The East Carolinian, February 5, 1980






Bhz
Carolinian
Vol. 54 No. as-1
Tuesday, February 5, 1980
(.reemille. VC
( inflation HMMMI
Downtown Snow
Photo by RICHARD GREEN
While snow was carpeting the unusually bare streets of downtown Greenville atlam stripn,c
gathering on College Hill for some snowy action. " af am" s,uden's were
Snowstorm Vandals
Overturn Parked Van
by MARIANNE HARBISON
News Editor
What began as a snowball fight
early Thursday morning resulted in
$2000 damage to a 1948 Chevy van
when it was turned over on College
Hill Drive.
The owner of the van. Leland K.
Williams, said, "One person climb-
ed into the van and held down the
brakes while the remaining 50 peo-
ple pushed it over and rolled it down
College Hill
One witness said, "As they were
pushing the van over, someone else
was smashing out the back win-
dow
Williams claimed that other
witnesses knew the identity of the
vandals but were reluctant to name
them.
Williams is offering a $300
reward in Blue Chip stock for infor-
mation leading to the arrest and
conviction of the person(s) responsi-
ble. Williams is also offering an ad-
ditional $100 bonus to the person(s)
who brings the incident before the
appropriate authorities.
As to the identity of those involv-
ed in the vandalism, Assistant
Director of Security Francis Ed-
dings stated, "We don't have any
idea who did the damage, so there
really wasn't anything we could do
about it He also noted that since
at least 500 people were involved,
there was no logical reason to send
two or three security officers to con-
trol the crowd.
Chief Eddings also commented
that the snow "riot" ran its course
and calmed down. Carolvn Fulgum,
dean of women said, "After the van
was turned over, the whole thing got
worn-out There were no arrests
made, according to Eddings.
Williams said his insurance would
not cover the damage.
Don Joyner, counselor of Aycock
Dorm, told Williams there were at
least 50 people involved, and there
was another car damaged during the
incident. While Joyner was speaking
to Williams, a student who had been
in the snowball fight came into the
room and began to explain how
much fun the event had been.
At that point in the conversation,
Joyner introduced the student to
Williams. According to Williams,
this was an evasive tactic intended to
prevent him from discovering who
was responsible for the damage to
his van.
Student Fee Increase Predicted
by TERRY CRAY
Vice Chancellor for Student Lite
Dr. Elmer Meyer told the SGA stu-
dent legislature Monday that in-
creases in student fees "have got to
come and said that the only ques-
tion was in which areas they would
occur.
Meyer mentioned the growing
needs of the intramural sports pro-
gram and the inflationary pressures
on student health services as ex-
amples of the reasoning behind any
future fee increases.
Melvin also reported to the
legislators about his recent trip to
Washington, D.C in which he and
Greenville
Residents
Injured
Two Greenville residents were in-
jured in an accident Friday morning
on Greenville Boulevard, just east
of the Elm'Street intersection.
Gwendolyn Dianne Tyson, 20, is
in guarded condition at Pitt County
Memorial Hospital, according to
Greenville police. Ms. Tyson is a
student at ECu and is the daughtei
of Pitt County Sheriff Ralph L.
Tyson. Philip Wayne Gibbs, 21, is
listed in stable condition.
Investigating officer W.R.
Robertson reported that Gibbs was
traveling east on Greenville
Boulevard when his car collided
with another car driven by James
Gregory Starkie, 22, of Grimesland.
The officer noted that Starkie and a
passenger, Kenneth Ray Buck, 23,
of Greenville, complained of pain at
the scene, but that neither was
transported to the hospital.
Robertson said that Ms. Tyson
was trapped in the Gibbs vehicle,
and it took members of the Green-
ville Fire and Rescue Department
approximately 40 minutes to free
her. She was unconscious during the
procedure. Both Gibbs and Ms.
Tyson were transported to the
hospital by the Greenville Fire and
Rescue Department.
Police reported that no charges
were filed in the incident.

10 other SGA presidents spoke to
HEW officials about the current
legal battle over segregation in the
North Carolina university system.
Melvin criticized HEW's methods
of gathering statistics for their study
of the case and said that the
assembled SGA presidents tried to
stress individual choice as the most
important question at stake in the
issue. HEW has brought charges
against the university system in part
because it is making insufficient
progress in fulfilling racial quotas
set by the federal government.
SGA Vice President Charlie Sher-
rod reported that the construction
company responsible for paving the
new parking lot behind Mendenhall
could not continue work until the
weather becomes dry and warmer.
Sherrod said that Dr. Elmer Meyer
would present a proposal to the
Chancellor's committee this week
recommending that the company
pull off the job completely until spr-
ing or summer, thus allowing the
unpaved lot to be used immediately.
A resolution asking local towing
companies to reduce their rates for
towing student vehicles illegally
parked off-campus was adopted
almost unanimously by the student
legislature. The present off-campus
commercial towing rate is $25, while
cars are towed on-campus for $15 or
$20, depending on whether it is day
or night.
The resolution asked that the rate
for off-campus towing for ECU
students be dropped to the on-
campus rate. In return, the resolu-
tion stated that all companies agree-
ing to do so would be considered
"favorable businesses" by students.
In other business, a bill to ap-
propriate $1,850 to the Visual Arts
Forum was tabled until the next
meeting due to improper paperwork
in preparing the bill for presenta-
tion.
Two requests for money for
political science department groups
were turned down on the basis that
the groups had no written constitu-
tions and were therefore ineligible to
be funded under the present SGA
policy.
'Life Of Brian'
Picketed By Local
Christian Citizens
by MARIANNE HARBISON
News Cdilor
"Brian is Judas, not Jesus
That's what one picket proclaimed as several
ministers and concerned Christians picketed the movie
Life of Brian" at Bucaneer Theaters Sunday Feb 3
Rev. Van Dale Hudson was issued a permit'to picket
by the Grenville City Police Department on Jan 29 n
officer was there to oversee the demonstration
'The picket was for the purpose of objecting to this
type of satire which is directed against the life of
Christ said the picket leader, Rev. Van Dale Hudson
of Trinity Freewill Baptist Church. "The picture was a
satire against the life of Christ, and we felt that it was
not wholesome for the community to be witness to it "
Rev. Hudson said the concerned group tried once
before to ban the movie in Greenville, and their efforts
were successful. "The Bucaneer movies are under new
ownership of Consolidated Theaters in Charlotte We
were able to prevent the movie from being shown when
we spoke with the old owners, but the" new owners
would not yield to our requests said Hudson
Alex White, the owner of Consolidated Theaters
said "We felt that the people have the right to eo to see
anything they want to see, including 'Life of Brian ' The
movie was screened here in Charlotte bv a
ministers and religious leaders, and thev came out ,
ting to know what all the fuss was about "
The ministers and other concerned 6
participated m the picket voiced their opi
film was more than just a satirical pom the I
ot Christ. It went toward mockery and blas.ihei
Christ, said Jim Nason of Parkers Chapel
Baptist Church. "Jesus Christ is God him
we see this kind of mockery made of tl
we tell that this was the final straw
A Methodist layman, T.R. Jones stated "
see or know what's in a can of garbage ir
point of looking down in there0" Jones �
sonal relationship between God and ma
should be publicly defended. "I just wante
and be counted as a Christian and to i
to this film Jones proclaimed.
"This violation is one of co-mission rail
sion if people go to see it because it drew
tion Jones added.
Bob Clyde of the Baptist Student Center
like the film was more of a charicature of the w
pie misrepresent Christ. It was like a comments .
See CHAPLAiJS pQge 3
Photo by RICHARD GREEN
Come Down On Wednesday
the weather is fine
ECU Classes
Unofficially
Cancelled
By DEBBIE HOTAUM,
Assistant Sens Kdit.tr
Several unconfirmed news
broadcasts announcing
cancellation of classes last T'r
i�y caused manv BCU vidcns
to miss classes.
The local stations made several
broadcasts, the first at 7 a.m
reporting that classes would be
cancelled until 2 p.m. Thursdav
John Moore of WRQR in
Farmville was one of the
jockeys who broadcast the class
cancellation. "Weil, we aren't
the only ones who broadcast this
information. Several other radio
and TV stations also said that
East Carolina had cancelled
classes.
"One of the other emplovees
(at WRQR) told me that he had
gotten the word that school was
closed. I don't remember who he
said he got it from
The campus police station
received calls throughout the da) .
according to Francis Eddings,
assistant director of security.
"People just didn't know what to
do. They had heard on the radio
that class was cancelled, and thev
wanted to make sure so they call-
ed us. We do try to have all of the
information, but sometimes it's
hard to get it that early in the
morning
Chancellor Brewer's secretarv
also said there was much confu-
sion. "We received a lot of calls.
The radio and TV stations should
have gotten their information
confirmed before they announc-
ed it. Chancellor Brewer is the
only one who can make such an
authorization.
Young Politicians Ponder Upcoming Candidates
By TERRY GRAY
Staff Writer
It's a long way to election day,
but two groups of politically-
minded students at East Carolina
University have already formed
some early thoughts on the 1980
presidential, gubernatorial and
Senate races.
Of course, the 20 members of the
Young Republicans and the 23
members of the Young Democrats
do not represent any other opinion
than their own. But these are the
people on campus who will pro-
bably be most active as the cam-
paigns get into full swing.
Closest to home is the Senate race
between ECU professor John East
and incumbent Robert Morgan.
What does Young Republican
Chairman Mike Elbertson think
about East's chances?
"As far as I'm concerned, he's
the number one candidate said
Elbertson.
How does Young Democrat
Chairman Joe Fink feel about
Morgan's chances?
"Optimistic � I think he can
win said Fink.
Both chairmen agree that the
financial support given to East by
the North Carolina Congressional
Club will be very important in the
election. Morgan's chances will be
directly affected by the amount of
funding East can get to get his name
and his message around the state,
said Fink.
Fink criticized East for not runn-
ing a more "positive" campaign,
recalling the strong attack East
made on Morgan's Senate record in
his first campaign speech on the
ECU campus Jan. 26. But Fink add-
ed that his organization had no pre-
sent plans to go "all out" in support
of Sen. Morgan.
In contrast, Elbertson said that
the Young Republicans had
"devoted" themselves to East's
campaign. He noted that since East
was still teaching classes in the
political science department, there
wouldn't be much to do until the
coming months.
The Young Democrats will be ac-
tive in getting ECU students to send
in absentee registration cards in
April for the May primary vote, said
Fink.
According to Fink, the members
of his organization are solidly
behind President Carter in his
reelection bid, while Elbertson said
that his group is almost equally
divided between Ronald Reagan and
George Bush.
Judging from the talk of both
chairmen, one thing is clear: 1980 is
not a banner year for alternative
liberal politics on the ECU campus.
The presidential choices of both
groups generally reflect the results
of various nationwide opinion polls
that show Carter leaving Kennedy
behind while Bush steals the thunder
from Reagan.
"Kennedy is too liberal as far as
North Carolina politics are concern-
ed, and I don't think the
Democratic Party will support any
far out liberals in the South said
Fink.
What about Kennedy's criticism
that Carter is running a non-
campaign by refusing to debate the
issues in public?
"There's no reason for Carter to
debate when he's so far ahead � it
would be a potentially dangerous
situation where he could only lose
said Fink.
Things on the Young
Republican's side of the fence are
not so clear cut. According to Mike
Elbertson, Reagan is slightly ahead
of Bush in popularity among the
members, while Connaly has a small
showing.
"We're still looking at the issues
and the candidates said Elbert-
son.
In the gubernatorial race the
situation is similar. Fink reports
that the Young Democrats are
unanimous in their support of Jim
Hunt. Elbertson said that although
he and several other Young
Republicans supported I. Beverly
Lake for governor, there was no
concensus in the group.
Inside Today
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 5, 1980
Announcements
Research Project
Funded
Chaplain
NCSL
Ihe S. M ill meel Wednesctaj night,
I eh h, al f JO in Ute�vtei B 103 Dl
I risl from lacksooviBe, N � will
spe.ik so the ni si on state funded
abortions Interested students art
welcomed
Notary Service
Free notary publu service we available
for 1(1 students al Mendenhall Stu
dent i enter, room 22�. llteSCiA office,
Valentines
Personalize youi valentine a valentine
cookie! "Coiten Hall's Valentine
i ookic Sales" �ill be taking orders on
I eh " N, and 11 lrom4tonp.m in the
lohhs il i ullen Hall Orders ma) he
puked up on I eh 14 I aiee ctxiliics
Ml and small
uiokics �nh �' itessai i an. 25 cents
Small cookies without messages ssrll
also he sold in tin Student Nk Store
ohhv
II o
no tlntei national I anguage
. i j . having a meeting on
v das, I eb al 2 W in IK 05
Ml people interested in foreign
ies and eultures are invited to at
lend New members are welcome Pai
ms, lectures and mhei activities
I - semeslei sll be discussed
(SO
II you have oi inicnd to declare a majoi
in a science ot health related eui
ricuhtm, you may qualify foi i()M
I KM services made available through
ihe C'entei lot Student Opportunities
K soi
iso currently has openings fen
students wishing lo receive tutorial set
sices. Ihcic are also ripenings For
students lo participate in individualized
" group speed reading, nntetaking and
lest taking techniques, elfective
organization ol lecture notes, and c
me Reading knowing more aboul
ssliat sun read in a shortet lime
( ounseling services include carcei plan
ume assistance, academic, peiMinal.
financial, lesi anxiety, and-oi group
counseling
It you would like lo he considered loi
participation in any ol these COS!
I Kl I services, contact Hi Bridwell,
(, eniei tor Studcnl Opportunities, 21h
Whichard nncx, m vail foi an ap
pointment al 757-122. 6075, oi n08l
Discount Day
del one third oil regular prices al Ihe
Mendenhall recreation centers on
"Discount Day "
Wednesdays, voo p.m -6:00 p m
Billiaids and I able lentils, one third
oil
I tidass, 1:00 p.m. MM) p m -
Howling, one ilmd off.
Faster Seals
Volunteer woik can plas a sital mle in
getting ihe ob you really want II you
are interested in work experience which
will help you alter you graduate, con
ia. t the 1 astei Seal Society al 758 1230
Women's Soccer
Help support women's sports at II
b joining ihe newly formed Women's
Soccel C luh Ihe team needs well ovct
2ii members, so anyone who is in
leresled in playing soccer should eon
laci Kris Soli at 7x s-sh ,� mii
Wiberg al 752 4553 as soon as possible
An organizational meeting will he held
Wednesday, I eh 1.1 at 2 p.m al 422
I4ih St (ihe huck house behind Bclk
Dorm) Practice will begin when all ihe
preliminary muk is completed, which
should be within ihe nesi couple "t
weeks onie out and give soccel a its'
Rho Kpsilon
Ihe Kho I psilon meeting was
rescheduled for fhursday, I eh 7, ai
4:00 p m in room 221 Mendenhall Ml
members and interested persons are
urged tn attend
SI Hashes
Moonlight Howling
"Moonlight Bowling" is b.uk al
Mendenhall Studententei Howl in
the moonlighl plus gel a chance lo win a
I Kl I (, MI ol howling I sets Sun
das from 5 tm p.m until 7:00 p.m
Rowling Specials
RIM l M I seis Saturday from
12 noon h (K) p m sou sail rent a lane
St 1(11 lot one liout
Kl I) I'lN BOWI l(. On Sundays
win a I KIT GAME hs making a strike
when the red pin is ihe head pin from
7 00 p m 10 00 p in
Family Child Assoc.
! he I nulls t hild Association will meet
I uesday. I eh 5 at 5 p in in the Home
Economics Conference Room (141)
Ml members are urged 10 attend this
important meeting
(.MAT
rhe Graduate Management dmission
lesi will he ottered at 1(1 on Satin
das. March I" ppiication blanks are
available al the restingenter. Speight
Building. Room los Registration
deadline i I chin.us 22
S(.A Loans
Ml students needing SOA loans Ljn
now get ihein from the SGA office in
Mendenhall oi from the Financial -id
( Iffice in the )ldaletena I lies arc no
longer available in vshiTiard room 210
lame' H Mallors. Associate Dean.
(Irientalioi, and ludiciars
I lie Studcnl I nion li.nel Committee
is sponsoring a trip in Kl I auderdale
and Hivnes World loi Spring Break
(Mar. h 7 lm i inly VI 75 foi quad s.
. s Koi more infot mafion, call
'57 6611, cxl I!rV
Ihe Studenl I nion Minority Vrts
(. ommitlce sstll he sponsoring a lewish
V s and I al I estival. I i b
i
�ri I shihiuon i omntitlec an
es the showing ol the ludau col
ol the North l arolina Museum
11 h 1 2si so, on 1 eh 5 al "
- it d bagels, and al " 30 p m
l v itian Knoll. a majoi
and curaloi ol ihe colles
non, will speak in ihe Multipurpose
Mendenha
1 SAT
1 he I ass School Admission I esl will be'
I I i I on Saturday, pul I1
deadline i- I ehiuais I I,
�- inks (which tuiisi
hs completed and mailed to I Is
d ' 'in the 11 I resting
Ri ' Sr� gl Building
Faculty-Staff Night
Iseis Monday from 5:00 p m until
S oo p in is I .Ktihs siall niglii al the
Mendenhall Bowlingenier ns ECU
t.Kiilis oi stafl inemhei ssuh proper
identification mas boss I two games and
gel a third game I Kl I Relas after
work and ak advantage ol Ihe savings
at Mendenhall
Summer Orientation
Ihe Office ol lame- H Mallory,
Vssociatc Dean. Oticnlalton and
ludiciary, is now accepting applications
foi counselors for Summer Orienta-
tion Applicants must he rising seniors
iduate students Applications mas
be picked up in Whichard Building,
21 ; I) nlhne iv I ndas. I cb. 8.
Chem Societv
I � . Kasteri s Carolina Section o!
American Chemical Societ) will
ts February meeting al 7 p m on
Wednesday, February I' al the Cap
lam's lahle Restaurant in yden Ihe
speaker 'or !he evening will he Dr
j n I oeppky ol the I niversity
� M ssouri . olumhia During his talk.
ed " Nil rosa mine Car
tnesis he will explore the
chemical and biological ramifications
trie question, "Are nttrosamines
causative ateniv in human cancer?"
Dinnei reservations should he made
through ihe Department ol Chemistry
le� 6711, bv Monday. I eh II
(iameroom
ll sou like pn ball, pool or loosball. the
place lo go is the MRi gameroom.
I ocated in the basement ot fcycock
is�,�. u ,v open lions IU a.m. until
Ihe checkout area for tents, canoes, car
,i.l and hie piesersers Remember.
the Men's Residence Council prosides
these services
WRC Officers
Ihe Women's Residence Council ex
ecutive officers loi the Spring Semester
are Stephanie Cianus, president. Oail
Watson, vice-president; Nancy lubhs,
secretary; Kaihs Stevens, treasurer;
(.mger Wade, publicity chairperson;
and Brenda Killingsworth, parliamen
tarian
I he k RC dorm officers lor (lenient
Hall are Cind) Rouse, president; Belli
Whitehcad, sice president; Irma
I homas. secretary treasurer, tor I lorn
ing Hall, Jackie lowrs. president;
Stephanie Schaub, vjce-president; i .ail
lacobs, secretary treasurer, for Garretl
Hall, leiese Woodruff, piesident;
sheila Keaton, vice-president; Beth
Wolfe, secretar) treasurer; lor laisis
Hall, Virginia Carlton, president;
leanne Spivey, vice-president; Mthea
Oliver, secretary-treasurer; for Cot ten
Hall, I ottie Scott, president. Diane
Hudson, vice-president; Myra Moses.
secretary treasurer; foi Fletcher Hall,
Sue Wrobel, piesident. Belli Rennicks,
sue pies idem. Jo Ann Meads.
secretary-treasurer; lor Greene Hall,
Idie lekeie. president. Ilene Kusiiak.
sue piesident. I isa Shaut. secretary
treasurer; and lor I s lor Ha Missy
Mdndge. president. Sandra leltman.
vice-president; Elaine r u r ner,
secretary treasurer
Draft Registration
Interested students are united to join
the Greenville Peace t ommittee in son
sidering the upcoming dralt regislra
lion I he meeting begins with a pot luck
suppei at � to I iidas nighi al mo s
Elm Street, two hhvks east ol campus
I or more information, call 758 4VOfs or
check with I d,ith Webber in 21H Austin
SI) Chairperson
Ihe application deadline lor Student
Union chairperson positions has been
extended to I eh x Anyone interested
in seeking one of these positions should
pick up an application from the Studenl
Union Office, room 2'4. Mendenhall
Student Center, or tall 757-6611, esi
210
Alpha Sigma Phi
Ihe Alpha Sigma I'hi hole sisieis are
sponsoring a Happy Hour al the Elbo
Room on Ihuisdas. I eh 7, from
p m until 9 K) p m A Besthesi con
lest will he held lor male contesta '
All men who ftish to put theii b.nls
where then mouth is are invited lo
entei'
UFDC
Ihe I nisei sitv I oik and Country
Dance club would like to invite all who
are interested in folk and country dans
ing lo attend meetings ol the I I IH
Ihe meetings are every Wednesday
night Irorn sesen lo nine p m. in
Hrewstei I) I0S II you're interested.
come on oscr or call 2 OK26
FC'U News Bureau
GREENVILLE � A
total of SI,363,102 in
outside funding was
received by ECU in
November, 1979.
Among the research
and training projects
receiving funding were
several sea grant pro-
grams funded by the
National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Ad-
ministration.
These included
$159,296 to the ECU
Institute for Coastal
and Marine Resources
for marine advisory
services; $36,335 to
Drs. Peter Fricke and
John Maiolo of ICMR
for individual research
on North Carolina's
recreational fishery,
hard clam management
and shrimp fishery;
$44,748 for a continu-
ing education program
for commercial
Circle K
I his is Circle K week, so some hs and
see whai this coed service stub is all
aboul Pie Circle K club of ECI meets
on ruesday in Mendenhall room 221 at
- ixi p m 1 his week's speaker IS 1 ren
ton Davis, and he will he speaking
aboul environmental health Anyone
who is interested is invited to attend
lishermen; and $17,938
for a leadership train-
ing program in marine
education offered by
the ECU Department
of Science Education.
Also receiving fun-
ding were ECU's pro-
gram in rehabilitation
counseling ($41,965
from the U.S. Office of
Rehabilitation Ser-
vices), and the ECU
School of Medicine,
which received two
grants totaling more
than $1 million from
the Eastern Area
Health Education
Center.
Dr. Richard Mauger
o the Department o!
C.eology received
$54,651 from the Na-
tional Science founda-
tion for his research in-
volving geologic and
petrologic studies of
the Sierra Calera-del
N i d o area of
Chihuahua, Mexico.
I continued from Page
tSpeaks
ways people are easily
misled Clyde also felt
that "Life of Brian"
was sacreligious and of-
fensive, but, "There
was also a great lesson
to be learned from the
film in terms of
misrepresentation
Clyde was not
associated with the
picket but was the only
person who had actual-
ly seen the film. Neither
Jones, Hudson, nor
Nason had seen the
film when the) picketed
on Feb. 3.
Alex White. Con-
solidated Theaters
owner stated. "Mosi
the people who were
picketing hadn't even
seen the picture
were voicing a
judgemental opin
about it
Contrary to the
attempt, the picket n
unsuccessful,
"Life oi Brian"
showing at
Bucaneer Theatei
Come to
Tutors Needed
Ihe Centei tor Studenl Opportunities
� si ii currently has openings foi tutors
m the following areas medicine,
premedictne. nursing, allied health.
biology, chemistry, physics, and i
science and health professions You
mas earn an income ai standard cam
u 11- Bi idwcll,m )
216 Whichard Vnnex, cm call M22.
. - � so7? foi an ippointmenl
DON'T FIGHT
Join our membership now
Non-aggression, 10 Commandment
Church that is peace and
charity oriented Established
in 1978. We are seeking
sincere, God dedicated people
to become part of our
membership. Please send a
self-addressed, stamped
envelope to Christian
Council Of Ideology Box
1131, Roanoke Rapids N C
27870. Please do not respond
if you are simply a
curiosity seeker
Help prevent
birth defects
Allied Health
I lie HieJ Health Professions Admis-
sion lest ssill be offered al ECI on
Saturday, March S pplieation blanks
are available at the Testing Center.
Speight Building, Room 105 Regislra
lion deadline is I ebniais �
lo sou hase a lued. si it l neck ' Ciaylan
Hoyte, a phssieal theiaps student, is
iiovs conducting research which m-
solses a MASSAGE lo the upper bask
and neck. It sou suiter from a tight
neek. call Oaslan ai "O'H1
Phi Beta Lambda
The Phi Beta 1 ambda business
organization will meet Tucsdus. I eh J,
at 4-00 in l()t Rass
Greek News
By RICKI GLIARMIS
Greek Correspondent
The members of
Sigma Sigma Sigma
sorority are celebrating
their 20th anniversary
as a chartered sorority
at East Carolina today.
Sigma was the first
sorority founded at
ECU on Feb. 5, 1960.
Sigma is also very
proud to have the only
chapter advisor who
has been active for 20
years. Virginia Minges,
an alumni of Sigma
Sigma Sigma, has been
advisor since 1960 and
helped form the
chapter here.
To celebrate this oc-
casion, Tri Sigma will
be honored with the
presence of several na-
tional officers, in-
cluding a former na-
tional president, Mary
Hastings Holloway
Page. Congratulations
to the pledges, sisters
and alumni of Sigma
Sigma Sigma.
The Kappa Deltas
held initiation for their
fall pledges Saturday
evening. Mrs. Marjorie
Hopkins, the mother of
a member off the sorori-
ty, was made an
honorary initiate.
The Chi Omegas
would like to con-
gratulate the members
of the Alpha Rho
pledge class on their in-
itiation Jan. 28. The
fall pledge class is hav-
ing a lockout the
weekend of Feb. 8, and
the winter pledge class
has just completed a
successful raffle.
The Chi O's are in
the process of holding
Spring Rush. Last
weekend the Chi O's
held their White Carna-
tion Formal to present
the fall and winter
pledges.
The Alpha Delta Pi's
were busy last week
with a new pledge class
of nine and plans for
sorority recognition
week.
On Wednesday, the
ADPi's had a speaker
from the Body Shop
who led the girls in ex-
ercises.
The ADPi's pledges
held their lockout Fri-
day and sold donuts to
raise money.
The Alpha Phi's held
a money-raising car
wash last Saturday.
Thanks to everyone
who supported this
project.
The Phi's are proud
to announce their vic-
tory during the spirit
contest at the ECU-
UNCW basketball
game.
On January 28, the
Alpha Phi's inducted
the members of the
Beta Gamma pledge
class. Congratulations
and welcome to the new
pledges.
The Phi's would like
to congratulate Tom
Hardy for being the
lucky winner of the
Dinner Give-Away at
Three Steers
Restaurant.
Sigma Tau Gamma
has moved to a new
location. The fraternity
is now located at 508
W. Fifth St. in the
oldest home in Green-
ville.
Because of this move
and the confusion,
Sigma Tau Gamma will
hold a second spring
rush beginning Feb. 11.
AH interested students
are invited to drop by.
The Sig Ep's woul
dlike to thank all their
Little Sisters for the
party Saturday night.
Pi Kappa Phi invites
everyone interested to
Pantana Bob's Tuesday
night. Everyone is
welcome.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 5. 1980 3
Rain Is Preferred
but snow is what we get.
Nazi Leader Calls
For Right-Wing
Demonstration
GREENSBORO,
N.C. (AP)1 Eight addi-
tional staff members
Nill be hired at a center
for mentally retarded
children to care for a
1 2-year-old
child who is
retarded.
autistic
severely
Guilford County
commissioners approv-
ed the hiring Mondav
night. The hiHng of ex-
tra personnel to care
for Danny Hunt was
the result of a com-
promise among state
and county officials
and Danny's parents,
Mr. and Mrs. Rav
Hunt.
The commissioners
delayed action last
vcek on a request by
the Hunts to hire the
extra personnel to care
for the boy, who is self-
destructive and needs
around-the-clock care.
They were waiting for a
promise from the state
that it would not aban-
don Danny after June
30, when his emergency
committment to Ken-
dall Center is scheduled
to end.
The Hunts contend
the state is required to
provide education for
the boy under the
Federal Education for
All Handicapped
Children's Act.
The salaries of the
eight, some of whom
will be part-time
employees, will cost the
county $16,000 through
June 30. The total cost
of his care is expected
to be about $23,000
through that period.
The state has promis-
ed to reimburse the
county for the money it
spends on Danny's
emergency care. Area
Mental Health Board
Director Daylon
Greene said he was told
the promissory letter
pledges to continue to
pay for D nny's care
after June 30, if funds
are available.
The case already has
cost the Hunts
thousands of dollars
and has exhausted a
privately funded trust
fund.
The state's decision
to provide emergency
care for the boy was the
result of an agreement
between Frank Johns,
an attorney represen-
ting the child's parents,
and state agencies. The
agreement put off a
lawsuit which Johns
had planned to file on
behalf of Danny and
his parents.
"It is not our inten-
tion to place this
burden on this com-
munity Johns said.
But if the state does not
make some kind of ar-
rangements for Dan-
ny's care after June 30,
"you may well have to
fund the needs of Dan-
ny Hunt
Johns left no doubt
that if some ar-
rangements are not
made for care after
June 30, he will go
ahead with the court
case, which County At-
torney Bill Trevorrow
described as a
"landmark case
Professor Co-
Authors Report
GREENVILLE �
Dr. James Buck,
visiting assistant pro-
fessor of finance in the
School of Business, is
co-author of a research
report prepared for the
White House Con-
ference on Small
Business.
Buck and his col-
laborator, Richard F.
Demong, are among 19
persons who con-
tributed to special
economic studies on the
status of small business
in federal Region III,
including Delaware,
Maryland, Penn-
sylvania, the Virginias
and the District of Col-
umbia.
The studies were
coordinated by the
Pennsylvania Technical
Assistance Program
and sponsored by the
U.S. Small Business
Administration.
Purpose of the
research was not only
to provide support
material for the White
House Conference, but
also to provide an
analysis of small
business problems and
needs which could be
used for legislative and
policy-making deci-
sions.
Buck is on academic
leave of absence from
the Mclntire School of
Commerce at the
University of Virginia.
Girl Injured DueTTo
Snowball Fight
By Debbie Hotaling
Assl. News Kditor
In a meeting on
Monday night, the
Men's Residence Coun-
cil voted to reject any
responsibility for last
week's snowball riot on
College Hill.
During the snowball
fight last Wednesday
night, a van was rolled
down the hill, cars were
vandalized, and one
student was slightly in-
jured when the car in
which she was riding
was attacked and a win-
dow was broken.
The student driving
the car, Sandy
Strickland, was attemp-
ting to return to her
room in Tyler. The
crowd attacked her car
with snowballs, break-
ing the rear window
and causing injury to
one of the passengers.
"I had no idea they
would act like that
said Strickland. "I've
never lived here before
when it was snowing. I
didn't think they would
go crazy like that.
"I was just trying to
go home Strickland
continued. "They (the
snowball-throwing
students) broke the
window in my car and
then just kept right on
throwing snowballs.
They were laughing at
the fact that they had
broken my window.
They behaved like a
bunch of maniacs
The MRC has refus-
ed to pay for any
damages incurred dur-
ing the "riot Grady
Dickerson, president of
the MRC, stated, "We
had a meeting tonight
and it was decided that
it was impossible to
narrow down the list of
people who did it to
just MRC members.
How in the world can
they prove that? If we
pay for one, we'll have
to pay for them all
Dickerson added
"Dr. Meyer approach-
ed me and asked me if
there was anything I
could have done about
it. I said, 'There's no
way I could have stop-
ped it � peer pressure
or not. I would have
been one aeainst 500
Dr. Elmer Meyer,
vice chancellor for stu-
dent life, said,
"Whether or not they
(MRC) had a moral
obligation was the deci-
sion they had to make.
At least a collection
should be taken up for
the damages done to
her car
Dickerson admitted
that the trouble on the
hill should not have
gone to such extremes.
"Anybody that would
break out a window
and hurt a girl and then
continue to throw
snowballs has to be im-
mature. I have per-
sonally apologized to
Chuck Williams (whose
van was overturned)
and he understood that
it could have happened
to anyone. I'm going to
apologize to Sandy
Strickland, but I
haven't been able to
reach her yet
Dickerson explained
the reasoning behind
the MRC's decision.
"It's all volunteer to be
a member of MRC.
You pay extra to be a
member. So, many of
those guys who were in-
volved in the snowball-
ing weren't members.
I'd say about 85 per-
cent of the guys on the
hill are members.
"It's not the money
factor involved he
added, "it's the princi-
ple. We do try to
benefit all, not just a
few. We give $300 to
$400 for foster children
at Christmas, $1200 to
SGA for student loans,
help with Heart Fund,
concerts, etc
Upon hearing the
MRC's decision not to
pay for damages to her
vehicle, Sandy
Strickland commented,
"The fact that they
voted against it does
not make me happy. I
just question the con
trol they had that night.
I think it's a moral
obligation. I think
MRC should take the
responsibility. Mr.
Calder said that he
thought MRC should
pay for all of the
damages. He also
thought there was some
obligation there
Strickland added,
"I'm not going to stop
here. I'm not satisfied
with the decision and
I'm going to take it a
little bit further
The Fast Carolinian
'�� 4 ttw
Puolisheo every r.jsda and
Thursday during the academic
year ind every Aedn.soa, -furmg
the summer
Th�r East Carohr.rfn .s fhe of
ficial n.wspaper of Gas Caroh
nian University owned operated,
ano published for ,v;j tt the
students of East Carol na Univer
Sity
Subscription Rates
Alumm sis eari�
Ml others S2fj early
e. . "d class pos'aqe paid at
Grcer '�, N C
The t . arolmian offices nre
�OCated �� If "a South Bu.iang
n nranpu, . cm. Greenville
i f
Tele�.
ItrfiNOKB S
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$!� last �arflltman
Serving the campus community for 54 years.
Marc Barnes, semorEd�o,
Diane Henderson, Managmg Ed,tor
Richard Green, coPyEd,ior
Anita Lancaster, products Manager
Marianne Harbison, News Edu�r
Robert M. Swaim, anew of&$
STEVE O'GEARY, Business Manager
Charles Chandler, spom Ed,�r
Karen Wendt, emu� eaiot
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5 1980
PAGE 4
This Newspaper fs Opinion
See For Yourself
lt seems .hat the , vhi.e church JgS �?&�
leaders who are decrying "Life of Bran' roug
Brian" and its following are decry- TsJ�"Pi" showing 0f the film,
ing something that they have not sign against ithe show ng o
themselves seen. We contend that it which e nexVt
is wrong to judge som.hing that you which was oorin a
Have not experienced for yourself. "$��� for a time, despite his
The demonstrations against follows urlan uia , v
"Brian" were made by people who attempts to tell them that he
have only heard that "Brian" is thess.ah.
wrong. They arc being led like sheep Many com c
,o the fold by their leaders - leaders � � slapstick antics of
Brian facing down a crowd of his
admirers while he stands nude in an
open window.
We wonder, too, about tne
underlying causes which surround
the mass hysteria of one movie
which takes a differing view of the
FORGIVE �FM� FOR THEV KNOW NOT UHAT THEV DO-LUKE 23-3H
who have not seen the movie.
Public Morals
We also wonder about the
plications of the control of
public morals that these leaders pro- wQrld according to Python
fess. We, on the other hand, believe
in the implicit dignity of man,
i-Letters To The Editor
Weather Hazardous
lm-
the
Suppression Of Freedom
Could it be that a group of in-
kc W.H � dividuals would go so far as to sup-
wonder about the wisdom of letting press artistic freedom for the sake
whatever his station in life might be
We feel, therefore, that man has the
mental and emotional ability to
make decisions on his own. We
others lead us into something that
they themselves don't know
anything about.
Meaning Of Cartoon
There will always be those who
will misunderstand. For example,
the cartoon at the right side of this
page appearson first glsmo
of making sure their own beliefs are
propagated to the masses? We
would hope not. If this were true, it
would not be outside the realm of
possibility that other artistic works
such as The Gulag Archipelago or
the poetry of Carl Sandburg would
come under suspicion by one group
or another, just because their
criticize something
y eshouianot criticize somethn
image of Jesus Christ. Look a little that we have not seen or experienced
closer. It is actually a representation
of actor Graham Chapman, who
played the lead role of Brian. The
setting is the artist's conception of
how the character of Brian must feel
about all the hubbub going on
around him.
This "Life of Brian" silliness has
little to do with religion, or belief in
God, or even a belief in the inane
humor of Monty Python. It has to
do, we believe, with the inability of
certian groups to recognize the dif-
ference between legitimate artistic
endeavor and blasphemy.
No Blasphemy
It follows then, that we do not
feel that "Life of Brian in and of
itself, is blasphemous. There are
certain parts of the film which have
parallels in the Bible, but we do not
feel that the film made a deliberate
attempt to run down or insult the
life of Jesus Christ.
It seems that many religious
for ourselves. We can, of course,
criticize anything we want in this
country, as long as we realize that if
we do not know what we are talking
about, we are not likely to be taken
very seriously.
Art Should Be Applauded
Secondly, artistic endeavor,
whether or not we agree with the
end result, should be applauded.
The British comedy group Monty
Python obviously did not set out to
make a great sociological statement
about twentieth century religion �
they only set out to make a decided-
ly comic film about Biblical times.
Must Be Experienced
Criticism is good, and even
necessary in a democracy such as
ours. We hold with the belief that
we should have the courtesy of ex-
periencing that which we are
criticizing.
To the Editor:
At this writing it is snowing very hard
with one to three inches more of snow ex-
pected today. At this writing a campus
policeman has conveyed the message that
The roads are very slippery. At this writing
all city and county schools have been
cancelled today due to the snow. At this
writing there is a North Carolina travelers
alert in effect. At this writing the Green-
ville Police Department has advised all
persons to stay off the streets and roads
unless absolutely necessary. Oh, yes, also
at this writing, the concerned" ECU ad-
ministration has decided to continue
classes as usual. Apparently, these well,
or perhaps over-educated, administrators
have assumed better judgement than
those licensed and trained to deal with
adverse weather conditions. Evidently
academia has been so over-emphasized as
to exclude common sense. 4ilWt -take a
nudent to taftrparaiyzed or killed in an ac-
cident in route to class for health and
welfare concerns to take priorit over
academia? Will someone have to die in a
car accident while being loyal to ECU's
absurd weather policies regarding snow" I
think we can learn a lesson from this ex-
cellent, well-caring, concerned ad-
ministration that cares so much about the
welfare of students as to require classes in
turbulent weather. Perhaps a return to the
sixties tactics of civil disobedience should
be considered when administrators
become so powerful that their absolute
power may indirectly snuff the life of a
student being loyal to dear ole ECU. But,
then again, who could ever question the
humane, caring, concerned ECU ad-
ministration?
Bill Haney
Women Will Not Be
Asked To Register
To the Editor:
I am writing in reference to the article
by Debbie Hotaling concerning reinstate-
ment of the draft registration. It was my
thinking that a reporter's personal opi-
nion belonged only on the editorial page
and not in articles reporting the news.
The statement by Ms. Hotaling, "ERA
is getting just what it asked for is ir-
responsible and shows that she is highly
mis-informed concerning the ERA. First,
as the ERA has not yet been amended into
the Constitution, in no way can this
legislation be responsible for women be-
ing asked to register. Second, the U.S.
Government has always had the power to
draft women and was close to using this
power at the end of WWII, long before
ERA became the issue it is today. Finally,
the true intent of the ERA is to guarantee
"equality of rights under the law to all
women of this country under the U.S.
Constitution, the supreme law of our
land. The ERA is a short, precise piece of
legislation which would remove the many
state and federal laws which discriminate
against women (and men) solely on the
basis of sex.
The reason the ERA has not yet been
ratified is because the opposition's
strategy relies on misinformation, and
falsified documents and statements to
gain support for their side.
As a school newspaper 1 feel that your
job is to inform students of events that are
important to both their present and future
lives in a responsible manner. The ERA is
one news item that deserves full and
responsible attention by the press, as its
passage would positively affect the lives,
and especially the job opportunities, of
every woman on this campus.
In the future I hope that the articles in
your paper present only the facts of the
news being reported and that opinions are
seen only on the editorial page.
Margie McCormick
of cigarettes, newspapers, c
maeazmes. cand. and even a c
six packs of beer.) In the future. Mi -
ine vou and vour cohort
moretime and effort toward
President about the Iranian
(shich the entire brotherhood
Tau Gamma has done), instea
time criticizing a campu-
which was trying to help the h
would also like to a thai bet
icnorant remarks we had
which 1 am sure the hostages �
vou for.
Also. Mr. Editor. 1 wou
ment on the trashy ant
have been appearing in
num. Every issue since lh� .
this semester has had an article
ing by fraternities. No
ask you how come ab
major positions of Tht :
SGA, Buccaneer, the schoolwte���a�o
and other school relatec
Washington Merry-Go Round
Fraternities Fight Back
To the Editor:
This is in response to the slanderous let-
ters written to you in the January 29 issue
of The East Carolinian. The author's
outlook towards the "Go to Hell Iran"
party is a Fine example of short
sightedness, and acute criticism without
accurate information. The proFits made
from this party were spent on a care
package of essentials that everybody on
this campus takes for granted (i.e. cartons
held by these "No good
rats Sou can't sav that -
voted them in because the
consist of about 5 percent of the
dent population. Also. 1 wou
you to look into the stal sties
many of these "no good bun
giving blood to the Red Cross, �
for the Cancer Society, the H.
and other service organizations II
guys do is harass people, stav drun)
cut class all the time, how have the
nities continued to exist on the 1
Carolina campus for over 30 vears1
Rick Cannon
Pres
Siema Tau Rhc
Letters To The Editor
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
pressing all points of view. Mail or dn
them by our office in the Old Sour
Building, across from the library.
Letters to the editor must include the
name, address, phone number anc
signature of the author(s) and must be
tvped, double spaced, or neatly printed
Letters should be limited to three typewrit-
ten, double-spaced pages. All letters mt
subject to editing for brevity, obcenity and
libel.
Kremlin Attempts To Snuff Out Flame
By JACK ANDERSON
and JOE SPEAR
WASHINGTON � The first an-
cient Olympic Games began in 776
B.C. as part of the glory that was
Greece. The Olympic flame sym-
bolizing peace and sportsmanship
among amateur athletes died cen-
turies later when the Romans ruled
the world and their emperors fouled
the ideals with crass corruption and
political self-aggrandizement. For
instance, the tyrant Nero won
laurels in the chariot race by Fixing
the event.
The Olympic Games were reborn
early this century in the hope of
rekindling the original spirit of
friendly competition among na-
tions. The quadrennial sports spec-
taculars were interrupted by two
world wars but survived to bring
' together athletes from around the
globe.
The flame of the Olympics is now
in danger of being snuffed out at the
hands of the rulers of the Kremlin
who were awarded the torch to con-
duct the games in Moscow this sum-
mer by the sports czars of the Inter-
national Olympics Committee.
IOC President Lord Killanin is
disdainfully rejecting President
Carter's demand that the 1980
games be moved out of Moscow
because of the Soviet takeover of a
defenseless Afghanistan. The Irish
peer haughtily says the Russians
have broken no Olympic rules and
that politics should play no role in
his organization's simon-pure
Olympian considerations.
Killanin and the Olympics are be
ing treated as a cat's pay by the
Soviet sports commissars, according
to a long string of classiFied cable
reports from our Moscow embassy.
They have used the games as a
springboard to present Russia as a
communist success story to gullible
visitors this summer. The Soviets
have colelcted millions from
capitalist enterprises such as the
NBC-TV network to refurbish their
dingy hotels and build massive new
Olympic village dormitories for
eventual use as public housing.
Transportation and communica-
tions facilities have been enhanced
with the help of Western contractors
to show Russia as a workers'
paradise. The Soviet Olympics
Committee, working as an arm of
the Kremlin propaganda machinery,
has issued four foreign-language
magazines extolling life behind the
Iron Curtain.
"Finally for the First time one
publication proclaims, "the Olym-
pics is being hosted by a country
which exempliFies the Olympic
goals No mention is made of the
detention of liberty-loving dissident
Nobel Prize-winner Andrei
Sakharov.
Even the Soviet mascot emblem
for the games, a cuddly little
"Misha the Bear has been con-
verted to propaganda purposes. The
Soviet Olympics Committee
describes Misha as "feared but lov-
ed" and "very dangerous to
anger
There is a strong likelihood that
our dedicated U.S. athletes won't
compete in the Moscow Olympics,
this year. Every American will sym-
pathize with their frustration at not
taking part in the sports tradition
that began centuries ago in Greece.
But it should be noted that even the
idealistic Greeks of those days bar-
red "women, foreigners and slaves"
from their games.
Whistle-Blower Blues: Whatever
our young athletes sacriFice to pro-
test the Soviet Afghanistan agres-
sion, a middle-aged Commerce
Department ofFicial has already
paid for trying to warn that we were
foolishly gullible in dealing with the
Kremlin.
We wrote last July that Larry
Brady was courageous and far-
sighted enough to tell a secret con-
gressional committee hearing that
the Carter administration was
foolish in approving the sale of
computers and other technology
that could be useful to the Russian
military machine.
Upon learning of his forthright
testimony in opposition to the ad-
ministration's line, Brady's
superiors issued a reprimand,
demoted him to another job and
told him to stop talking to con-
gressmen.
When the Soviet strike forces roll-
ed into Afghanistan, the CIA quick-
ly discovered that trucks, mass-
produced with the help of our IBM
computers, were transporting Red
Army troops across the border in
the blitzkrieg.
The Carter administration hastily
second-guessed itself and the presi-
dent blocked further shipment of
spare computer parts to Russia.
The hindsight did Brady little
good. After being hectored and
made a pariah for his whistleblow-
ing, Larry Brady resigned last week
from his government job.
Soviet Shins Barred? The Soviets
are still vulnerable to another
economic twist of the screw if Jim-
my Carter decides to use it. The
Russians could be denied use ot
U.S. ports by their highly profitable
merchant marine fleet. Their
tankers and freighters are reaping
hundreds of millions of dollars by
carrying goods from this country to
overseas buyers. Only 15 percent of
the Red fleet's cargo is intended for
consumption by the Soviet people
The rest nets the Kremlin's bank ac-
count hard cash or vitally needed
goods from other nations.
Rep. John Murphy, D-N.Y asl
head of the House Merchant Marine!
and Fisheries Committee, is urging!
the White House to bar all Soviet!
ships from U.S. ports. Amcricarj
longshoremen on the East and Gulr
Coasts have already refused to loac
or unload Soviet vessels. Theit
fellow dock workers on the West
Coast have been more reluctant tq
boycott the Red ships.
I � ���, W�r. h
1
.�. �





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
rhBKl -IO . IVWi ��c5
Students Lean Toward
Dodging New Draft
Fun And Games In The Snow
got slightly out of hand
Photo by RICHARD GREEN
Snow Wars
Winter
Riot
By BEAU HAYS
ssislanl Features Editor
It was an unspectacular beginning.
A few Hurries drifted serenely to the ground, only to
be returned to their original liquid form. But the clouds
grew tiFed of watching their little white missionaries die
peaceful little deaths, and soon the snow-flakes were fall-
ing fast enough to cover Greenville in the proverbial
blanket of white.
The effect of snow on the average collegiate mentality
is positively mind-boggling. If you take a group of
students who are busy imbibing assorted alcoholic
beverages, taking recreational chemicals, and exploring
the copious virtues of the opposite sex and add a late
night snowstorm, anything less than a riot would be a
minor miracle.
You can count on the guys on the Hill to provide a
riot when the need arises. While a large portion of the
campus was playing in the snow with admirable con-
straint, the men of College Hill Drive � with con-
siderable support from the female population � were
busy participating in random acts of property violence,
aggravated assault with snowballs, and general
hooliganism.
It was almost enough to have people thinking that the
Iranian Embassy was on the fourth floor of Aycock
Building. There must have been between 500 and 27,000
people. Not since Woodstock have so many people
gathered together without protesting something.
' This was no protest � it was an extremely energetic
celebration of winter's Jirst real snow. It's heart-
warming to see that Americans can still participate in
that great American pastime, mob behavior, without
leaving a singlecorpse behind.
The Jones vs. Aycock battle highlighted the show. It
was an absorbing conflict, vaguely reminiscent of the
Battle of the Bulge, with each side hoping to annihilate
their opponents.
Fortunately for the combatants on both sides, a
group began by directing their snow-flinging at in-
animate objects. Poor inanimate objects. An unsuspec-
ting van was swept up by the tide and pushed down Col-
lege Hill Drive. About halfway down, the truck flipped
onto its side, thus preventing the mob from shoving it
into Memorial Gym.
A Greenville policeman pulled into the war zone.
That was his first mistake. His car immediately suffered
an awesome barrage of snow'and ice. The officer step-
ped out of the car. That was his second mistake. He was
promptly overwhelmed by a volley of amazingly ac-
curate snowballs. Quickly realizing that nothing short
of the 82nd Airborne would be able to contain the
throng, the officer returned to his damaged vehicle and
retreated to civilization.
The crowd continued to hit cars, windows, and other
humans until about 4 a.m when people straggled to
their rooms, praying that there would be no classes.
The sun came up and the snow was still falling, but
the magic of the wee morning hours had faded. People
trudged through the ankle-deep snow and slush to get to
classes that weren't being held because the instructors
didn't show up. A few isolated groups would pack
togther a snowball and assault a passerby, but by 1 p.m.
most of these had been rounded up and executed.
A famous journalist once said, "There's nothing
worse than three-day old snow Nature agrees, and as
temperatures rise, the last remnants of snow will finally
be snuffed out. Soon, the only thing remaining will be
the exaggerated recollections of the participants and
spectators of the violent non-protest that was the Winter
Riot of 1980.
By HELENCORDES
College Press Service
WASHINGTON, D.C. (CPS) �
The phone won't let him finish a
sentence. This time the call is from a
Pennsylvania college student, ask-
ing Jack Coljoun how to obtain
conscientious objector status.
"I don't know how the ad-
ministration will set CO. status this
time Colhoun confesses.
"No he continues, "I think it is
going to be even tougher to get into
Canada now explaining that a
sour Canadian economy has made
immigration more difficult than ten
years ago.
Colhoun, director of the National
Anti-Draft Teach-in Project, hangs
up and sighs. It is two days after
President Carter's Jan. 23 proposal
to begin military registration of all
18-24 year-old males, and Colhoun
quickly collected a mountain of call
back slips on his desk. "A good
number of students are freaking
out
Colhoun and other veterans of
the anti-draft movement of the Viet-
nam era � people who still dot their
speech with terms like "freak out"
� wasted no time trying to organize
that groundswell of fear and curiosi-
ty in the aftermath of Carter's pro-
posal.
"I'm from a completely different
background than students now
observes the 34-year-old Colhoun, a
former ROTC officer who fled to
Canada in 1970 and edited a
magazine for expatriates there. "It
will be.interesting
Colhoun readily acknowledges
that many of today's students � the
people who would be most directly
affected by any new registration and
draft system � were too young to
recall the emotions and tactics of the
anti-draft movement of a decade
ago. ROTC, once the beleagered
neighborhood symbol of war, is
making a comeback on campus, a
phenomenon suggesting that
students may not respond to the old
anti-military and anti-draft organiz-
ing tactics. Recent campus violence
against Iranian students, moreover,
indicates a certain nationalism on
campus that might accept registra-
tion this time around.
The anti-draft organizers remain
optimistic, however. "I think a lot
of students who disagree with the
anti-Iranian talk on campus but
didn't say anything will speak out
now against the draft says Frank
Jackalone, national chair of the
U.S. Student Association (USSA).
Washington Peace Center co-
director Jane Midgely adds, "Many
didn't talk then because of peer
pressure She maintains the cur-
rent anti-draft effort will be aided
by "the example of Vietnam
Midgely is the youngest of the
emerging central anti-draft
organizers in Washington. Members
of Colhoun's teach-in project in-
clude Bob Chenowith, a prisoner of
war in North Vietnam for five years,
former SDS officer Jeff Segal, and
Dave Cortright, author of Soldiers
in Revolt.
It's too early to tell if students will
actually revolt, too. A survey taken
several days before President
Carter's address by the Independent
Florida Alligator at the University
of Florida found more than 75 per-
cent of the students favored retain-
ing the volunteer army. Most also
believed women should be included,
and that there'd probably be a ma-
jor war during the 1980s.
Asked if they'd comply with a
draft order if the U.S. were at war,
however, 76 percent of the males
and 64 percent of the females ques-
tioned said they'd go. Of those who
said they wouldn't comply, the
overwhelming majority said they'd
leave the country.
Colhoun and the others didn't ex-
pect to have to mobilize those sen-
timents for another year. Both
houses of Congress defeated
registration proposals last fall, pro-
pelling anti-draft activists � who
were confident the draft issue would
arise again � to lobby for a repeal
of Congress' right to conscript. Col-
houn himself got USSA backing at
the same time for his anti-draft
teach-ins and speaking programs.
While Colhoun says he wasn't
surprised by Carter's registration
proposal, he hadn't expected a draft
reinstatement effort until 1981.
Ready or not, the calls have
started at his project's headquarters
in the USSA olfices. "About 25"
schools are interested in his teach-in
project. This day he gets a contribu-
tion from a 71-year-old Florida
woman, enrolls a black Vietnam vet
for the speakers program, and
counsels and 18-year-old who states
"I want a student deferment, but I
don't start school until fall
"There wasn't much of a flap
over the registration announce-
ment" at George Mason College in
nearby Fairfax, Va according to
GMC professor David Keubrich.
"We're a conservative campus
and out students are good, but they
seem to have a low level of political
awareness he adds as he gathers
materials on disarmament and the
anti-draft project. The matefials, he
says, are for a faculty group of
"former sixties activists who want
to become active again
Olympic Date
The 'Nighthawks'
a great performance Sunday
Band Performs
Correction
In the Jan. 31 issue of The
East Carolinian there were
two typographical errors
which may have resuted in
some confusion.
in the article, headlined
"Telerama A Success" the
correct information should
have read: "Skip Stevenson,
of NBC's 'Real People' was
one of the stars in the produc-
tion
Also, Sherrod was awarded
the Thomas Jefferson Film
Award by the producers of
"60 Minutes
We regret the error.
By KAREN WENDT
Feature- hditor
The Nighthawks, a blues band
that performed in Greenville Sun-
day night, are headed for Lake
Placid and the Winter Olympics.
"We're such fine examples of
physical fitness" said Mark Wen-
ner, laughing.
Wenner, one of the founders of
the group, seemed to be looking for-
ward to his performance before the
Olympic athletes.
When asked how they got the gig
in Lake Placid, Wenner replied,
"through a couple of connections
He also mentioned that there is
heavy security clearance for the
group, but anticipates no problems.
The performance is scheduled on-
ly for the athletes, and the public
has not been invited.
The Nighthawks have worked on
eight albums, including some
background work for such groups
and people as Muddy Waters, B.B.
King, James Cotton, Otis Rush, and
J.B. Hutto, among others.
Their concert Sunday at the Attic
did them justice, even if the crowd
did not. Tom Haines, manager ot
the Attic, expressed disappointment
over the fact that there was not a
packed house, as there had been for
other concerts by the group. They
have been playing there for three or
four years now.
Wenner laughed this off, saying
that when they had first begun play-
ing at the Attic, they had been lucky
to have a crowd of fifteen. The lack
of a full house, though it was by no
means empty, was blamed on the
presence of snow, from several days
before.
Their music was a pleasing mix-
ture of rock, blues and if you listen
ed closely, a little classic jaz. I
recognized the song, "When the
Saints Come Marching In during
one harmonica solo, though with
the background of guitar and drum,
you almost forget that it's not rock.
Critically Acclaimed 'Days Of Heaven' Presented
Days of Heaven' is a most elo-
quent and important film said
New Yorker magazine. "It tells us,
with narrative restraint and a noble
absence of open emotion, about the
strength of Americanness The
Student Union Films Committee
presents this critically acclaimed
film for one show only on Wednes-
day, Feb. 6 at 8:00 in Mendenhall
Student Center's Hendrix Theater.
The movie will be followed by an
informal discussion with coffee and
doughnuts served at a place to be
announced. Admission is by ID, ac-
tivity card or Mendenhall Student
Center Membership.
' "Days of Heaven" was initially
released in only a handful of cities in
late 1978. While very few people
saw the film, the critics raved Para-
mount Pictures then decided to
distribute the movie nationally, and
it soon became one of thesleepcrs of
1979.
The film opens with some "old"
photographs of poverty in the early
20th Century. These become the
Chicago slums and the oppressive
industrial power of midwestern
America. Suddenly, a train leads
people to what might be the promis-
ed land � the wheat fields of Texas.
The role of Bill is played by
Richard Gere, a character who peo-
ple automatically feel the urge to
help. Brooke Adams plays Abby,
married to one man, and in love
with another-a classic tale which is
revitalized in 'Days Of Heaven' as
an intensely htman conflict.
It is this sweeping vision of the ex-
pansive Texas panhandle which en-
compasses the main characters of
the film � a young man, a young
woman, the man's 12-year-old
sister, and the owner of the farm
they settle on.
The actors speak little; they do
not even seem to be acting. Yet they
stir the emotions and draw the au-
dience into the film. The scene is not
a pretty one. It is simply an
awesome one. Director Terrence
Malick makes his point; "Days of
Heaven" is a visual experience.
Charles Champlain of the Los
Angeles Times said, "Its most spec-
tacular sequences will stay in mind
forever and so will its sounds.
Without parallel in this or any re-
cent year. Incomparable
"Days of Heaven" is one of the
truly excellent films of 1979. It is an
extraordinary film which can
energize, haunt, hearten and
fascinate the audience.
'Days Of Heaven'
a Student Union Special lresentation
-� �� � �� �r m. �� KWKWil
�m � m tm �"





THt I'VsT CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 5. 1980
New Album Releases: London Calling
Bv PAT MINGES
Features Writer
'London Calling
New Wave Hit of the 80's
Chaos Rules
SGA Meeting
By BEAU HAYS
ssilan( Features Fditor
East Carolina's long-
running tragi-comedy,
the Student Govern-
ment Association,
opened again Monday
night to a Standing
Room Only crowd. The
cast was officially listed
at 44 of a possible 51,
the largest in recent
history.
The meeting began
with everyone standing
for a moment of
sWctvce, a m.emoi-iMXv to
persons or events
undetermined. This
was quickly followed
bv an approval of the
minutes, a lengthy
document which few of
the participants had
read by the time the
motion for approval
was called. Then, most
of the standing com-
mittees reported that
they had not met and
therefore had nothing
to report.
Robert's Rules of
Parliamentary Pro-
cedure were strictly
followed during the ses-
sion. Inquiries from the
floor were often phras-
ticm?" The response
from the speaker was,
"Yeah, go ahead
sC,A President Brett
Melvin was allowed to
speak. Melvin discuss-
ed his meeting with of-
ficials from HEW con-
cerning its dispute with
the University of North
Carolina system. Many
of the legislators were
interested in Melvin's
speech, but several of
the members appeared
to be more concerned
with whether or not
they were going to the
Attic.
The rules were
suspended to allow the
iwre to vojyon -a
resolution concerning
See SCiA, page 7, Col.l
Let's not mince words. London Calling, by the
Clash, is the finest recorded effort that has ever
been released. Everyone has their favorite recor-
ding stars, and with a little patience, perhaps you
wilt understand why these guys are mine.
The world of the eighties is one of turmoil, a
world in which the political scene is an ever-
changing and evolving masterpiece of enigma.
The impoverished peoples of the world are begin-
ning to assert their independence and autonomy.
Iran, the anti-Soviet rebels in Afghanistan, and
Panama are not the final blows to international
imperialism, but only the beginning of a third-
world revolt casting off former superpowers in
search of self-dignity and preservation.
Forced to turn inward, we are beginning to
question whom our government is really serving
� the people or the huge multi-nationals (against
whom most of the international protest is aimed).
We are a stagnant society, alienated from our
own government, indecisive about our national
goals, and subservient to a technology that defies
our ability to understand and control it. Seeds of
unrest that lie deep in the unconscious psyche of a
nation have begun to germinate in the fight
against big oil, the nuclear threat, the multi-
nationals in general, and specifically, a govern-
ment which walks hand-in-hand with the corpora-
tions, forgtting from whom its power is truly
derived.
Into this climate of revolution steps the Clash,
and as music is usually in accofdance with the
soul of nations, their music is revolutionary both
in spirit and letter. Their first release, The Clash,
in 1977, was the most cirtically acclaimed album
of the last decade, receiving kudos from Time
(which called the Clash the most powerful group
since the Who or the Stones) to the Village Voice
("The Clash is the greatest rock group in the
world) L .
The music featured "startling rhythmic shifts
and harmonic extensions, counter-melodies and
keyboards and horns, up-front hooks and hooks
in the background and guitars everywhere
(John Piccarella). Its lyrics mumbled of boredom
and discontentment, alienation and hunger for a
promising future, unemployment and worthless
currency, corporate manipulation of the in-
dividual and a single-minded idea that the only
way we can change things is to take them into our
own hands. Give 'Em Enough Rope, the Clash's
second album, held its ground musically, but
their lyrics turned from street politics to more
global concerns. It was also very well received.
London Calling may receive somewhat of a
mixed reaction because its stunning power has
been sublimated for a more palatable appeal, yet
it is still the most absorbing music of its time.
London Calling is a plainly-packaged, double
album. Its no-frill approach is the most affor-
dable endeavor ever released. It is the very an-
tithesis to the slick commercial product that
-abounds on tne ntr�t TKict av.production and
music, although the album is more pop-
influenced than any other Clash effort. The
songs' varied influences range from Phil Spector,
R&B rockability, Beatles, urban soul, and reggae
- especially reggae. This back-to-the-basics rock
and roll so potently blends old and new that it
almost takes on a mystical quality.
Side one begins with the title cut, ' London
Calling a song which offers London as an ex-
ample of where we may end up. Ominous lyrics
decry:
London calling upon the zombies of death
Quit holding out, take another breath
London is drowning and I live by the river
I've been shown up, but I've grown up
And I'm not down. I'm not down.
And I have lived that kind of day
When none of your sorrows will go away
It goes down and down and hit the floor
But I know there'll be some way
When I can swing everything back my way
Like skyscrapers rising up floor by floor, 1 m
not giving up.
"Revolution Rock" is next, proclaiming the
power of this new form of music and reassuring
our parents that everything is going to be all right
Brand New CadH.ac" foUows an Od song .ha, J��E&!�r
takes on a new meaning if you view it as a descrip-
tion of the corporate lure of government.
"Jimmy Jazz" is not like anything the Clash has
done before. Its distinct horn section and acoustic
guitar weave into a reggae ballad that examines
differences in judicial systems across cultures
"Hateful" deals with lower-class drug abuse, and
"Rudie Can't Fail" is about the rude boys of
Jamaica and their role in Jamaican culture.
"Spanish Bombs" is a historical review of the Topper
civil war in Spain, and its unique pop flavor is
somewhat ironic in its relationship to the theme.
Montgomery Cliffs demise, due to the excesses
of his world, is detailed in "The Right Profile, a
rocking ditty that blends chord progressions
(characteristic of the Clash) and dynamite horns.
"Lost in the Supermarket" is one of the finest
scenarios of modern life ever, depicting an in-
dividual lost and misguided from and because ot
his environment. "Clampdown" is an assault on
the corporations and their degrading influence on
a society's morals and morale. It ends with ar
album, reminiscent of "Police and Thieves,
with its choppy guitar chords and rhythmic
dominance, accentuated bv a nice horn arrange
ment. The final cut is " I rain In Vain a pop
soul romance that was included probably because
of its commercial potential.
The group is composed of Mick Jones and Joe
Strummer on guitars and vocals, the new I en
nonMcCartney, and Paul Simonon on bass, and
Headon on druni percussion. The
Clash's combination of anger, boredom, frustra-
tion, streetwise experience and world class
idealism, fuses with a complexity, that creates im-
portant ideological approaches toward much
the 70s. With philosophical implications that ex-
tend beyond the field of music, the Clash are the
most important occurrence in the history ot the
rock genre. London Calling, because of its im-
mense scope, is the finest endeavor the Clash have
ever accomplished, fhe Beatles, ;he Sione
Dylan and Elvis, and the Sex Pistols ire legends
from our past. The Clash are our musical tuture.
tack on Jimmy Carter and the possibility of a
nuclear meltdown. This could easily be the
revolution's themesong, but "The Guns of Bnx-
ton" is a call to arms, asking:
When they kick at your front door
How you gonna come
With your hands on your head
Or the trigger of your gun
and what a brilliant tuture. hs the
themselves say in "Death and Glory"
bov
Side three is the weakest of the album, beginn
ing with the justice among thieves "Wrong En
Boyo" and ending with the same theme in "The
Card Cheat a Springsteen-ish cut whose theme
could be expanded to detail the power-mongers
fascination with war (take note, Jimmy). In the
middle we find "Death or Glory about man's
search for meaning, and "Koka Kola about
upper-class drug abuse and its lean future.
The final side is definitely the strongest, beg a
ning with "Lover's Rock a hitherto never-
unexplored realm of rock � a plea for sexual
equality. Listen up. feminists. "Pour Horsemen"
is a bit'pretentious, somewhat of a self-glorify ng
endeavor, but this is the greatest rock group in the
world. "I'm Not Down" is the finest cut on the
album, a proud effort that could easily be a theme
song for America:
I've been beat up. I've been thrown out.
But I'm not down. I'm not down.
From every dingy basement on every :
street
I hear every dragging handclap ovei
dragging beat
fhat's just the beat of time the beat
�t� on
If you been trying I
already heard your song.
Read Hie
East Carolinian
We're getting togettte
Seafood
Tuesday Might
Specials
FLOCiYliEK $3.50
TROUT $2.95
PERCH $2.95
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W� are proud to
announce that we
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dining pleasure
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w- � � ��� �





THE EAST CAROL IMAN
I I BRL AKi
WHO
DeMarco Will Give Lecture
From
The School of Art
On Wednesday, Feb.
6, at 8 p.m Richard
De Marco will return to
ECU to lecture on
"Artists as Seafarers
This free event is part
of the Visual Arts
Forum annual sym-
posium and will be held
in the Jenkins
Auditorium.
The director of the
De Marco Gallery in
Edinburgh, Scotland,
first visited ECU about
this same time last year.
This year he will be go-
ing from here to UNC-
Chapel Hill. He is cur-
rently lecturing at
American universities
and recruiting students
and others for his 1980
summer voyage sear-
ching for the origins of
European culture.
These annual
voyages began in 1972
as an offspring of the
Edinburgh Arts
Festival and they trace
the origins of the Celtic
people, whose culture
serves as the founda-
tion of contemporary
American and Euro-
pean society. Several
students from ECU ac-
companied De Marco
on the 1979 voyage of
the "Marque The
voyage covered some
10,000 miles and took
64 days. Stops were
made at numerous
preselected points.
The artists, who have
been on these journeys,
have discovered
remarkable
resemblances between
contemporary art and
Celtic artifacts.
Remember The Good Old Days
when water flowed?
Photo by ROSS MANN
Grad Students Included In Show
The North Carolina
Museum of Art's
1 ! aveling exhibition
will include 25 pieces
from Fast Carolina
graduate art students
when it begins its tour
this month.
The pieces, chosen
b the School of Art
Graduate Council, will
be shown at university
galleries and local art
centers in the state dur-
ing the exhibition's
nine month tour.
According to a
spokesman for the art
department, this is the
first time that the ECU
School of Art has
received such
widespread exposure in
the state.
There will also be a
month-long exhibition
of about 70 other
works by 35 graduate
students in Grey
Gallery, on the second
floor of Jenkins begin-
ning Feb. 7.
A reception will be
held Sunday, Feb. 10,
from 3:30-5:30 p.m
and the public is in-
vited.
Also in the news
from the school of art,
Dr. Michael McCann,
who recently written a
book entitled Artist
Beware, will speak at a
Business of Art seminar.
McCann, president
of the Arts Hazard
Project, was invited to
ECU by the School of
Art and the School of
Allied Health.
According to a press
release, McCann is a
recognized expert in a
relatively new area of
health and safety con-
cerning artists' sup-
plies.
Some art products
can be dangerous if us-
ed improperly, and Mc-
Cann is an expert on
the subject.
Val M. Cushing, pro-
fessor of ceramics at
State University of New
York, will be the guest
artist at the School of
Art Feb. 13-15. The
schedule for a free slide
and workshop is:
Wednesday, Feb. 13:
Slide Lecture, 7:30
p.m Jenkins
Auditorium.
Thursday, Feb. 14:
Workshop, 90-12
noon and 2-4 p.m. in
Jenkins, room 103.
Prevent
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SGA Legislators
Appear Confused
C ontinued From Page 6
the towing of vehicles
from the campus. The
resolution was phrased
as a request to the
businesses which tow
cars from campus set-
ting maximum towing
�charges and initiating a
"most favored trade"
status with cooperative
companies. The resolu-
tion was passed by ac-
clamation.
A Visual Arts ap-
propriations bill
generated a great deal
of confusion in the
legislature when it was
discovered that the
committee version of
the bill differed from
the one which each of
the legislators had
received. A motion to
table the bill brought
on this comment, "Can
we hold off tabling this
until we get a
blackboard so we can
explain The bill
was tabled without the
blackboard.
Two bills concerning
SGA funding for
registration fees of two
groups attending con-
ferences were also
brought to the floor.
"Are we voting on
these bills together?"
asked a voice from the
back of the room. "We
might as well was the
reply. Both bills were
defeated.
Old business, new
business and committee
reports done, notices
were heard while the
legislators shrugged in-
to their coats and
waited for a chance to
call for adjournment.
The SGA officially ad-
journed and soon the
room where student
representation takes
place was again empty.
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Support
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
FEBRUARY 5, 1980 Page 8
Titans Down Pirates;
May nor Stars In Loss
Tankers Drop
To UNC-CH
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
It was a long night Monday in
Minges Natatorium for East
Carolina faithfuls watched as the
men tankers lost 69-44 and the
women 89-51 to UNC-Chapel Hill.
The men led the Tar Heels 19-15
after four events, but UNC swept
first and second in the 200 in-
dividual medley to go ahead 23-20
and cruised through the remaining
events to record their sixth win of
the season against five losses.
The veteran unit of Doug
Nieman, Kelly Hopkins, Jack
Clowar and Bill Fehling put the
Pirates on the board first with a
time of 3:27.50 in the opening event
of the evening, the 400 medley relay.
The group trailed by half a body
length after the two legs, but re-
bounded to set new school, meet
and pool records in the event.
Other first place finishes included
Nieman with a time of 1:40.74 in the
200 free, Fehling with a :21.74 in the
50 free and a :47.28 in the 100 free,
Perry Newman with a 1:55.66 in the
200 butterfly and Hopkins with a
2:08.54 in the 200 breaststroke.
The Lady Tar Heels quickly
capitalized on experience and
strength to take a commanding 15-1
lead after just two events and allow-
ing the Pirates only first place
finishes in the 16 event meet.
Lori Ross took first in the 100
free with :57.01 and 50 free at :25.97
and Cindy Sailor claimed another in
the 50 butterfly at :28.38. Diver
Connie Wages captured first in the
one-meter event, setting a new meet
record with 221.35 points smashing
the previous mark of 157.45 set in
1978.
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
DETROIT, MichTwo clutch
plays by Detroit's Joe Kopicki
helped the Titans overcome a se-
cond half 10-point deficit and claim
a 69-65 win over stubborn East
Carolina Saturday.
The Pirates, who led at the half
by six at 34-28 behind guard George
Maynor's 16 points, scored the first
two buckets of the final half to take
a commanding 38-28 lead. The
Titans quickly went to work and
took over the lead with just over
eight minutes remaining at 52-50.
ECU was not finished, though, as
the Pirates again captured the lead
and appeared in good shape with a
three-point lead and the ball theirs
for nearly a minuted and a half.
Ahead 61-58 at the 4:02 mark, the
Pirates went into a semi-stall pass-
ing offense. The two teams ex-
changed buckets when afterwards
perhaps the game's biggest play oc-
cured.
ECU lead 63-62 when forward
Herb Gray spotted a seam in the
Detroit defense and drove the lane.
The quick hands of Kopicki,
though, prevented Gray from com-
pleting the play as Kopicki took the
ball the length of the court for a
staff, giving Detroit the lead again
with 1:34 remaining.
The Pirates never threatened
afterwards as the Titans made five
of their last six free throw attempts.
A big key in the contest, said
ECU coach Dave Odom, was the
steal and stuff by Kopicki. "If
Herb Gray had gotten through the
gap Odom said, "it would have
been a dunk and the game would
have been over
A perhaps shocking statistic in the
contest was the Pirates dominance
on the boards, as they outreboun-
ding the larger and stronger Titans
42-25.
"I thought we rebounding very
well said Odom. "It was a major
concern of mine before the game
Helping keep the Pirates in charge
most of the way was Gray, whose
defense kept Titan star center Earl
Cureton silenced for much of the
evening. Cureton, a top-notch pro
prospect, did not score a field goal
in the first half and finished with
only 12 points and five rebounds.
"I was very proud of Herb
claimed Odom. "He did an ex-
cellent job on Cureton and 1 think
Earl is one of the best big men in the
country
Detroit coach Willie McCarter
was impressed, to say the least, with
the Pirate performance. "You have
to give East Carolina a lot of
credit he said. "We started out
lackadaisically and had to bust our
butts to get back into it
ECU's George Maynor led all
scorers with a season-high 28 points.
Maynor connected on his first eight
shots in the opening half before
missing the last ten minutes of that
half with three personal fouls.
Gray was the game's leading re-
bounder with 11 and Titan guards
Wil McCormick and Dave Niles led
in assists with seven apiece. ECU's
Tony Byles dished out six.
Supporting Maynor in the Pirate
attack was Gray with 14 and Herb
Krusen 10. These numbers give
Krusen 1,001 points for his ECU
career, making him only the fourth
player in Pirate history to ac-
complish the feat.
Four players scored in double
figures tor the Iitans, now V-9. Carolina for a Thursday game
Niles led with 18 while Kopicki and before returning home for a Satur-
Cureton both tallied 12. day matchup with Illinois State, a
Sophomore forward Jerry Davis team that boasts a 15-4 mark and
finished with 11. possible national ranking in this
The Pirates. 11-8, travel to South week's polls.
S E �
Tony Byles sets ECU offense
Avenge T979 Loss
Lady Bucs Pound High Point
Ptwtoby KIP SLOAN
Freshman guard Donna Brayboy manipulates opponant
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
East Carolina's women took ad-
vantage of a six minute High Point
cold spell in the first half to jump to
an 18 point lead and then cruised to
a 92-72 victory Saturday at Minges
Coliseum.
The Pirates followed the hot out-
side shooting of forward Kathy
Riley and guard Lydia Rountree to a
46-30 halftime edge. Riley pumped
in 14 opening half points, with
Rountree adding 12.
High Point threatened the Pirates
for the lead only once in the opening
frame, cutting the gap to 39-30 with
1:46 before intermission. But the
Pirates exhibiting offensive poise
spread the margin to 16 at the half
with a pair of field goals by
freshman Donna Moody.
ECU picked up in the second half
where they left off, building to their
biggest lead of the contest, 62-39,
with 12:05 remaining on 11 points
by senior Rosie Thompson.
High Point's Andreia Blanchard
earned honors as the games leading
scorer and rebounder with 32 points
and 18 rebounds.
Rountree led all Pirate scorers
with 24, followed by Riley with 14
and Thompson and Laurie Sikes
with 12 each.
Freshman Mary Denkler tallied
13 points with only 13 minutes play-
ing time. The Alexandria, Va.
native connected on five of seven at-
tempts from the floor and 3 out of
five from the line.
Rountree and Thompson grabbed
seven rebounds each to lead the
Lady Bucs in that category. Sikes
dumped off a game-high nine assists
in leading ECU to their 16th win
against seven losses.
"I was very, very concerned com-
ing into this game admitted ECU
coach Cathy Andruzzi. "Not just
because we lost to them last year,
but because they have a very good
team.
"We were pleased with the
momentum both offensively and
defensively. We caused a great deal
of turnovers (36), and many of them
were by slapping the ball away when
they were trying to loft it inside to
-Mary Denkler
Blanchard.
"We did well with the different
combinations we had in there
tonight � I thought we played good
team ball
The Pirates connected on 20 out
of 27 free throw attempts for 74.1
percent, considerably above their
seasonal percentage of 66.2.
"I was really pleased to see us
shooting so much better from the
line said Andruzzi. "We needed
that game and we were not sure we
could get it and certainly not by
such a margin
The Pirates face the Tar Heels of
UNC-Chapel Hill tonight in their
final NCAIAW Division I game of
the season. The Lady Pirates go into
the contest at 1-2 in conference ac-
tion.
HIGH POINT (72)
Rilev 4 3-4 11, Wardlaw 1 0-0 2
Blanchard 13 6 32, Holt 3 0-0 6
Henline 2 3-4 7, Wingfield 0 0-0 0
Bowers 0 0-0 0. Warren 2 1-25
Scriven 2 5-6 9. Totals 27 18-23 "2
EAST CAROLINA (92)
Thompson 4 4-5 12, Riley 6 2-3
14, Girven 0 2-2 2, Rountree 10 4-5
24, Sikes 6 0-0 12. Owen 1 0-0 2.
Brayboy 0 3-4 3, Moodv 2 1-2 5.
Hooks 2 1-1 5. Denkler 5 J-S 13
Totals 36 20-27 92.
Halftime: ECU 46. HP 30. Foul-
ed out: Girven. Holt. Total fouls
ECU 20. HP 24. Technicals, none
A-500.
Stampeding Terrapins Meet Potential
i
People say 13 is an unlucky
number, right? Well, after wat-
ching the events of this past
weekend ECU basketball coach
Dave Odom might just agree.
For its February 13 that the
Pirates must travel to College Park,
Md. to face the might-stress the
word mighty-Maryland Terrapins.
Fresh off a 101-82 shellacking of
Duke this past Saturday, Maryland
is finally being recognized as a real
power. Atop the Atlantic Coast
Conference with a shocking 8-1 con-
ference record and a 15-3 overall
mark, the Terps are sure to climb in-
to the Top Ten in this week's na-
tional polls.
All this comes as a surprise to
many as the Terps of the past
several seasons have been a team of
go��d one-on-one capacity at best,
lor several seasons, Maryland
teams have beat themselves worst
than their opponents have.
But, ah, how things do change.
1
Charles Chandler
The current Maryland team is a
beauty to watch. Team ball is the
name of the game for the 1980 ver-
sion of the Terps.
The individual talents of supers
like Albert King, Ernest Graham
and Buck Williams are blending
together to make Maryland perhaps
the most exciting team in the coun-
try to watch. Forget Lousville, the
Terps are the true "doctors of
dunk
Why are the Terrapins so much
better this season than in the past?
To answer this you must consider
two things�Maryland is a more
mature squad than the "kiddie
corps" of the past and the Terps
now have a King to lead them into
the promised land.
First the maturity. Graham and
King are juniors, Williams a
sophomore, guard Greg Manning a
junior and guard Reggie Jackson a
sophomore. Young? Sure, but con-
sidering these five played most of
the time last season there is a great
deal of experience.
On to the King. Junior forward
Albert King came out of high school
three years ago touted as the
number one shoolboy in the nation.
He was to be the man to save
Maryland coach Lefty Dricsscl
immediately-much in the same way
that Moses Malone would have had
he not turned pro.
But things just didn't work out
for King. He was a very shy, con-
fused freshman. He seemed afraid
to unleash his incredible talents
because of his freshman status. He
felt the juniors and seniors of the
team should lead.
The same was the case last season
as a sophomore King looked to
senior center Larry Gibson as the
majn man in the Terp attack.
This brings us up to the present
season, to a Maryland team that has
no seniors among its top eight
players. The juniors are the elders
and King is, of course, one of those
juniors.
He now feels he must lead and
lead he has. He has now become the
player he. was suspected to be all
along. King is perhaps the best all-
around forward in the league since
the days of David Thompson and
Walter Davis. And this includes
Mike O'Koren.
King is side-by-side with Duke
center Mike Gminski in the running
for the ACC Player-of-the-Year
Award.
What helps King do his job so
well are his counterparts on the
frontline, Williams and Graham.
This trio gives Lefty one of the truly
great front lines in the college game
today.
And just think, the entire starting
lineup will return next season intact.
This must throw chills into oppos-
ing coaches bodies.
So must the thought of February
13 for Dave Odom.
twinski silenced
k Mankind
IpiBKwavftK





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
II-BKI AKY 5. 1980
Grapplers
Defeat
Appalachian

:
Photo bv KIP SLOAN
Center Mania Girven piimp
B ED WILLIAMS
Staff Writer
ECU's Pirates went
to Virginia this past
weekend and placed a
"1" in every possible
scoring column.
The Bucs defeated
Appalachian State
28-12, lost to Virginia
Tech 22-19, and tied
William and Mary
21-21.
The result of these
matches leaves ECu
with a 5-3-1 mark on
the year.
The wrestlers' per-
formances were summ-
ed up by Coach Ed
Steers, who said, "The
key thing we did was
thai we found we could
push ourselves pretty
well. We made some
mistakes that were of-
fensive, but I can han-
dle that.
"If we weren't try-
ing, I couldn't handle
that he continued.
"But that wasn't the
case
Steers cited Frank
Schade for a
"superlative perfor-
mance, the kind we've
been leaking for from
him all year Schade
won all three of his in-
dividual matches.
Curtis Sendek also
performed well in the
158 pound weight class,
Steers said.
Sendek had only
recently been inserted
into the lineup
"because he had a
broken arm before
Christmas according
to Steers.
Butch Revils and
D.T. Joyner continued
K(T wrestling action
their winning ways.
Both won all three of
their matches and are
ranked sixth nationally
in their respective
weieht classes.
The only disappoin
ting aspect of the mat-
ches involved Danny
Keene, who severely
spained his ankle.
Handball Club Hosts ASU
Greene Dorm Wins
Kl (.11 RMIs
i ' itrrrspoiKtenl
7
reps and persons
responsible foi organiz-
the tournament and
the participants for its
tendous success!
Handball Highlights
B Freddie fraier
! C I
: e am
Handball
to appalachian
eekend
series.
State is a
. ed and
tnized unit,
! I showed some
promise in w inning
And keeping
it games close and
ought.
M went to the na-
tional tournament in
last year and
table
ow ins This ex-
, nee helped them in
j a 25-18 win in
game. I heir
, �. Rand) Mc-
eight
e w in.
ECU re. . ed for
d game and
1-14 primaril) by
playii - n ac ious
� en se . 1: veryo n e
lyed haul for EC U
. n showed in the
ural win. Joe Daas was
- leading scorei with five

pi;
goals.
The third game of
the series was won bv
�Sl , 20-16, in a very
physical match. 1 he in-
ternational style of play
is much more physical
than our regular in-
tramural play. I he
leading scorer again
was Rand) McCaslin
with seven goals, while
Gerald Hall scored five
for ECU.
I or the series, the
leading scorer was Ran-
dy McCaslin for AST
with 20 goals. Joe Daas
and Gerald Hall led
ECl with eleven goals
eac h, while Mike
Swart had ni ne.
ECU's goalies 1 arr
W ebb and Ron Sistare
show ed remat kable
talent .nd determina-
tion.
1(1 will nael to
sl on I ebiuais 2;
for a triangular tourna-
ment against Chat-
tanooga and Sl . I his
competition will be in
preparation lor the
prestigious twelve-team
international at West
Point. N.Y March
28-30
Roller Hocke)
This season. Roller
Hockey competition
has been exciting and
hard-played. The Dole
Sigmas defeated
UnKappa Fifth while
the Skater Daters rolled
ov e r the W r o n g
Numbers. The Chub-
niks lost their game to
the H.Rs.
In other games, the
Body Bruisers, Delta
Riders, Sam the Slam
and the Hammerheads
aKo posted wins during
the early season
openers.
Darrell Jones of the
H.Rs is the season's
high scorer so far with
18 points followed by
I ynn Barber with 14,
Mike Wise with nine
and Billy Dixon with
eight.
lop teams in the
Silver Pucks League are
expected to be the Body
Bruisers Cola, Sam the
Sam and the Ham-
merheads.
The Skater Daters,
Dole Sigmas and the
H.Rs are expected to
lead the Slick Sticks
League.
Anyone interested in
an afternoon of fun
and excitement should
make their way out to
Twin Rinks where
games are being played
Monday through
Thursday from 3:45
p.m. until 6:30 p.m.
Women's Soccer
Help support
women's sports at ECU
by joining the newly
formed Women's Soc-
cer Club. The team
needs well over twenty
members and anyone
interested should con-
tact Chris Solt at
758-5756 or Will
Wibert at 752-4553 as
soon as possible.
An organizational
meeting will also be
held Wednesday, Feb.
13 at 7 p.m. at 922 14th
Street (the brick house
behind Belk Dorm.)
SAAD'S SHOE
REPAIR
113Grande Ave.
758-1228
Qaalily Shoe Repair
IT'S NEW IT'SGOOD
ROAST BEEF DINNER
Comes with mashed potatoes
and gravy,Choice of 1 veg.
Homemade biscuits,and All
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Only $2.99 11am 4pm
S3.49 4pm Closing
ROAST BEEF SANDWICH
Comes witfi French Fries,
Choice of,1 veg and All
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Only
52.29
CHECKOUT OUR NEW
LUNCHEON SPECIALS
They include choice of
potato.Choice of 1 veg.
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From SI.99 to S3.99
Call 756 6508 For
fKW-OIN ROOM RESERVATIONS
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PREGNANCY
$175.00 "an inclusive"
pn-anancy test, birth con-
trol and problem preqnan
cy counseling For further
information call 832 0535
itoli free number
800 221 2S68) between 9
AM 5PM .veekdays
Raleiqh Women's
Health Orqannation
VI 7 West Morgan St
Raleigh, N C. 27603
SPORTSWORLD
COLLEGE NIGHT
Tuesday Night
6:30-10:00
Bring I. D. and
Get In For Onlv SI.25
PERSONAL
- � '
��S lor Dance
. spring For
� 35
N - ME STUDIOS of
Ba � Jaf,
; and Disco
ma 11 o n ran
lor western North
-
�,a ar, and Ira E"
nee not � � Out must
. ng and ork.ng tm
n On . "i cut non
. . . � Ktents need ap
p , r replication and Drochure
Camp Pinewood 1801
and R-1 ami Beach Fla
DOG NEEDS HOME ov.ng dog
free to carmq person Ten months
old part Labrador Retriever Call
'56 66-J4
HELP WANTED I am looking for
two friendly, outgoing people for
weekend and holiday work Job
pays well for the nqht individuals
Must be mteliegenf guick witted,
and en,oy happy people Travel
involved Transportation furnish
ed job is ideal for educator of stu
dent seek ng extra m Not sales
work interested Call 758 6449 for
application
HELP WANTED Exclusive
pnvafe beach club at Atlantic
Bach N C desires two
Bartenders must be 21 or older
Waitresses must be 18 or older
Lifeguards Must have W S I
Season begins approximately May
20 and runs through Labor Day
No hv.ng quarters furnished Rep
i, f0 Mrs T Gaibreath Jr 2309
Hardee Rd Kinston N C 28501
No phone calls accepted
DISCOURAGED OR LONLEY
to.n Bible study and fellowship
Can 6 ��41 after 5 00
WEWAKO S Lost I pair of gold
tnrm r.mm.d giass.s and contact
s. ns case Both w. re m brown
solt leather cas Possibly lost m
Brwst.r .�r Austin Contact
H,chard Or-n at ISt 2V85 ihom-i
-s' Hit � �oork I
TYPING tor students and pro
lessors available call 752 7492
6 00p m
S lit WARD S 5300 in NYSE Iblue
chips) certificates Leading to the
t and conviction of most pel
onts) responsible for the thieft
rtnd vandalism of a 1948 Chevy
.an on January 30. 1980 at 1 30
a m S00 bonus to the personis)
ho brings vandalism before the
appropriate committee
FOR SALE
FOR SALE 1978 Nova. 6 cylinder
air conditioner power steering tilt
wheel AM FM cassette, radials
Call 752 3405 after 5 00
GUITAR FOR ALE Korean Sun
burst, six string with case and
strap Very good condition $70
Call 752 7279
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE wanted to share
two bedroom partially furnished
apartment Within walking
distance from campus One half
rent and utilities Call 758 3076
ROOMMATE NEEDED for nice
3 bedroom house Two other oc
cupants 592 month plus one third
utilities Call 752 7416
TWO ROOMMATES wanted at
Georgetown Apartments 602
Cotanche St Stop Oy or call
758 7198
STUDIOUS MALE ROOMMATE
needed to share rent and utilities
in one bedroom apartment at
King s Row Call 752 7325 after
11 OOp m
34th Year For
This Great
Event!
In Downtown Greenville
THURSDAY, FEB. 7th
Is
STEEPLECHASE
CAFETERIA
Pitt Plaa
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Now It's YOUR TIME To SAVE Downtown
Sponsored by the Downtown Greenville Association, Inc.
Mon .Sat. 1100 2 00
4 30 8 00
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Distributed
By
Taylor
Beverage Co.
Goidsboro
Pizza iiift
AMERICAS FAVORITE PIZZA

IMPORTED
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THI
HOLLAND BEER
1 IMPORTM) BUR IN AM. Rl( A
PIZZA BUFFET
ALL THE PIZZA AND
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$259
MonFri. 11:30 2:00
Mon, �P Tnes. 6:00-8:00
758 8266 Evening buffet �2.79
Hwy 204 bypass Greenville , N. C.
WED. 5 Feb. 1980
$1.14 Pork wDressing
$1.49 Chicken Chow Mein
THUR. 6 Feb. 1980
$1.14 Spaghetti wMeat Sauce
$1.49 Stuffed Peppers
FRI. 7 Feb. 1980
$1.14 Beans w Franks
$1.49 Smothered Chicken
SAT. 8 Feb. 1980
$1.14 Creole Spaghetti
$1.49 Meat Loaf
SUN. 9 Feb. 1980
$1.14 Chicken Noodle Casserole
$1.49 Shaved Ham & Yams
MON. 10 Feb. 1980
$1.14 Baked Lasagna
$1.49 Fish Patties wTarter Sauce
TUE. 11 Feb. 1980
$1.14 Tuna Casserole
$1.49 Liver & Onions
All Dinners Served with 2 Veg. & Roll
TRY OUR NEW FRIED VEGETABLE PLAT1

fl





10
THE EAST CAROL INIAN
FEBRUARYS, 1980
Jesse Owens Faces
Bout With Cancer
B WILLGRIMSLEY
AP Special Correspondent
While the country
wrestles with the dilem-
ma of boycotting the
Moscow Olympics, all
of us should pause a
moment and give a
thought to perhaps the
the greatest Olympian
of them all, Jesse
Owens.
Jesse, now 66, has
had to tight most of his
life. Son of an
Alabama sharecropper,
he has had to overcome
bias in this country and
slurs o' being "of an
inferior race" when he
invaded Berlin for the
1936 Nai Olympics.
The swift, coor-
dinated black athlete
shamed Adolf Hitler by
winning four gold
medals and overcame
numerous obstacles to
emerge as a succesful
businessman,
America's Olympic
"elder statesman" and
most fluent
spokesman.
Now he is facing his
toughest battle ' lung
cancer.
A telephone call to
his Phoenix, Ariz
home brought good
news. He is reacting
favorably to drugs and
gaining strength after
treatment at the
University of Arizona
Health Sciences Center.
"He is up and
about said his wife,
Ruth, "and we are en-
couraged, but he isn't
up to a lot of conversa-
tion
Asked if Jesse had
expressed himself on
the present Olympic
situation, Mrs. Owens
said: "Oh, no. He's not
read) to bite that bullet
yet. You know, he gets
ver emotional
There are few more
emotional or dynamic
men thai Jesse Owens,
who is reminiscent of
the late Dr. Martin
Luther King when he
takes the podium in
defense of Olympic
ideals and pride of
country.
'The Olympics have
become the whipping
pov; of politics he
once said. "but. thank
God, they are still run
b man. Man has a way
of over-riding such in-
fluences
There is no indica-
tion how Jesse would
view President Carter's
call for a Moscow
boycott. He un-
doubtedly would be
torn between
patriotism and a strong
belief in the sanctity of
the Olympic code.
While the press sen-
sationally played up the
theme that Hitler, sur-
rounded by storm
troopers, snubbed the
black man who shat-
tered the Fuehrer's
theory of Aryan
supremacy. Owens
himself always has
downplayed the inci-
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"I don't know
Jesse said. "I never
looked toward the box
where Hitler and his en-
tourage sat. I was too
busy worrying about
fulfilling my childhood
dream.
"I was conditioned
to discrimination when
I went to Berlin. I was
not politically oriented.
None of us was. We
were too busy working
on our personal goals
Patriot, preacher,
ambassador, inspira-
tion for the young,
Owens refused to
become embittered by
early hardships and
emerged as an un-
wavering booster of the
American way of life.
"1 live here. It's all I
know and all I have
he has repeatedly in-
sisted. "My job is not
to complain but to try
to make it better
It was Owens, his
name and his stature
among the athletes that
prevented a mass
walkout of U.S. blacks
after the clinched fist
demonstration by John
Carlos and Tommie
Smith in 1968 in Mex-
ico City.
"I could appreciate
their frustrations he
said afterward. "I told
them that they should
light their war on
another battlefield. The
Olympics were not the
proper place
Jesse was picking
cotton at the age of
seven. He was nine
when the family moved
to Cleveland where he
early established
himself as a running
prospect. He got a
scholarship to Ohio
State.
ECU Gymnasts
Down Radford
Junior Susan McKnight
photo by KIP SLOAN
East Carolina's
women gymnasts
claimed their fourth
victory of the season
Saturday afternoon
with a 115.2-113.15 vic-
tory over Radford Col-
lege in Minges Col-
iseum.
"They weren't as
tough as I expected
says ECU coach Jon
Rose. "They didn't ex-
ecute the way they have
in the past. I hope we
can beat them again
when they have their
regionals there later
on
Elizabeth Jackson
came through once
again for the Lady
Pirates, claiming a first
place tie in the floor ex-
ercise with an 8.05 per-
formance. She took se-
cond in the balance
beam with 7.25 and
third in the uneven
parallel bars with 7.0.
Her overall total of
29.6 was enough to
capture second place
honors for the Bucs in
the all-around competi-
tion.
Elsewhere, Cindv
Rogers posted a 7.45
first on the balance
beam, a 7.05 second on
the uneven bars and a
7.95 third in floor exer-
cise.
Annie Loeschke add-
ed a fourth on the
uneven barss with a
6.75 and a fifth in floo
manuevers at 7.7.
"I'm still looking for
118 points from this
team by the end of the
season said Rose.
"We still have a lot of
potential.
The Lad) Piratev
now 4-5 overall, ti i
to l NC-Chapd H .
Wedneda for
p.m. matchup with tin
Tar Heeis before
South arolina
I u r m a n
weekend.
&-
hast Carolina Playhouse Present
A FUNNY,
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The decision may well be difficult
but the abortion itself doesn't have to be.
We do our best to make it easy for you.
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Students 1.50 Public 2.50
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 5, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 05, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.36
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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