentine a valentine
cookie! "(otten Hall's Valentine
Cookie Sales" will be taking orders on
1 eb 7, 8. and 11 from 4 to 6 p m in the
lobby ot (otten Hall. Orders mas be
picked up on Feb. 14. Large cookies
with message are 60 cents and small
cookies with no message are 25 cents
Gong Show
Ihe Ripple Raiders are having a fund-
raising "dorig Show on Monday.
Feb II at the Attic, starting at 8:00
p m Entertainment will be provided bv
The Ripples, teaturing Mike
"lightning" Wells, f arl White, John
Worthinglon and Roy Rower; and the
Auto's, (ireenville's answer to the
Cars The Gong Show will be hosted bv
Jeff Blumburg comedian The
judges are: Allen Handelman, radio
personality; Tom Haincs, manager ol
the Attic, and Shep. promoter and part
time musician. To enter, call Kay or
Teresa at 752-9883. All acts par-
ticipating in the show will receive
prizes.
HEAPING
PORTIONS.
tiny
price.
THURSDAY FEATURE
ONLY189
Feb. 7th
i'
TROUT
ALMONDINE
with Hot Slaw and French Fries
SUNDAY FEATURE
ONLYJ99
Feb. 10th
TURKEY
WITH DRESSING
or
COUNTRY STEAK
with any two vegetables
Come home to eat at S&S � we're located in the
Carolina East Mall in Greenville, at the intersection of
West Haven Road (U.S. 264 Bypass) and Hwy. 11. Plenty
of free parking too.
Carolina Eaat Mall
Serving continuously dally
froailla.ai.till8p.ai.
(8:30 Friday & Saturday)
Two Non-Credit
Courses Offered
HOW TO PLACE A WANT AD
in The East Carolinian
Massage
Do you have a tired, stiff neck? tiaylan
Hoyle. a physical therapy student, is
now conducting researVi which in
solves a MASSAGE to Ih - upper hack
and neck If you suiter from a tight
neck, call Ciavlan at 756-2787.
Easter Seals
Volunteer work can play a vital role in
getting the job you really want If you
are interested in work experience which
will help vou after you graduate, con-
tact the Faster Seal Society at 758-3230.
Summer Orientation
The Office of lames H Mallorv.
Associate Dean. Orientation and
Judiciary, is now accepting applications
lor counselors for Summer Orienta-
tion Applicants must be rising seniors
or graduate students Applicaiions niav
be picked up in Whichard Building.
Room 210 Deadline is 1 ridav I eb 1
Trout Aimondine. Golden Fried Shrimp. Veal Parmesan. Barbecue
Ribs. Rare Roast Beef.
There's a selection like this at S&S Cafeterias � more than 100
delicious things to eat, homemade fresh from scratch every day!
Best of all, they're served in heaping portions at a tiny price.
Mmmm S&S! Get a taste of the feast you can afford on these
special days!
SGA Loans
All students needing SO A loans can
now get them Irom ihe SGA office in
Mendenhall ur Irom the I manual Aid
Office in the Old Cafeteria Thes are no
longer available in Whichard room 21(1
� James b Malloiv. Associate Dean.
Orieniatu'ii and iudiuarv
ECU News Bureau
Parents, teachers,
day care personnel and
others who live and
work with young
children are invited to
enroll in two new even-
ing course offerings at
ECU this spring.
"Teachers Teaching
Art" (Mondays, Feb.
4-March 3) and
"Language Develop-
ment in the Child"
(Tuesdays, Feb.
5-March 4) are offered
by the ECU Division of
Continuing Educa-
tion's Non-Credit Pro-
grams Office. Both are
scheduled for 7-9 p.m.
each session.
The art course is
designed to help adults
stimulate a child's ar-
tistic attempts during
the early years when
natural creativity is
freely expressed.
Participants will
work on a variety of
projects which can be
adapted to school,
nursery or home use,
and each will be analyz-
ed and discussed in
terms of its ability to
help a child reach max-
imum artistic potential.
Instructing the art
course is Roxanne
Reep, a graduate stu-
dent at ECU in metal
design and drawing
whose work has been
exhibited widely
throughout
Southeast.
the
The language
development class is
planned to help adults
understand techniques
of gentle, positive and
effective guidance as
they work with young
children learning to use
language.
Topics to be discuss-
ed include the nature of
language, the process
by which children learn
to talk, the age at which
"baby talk" is no
longer "cute what
parents and teachers
can do to enhance
language skills, making
play time a learning
time, and selection of
age-appropriate books.
Instructor is Patricia
McMahon, who holds a
master's degree in child
development from
ECU and now works as
a training specialist in
the Eastern North
Carolina Day Care
Training Project.
Further information
about these and other
spring "credit-free"
classes is available from
the Office of Non-
Credit Programs, Divi-
sion of Continuing
Education, ECU,
telephone 757-6143.
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Southern Bell
Increases Rates
RALEIGH(AP)-S-
outhern Bell was �
granted slightlv more
than half the $45.3
million rate increase the
company had asked for
by an order issued
Wednesday by the
North Carolina
Utilities Commission.
"It's rather difficult
to be completely pleas-
ed about an order gran-
ting slightly more than
half of the amount we
requested in our up
plication said vice
president Alan E.
Thomas in a reaction
statement.
"The $45.3 million
we asked was well
within the president's
wage and price
guidelines Every, dollar
was ital to our con
tinned abilit to finance
ever-widening and ever-
impro ing communica-
tions in North
Carolina
Because of inflation,
Thomas said. Southen
Bell has been unable to
earn the rates of return
authorized by Southern
Bell in more than a
decade. Inflation, he
said, "tends to obsolete
rate orders, so that they
are often too little and
too late
The Utilities Com-
mission granted the
company an increase of
5.7 percent, instead of
the 10.2 percent the
company had asked
for. The 5 percent
will result in a revenue
increase of 525.5
million.
The commission's
action on Southern
Bell's proposal came
after seven months of
investigation into the
request and hearings
across the state.
Under the utility' s
proposal, the residen-
tial rate tor local ser-
vice would have in-
creased an average of
45 cents a month for
one-part) service and
approximately 25 cenl
a month for two-party
service.
The commission
order allows an in-
crease averaging 35
cents per month for
one-party service and
25 cents per month tor
two-party service, for
an average increase of
four percent on
residential rates.
Bell had asked for an
increase from $31.10 to
$59.70 for installing a
residential telephone
for a new customer. It
got an increase to
$36.75 under the com-
mission's order.
The utility also
wanted an increase for
installing a business
telephone from $40 to
$73. The commission's
order will allow Bell to
increase the charge to
$48.10.
The commission rul-
ed that the approved
rates under the 5.7 per-
cent rate increase
would allow Bell to
earn a 10.19 percent
rate of return on its
property. The commis-
sion said the increase
was granted because of
the impact of inflation
on Bell's costs.
Bell's last rate hike
went into effect on
April 26, 1978, when
local service rates were
increased bv 1 percent.
A ward
Given
ECU News Bureau
Dorothy Hennigan
Bowser of Virginia
Beach, Va senior stu-
dent in the East
Carolina University
School of Business, is
the recipient of a SI00
annual scholarship
award from the Green-
ville Credit Women In-
ternational.
Ms. Bowser is con-
centrating on manage-
ment and plans to pur-
sue a career in person-
nel or labor relations
upon graduation in
May.
She is a member of
Phi Kappa Phi honor
society and the
daughter of Gabrielle
Hennigan of Virginia
Beach, Va.
T h e Greenville
organization presents
the award each spring
to recognize an
outstanding female stu-
dent enroUed in the
ECU School of
Business. It was for-
mally presented at the
GCW January dinner
meeting.
Jarvis Co-eds Are
Given An Option
Continued from Page 1
"The girls will sides of campus
definitely have a place Meyer said. "It (co-ed
to go. Dr. Meyer will living) makes for a bet-
see to it that the transi- ter total environment,
tion will be made as
pleasant as possible for "I hope everyone
those girls being mov- understands that
ed nothing definite has
Many state colleges been decided yet as far
have begun the transi- as Belk and Scott are
tion from separate liv- concerned. There are
ing to a co-ed environ- still a lot of questions
ment. to be answered: If Belk
Until Jarvis Dorm is made co-ed, should
was considered for co- Jarvis girls have
ed living, East Carolina preference there, or
had only two co-ed should it be open for
dorms. Umstead and everyone? I think we
Slay. have to look at the
"I'd really like to see dorm system as a
a better distribution of whole. What is best for
men and women on all everyone?"
Patronize
The
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FFBRUARY7. 1980
East
Carolinian
Advertisers
Classified
Thank you
iJlwrsduyMti
RKI) FOIL HF.ART
1 LB $4.75
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE: wanted to share
two bedroom apartment. Within
walking distance from campus
One halt rent and utilities. Call
758 3074
STUDIOUS MALE ROOMMATE
needed to share rent and utilities
in one bedroom apartment at
Kinqs Row Call 752 732S after
11 00pm.
RESPONSIBLE: female room
mate needed to share two
bedroom apartment at Village
Green Half rent and utilities
Call 758 6186 after 6:00 p m
FOR SALE
FOR SALE 1978 Nova. 6 cylinder,
air conditioner.power steering, tilt
wheel, AM FM cassette, radials
Call 752 3405 after 5 00
GUITAR FOR SALE Korean Sun
burst six string with case and
strap Very good condition $70
Call 752 7279.
PERSONAL
ANYONE INTERESTED in for
mmg a weekly Bible study group
please call 756 4443 after 5 00
DANCE AUDITIONS for Dance
festival held every spring For
more information call 756 7235
SUNSHINE STUDIOS offering
the following classes Ballet Jan
Belly Dance. Yoga and Disco
For more information call
756 7235
COUNSELORS for western North
Carolina co ed 8 week summer
camp Room, meals laundry
salary and travel allowance E
penence not necessary, but must
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after 6 00p m
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917 West Morgan St
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407 EVANS MALL
GREENVILLE. NC 27834
GREENVILLE S SEIKO WATCH HEADQUARTERS
DIAMONDS LOOSE AND MOUNTED
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i9l9) 756 1423
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INDEPENDENT JEWELERS
Mike RoOmsoo
(919)756 3667
Home
Quality e Competitive Prices � Service
911 Dickinson Ave.
752-7105
6th St. & Memorial Dr.
758-4104
MUSHROOM
BESURETOVISIT
the MUSHROOM
DURING DOLLAR DAY
SALES FEB. 7,8,9
318 Evans Mall
We Accept Visa and Master Charge
Thursday and Saturday
ALLAN HANDELMAN
plays your favorite
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with special guests
The Beatles
no admission charge
I mprove
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with the key component�Original Master Recordings
by Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab
AUTO SERVICE SPECIALS
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Retread Tires
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1 $34.95j
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Site Saat (Earnliman
Serving the campus community for 54 years.
Marc Barnes, senmr Editor
Diane Henderson, �����, �.��
Richard Green, copy Edm
Anita Lancaster, production m�m"
Marianne Harbison, n &m
Robert M. Swaim, amor ,j Advem�
C HRIS LICHOK, Business Manager
Charles Chandler, spans Editor
KAREN WENDT, Features Editor
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7 1980
PAGE 4
This Newspaper's Opinion
Close For Safety
The East Carolina University ad-
ministration should cancel classes
whenever the N.C Highway Patrol
declares the roads in the Greenville
area extremely hazardous.
It doesn't make sense to hold
classes at this university when snow
removal crews are hard pressed to
clear snow that has already fallen,
not to mention the snow that is fall-
ing now. Sidewalks and roads are
icy, and everywhere people are fall-
ing down or having traffic ac-
cidents.
On a campus where at least half
of the students live off campus and
must drive or find a ride to class, it
would only be reasonable to assume
that the administration would
cancel classes.
The campus administration
should listen to those who are
specifically trained to deal with road
conditions. When local law enforce-
ment agencies such as the Greenville
Police Department and the N.C.
Highway Patrol say that roads are
hazardous, they should heed the
warning and close ECU for the day.
Students who live in outlying
areas such as Farmville or Winter-
ville would not have to risk their
lives to come to class. The recent
tragic accident on an icy road in
Raleigh which claimed the lives of
two young girls�in a car that
authorities said was going only 25
miles per hour�should serve as a
warning to us all to stay off the
roads.
There are some who will say that
our purpose is self-serving, that we
would rather play in the snow than
go to class. For some students,
especially those who might have a
test today, that might be true.
But from a practical standpoint,
think of how many cars would not
be on the streets of Greenville if
school were to close for a day. That
would probably make an extremely
hazardous situation a little better.
All of the ECU traffic would be off
the streets, and essential personnel
(such as emergency vehicles) would
have almost empty roads for their
use.
Remember, the needs of a city the
size of Greenville must be placed
above the needs of 13,000 people to
attend class for one day. Our
neighbors in the city number about
35,000, and when they take to the
roads in icy weather, it is often to
earn a living or perform a needed
service. They don't need 6,000 extra
college students on the roads when
it isn't necessary for them to be
there.
The Department of Institutional
Research testified last year at a
highway right-of-way hearing that
70 percent of ECU students came
from west of Greenville. Given this
fact, and the fact that a clear ma-
jority of students come from the
Carolinas and Virginia, it should be
considered that most of us have not
had a great deal of experience driv-
ing in snow in ice. Frozen weather
conditions do not come our way
often enough to provide experience
as in other regions of the country.
Often people have a tendency to
boast about their talents of driving
in the snow. This bragging can
cause overconfidence�and result in
traffic accidents and tragedy.
The administration should realize
the danger some ECU students will
face coming to school when condi-
tions are serious. The highway
patrol should be the standard for
making the decision to cancel
classes.
Scrutiny Is Needed
ABSCAM, the FBI's code name
for the contoversial congressional
investigation, has opened another
"Watergate Brand" can of worms.
Examining the contents reveals an
unhealthy mixture of questional ac-
tions by the investigated and the in-
vestigators.
Although Attorney General Ben-
jamin Civiletti has assured everyone
that the investigation was
"respectable it will be interesting
to discover how FBI agents manag-
ed to offer and successfully pay
bribes without being guilty of en-
trapment. If entrapment indeed oc-
American Journal
curred, the legislators still must face
ethics committees.
The nine accused are throwing up
the smokescreen of entrapment in
an attempt to hide the real
crime�that they did accept bribes.
Even if the FBI has to swallow their
pride with entrapment charges, they
can at least enjoy the fact that they
exposed dishonest elected officials.
The acronym ABSCAM should
stand for something more impor-
tant than Arab scam: Americans
Better Scrutinize Carefully Ad-
ministrators' Morals.
"HoWp IdU ICOoO I uvifb GofOGUpCoccfG H� 0HCf
Letters To The Editor
Pro-Greek Letter Rebutted
To the Editor:
This is in response to the letter by Ricky
Cannon that appeared in the Feb. 5 issue
of The East Carolinian. I would like to ex-
press some feelings that 1 think are held
by the majority of students here at ECU.
I am tired of seeing the numerous
advertisements in The East Carolinian
that espouse the "Greek" way of life. Re:
"Greek Week Of course, I realize that
these are paid for by the frats and
sororities, or the "Panhellenic Council
If Greek organizations are so noble and
virtuous, why do they find it so necessary
to sponsor such gaudy self-promotion?
I question adn object to the use of stu-
dent transit buses for the purpose of
transporting students to and from rush
parties. How in the world did they
manage that? Perhaps the fact that
"about one third of the major positions
of The East Carolinian, SGA, Buccaneer,
the school radio station, and other school
related functions" are held by Greeks
may have something to do with it. I say to
Mr. Cannon that it is very possible for the
frats to vote their "brothers" in. I ask
him to refer to his Poli Sci 1050 notes
regarding the "vocal minority I regret
such gross misrepresentation of high of-
fice on this campus. To be sure, it is the
fault of the silent, non-voting majority of
students here.
It is my hope that someday this majori-
ty will somehow unite for the purpose of
placing the Greek life in proper perspec-
tive on this campus. I appreciate and ap-
plaud all charitable efforts by Greek
organizations.
However, I suspect that the energies us-
ed in politicking, partying, and promoting
far outweigh those used in humanistic and
academic pursuit.
Tony Hopfer
to take property which belongs to so-
meone else. I would think it even worse to
steal from one of your peers. Why steal
from someone who has no more than you.
If you felt the urge why didn't you steal
something from someone who had an
abundance and wouldn't miss it.
What you stole represented Christmas
for me in 1979. It was less than 2 months
old. Since I am a graduate student here
and have just gotten married it will work a
hardship on my family to replace what
you took.
I just want you to know that I am spar-
ing no effort to find out who you are. If I
can find you I promise to break your face.
It's worth $25 to me to find out who you
are. Any that can provide me with any in-
fo that leads to the opportunity for me to
realize what I promised two sentences ago
is urged to leave a note for me in my box
in the Econ office.
Donald Pack
Value Of Sacrifice Disputed
To the Editor:
I refuse to believe that the ragged old
potato chip van sacrificed to the snow
gods early Thursday morning was even
worth $2,000.00. It had sat out in front of
Aycock broken down since last September
and had become an eyesore.
It was also a traffic hazard, being
responsible for a couple of fender benders
and ugly bike smashups, and smearing
powdery, dead paint on passing clothing.
I also refuse to believe Aycock's
counselor attempting to cover up the
mob's endeavor. I'll bet he enjoyed the
story more than anyone.
Daniel C. Couch
Reader Chastises Thief
Editor's Note: The following was written
as an open letter to the ECU student
body.
Crowd Support Needed
To the Editor:
Dear
777777.
I would just like to take this opportuni-
ty to tell you what I think of you for steal-
ing my T.I. 58C calculator out of my of-
fice in Rawl. It's bad enough for someone
Saturday night's basketball game with
UNC-Wilmington pointed to two pro-
blems of the East Carolina basketball pro-
gram. They are problems however that
cannot be remedied by the players or
coaching staff. The solution has to come
from the East Carolina student body as
well as Greenville and Pitt County
citizens.
The problems that surfaced again
Saturday night have to do with fan sup-
port and what are loosely termed the
cheerleaders. Both are related.
Coach Dave Odom got more response
in ten seconds of activity on the sideline
than the cheerleaders did all night. Coach
Odom brought everyone to their feet.
When was the last time the cheerleaders
did as much? Coach Odom obviously has
more ability in cheerleading but this is not
his job. He has more important things to
do.
The past two years have done a great
deal to turn people off to ECU basketball.
Odom and his staff have turned things
around and have the program headed in
the right direction. But to get the program
to the level of respectability of our foot-
ball team, crowd support is needed. A
visitor from Duke was surprised to see
ECU students sitting during the game. At
Duke and UNC she said people never sit
down. There is constant noise. Never is
there a quiet moment.
In order to help encourage the team
more students need to come to the games.
More noise has to be generated. Minges
has to become a place where teams don't
want to have to come. Minges has to be
elevated to the likes of Clemson's "Death
Valley UNC's Carmichael or Reynold's
Coliseum. Only the students can do this.
We also need cheerleaders who can excite
the crowd. If we want to see pyramids we
can go to a tumbling demonstration.
If the basketball program is to become
a strong one, we students have to support
the team and coaches. And if the remain-
ing four home games are like last Satur-
day's people who don't come will be miss-
ing a treat. It was the best game played
Saturday.
John Lambeth
Steve Reid
Letters To The Editor
The East Carolinian welcomes let-
ters expressing all points of view.
Mail or drop them by our office in
the Old South Building, across from
the library.
Letters to the editor must include
the name, address, phone number
and signature of the aulhor(s) and
must be typed, double spaced, or
neatly printed.
Mohawk Indians Question Site Of Olympic Winter Games
t
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
When the Winter Olympic Games
begin near Lake Placid, N.Y. this
month, the Mohawk Indians native
to the region v ill have more on their
minds than whether Soviet athletes
should be allowed to compete for
gold medals. They're already
wondering what the long-term im-
pact of the games will be on their
lovely but poor and increasingly
polluted region, a stretch of ter-
ritory they say is theirs by virtue of
historic treaties.
Most places that have hosted the
summer and winter games in recent
years have lost money. There i� a
sudden influx of high-spen
tourists and a leap in local emK
ment that looks promising at first.
But the tourists go home with that's
left of their money and the jobs
created to service the crowds soon
disappear. The Lake Placis area
faces those problems, and one more
besides: Housing for athletes in the
Olympic village is scheduled to be
converted into a federal prison after
the games. And a large number of
local people, especially the
Mohawks, don't like it.
"This area doesn't need a new
prison said John Mohawk, a staff
member on the activist Indian
newspaper Akwesasne Notes, jn a
recent interview. "We need decent
housing, and jobs, and pollution
Control to stop the acid rains that
are killing the conifer trees and
poisoning the lakes around here.
The Olympics and the prison were
planned with no attention what-
soever to the needs of the area
The Mohawks can do nothing to
stop the games, and show no sign
that they want to. They hope to use
the Olympics to focus national and
international attention on their pro-
blems. And they have a dramatically
different design for the future of the
OlympL Village.
"We got together with the New
York State Council of Churches and
proposed that the village be con-
verted into a permanent center for
the study of 'appropriate
technology' after the games John
Mohawk said. "We'd like to see
solar power studied there, and what
to do about the dying environment
and how to put up efficient housing
in one of the most difficult climates
in the continental United States. We
think those are much better uses of
the facilities than a prison
The Mohawks' proposal was for-
warded in verbal form to the White
House last fall. But, according to
Nader Maroun, a New York State
Council of Churches staffer in
Syracuse, prospects of establishing
the appropriate technology center
are shaky. "We were making some
progress with the White House last
fall he said. "Stuart Eizenstadt
sent staff members to Lake Placid
to see the complex and they agreed
the appropriate technology center
could work there. But then the Ira-
nian crisis broke and we haven't
heard from them since
Just after the Mohawks announc-
ed their alternate plan for the Olym-
pic village, the U.S. Olympic Com-
mittee, sponsors of the games, hur-
ried to the Indians with proposals of
their own. The Mohawks could sell
Indian crafts at the games, the Com-
mittee said, and make a cultural
presentation � speeches and dances
� to the world's athletes. The
Mohawks accepted the offer. Now
the cultural presentation is off.
"The Olympic Committee hasn't
told us why John Mohawk said.
Nader Maroun said he feels the
Committee's offer may have been a
ploy to draw attention from the
Olympic prison and the overriding
issue of Indian land claims. The
Mohawks claim the site of the
games as their own, citing treaties
with the U.S. government in 1784
and 1794.
Regardless of how their proposal
for the appropriate technology
center fares, the Mohawk nation
plans to dramatize the Native
American heritage of Lake Placid.
When runners bearing the Olympic
flame reach the outer edges of the
original Mohawk lands, Indian run-
ners will be there to meet them, and
will escort the torch all the way to
the Olympic village, in the heart of
Mohawk country.
(The writer is a syndicated colum-
nist.)





Features
Dinner Theater Presents
Comedy 6 Rms Riv Vu
FEBRUARY 7, 1980 page 5
By JAY STONE
Staff Writer
"6 Rms Riv Vu" premiered at the
Helen Hayes Theater in 1972. It was
nominated for an Emmy after being
adapted for television in 1974, and
Bob Randall, author of the play
received "The Drama Desk Most
Promising Playwright Award" in
1972.
It is a play with a pronounced
Neil Simon-ish essence. The writing
strives to make a statement on the
human condition while avoiding
odious or cumbersome attempts at
profundity.
Randall's characters deliver lines
that drip with a banal kind of
ludicrousy that satirizes bourgeois
sensibilities and Victorian ethics.
"6 Rms Riv Vu" revolves around
the characters of Paul Freidman
(Mick Godwin) and Ann Miller
(Rosalie Hutchins), who become ac-
cidentally locked into an empty
apartment while shopping for a
place to live. After-a number of re-
joinders, self-reproaches, and false
starts, they fall into an adulterous,
mad embrace. Their subsequent
dilemma transforms the play into a
satirical look at American sexual
mores.
We are not asked to "believe" the
characters of Paul and Ann, merely
to laugh at them. They represent the
refugees of a maturing process that
has left them feeling stagnant and
purposeless. It is, in part, through
each other that they finally discover
themselves. Ironically, because of
their lack of credibility as tenants in
the real world, we are afforded
laughter. Paul and Ann are earthy
enough to earn the adjectives
"bawdy" and "irreverent yet
they are sufficiently chaste and
caricatured to qualify as non-
entities.
Dr. Helen Steer's direction of the
play was adequately perceptive and
acute. Larry (played by Ronald
Cherry) had considerable fiasco
potential. The character was con-
trived, awkward, and generally
over-acted; however, after the first
scene he was never permitted back
on stage until curtain call. Mick
Godwin did an effective rendition of
Paul; however, his performance on-
ly began to achieve a plateau of
quality drama during Act Two.
Rosalie Hutchins' interpretation of
Ann Miller was convincing enough
to give substance to lines like:
"You're willing to kill yourself
for me. How big of an ingrate do
you think I am?"
High moments during the produc-
tion ebbed and flowed until they
found themselves beached and sub-
ject to inspection. In Act Two the
ominous character of "The Woman
in 4-A" (Hazel Stapleton) walks
onstage bearing a book entitled
Things Fall Apart.
The parts of Richard Miller and
Janet Freidman were played by
Marvin Hunt and Anita Lancaster.
Karen Baldwin played a pregnant
woman and Eddie was Willie Tyson.
"6 Rms Riv Vu" will be presented
in Mendenhall Auditorium 244,
Feb. 6-9, as a dinner theater produc-
tion. The buffet dinner will include:
sliced roast round of beef, chicken
paprikosh, baked Idaho potato with
sour cream, buttered green beans
with toasted almonds, glazed car-
rots, sliced French bread,
margarine, congealed lemon-
pineapple salad and mixed fruit cob-
bler.
All other performances will be
$7 for students and $9 for others.
A dministrators:
6 Kim Riv v
��� A Dinur f'frcat:
P GUS
U
A Complex And Elaborately Designed Hierarchy
11
It Came From Outer Space
A Science Fiction Classic
Special Late Show
3-D Space Film
Will Be Shown
"It's something that we've
wanted to do for a long time said
Steven Bachner, chairman of the
Student Union Films Committee.
"Late shows have been extremely
successful at UNC and N.C. State
This Friday night the Committee
will present a special late show, the
science fiction classic "It Came
From Outer Space" at 11:00 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student Center's Hen-
drix Theater. Admission is free with
a student ID, activity card or MSC
membership.
"It is experimental continued
Bachner. "If it works well, we will
try to schedule one or- two each
semester. But the problem with hav-
ing a late show is that the Student
Center is only open until midnight.
�'For It Came From Outer
Space we had to get approval to
keep the building open until the
movie ends at 12:30, and we had to
have the money to pay the ushers
and other personnel for their over-
time.
It Came From Outer Space' has
another interesting characteristic
which makes it ideal for a late
show said Bachner. "It's a 3-D
movie. We've got enough pairs of
3-D glasses for everyone at the
movie; there are 800 seats and we
have 800 glasses
Three-dimensional photography
is a process based on the scientific
principle that the eyes have a slightly
different perspective, and it is this
change in this perspective which
creates depth perception. A 3-D
movie talus 9&Bm th,s b
filming with two cameras, set inches
apart.
When "It Came From Outer
Space" premiered, the movie re-
quired two projectors working
simultaneously. But if the two prints
were not synchronized perfectly, the
result was hundreds of headaches.
The more recent process superim-
poses two different tinted prints �
red and green � onto one reel.
When viewed through the specially
tinted 3-D glasses, the illusion of
depth perception returns.
"It Came From Outer Space"
was filmed in 1952, making it one of
the oldest of the science fiction
"invasion" films. It was the success
of 'Outer Space' which convinced
filmmakers that sci-fi was a viable
movie market and led to the crea-
tion of such classics as "The Inva-
sion of the Body Snatchers" in later
years.
The townspeople in rural Arizona
suspect nothing when a bright flash
streaks across the sky, but soon
friends and neighbors change, and
people realize something is going
on. Further investigation leads to
the discovery of the alien beings and
to new heights in terror.
Creative camerawork plays an im-
portant role as the desert of Arizona
becomes an eerie hiding ground for
the aliens. Director Jack Arnold
also uses a cinematic twist � he
changes the viewpoint from the ear-
thlings tc that of the aliens, who see
the earth creatures as bumbling little
folk.
By LINDA J.ALLRED
If you have ever attempted to
handle a problem (no matter how
trivial) that involved contact with
academic administrators, you have
no doubt discovered that they are a
strange, fascinating, and sometimes
exasperating breed who seem to
function by a system of logic that is
totally alien to the rest hJfetfcW civiliz-
ed world. '
You may have begun to feel there
is no logic to the system other than
to make things difficult for you per-
sonally. However, this is not the
case. Academic administration is ac-
tually a complex and elaborately
designed hierarchy, whose opera-
ti nal guidelines have been the most
carefully guarded secret since the
recipe for Kentucky Fried Chicken.
This week a highly confidential
document entitled A Handbook for
Academic Administrators was
discovered in Spilman by an under-
cover agent posing as a befuddled
student attempting to track a "lost"
tuition payment. The unidentified
agent managed to camouflage the
document as a pizza by covering it
with tomato sauce and cheese and
left the building unnoticed.
Following are a few exerpts from
the handbook:
�THE PRIMARY GOALS OF
ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATION
ARE SELF-PERPETUATION
AND PROPAGATION. As an in-
dividual administrator, it is your
responsibility to keep the system go-
ing and growing. This process can
be facilitated in a number of ways.
�Maximize the apparent impor-
tance of your own position. This
may require considerable creative
input on your part, but in the long
run, the positive effects will be ap-
preciated by everyone in the hierar-
chy. Keep in mind that the perceived
value of any job is directly propor-
tional to the number of people
working under you, the frequency
of your signature on official
documents, the necessity of your ap-
proval for an outsider's activity
within the system, and the number
of file cabinets or computer banks
necessary to store your records.
The activities which can potential-
ly require your permission are vir-
tually unlimited, but it is highly
recommended that you limit them to
only those which can be handled
between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. For ex-
ample, requiring that every student
get your written permission for each
trip to the bathroom would require
your presence 24 hours a day and
should therefore be avoided.
�Maximize the apparent impor-
tance of all positions beneath you.
This is easily accomplished by assur-
ing that everv employee under your
supervision has at least one
employee under their supervision,
and that every document that re-
quires your signature or approval be
processed through at least one other
person before reaching you. It is ob-
vious that such a tactic will i
produce an infinite number
tions within the system; theic
is highly
�Minimize actual work while
maximizing apparent work. Stan-
dardized forms, computerized pro-
cessing and storage systems, rubber
stamps and Xerox machines are
your greatest allies here. Remember
that your goal is only to appear
overworked. The more paper you
generate, the more impressive and
crucial your position will seem to
the outsider, particularly if you can
keep your desk piled high with
mounds of documents which need
your personal attention. (It does not
matter what the paper actually is,
although unopened boxes of blank
typing paper and stacks of comic
books obviously would not generate
the right impression.)
�Remove all traces of economic
efficiency. You are not working in a
profit-loss situation, and as the cost
of operating your division increases,
its perceived worth to the system
will increase. Remember, however,
that to the outsider it must not ap-
pear that you are deliberately
wasting money, so luxurious office
decor should be avoided Opera-
tional cost can easily be kept high if
you observe a few simple principles:
1. Never use one form when a
dozen will do.
2. Require at least three copies of
every document. In addition to in-
creasing cost, this will also con-
tribute to the amount of storage
space you need, thereby increasing
the importance of your position.
3. Use as many paper clips and
staples as possible. (This is a small
item but in time can actually be
quite expensive.)
4. Update all forms annually and
print at least twice as many as you
will actually need. At the end of the
year, the unused forms can simply
be discarded and replaced. (This has
an additional advantage in that the
constantly changing forms will
create confusion for outsiders and
thereby increase the importance of
your role in helping" them.)
5. Never use the least expensive
product available
See RED, Page 6, Col. 2
Thriller 'Halloween'
Runs This Weekend
l-Ji v.
Ha ���
�?�This Week M jrreja
From the opening frames,
"Halloween" grabs you by the
throat and hangs on, squeezing
every possible bit of terror from the
audience. It is hardly the type of
movie that can he watched while
leaning back comfortably.
This Friday and Saturday night at
7 and 9 p.m the Student Union
Films Committee presents
"Halloween" in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center's Hendrix Theater. Ad-
mission is by student ID. activity
card, or MSC membership.
"Halloween" begins one hallow-
ed eve when a young boy dons a
mask, grabs a butcher knife, and at-
tacks his sister and her boyfriend.
Then the film progresses 15 years to
the time when the psychopathic
young man returns to stalk un-
suspecting Halloween revelers.
Halloween' is a horror master-
piece said Richard Corliss of the
New York Times. "It's a horror
movie in the classic tradition
Newsweek called the movie "a
superb exercise in the art of
suspense It is the most frighten-
ing flick in years
The storyline and acting take a
back seat to the violence and gore,
yet the intense suspense and
savagery of the killer arc enough to
leave the audience gripping the ar-
mrests.
Halloween' is a sleeper that is
here to stay wrote Tom Allen of
the Village Voice. "It can stand pro-
ud along side of 'Night of the Livina
Dead' and Hitchcock's 'Psycho It
is a movie of almost unrelieved
chills
Variety said "a film 1HC
'Halloween is judged by the
number of screams it can raise t"un
the audience This one raises quite
a few, especially during the last 3D
mi Antes





IHLLASI CAROLINIAN
hhBRUARY7, 1980
t
As Congress Debates Issue
Draft Registration Reviewed
A World Record In Volleyball Photoby kipsloan
how long will it last?
Record Broken
In Greenville
At 10:50 p.m Sun-
day, Feb. 3, 1980, a
new world record for
marathon volleyball
was set at the Elm
Street Gym. The two
six-man teams claimed
a spot in the Guiness
Book of World
Records at 75 hours, 30
minutes.
The teams were led
by Jeff Sutton and
Ricky Tolstoy, who
currently hold the
world record for
marathon tennis at 105
hours. The two were
joined by ten other
residents of Kinston,
N.C Sutton's
brothers, Kyle and
Kurt; John DeVechio;
Dave Eudy; Gary
Baker; Ed Dupree; Ed
Smith; and Tolston's
brothers. Gary, Mike
and Mark Baker is a
student at ECU.
The marathon,
which raised pledged
proceeds for the Special
Olympics programs in
eastern North
Carolina, began at 7:20
p.m Thursday, Jan.
31. The original goal
was to break 70 hours
and 33 minutes, but
during the competition,
word was sent that a
THERE JS A
DIFFERENCE!
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NAT L MED BDS.
NAT! DENTAL BDS.
NURSING BOARDS
MCAT � OAT � LSAT � GRE
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California group had
set a new mark of 75
hours.
The teams were
allowed five minute
breaks each hour for
rest and refreshments,
which were contributed
by numerous local
businesses. Deducting
the time spent off the
court, the teams still
played �w i t h o u t
sleep�for 68 hours, 45
minutes.
College Press Service
If Congress endorses Presideni
Carter's Jan. 23 proposal to begin
military registration, it will be the
Selective Service System's first stirr-
ing since 1976. But it will not be the
first time registration has been
brought back from the grave. The
U.S. has employed various kinds of
conscription systems periodically
for over a hundred years. A brief
history, as gleaned from the
published works of Boston Univer-
sity Professor Michael Useem:
n,e nation's first draft law,
enacted during the Civil War, was
easiest for the moneyed classes to
avoid. The law allowed draftees to
hire substitutes, and to buy exemp-
tions for $300. Thus the war, accor-
ding to a popular saying of the day,
was fought "with rich men's money
and poor men's blood
The law, moreover, was ineffi-
cient. Of the 300,000 men called up
in 1863, nine percent hired
substitutes, 18 percent paid the
deferment fee, and a whopping 70
percent resorted to medical and
other exemptions. Only three per-
cent of the draftees were formally
inducted.
Peace ended the draft, which was
not reinstated until World War 1. It
was considerably more efficient the
second time. Draftees accounted for
the majority of American soldiers
for the first time in American
history.
Around 145,000 college students
served instead in the Study Army
Training Corps during the Great
War. Almost half the draftees
claimed physical or occupational ex-
emptions.
Others protested more directly.
Numerous anti-draft marches on
Washington ended with the jailing
of the march leaders. Various
unions � notably the Industrial
Workers of the World � organized
resistance, and were nearly
destroyed as the result. Charles
Schenck, an officer of the then-
formidable Socialist Party, was ar-
rested for merely circulating a peti-
tion arguing the draft violated con-
stitutional strictures against in-
voluntary servitude. His case ended
with Supreme Court Justice Oliver
Wendell Holmes' historic ruling
that limited freedom of speech in
times of national emergency.
In all, the War Department listed
325,000 missing war resistors two
years after the Treaty of Versailles
was signed.
The draft ended with the war, and
remained inactive until 1940, when
the U.S. began its first peacetime
conscription program.
The draft expired in 1947, but the
Truman administration worried that
volunteer rates would be too low to
sustain Cold War military policv.
and successfully sponsored another
law which, with certain modifica-
tions, remains in force today. But
the nation's second peacetime draft
did excite protest. Resistance was
loud enough to force a liberalized
deferment system.
Indeed, the deferment system was
so discretionary that a dispropor-
tionate share of the 1.5 million men
drafted into the Korean War were
from working class families.
The pattern continued through
the Vietnam War, when draft
resistance hit its peak. Some studies
suggest as many as 250,000 men il-
legally failed to register, while
another 300,000 either refused in-
duction or emigrated to avoid in-
duction.
Resistance was so broad that bv
the early seventies the milttarv
system was under attack bv a large
proportion of the young men who
were supposed to staff it. In 1973,
President Nixon ended all phv
exams and inductions. Registration
was suspended on April 1. 1975, and
the Selective Service System was of-
ficially put on standby st��l is n
Januarv. 1976.
Red Tape Handbook Released
Cont. From Page 5
�Avoid talking on
the telephone. If you
can be easily reached by
phone, it will appear
that you have nothing
better to do. Have your
receptionist follow
these simple guidelines:
1 . Never put
unscreened calls
through to you.
2.Ask who is calling,
a. If it is your superior,
the receptionist should
be instructed to state
that you are in a
meeting but that you
requested to be notified
H that person called.
The c.Uer should be
let! on nold for about
30 seconds before you
answer.
b. Calls from your
stock broker, realtor or
lawyer should bt put
through immediately.
c. If the caller is a
faculty member of stu-
dent, the receptionist
should state that you
are not available and
that the caller should
leave a message. Calls
from students may be
disregarded. Calls from
faculty members
should not be returned
until the faculty
member has called back
at least twice,
d. If the caller refuses
to identify himself (or
herself), the recep-
tionist should place
them on hold in-
definitely. Eventually
the caller will give up.
(This tactic may also be
used on students who
persist in trying to
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Backpacks, B 15. Bomber.
Field, Deck, Flight, Snorkel �
Jackets, Peacoats, Parkas.
Shoes, Combat Boots, Plus.
isoi S. Evans Street 4.
reach you.
�Always answer
negatively to any stu-
dent's request. Most of
the time the issue will
simply be dropped. If
the student persists,
resort to the next tactic.
�Always answer
positively to any facul-
ty member's request.
This does not mean
that you must actually
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No Foreign
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20
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&
KODACOLOR m
Developed and Printed
FAMOUS PIZZA
50 OFF any Pizza with this Coupon
Offer expires Feb. 15. 1980
NOW SERVING YOUR FAVORITE GOLDEN BEVERAGE
24
EXPOSURE
ROLL ONLY
No Foreign
Film
PIZZA Small Urge
Tomato & Cheese
On,or
Pepper
Mil sl 'OOTl
On. ,n & Pepper
Z.So 4.K
Pepper
Sausago
Htmliu - j.
Ani.hovy
Canadian B n on
& Pingapp e
2 Wdy
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House r;p�(
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DESSERTS
Cnaese Cake I Jff Apple P.eLy
I Blueberry Pi� fjf
SUBS Small Large
Meatball
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Ham
Tuna
Roast Beef
Pastr
BLT
Pepper & Epjg
Veal
Super Sub
Pepper Steak
win 'j,i ice
with Meiijjii
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FILM DEVELOPING
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KODACHROME
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PROCESSING ONLY
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Greek Salad
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BEVERAGES
Coffee
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29-
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36 EXPOSURE
KODACHROME
AND EKTACHROi
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LOW, LOW PRICES ON
Movie
PROCESSING
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SUPER � AND STANDARD � MOVIES
LIMITED OFFER
KODACHROME
AND EKTACHROME
PROCESSING ONLY
act on the issue. If the
person contacts you
about the progress of
their request, respond
that you're working on
it, but these things take
time.
�Always follow
through on requests
from your superiors.
After all, they are try-
ing to maintain the
system too.
March of Dimes Funds Enable
Specialists to Reach
Outlying Areas
A FORMER TEACHER or the Nava r- ervation - C near
Elizabe- V, - pple 1 -� a. Alexandra.� ' (Cath-
erine soon after the r -cer died. M 11 eni Emily 4
Adam. V 2 have been added tc the fam f. Each
and requires scec a attention
Support March Of Dimes
February 14 is
"I LOVE YOU day!

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ed
Hi ! M . koi M N
Sports
Host Illinois State Saturday
BRl AR 7, ivho page
Pirates Travel To USC
o
low
� � � byCHAPGURLEY
i i 's I rank lloh.son Rebounds
B CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Kditor
The Fast Carolina basketball
team begins its toughest week of the
season tonight (Thursday) when il
visits South Carolina, a learn the
Pirates upset last season 56-55 in
Minges Coliseum.
Following the matchup with the
Gamecocks, ECU hosts powerful II
Imois State on Saturday. Delaware
State on Monday and travels
sixth-ranked Maryland the to"
ing Wednesday.
This is a tough stretch for us
admitted Pirate coach Dave Odom.
"We'll just take them one at a time
and hope tor the best
The South Carolina matchup is a
most interesting (me considering the
Gamecock loss at ECU last season
must have been a grave disappoint
ment to CSC" coach Frank McGuire.
He would like nothing more than to
avenge that loss.
I he game is also of interest
because the present season is the last
at USC tor the legendary McGuire.
rhe man who once led North
C arolina to a national champion-
ship (195) and broughl the
Gamecock program to national pro-
minence in the late 10's and earh
70's is being forced into retirement
by the ISC administration folio
ing this season.
"I'm sure their players wi
tired up said Odom. "1 kn
it IS
ey'll pro-
extra just
tw -
low last
Rosie's '10'
To Be Retired
year's game lingers in their minds.
rhey would just love to avenge it.
"Also Odom continued, "they
will be double tough because
McGuire's last season. Ih
bably he giving that little
for him
I lie (iamecocks have tared excep-
tionally well at McGuire Arena, los-
ing only to Marquette.
'They're probably playing at
home as well at home as any team
we've placed proclaimed Odom.
' I hey otter us quite a challenge,
but I look forward to it
I he Gamecocks are led bv 6-8
senior forward Cedric Hordges,
who leads the team in both scoring
and rebounding with 20.3 and 8.7
averages, respective
Guard Mike Doyle averages 12.3
points while burlv 6-11 center Jim
Strickland averages 9.3 and 8.5 re-
bounds.
"The have the biggest front line
we'll play said Odom. "W
have a tremendous matchup
blem
To compensate Odom noted that
Mike Gibson and Frank Hobson,
two 6-8 post men, would see more
than their average playing time.
"Mike and Frank will have to
plav io compensate tor their size ad-
vantage claimed Odom. "I
expect to use Kyle Powers
deal tor the same reason
In the Saturda) matchup
State,
of the
' I hey
the
top
would
Minges with Illinois
Pirates, 1 1 -H. face one
teams in the countr.
well be one of the nation's top twen-
ty teams Odom said sternlv.
I he Kedbirds. 16- are led bv
seven-toot center loe Galvin, who
averages 10.9 points and 6.1 re-
bounds per game Guard Ron lones
is the leading scorer with a 1" 3
average. Forward Del Varborough
tallies 12.6 and 6.7 caroms.
'They're probabl) the best team
to come into Minges Coliseum since
the Jacksonville team that Artis
Gilmore plaved on Odom said.
"People holler about getting name
teams in here-well, this team is the
surge of the midwest
Odom had special praise tor the
seven-foot Galvin. "He's a super
player aid the First-year Pirate
coach. 'N.C. State wanted him
badlv when he came out of high
school
Redbirds 'It n
game I
onlv wa for u
shot at winn
frJ
e il
pro-
Ot the Redbirds on the whole
Odom said he expected to see the
play much in the same style
diana.
as
:m
In-
also
a great
L
H Win R
- � � m a
� nn
.
illege
FCU'�; all time
I oilovving
s
� -ev
I
"1
hat
she
when
Hil 1 saw
1 eels
1 hat sure
ii ib'lit it
:ords held bv
� e are 1 C I
� mnding
. . �. I hompson
. ' and 1.119 re-
tging 18.3
; pei contest.
a (mid be
need a
the past
� i ten games,
red in double
; C o r e her
pei game.
i i I uesdav at
v tallied 25
� it of the
ays, there
h � recent lack
guards and for-
tuning their
real well she said.
laking the shots.
i need for us to
I fiev wei e :
I here wa
nside : me.
"I tried oneentrate more on
defense Honestly, I tee! during
thai 1 was playing as
II all around as 1 ever have. I just
wasn'r scor ing as much
Miss rhompson's contributions
to the 1 ast Carolina women's pro-
im have surelv been many, not
onlv on the floor but off.
Few people realize, for example,
she has never had an athletic
scholarship until this season "They
�av s told me I could have one
pson explained, "but I refus-
ed because I already had an
tcademic scholarship. 1 wanted our
coaches to use the scholarship that
was ottered me to be used to get
quality players in here
How did Miss rhomspon a
"quality" player herself, arrive at
EClBelieve it or not, former
Pirate football coach Pat Dye had a
tremendous influence on her deci-
sion
"Coach l)ve encouraged me to
come here she said. "I had plann-
ed to wait a vear after 1 graduated
from high school
Though she did not wait that year
before coming to ECU, Miss
Thomspon is finishing out her
career at the same time as if she had.
"1 onlv played lour games my
sophomore vear she explained,
"because o! an injury
I he experience is not one that she
likes to think of. "It was horrible
exclaimed the senioi forward. "We
were 6 16 that yeai and I couldn't
stand just watching. 1 don't know if
our record would have been better
had 1 plaved. but at least I could
have tried
I hat was four years ago. The
I ad) Pirate program was come a
long wav since then, now owning a
16-8 record.
"Bob Donewald (ISl head
coach) served as an assistant under
Bobby Knight at Indiana for a
while he said. "I think you'll see
a lot of Bobby's coaching in him
Odom noted that his team would
have to be mentally readv tor the
Center Joe (ialin
7-foot Reclhini
Lady Pirates
Fall To Heels
Rosie Thompson
"The major change said Miss
Thompson, "is that Coach (Cathy)
Andruzzi is getting good caliber
players in here. You really need that
now because everybody we plav is
tough. You can take nothing for
granted
One thing Thompson is not tak-
ing for granted is her own future.
She is presently engaged and has
ambitions to play professional
basketball.
If she makes it in the Women's
Basketball League (WBL), she will
join fiancee' Zack Valentine to form
a family of pro athletes. Valentine,
former ECU defensive end, is a
linebacker for the World Champion
Pittsburgh Steelers.
Miss Thompson said that though
she had not spoken with scouts, she
felt her chances at a pro career are
good. "Coach Andruzzi has a lot of
connections Thompson said. "1
just hope some of them will pav
Something else in her favor is the
fact that two former ECU mens
coaches, Larry Gillman and Terry
Kune, are coaching in the WBL.
Ciillman, who ended a stormy two-
year ECU tenure last season,
coaches the St. Louis Streak while
Kune, Gillman's assistant last
season, coaches at Minnesota.
"I guess it will help me since
they've seen me play Thompson
said. "I used to talk some with
both of them
As for Saturday's game with
George Mason, Thompson said she
had no extra feelings because of her
number being retired. "I'll treat it
just like any other game and any
other night
She may, but the fact remains it
will be more than just another
night. It marks the end of an era.
B JIMM Dul'KI-t
Iwislanl Spurls I tliinr
H MM 1 Mil 1 tter ha
led bv one at the half, East
Carolina's women fell to North
Carolina 85-71 I uesdav afternoon
at Carmichael Auditorium.
The lead changed hands wt
times in the action-packed first half.
with neither team able to mount
more than a three point advantage.
�prille Shaffer opened the second
half with a bucket to regain the lead
for the Heels, but EC I forward
Kathy Riley quick!) answered with a
drive once agam shifting the narrow
edge. Center Marcia Girven added a
field goal to put the Pirates up bv
three.
Then the poised lar Heel- com-
bined a pair of field goals from
leading seorei kathv Crawford,
another from Shatter and a follow
shot by team captain Bernie
McGlade to post a 39-34 advantage.
appearantly taking command of the
game.
The teams exchanged field goals
before Girven added a three-point
play and Lydia Rountree chipped in
a 15-footer to knot the score at
41-41.
Crawford drilled home three
straight for L NC, countered bv a
pair from Rosie Thompson to set
the score 4-45 in favor of the hosts.
But then the nightmare began for
the visiting Pirates.
UNC capitalized on four Pirate
turnovers and blitzed to a 63-45 np
on 16 unanswered points to silence
East Carolina's hopes of victory.
Riley posted 12 of her 19 points
on the evening in the final eight
minutes of play, as the I ady Pirates
made one final run for the rrionev
Heidi Owen's jumper with 1:40 on
the clock cut the score to 79-67, but
it was too little, too late as ECU suf-
fered their eighth loss with 16 wins.
Crawl
.oitk . �
Bern added 2) points from
perimeter and Shafft
! � omps
.lt1M .
v, v. :
with 25
while R
Sikes 12
"Thev
win
Cath nd . . . a I
1-3 N( 1 vv
weren't intense.
"We d
Hill has. You need
ballplayers.
Craw ford picked - st
cond half and hurl is;
team picked up ii � set.
w e had to p
she missed the shots
unfortunatlv she d d
East Cat olina
Mason Saturdav a I 5 p
change from the prt isl
nounced tipofl time
Thompson
celebrated, with
' 10' jerse being
ECl ("D
Thompson 8 9-11 25, R e 8 - "
19, Girven 4 1-1 9. Rou tree4
Sikes 5 2-2 12. Bravbo 0
Owen I o-i) 2, Denkiei
Barnes 0 0-0 o 1 otals 28 15-2! '
I N( (85)
McGlade 3 1-2 7, rawf, rd
8-10 30, Walls 0 2-2 2, Shaft
8-11 IS. Berry 9 2 4 20. Hiomas 2
0-0 4. White 2 0-0 4. BoykinOCM
Jones 0 O-o o. Totals 2 21-29 85
Halftune: E( I JO, I C 29
fouled out: Rilev. Totals
ECl 23, I NC20. rechnicals: none
A-150.
Willie Mays Set To Visit Green ville
isually a month tor
I valentines. But for East
i and Greenville, this
will be a month
! hv baseball,
i istern North Carolina
illlink will be held at ECU
lay, I cb. 9 with several big
upectted to be present.
I � Kansas City Royal and
( ?al md 's manager Jack
McKeon, now the assistant general
it San Diego, headlines tne
,p of guests. Also par-
ring will be Jack Krol, third
base coach of the St. Louis Car-
ds. Bobby Guthrie, assistant
h at UNC-Wilmington; Tony
Guzzo, head coach at NC W'esleyan.
Also, ex-Atlanta Braves' manager
Clyde King, now pitching coach of
the New York Yankees; Boston Red
Sox scout Wayne Britton; plus ECU f ' fe '
coaches Hal Baird and Gary Over- J gjJCS
ton.
The clinic is open to all persons
junior high school and high school
age.
Charles Chandler
Later in the month of February,
one of the truly great basebali
players of all time will be in Green-
ville.
Wilie Mays, the "Say Hey Kid
will speak at the Greenville Sports
Club on Feb. 28.
Mays, a real superstar for the
New York and San Francisco Giants
before spending his last few seasons
with the Mets, ranks as the third
leading home run hitter of all time,
just behind the immortal Babe Ruth
and Henry Aaron.
Recently, Mays was named to one
of the top three outfielders in
history when he was named on
baseball's all-time all star team.
Mays has a controversial side of
him to that will almost surely be
discussed at the Sports Club
meeting. Recently the Hall of
Famer was banned from his baseball
connections due to his ties with a
gambling ring.
Some have supported the move
made by Baseball Commissioner
Bowie Kuhn while others claim
Kuhn gave Mays too grave a punish-
ment.
Nevertheless, the man who made
the "shoestring catch" famous, and
made baseball a sport of all-around
athletes will speak on the 28th.
Mays had earlier been scheduled to
speak on the 14th but had to cancel
for business reasons.
Odom with a chuckle. "We were
beat at Duke by 19 and Maryland
just beat Duke by 19. That's 38 and
add the ten points for the home
court advantage and you've eot
48
Who says basketball coaches
don't have good common sense1
ECU head basketball coach Dave
Odom faces a stern task on the 13th
of this month when he takes his
Pirates to College Park to face the
sixth-ranked Maryland Terrapins,
ACC leaders at this point.
He seems to realize just this.
"Heck, I guess we're 48 point
underdogs at least, aren't we said
An interesting note concerning Il-
linois State, a team that comes to
ECU for a Saturday night game in
Minges Coliseum concerns an early-
season loss.
The Redbirds, an impressive 16-5,
lost a 72-70 overtime decision to
second-ranked Syracuse earlier this
season. Syracuse has a sparkling







8
I HI EAS1 C ROl INIAN
M-BRl KN 7. yso
Top IM Teams
Dominating
B FREDDIE FRAZIER
HI Intran al Department
1 he intramural basketball season
is off to a fast-paced start. The
season is now in full suing although
the lop teams have et to be match-
against each other. Most of the
nes involving the top teams were
one sided
1 lie dorm division does not have
r top teams, but the ones the)
excellent. 1 he top-tanked
� easers destroyed the Supei
shots 90-27 while the Belk Stylons
: the ycock Desolation Angels
35 and the Jones Nads 56-40.
In the fratemiu division, the two
ranked teams had no trouble in
first games. Kappa Alpha
nolished Delta Sigma Phi 77-13,
I au Kappa 1 psilon trounced
Nu -14 IS.
pendent div ision con-
nosl of the better teams. The
inked team on campus, the
Supt 1 ight, had no trouble in
he illage People 84-34.
tists easil got b the
62-21, while the White
uising past I ambert's
lunatics 61-20. The Joint light
handled the Golden Buds 85-43
while the freshmen Sensations
defeated the Village Green Buds
52-29.
1 he basketball quality should on-
ly get better as the season wears on.
1 he teams will work better together
and the competition will become
stiffer.
Men's lop I en
Belk Pleasers
Super Eight
Murphy's I aw
V arious Artists
v lute Hope
Joint light
Belk Stylons
Kappa Alpha
I au Kappa Epsilon
0. Freshmen Sensations
3.
4.
s
8.
9
v omen's I op Five
1 rylei Misfits
: Mpha i Delta 1
V Sharpshooters
4. Alpha Delia Pi
5. Diet Mr. Bills'
ECU Hosts ODU
IT'S ROSIE
THOMPSON
NIGHT
Saturday, February 9
ALSO,
It's Ladies' Night
ALL LADIES
ADMITTED FREE
The Lady Pirate Great's
No. 10 Jersey To Be
Retired During:
BIG DOUBLEHEADER
6:15 p.m.
ECU Women (16-8)
vs.
George Mason (4-6)
Afterwards
ECU Men (11-8)
vs.
Illinois State (16-5)
bast Carolina Playhouse Present
A FUNNY,
FUNNY,
VALENTINE
Sponsored by ECU Sports Promotions
Wayne Newnam, Chairman
Bn t H Ri KS
( H VMM IK
sports I dilor
1 asi Carolina
� 2 I ;am hosts
inJav
the
o lasi
itch of the
; i in du
Faces the
V
uimp
1
i
nt.
realh he
I I I
Steers "We
rginia lech
his year and
ished second to
Dominion m the
. nent
he w
M narchs is All-
cai : idai e
The
has been
. ranked
two seas
won the
- Eastern
al championship
?ars in a r �w
ng up against Lee
he freshman Grey
a ho owns a 10-9
�n season.
done a nice
us said
rs "Most of the
: he has just been
ng his feet uet.
he's come a long
He'll go at 'em.
I ee will know he's been
in a match when it's all
over
I eading the Pirate
grapplers in the match
will be heavyweight
1)1 Joyner, 28-2, and
1 77-pou nder Bu I ch
Revils, 30-1. Both are
ranked sixth national!)
in their respecti e
weight classes.
" 1 hat's the highes
rankings we've receive.
year said Steers.
"f oi that, we can real-
l be pleased
Ol the match with
the Monarchs, Steers
said the ke fot I C I
was balance. "We :an
gie them a good go
said the first-year
Pirate coach, "it we
base a well-balanced
attack. I wasn't able to
recruit much because I
arrived here in the spr-
ing. Because ol that
we've relied on good ef-
fort. I just hope that
will be enough Satur-
da
Steers noted that a
change in his lineup
should be a big help to
the Pirates "Steve
Milanese has decided to
trim down and wrestle
in the 118-pound
class he said. "He
had been a 'light'
126-pounder. Now
he'll be a
'heavy' 1 18-pounder.
That should make a big
difference for us
i mrn
WEDNESDAY
ALL DAY HUMP DAY
Tacos 29c
WASH
HOUSE
E. 10 ST.
'OSS FKCM
11 n FW-L 96Mi'C� UWOkY"
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� �' i Irtd � frj Si rviCX
� frit re; 'V. ; � � �,
' : i )f I rofssCAM f citric ' '�� r
3
crfSiQji
t
GHz wis vw a. Soft drifti
ii)ffh "thiS " n fjLpor
, i - id tnjJ cAt h y
)
-�
Distributed
By
Taylor
Beverage Co.
� Goldsboro
IMPORTS �

Heinekeri
HOLLAND BEER
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February 13-16,18-23
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Drama Building
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8 THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 7, 1980
Top IM Teams
Dominating
By FREDDIE FRAZIER
ECU Intramural Department
The intramural basketball season
is off to a fast-paced start. The
season is now in full swing although
the top teams have yet to be match-
ed against each other. Most of the
games involving the top teams were
one-sided.
The dorm division does not have
many top teams, but the ones they
have are excellent. The top-ranked
Belk Pleasers destroyed the Super-
shots 90-27 while the Belk Stylons
beat the Aycock Desolation Angels
55-35 and the Jones Nads 56-40.
In the fraternity division, the two
top-ranked teams had no trouble in
their first games. Kappa Alpha
demolished Delta Sigma Phi 77-13,
while Tau Kappa Epsilon trounced
Sigma Nu 44-18.
The independent division con-
tains most of the better teams. The
second-ranked team on campus, the
Super Eight, had no trouble in
beating the Village People 84-34.
Various Artists easily got by the
Bouncers 62-21, while the White
Hope was cruising past Lambert's
Lunatics 61-20. The Joint Eight
handled the Golden Buds 85-43
while the Freshmen Sensations
defeated the Village Green Buds
52-29.
The basketball quality should on-
ly get better as the season wears on.
The teams will work better together
and the competition will become
stiffer.
Men's Top Ten
1. Belk Pleasers
2. Super Eight
3. Murphy's Law
4. Various Artists
5. White Hope
6. Joint Eight
7. Belk Stylons
8. Kappa Alpha
9. Tau Kappa Epsilon
10. Freshmen Sensations
Women's Top Five
1. Tyler Misfits
2. Alpha Xi Delta 1
3. Sharpshooters
4. Alpha Delta Pi
5. Tyler Mr. Bills'
IT'S ROSIE
THOMPSON
NIGHT
Saturday, February 9
if
Look for the Onion Label
ECU Hosts ODU
ALSO,
It's Ladies' Night
ALL LADIES
ADMITTED FREE
The Lady Pirate Great's
No. 10 Jersey To Be
Retired During:
BIG DOUBLEHEADER
6:15 p.m.
ECU Women (16-8)
vs.
George Mason (4-6)
Afterwards
ECU Men (11-8)
vs.
Illinois State (16-5)
A FUNNY,
FUNNY,
VALENTINE
Sponsored by ECU Sports Promotions
Wayne Newnam, Chairman
ByCHARLES
CHANDLER
Sports Editor
The East Carolina
wrestling team hosts
Old Dominion Friday
at 7:30 p.m. in the
Pirates' next-to-last
home match of the
season.
ECU, 5-3-1 in dual
matches, faces the
Virginia state champs
in the Monarchs, via
their win in last week's
Virginia Intercollegiate
Tournament.
"They'll really be
tough said ECU
coach Ed Steers. "We
lost to Virginia Tech
earlier this year and
they finished second to
Old Dominion in the
Virginia tournament
Leading the way for
the Monarchs is All-
America candidate
Buddy Lee. The
134-pounder has been
nationally ranked for
the past two seasons
and has won the
NCAA's Eastern
Regional championship
two years in a row.
in a match when it's all
over
Leading the Pirate
grapplers in the match
will be heavyweight
D.T. Joyner, 28-2, and
177-pounder Butch
Revils, 30-1. Both are
ranked sixth nationally
in their respective
weight classes.
"That's the highest
rankings we've received
this year said Steers.
"For that, we can real-
ly be pleased
Of the match with
the Monarchs, Steers
said the key for ECU
was balance. "We can
give them a good go
said the first-year
Pirate coach, "if we
have a well-balanced
attack. I wasn't able to
recruit much because 1
arrived here in the spr-
ing. Because of that
we've relied on good ef-
fort. I just hope that
will be enough Satur-
day
Steers noted that a
change in his lineup
�WASH
HOUSE
10
.
across from
KMSrY KREME
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WEDNESDAY
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Tacos 29
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gvM-fc:oo �vux one tee U&tf
m
13-16,18-23
Studio Theatre
Ticket Office
Drama Building
1.50 Public
Going up against Lee should be a big help to
will be freshman Grey the Pirates. "Steve
.?m(r n R j
Hiiru�kt�n
Sours, who owns a 10-9
record this season.
"Grey has done a nice
job for us said
Steers. "Most of the
year he has just been
getting his feet wet.
Milanese has decided to
trim down and wrestle
in the 118-pound
class he said. "He
had been a 'light'
126-pounder. Now
he'll be a
Distributed
By
Taylor
Beverage Co.
Goldsboro
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5 P.M - til - CLOSING
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ttRNK�) S
U�
9
tMPOWTED
But he's come a long 'heavy'118-pounder.
way. He'll go at 'em. That should make a big
Lee will know he's been difference for us
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CHEESE
ONION
GREEN PEPPER
PEPPERONI
FRESH SAUSAGE
GROUND BEEF
OLIVEfBtock or Green) 350
ANCHOVY 3.50 5.20 625
MUSHROOM 3.50 5.20 6.25
HAM 3.50 5.20 6.25
ADDITIONAL ITEMS .60 .75 -95
CHANELO'S SUPREME 550 7.75 9.50
Pepperoni, Italian Sausage. Mushrooms. Onion. Green
Green Olive, Anchovy on request.
10"
14"
16"
1.25
12.70
CHEESE $3.50 5.20 6 25
ONION 4.10 5.95 7.20
GREEN PEPPER 4.10 HS �2
PEPFERON. JJO H Jjg
FRESH SAUSAGE J � � J;g
GROUND BEEF 410 595 7 20
OLIVEtBJeck or Green. 410 5.95 7.20
ANCHOVY 4.10 5.95 7 20
MUSHROOM 4.10 5.96 7 20
HAM 410 5.96 7.20
ADDITIONAL ITEMS 60 75 95
SICILIAN SUPREME 610 850 10.45
Pepperoni.ltaiian Sausage.Mushrooms. Onion.Green
Green Olive. Anchovy on request.
20"
695
10.20
1020
10.20
1020
10.20
10.20
10.20
10.20
10.20
1020
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FREE
HOURS
MonTfcuc& 4pjRlAJB.
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Srturdey 11 ml.Sun.
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FUN SHOWS 2:30-4:50-7:10-�:
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PITT.PLAZA SHOPPING CENTER
HELDOVER
2nd BIG WEEK
ALAN BATES
Cokes DELIVERY! Cokes
� I 1
With Every j
Pizza
Not Good Burin
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307E.14thStr�t
QreenvHle, N.C
768-7400
YOU DESERVE THE RMJL RICH
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 7, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 07, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.37
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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