The East Carolinian, February 1, 1980






�he i�nat Carolinian
Vol. 54 No JHT
jb
8 Pages
Friday, February I, 1980
Greenville, N.C
Circulation 10.000
Jarvis Residents Will Face
Possible Second Eviction
Carolyn Fulgum. Dean of Women
Irritated Jarvis residents voiced their opposition
yesterday afternoon to the future plans to change Jarvis
into a co-ed dorm.
Martha McDonald, a sophomore living on the first
floor of Jarvis, explained what was going on: "They
decided that they were going to make Jarvis a co-ed
dorm with guys on the first floor and girls on the se-
cond. All the girls on the second floor get to keep their
rooms, but we don't get to keep ours
She added that first floor occupants are essentially be-
ing "kicked out" of their rooms. Another Jarvis resi-
dent, Jackie Whitner, stated, "If they can kick the girls
out of the first floor or Jarvis and make provisions for
the men to move in, then they can make provisions for
us to have a place to live also
Ruth Jakes, another first floor resident, said, "We
paid first and that's why we are on the first floor. We
are the ones getting kicked out yet we are supposed to
have priority over second floor residents. They're also
not doing a damn thing about where we can go either
Jarvis residents were also upset about men having
suites like students in Scott Dorm. One resident claim-
ed, "You best believe that if I got a chance to be in
Scott, I'd be there. It's just not fair to kick our asses
out. It should be a fair swap
One student commented that guys wouldn't like Jar-
vis rooms because thev are much smaller than other
rooms. "They're also going to tear them up. They'll
probably rip out the air conditioning she said.
"The girls haven't even had a chance to get suites
another resident commented, "and now we get a nice
place to live and the guys are going to come in here and
tear it up. I mean, that's just guys
Most of the girls wanted to talk to Dean Fulgum,
dean of women. "She wouldn't come over and talk to
us today to answer any of our questions. She made the
head of our dorm tell us one resident said. When con-
tacted by The East Carolinian, Dean Fulgum declined to
comment.
The women were told there would be a meeting
tonight and their questions would be answered. Ruth
Jakes said, "Dean Fulgum said she would answer our
questions, but she has not said that she would do
anything about it. She's not giving any of us a fair
chance
Virginia Carlton, Jarvis president, predicted, "The
thing is final. This will be a co-ed dorm. What we have
to do is make sure that the Dean and everybody have
facilities that will satisfy all of these girls because they're
left out in the rain
When one resident suggested that the dorm be open
for first and second floors to have equal choices for the
rooms on second floor, Carlton eplied, "Let's forget
about that. That's over with. What we have to deal with
now is where these girls will be put. Everyone keeps
talking about the dorm becoming co-ed. Forget that.
The fact remains that Jarvis is going to be co-ed. We
want the dean and everybody to work with these girls on
first floor and help them find someplace else to live
The problem remains. Jarvis residents are
dissatisfied, but their efforts seem to be useless accor-
ding to Carlton.She added, "If you want to march, we'll
go right now, but it's not going to do any good
There will be a meeting tonight where the many
questions from Jarvis residents will be answered.
Canada Aids American Diplomats
By The Associated Press
Relatives of the Americans spirited out of Iran by
Canadian-L.S. efforts shed tears of relief and broke
their silent vigil after learning that their loved ones were
safe.
"I'm going to be indebted to Canada for the rest of
mv life said Marge Schatz of Post Falls, Idaho,
mother of Henry Lee Schatz, an agricultural attache
who uav one of the six who fled by posing as Cana-
ms.
In Oceanport. N.J Setsuko Amburn, whose
daughter Cora I ijek and her husband, Mark, both 25,
also escaped, said she cried "like a baby" upon hearing
the news.
And in (ossviJIe, Tenn Mary Frank, mother of
Visitation Commitee
Kathleen F. Stafford, who fled with her husband,
Joseph, said, "I'm still walking on water
There was no immediate word from relatives of the
sixth American, consular official Robert G. Anders.
Schatz, 31, a graduate of the University of Idaho,
served in India before being assigned to Iran.
"Throughout the three months, it has been a time of
uncertainty his mother said. "I haven't actually heard
from him since he was home last October All I know
is that he is safe and coming home she told the Coeur
d'Alene, Idaho, Press on Tuesday.
All six have been hiding out in Tehran since last Nov.
4, when militants stormed the U.S. Embassy and took
Americans hostage. They fled � with the help of the
CIA and the Canadian government � and are now in an
undisclosed location.
"I was so worried, although I knew she was not a
hostage, but was hiding out said Mrs. Amburn, ad-
ding she heard from her daughter once after the
takeover but did not know where the couple was hiding.
Mrs. Lijek and Mrs. Stafford were consular assistants at
the embassy, while their husbands were consular of-
ficers.
"I don't know when she will be home or when she will
land said Mrs. Amburn, who lived in Tehran from
1972 to 1975 while her husband, Joseph, worked for an
Iranian company. "My husband says he will take the
day off when she arrives and he bought champagne. It's
one of the best days of our lives
Winter Finally Brings Snow To Greenville
and students are loving it
Survey Reveals ECU Student Preferences
Early Visitation Protests
By WAYNETALTON
Staff Writer
The Student Visitation Commit-
tee met Tuesday night in
Mendenhall Student Center to
evaluate the results of their recent
survey and to draft recommenda-
tions to present to the SGA.
The committee was formed to
make recommendations about
visitation policies and came to the
attention of Barbara Ellstrom and
Dasha Efird, co-chairpersons, at a
SGA meeting. They then formed a
committee composed of the student
resident staff, SGA members, and
WRC and MRC presidents.
Efird pointed out that these peo-
ple have a strong interest in student
life and wish to improve the present
visitation policies.
The Visitation Committee is com-
prised of the following members:
Barbara Ellstrom, assistant resident
advisor and member of the SGA;
Dasha Efird, hall advisor and
member of the SGA; Stephanie
Ganus, WRC president; Eileen
Rodri, hall advisor; Leslie
Broadhurst, assistant resident ad-
visor; Kirk Little, member of the
SGA; and Al Patrick, member of
the SGA.
The purpose of the survey was
make recommendations reeardine
"We are hopeful that these recomendations will be carried
through by the administration. "
the visitation program, co-ed
residence halls, and security entry
into the residence halls. The forms
were administered to individual
residence halls so ECU students
could voice their opinions.
Approximately 2000 were ac-
cumulated for the survey. The first
question on the survey form was:
"Do you entertain guests of the op-
posite sex in your room?" Nineteen
hundred students said yes, 70
replied no, while 17 had no opinion.
One of the most popular ques-
tions on the survey was: "Would
you like to see the hours extended
on weekends, Friday-Sunday?"
Although 147 students answered no,
1812 replied yes and 1167 of these
residents preferred twenty-four
hours for weekend visitation.
One section of the survey form
allowed students to write comments
and suggestions concerning visita-
tion policies, and there were varied
replies.
Concerning the centrex system,
one student said it would be an ex-
cellent solution in place of the inter-
com system.Another added that
many times one couldn't hear
through the intercom, and half of
the guys don't even know how to
use it.
A resident of Fletcher dorm feels
that visitation hours are too short
because even an out of town guest
must wait until noon before entering
the dormitory rooms.
One student commented that the
indviduals here are mature adults
and should be treated as such. A
Jarvis resident added that as college
students, we should be past
"hand-holding" by campus regula-
tions.
Several individuals favored the
use of a key card for entry to the
dorms after visitation hours, instead
of campus police. A Fleming resi-
dent said her main disagreement
with visitation policies was entering
and exiting only through the front
doors because of the inconvenience.
One student summed up his feel-
ings stating that visitation hours are
for kids and sick people in hospitals.
After evaluating the surveys, the
visitation committee drew up nine
recommendations "to be presented
Tuesday night to Dean Fulgum,
dean of women, and Dr. Meyers,
the vice chancellor of student life.
They are: 1) Experimental 24-hour
visitation on weekends should be us-
ed throughout the campus. If the
students can wisely use this
priviledge, it should become a per-
manent part of the visitation policy.
2) Escorted males should be allowed
to use any entrance or exit until 8
p.m. 3) On the SGA Judicial Hand-
book under the visitation policy on
page 27, Rule D�"Doors will re-
main open and lights will stay
on"�should be voided from the
policy. 4) Implement as soon as
possible the centrex system because
the intercoms are constantly broken
and used improperly. 5) More police
personnel should be on duty in the
early mornings to let girls into the
dorms. 6) Greater efforts to imple-
ment the key system campus-wide,
and consider the use of a magnetic
card system. 7) Mix up male and
female dorms on campus by bring-
ing a male dorm to the west campus
and convert Scott Dorm into a co-ed
living arrangement. 8) The usage of
supervision sheets should be voided
in the female dorms. 9) Considering
the results from the survey concern-
ing extending hours during the
weekdays, the committee suggests
that longer hours be voted on by
residents of each dorm. This recom-
mendation is referred to in Rule B
ECU Students Speak Out On Draft Registration
By DEBBIE HOTALING
Asst. News Editor
Eighteen- to twenty-six-years-
old? That's the prime age range.
ECU students are thinking about
draft registration and the possibility
of being drafted.
The issue of reinstating draft
registration is being discussed in
Washington, D.C now � not only
for men, but women, too. ERA is
getting just what it asked for.
The Carter administration recent-
ly revoked the Soviets' export
license allowing them to buy high-
technology parts. Their license was
revoked because these parts helped
construct the trucks used in the in-
vasion of Afghanistan.
American athletes are stilt waiting
for the final word concerning Presi-
dent Carter's call for an American
boycott of the Moscow Olympics
pending a Soviet Union pull-out
from Afghanistan.
Many ECU students feel the draft
is something we'll all have to con-
sider soon, and we should be ready
to go to war. Others feel that the
draft is inevitable, but they refuse to
go. Regardless of opinion, people
on campus have taken a stand on
the question of draft registration.
"President Carter is correct in in-
sisting in the reinstating of the draft
registration because America, at this
time, is sadly lacking in defense per-
sonnel said Beau Hays, a
freshman poli-sci major from
Raleigh. "I think women should be
drafted and put in desk positions.
I'll fight for my country, but damn-
ed if I'll die for it
Oredia Walston, a cophomore ac-
counting major from Wilson:
"They'll reinstate the draft. But if
the draft question drags into the
next election, there probably won't
be a lrft. I think women will be
draflcu, out I wouldn't volunteer to
go. I think this crisis is our business
now, but it could have been avoid-
ed. America gives in to everybody so
they (other countries) think they can
take advantage of us
Jacqueline Batts, a freshman
computer science major from,
Wilson: "I don't think women will
be drafted, but I'd go if I had to.
Iran has our people as hostages
because we allowed the shah to stay
here. I definitely think the Iran crisis
has greatly influenced the bringing
back of the draft
Robert Swaim, a senior accoun-
ting major from Greensboro: "All
Carter can do is ask Congress to
renew registration. I see the necessi-
ty of registration. I guess we could
call it a necessary evil. When you
register for the draft, you're signing
up to gamble your life in the event
of war. It's necessary. I would do it
reluctantly. We're prepared to de-
fend ourselves against anybody �
except the Soviet Union. It's a cry-
ing shame we're second in power to
this vicious, communist nation
because of Carter's appeasement
and weakness. We've had a gutless
president
Monte Bracy, a junior art educa-
tion major from Richmond, Va
"I'm pretty sure the draft is coming
back. Yes, I think women will be
drafted. I guess I'll be heading south
for the summer or north for the
winter, depending on when it hap-
pens. Registration will probably be
in the next three to six months
Jeff Betcher, a junior industrial
tech. major from Goldsboro: "I
don't see fighting, everybody else's
war like Vietnam. But the situations
in Iran and Afghanistan are testing
us. I think we should be ready to go.
Registration is one step closer to the
draft, and that's one step closer to
war. I think women should be re-
quired to register. After all, they
wanted equal rights, so they should
have to go, too
Edie Fekete, a sophomore biology
major from Richmond, Va "I
See DRAFT, page 2
Inside Today
I � ffram KaHragr 7
�wfc�ha� immrtragr J�
Nfcfcittwa
1
on page 27 of the SGA Judicial
Handbook.
The Visitation Committee has
future plans that include an evalua-
tion of the centrex system, room-
mate rights, and a comparison of
visitation policies at the UNC
schools.
When asked to comment on the
overal survey, Barbara Ellstrom,
committee co-chairperson replied,
"I thought the results were good,
and I'm glad that students had a lot
of input into this issue. We are
hopeful that these recommendations
will be carried through by the ad-
ministration.
Improved
Language
Lab Opens
By KICHARD GREEN
Copy Kditor
New language laboratory
facilities will open Feb. 4 in
Graham, room 105, according to
Gary Ambert, director of the lab.
The new lab will gradually replace
the old one in room 106 as funds
become available.
"The chancellor and the vice
:hancellor of academic affairs are
doing everything possible to find
funds that are needed for this ex-
pansion Ambert said.
The old lab recently had a shor-
tage of recorders, but most have
now been repaired. According to
Ambert, the shortage of operable
recorders in the lab was the result of
11 years of constant use. He said the
normal life expectancy of the
recorders is four years.
At present the new lab has only
five new recorders. The new
machines use cassettes, rather than
the old recl-to-reel type, and the
quality of the recordings is much
greater.
Ambert said the only problem
with phasing out the old lab is that
the new lab will not be able to ex-
pand quickly enough to accoimHlatc
I he same number of student. rhc
reason is lack of fund, he sakl.
I
1





I he fourteenth session of the
I egisiature of the Student Government
sivianon was sailed to order b
Speaker Mike Adkins at 5 (M p m A
moment of silence was observed, the
i.ill was sailed, a quorum was declared.
and the minutes were approved
s i S)I
kl COR IS
tOMMIITII
Ms ollniei reported lhat Ihe p
.moils C ommittee met loda) .ind
.sid out ihe I CGC, E I I'lavhouse.
d ihe E I Science Education i luh
hi!U lasoiahls with amendments
Mr Patrick vaid ;he Student Welfare
l ommittee was to meet tonight We
also h.nl received I letter tiom Or
concernin installing lights m the
ad track area neai Minges. the
L-ould not he installed because of
property
Ms Bell reported ihai the Rules anj
i I mmntec had amendments
ii Ihe I lection Rules and would
host d.i
M Bernstein reported that ihe
Screenings and ppointments . ommil
id screened and chosen three new
tav I egislators to be approved 'odas
David Howe; man. Ras like and
I Jwaids
SGA Minutes
January 28, 1980
NtW BUSINESS:
Mi Bernstein moved to suspend the
rules to consider IB 14 1, "Approval
of New Day I egislators " Suspension
passed and Mr Bernstein made a mo-
tion on the bill Question was called
and the bill passed Mr Mann swore in
new Dav I egistalors David Bowerman.
Ra I ike and Muhael I dwards
Ms Bateman introduced I B 14 2.
"Appropriation to ihe A.I- "
Ms Bell introduced I B 14 I.
"Approval ol C onstitution
Ms Bishop introduced I B 14 4.
Approval of l onstitution tor ihe
ECU dult I ducation Association
Mi Brown moved to suspend the
rules to consider I R 14 I. "ECU StU
dent Government -Xssosiation Supports
ihe Greenville Rescue Squad " Suspen-
sion passed and a motion was made on
ihe bill Mr Ouinn moved to pass the
hill hv acclamation; motion failed Ms
ollmei commented ihat the resolution
wa- a good was fot I (. I to get out into
ihe community Mr Quinn moved for
previous question Motion passed
Resolution passed
Ms Hell introduced 1 B 14-5,
"Appropriation io ihe National Model
Organization 't fncan I nity and
I H 14 f. "Appropriation to the Vi
tional Model Organization ol American
Stales "
liay Community,1' as amended It was
explained that the 1150 00 for Peer
Counseling Training was to have pro
fessional psychiatrists train students to
be counselors Mr Settle commented
that there is not really any difference
between ECOC and religious, fraternal,
and political organizations on campus
which are not funded Ms Stanlorth
noted that it is a service organization
Mi Sherrod added that the bill should
be nidged by Us metit only Question
was called, and the bill passed on a dm
sion vote of 15 12 with ft abstentions
Ms Vollmer moved to pass LB 13-2,
"Appropriation to Fast Carolina
Playhouse. Supplemental. 1980 " Ms
Vollmer explained that the Playhouse
had a shortfall of S2.274 00 and that
Ihe hill was originally cut by f.iVK) (�)
in the tall Ms Simpson commented
that the Playhouse had alreadv been
funded rincc and should not receive
money thai an unfunded club might
need Question was called Bill passed
NOI C IS
NOl NCEMENTS
AND
AN
ll I SI loss Nl) l'RI II I ol s
i, i iwe SGA treasurer, made .i
cporl He explained thai the
Funds left IO appropriate, in-
c projected lust sessions summer
, v.? N 4ti this amount
ncludes the M5.000.00 in the
"emergency" account whuh the
i ure agreed not to use
M Ik spoke ii Election Rules
: nents decided upon bv the Rules
ludii �r t ommittee She
I .iied a list ctl all changes and ex
cash One change was to have
Spring Election the Wednesday
Spring Break Mi Mclvin com
�d tl i there would be a ;wo week
l pet od it a run-off was
vary ui 11 I here were a n v
� es Mi 11 iplett pointed out
� trtendly amendments s,mld be sue
� debate on ihe bill.
1 estet Nail at 1(1 member ol ihe
lie Volunteet Rescue Squad.
the squad He said ihat the
i i . . inmate its chattel
and ihai m ihe past, it nas
. ide, 'he I ire Department He ex
u ihat here was a plan to COO-
the Rescue Squad and the I ire
and there was a problem of
h ,i between ihe iwo
M � � here is,is tn average
I ; campus Rescue squad calls a
: asking fot SGA support
squad, he read a resolution to be
g the meeting
Mi S m reported ;hai there was
tj possibility ot obtaining .� i!1
� - ea if not this yeat He also
�� , tudenl handbook change,
� c -s kcsi out ��. Dt Mater,
not
ii student ieaslic- to hold
'uisidc of ihe houis i B
i 1 � day
Ol I) HI SINI ss
Ms Vollmer moved to pass I B 13-3.
"Appropriation to the Science Kduca
lion c lub as amended bv the Ap-
propriations Committee The total
amount lor the bill now reads
2,2HH (�i Ms Vollmer noted that the
students included in the field trip would
be presenting papers in April when
fI hosted the sonvention of the
Academy of Science Mr Irancisnoted
that wuh the past precedent ol not fun
ding navel, he sould nol support the
total amount Mr Ouinn asked for a
friendly amendment "Article III- All
monies not used will revert back to the
General fund " It was assepted A
friendly amendment was made and ac
cepted to change the bill to the original
amount ol �3,190.00 Alter some
negative discussion of the total amount.
another friendly amendment was made
and accepted for ihe Sum to be Ihe
amended amouni ol S2.2S8 tX) Ques
non was sailed, objected to; and Ms.
Johnson moved to override the objec-
tion the motion passed (Ml a division
vole of 2U 8 Bill passed on a division
vole ol 25 11 wuh 1 abstention
Ms Hell moved to pass 1 B 10 I,
"Amendment u the Election Rules
1i Bernstein asked tor a friendly;
amendment to make the election date
ihe 2nd Vedtiesdav atier Spring Break
instead ol the Wednesday before Spring
Break Ii was accepted Mr Bernstein
oked foi a friendly amendment to
nave ihe Screenings and Appointments
Committee screen and select an lies
tions Committee chairperson lor
1 egisiature approval instead of having
the Executive lake ihe responsibility as
proposed bv ihe Rules and Judiciary
i ommittee It was not accepted Ques-
lion was sailed B;l! passed
Ms ollmei moved to pass I B I 3-4.
"Appt ipriation to the East Carolina
Ms Vollmer announced an Ap
propnations Committee for 4 (Kl Mofl
dav
Mr Patrick said that there would be
a Siudeni Welfare committee following
1 egisiature
Preston Sisk. last Carolina
Plavhouse manager, announced that he
would be leaving ECU nexi year, and
he said he had enjoyed working wuh
the SGA in past sears
Ms C alder announced an I (I law
Society meeting for Tuesday night
Ml I nile said there would be an es
ccutive council meeting Thursd.o at
5:00 p m
A motion to adjourn was made and
passed
I ynnatdet
SGA Secretary
Mike Adkuis
SGASpeaket
The Kast Carolinian
V' . ' .
the idiiii iinmnuniix
fot W vears
WASH
HOUSE
die. osr.
across from
KRlSpy KRME
DOvJUTS
"A FULL SERVICE LAUNDRY"
. NEW fAfMTRCi VJAShERS
.Cdrpetcd LocWjt uith Color TM
.FLUFF SNd FOld Service-
.PiNbcM machines
. txcelknt prok'fjoiYU dryCfcinn
&
I
ob Ludsh arid a tcinnic
LOiih -this coll pern
empires Feb. &, hjBo
oo-(o6o
f:
Continued from page 1
think (he draft should be reinstated.
If we go to war now, we won't be
ready. Women should be drafted (
just as they are in other countries
like Russia and Israel. I'd be willing
to give up school to go. The situa-
tions in Iran and Afghanistan in-
volve us a whole lot more than Viet-
nam did
Nicky Francis, a graduate student
in business administration from
Winton: "I think registration is a
necessity. It's nothing new to me �
I've been registered since 1974 and
carried it at all times. We're sitting
in a similar situation as we were
before the Vietnam conflict because
of communist expansionism. In
order for the United States to re-
Pubbshed every Tuesday and
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the summer
The East Carolinian is the of
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Subscription Rates
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main as a world power, we must
have a strong military influence on
the rest of the world.
"Women can hold certain combat
positions now. Recently, they re-
examined the status of women in
combat roles. No, I don't think
they'll draft women to hold desk
jobs. There are enough enlisted to
do that.
"I've always taken the attitude
that the price of freedom has to be
paid, and if I was called by my
country, I'd go without hesitation
Dr. Lon Felker, political science
professor: "There's a great
possibility that the draft will be
brought back. I'd say there's a
distinct possibility of women being
registered and drafted. I don't think
women will serve in the combat
capacity. Given the urgency of the
crisis, it (registration) will be ex-
pedited through Congress as soon as
possible.
"In order to insure a democracy,
some form of sacrifice is necessary
Personally, I'm against war, but
perceiving the situation as it is,
there's a certain degree of urgency
which must be dealt with. If we fail
to meet this crisis, worse things
could happen � such as the loss of
the Persian Gulf which would make
our energy situation extremely
desperate
Steve Lamneck, a Junio
philosophy major from Ohio: "It's
time to find out who the enemv real-
ly is. I think it's the world
marketplace. Anv war that has
curred happened because of
economics. Big business got us into
the hot water. It's our voung men's
lives who have to pav to get them
out. If I cre drafted, I wouldrw
eo. I am a CO as I was to the
nam war. I'm registered as one. The
oil companies raped Iran, and
Iran wants something bad
like the power companies and
companies have raped us
years
Draft registration: It's iomei
to think about Soonei
sou'Ii have to.
Friday's is making one change and we
want YOU to Know First
FOSDICK'S
1890
Seafood
Friday s 1890 Seafood will
be changing its name in
February of 1980. We will
be changing to Fosdick's
1890 Seafood after our
historic tugboat. We take a lot
of pride in our regular custo
mers so we would like for you
to know first. There will be no
menu changes or management or
ownership changes. We will continue
to serve quality seafood and other menu
selections we hope you have enjoyed in
the past.
THE COMPLETE
STUDENT
ALL YOU CAN EAT
SPECIALS
SALAD�50� EXTRA
ASST. VAR.
PIZZA
MOCAMYOUT
$199
ONLY
1
TUE.
WITH FRIES & COLESLAW
FRIED
CHICKEN ��
$199
1
WED.
WITH GARLIC BREAD
ITALIAN
SEA
WITH FRII
'hat s the easiest way to comp ee �
plans �no matter what you re ptanr j
By making one convenient It p �;
Kroger Sav-on where you ' z
everything from apple cider to transistor
radios to footballs and more a �
cost cutter pnees No matte' �? .
plans complete them with oe eas� '� :
.to your Kroger Sav-on
y
MT. DEW OR
FRIED
FISH.
ONLY
$-199
1
FBI.
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Records and
Tapes
jmsfeOUItTEBj
Up
To
� 30
- � T16-Oz
p- Ret
Btls
Pepsi-Cola
8$
MALT LIQUOR
Colt 45 Silver
6
12-Oz.
Cans or
Btls.
COLONY WINE
j&
Chablis, Burgundy
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Mendenhall
Workshops
Stained Glass
Learn cutting and designing of stained glass us-
ing copper foil and came techniques. Possibilities
include window hangings, mirrors and lamps. In-
structors: Gary Blevins and Pam Timberlake?
Section A: Tuesdays, 6-9 p.m. (Feb. 5, 12, 19, 26,
Mar. 4.) Section B: Thursdays, 6-9 p.m. (Feb. 7,
14. 21, 28, Mar. 6.)
Batik
Basic steps to resist dye techniques for produc-
ing designs on fabric. Possibilities include hang-
ings, yardage, scarves and pillows. Instructor:
Cheryl Baker. Wednesdays, 6-9 p.m. (Feb. 6, 13,
20, 27.)
Enameling
Get quick results with the simple art of enamel-
ing. It can be beautifully applied to create a varie-
ty of items from ashtrays to wall plaques and is
often used in crafting jewelry. Instructor: Pam
Timberlake. Wednesdays, 6-9 p.m. (Feb. 6, 13,
20, 27.)
Pottery
Basic instruction in wheel-throwing and hand-
building techniques, glazing, and firing of clay.
Instructors: Susan Rosch and Eric Nordgulen.
Section A: Mondays, 6-9 p.m. (Feb. 4,11, 18, 15
Mar. 3, 17.) Section B: Thursdays, 6-9 p.m. (Feb.
7, 14, 21, 28, Mar. 6, 20.)
Darkroom Techniques
Basic instruction in darkroom procedures and
techniques. Students will learn to develop and
print their own black and white film. Instructor:
Susan Edmunds. Wednesdays, 6-9 p.m. (Feb. 6,
13, 20, 27, Mar. 5, 19.)
Photography
For beginners, an introduction to the use of a
35mm single-iens reflex camera. Material will
cover the basics of 35mm photography including
metering, depth of field, shutter speeds, filters,
electronic flash, types of film, etc. Instructor:
Pete Podeszwa. Tuesdays, 6:30-9:30 p.m. (Feb.
5, 12, 19, 26, Mar. 4, 18.)
Beginning Jewelry
Design and make your own jewelry using a
variety of techniques to create pieces such aS�
silver rings, bracelets, pendants, key chains, etc.
Instructor: Pam Timberlake. Mondays, 6-9 p.m.
(Feb. 4, 11, 18, 25, Mar. 3.)
Floor Loom Weaving
Learn to use a four-harness floor loom. Several
patterns will be learned in creating a sampler
from which your own choice of projects will be
drawn. Instructor: Annie Cable. Wednesdays, 6-9
p.m. (Feb. 6, 13, 20, 27.)
Quilting .
Basic techniques for drawing and assembling
quilting designs including appliques, log cabin,
mosaic, stars and cathedral window. Method us-
ed will be quilt-as-you-go. Instructor: Kay
Clemens. Mondays, 7-9 p.m. (Feb. 4, 11, 18, 25,
Mar. 3.)
Kite Making
Learn the craft of kite making in this two-hour
mini-workshop. No fee will be charged. Instruc-
tor: George Brett (PCC Artist-In-Residence).
Wednesday, March 26, 6-8 p.m. (one session on-
ly)-
Announcements
Poetry Forum
The East Carolina Poetry Forum will
hold a regular workshop and meeting
Thursday, Feb. 7, at � p m in
Mendenhall. room 248. The public is
cordially invited.
Scholarship
The James B Mallory Men's Residence
Council scholarship will be awarded
this semester to a young man who is a
member of the Men's Residence Coun-
cil. The scholarship will be based on
need and residence hall contributions.
Applicants must have at least a 2.3
grade point average. Applications may
be picked up in each dorm counselor's
officer. The deadline is March I
SGA Loans
All students needing SOA loans can
now get them from the SGA office in
Mendenhall or from the Financial Aid
Office in the Old Cafeteria They are no
longer available in Whichard room 210
� James B. N'tllory, Associate Dean.
Orientation and Judiciary.
Racquetball
Anyone interested in this fast growing
sport please come to Memorial Gym,
room 104. tonight at 5 p.m. This is an
important organizational meeting.
We'll also be discussing upcoming com-
petition with other schools. If you
don't know how to play, but would like
to learn, come on out. We hope to set
up clinics and court lime for our active
members
ECU Hillel
The ECU Hillel will have its first
membership meeting of the spring
semester on Thursday, Jan. 31 at 8:30
p.m. in the Multi-purpose Room in
Mendenhall. All member and perspec-
tive members are invited to attend.
Also, on Sunday. Feb. 3, at 7:30 p.m
Hillel will present the first of its three-
pan Jewish Education Series at the
home of Jody Fine (1507 Chestnut St.).
For more information or directions,
please call Mike Freelander at
752-9495.
Summer Orientation
The Office of James B. Mallory,
Associate Dean, Orientation and
Judiciary, is now accepting applications
for counselors for Summer Orienta-
tion. Applicants must be rising seniors
or graduate students. Applications may
be picked up in Whichard Building.
Room 210. Deadline iw Friday, Feb. 8.
Family Child Assoe.
The Family Child Association will meet
Tuesday, Feb. 5 at 5 p.m. in the Home
Economics Conference Room (143).
All members are urged to attend this
important meeting.
Allied Health
The Allied Health Professions Admis-
sion Test will be offered at ECU on
Saturday. March 8. Application blanks
are available at the Testing Center,
Speight Building, Room 105. Registra-
tion deadline is February 9.
Kappa Alpha
Kappa Alpha Beat the Clock Night at
Chapter X, Monday. Feb. 4, 9 p.ml
a.m. Door prizes, chugging contest
(prizes awarded), and. of course, all
your favorite beach and disco.
cso
LSAT
The Law School Admission Test will be
offered at ECU on Saturday, April 19.
Registration deadline is February II,
1980. Application blanks (which must
be completed and mailed to ETS) may
be obtained from the ECU Testing
Center, Room 105 Speight Building.
Ski Refunds
If you have or intend to declare a major
in a science or health related cur-
riculum, you may qualify for COST-
FREE services made available through
the Center for Student Opportunities
(CSO).
CSO currently has openings for
students wishing to receive tutorial ser-
vices. There are also openings for
students to participate in individualized
or group speed-reading, notetaking and
tesitakins techniques, effective
organization of lecture notes, and Ac-
tive Reading � knowing more about
what you read in a shorter time.
Counseling services include career plan-
ning assistance, academic, personal,
financial, test anxiety, and-or group
counseling.
If you would like to be considered for
participation in any of these COST-
FREIT services, contact Dr. Bridwell,
Center for Student Opportunities, 216
Whichard Annex, or call for an ap-
pointment at 757-6122, 6075. or 6081.
Rho Epsilon
There will be a Rho Epsilon meeting
Thurs Jan. 31. at 4:00 p.m. in room
221 Mendenhall. All members and
those interested are urged to attend.
Spring plans will be made at this
meeting.
The Christmas Snowshoe Ski group will
meet in Room 108 Memorial Gym on
Thursday. Jan. 31 at 3:30 p.m. for
deposit refunds.
Book Sale
The Society for Collegiate Journalists
will sponsor a Used Book Sale on
Thursday, Jan. 31 from 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. and Friday, Feb. I from 8 a.m. to
2 p.m. in the lobby of Austin Building.
Proceeds will be used for scholarship
purposes.
Women's Soccer
Help support women's sports at ECU
by joining the newly formed Women's
Soccer Club. The team needs well over
20 members, so anyone who is in-
terested in playing soccer should con-
tact Kris Soil at 758-5756 or Will
Wiberg at 752-4553 as soon as possible.
An organizational meeting will be held
Wednesday. Feb. 13 at 2 p.m. at 922
14th St. (the brick house behind Belk
Dorm). Practice will begin when all the
preliminary work is completed, which
should be within the next couple of
weeks. Come out and give soccer a try!
Phi Sigma Iota
A quadricentennial celebration of the
publication the Essais of Montaigne
(Bordeaux, 1580) will be held on Mon-
day, Feb. 4, at 7:30 p.m. in the Coffee
House of Mendenhall. Dr. Nicole
Aronson, of the department of foreign
languages, will speak on the
characteristics of this important writer.
She will be assisted by Professor Stuart
Aronson, of continuing education, who
will read-selections in English transla-
tion from Montaigne's essays.
All interested persons are cordially
invited. This tribute to Montaigne is
sponsored by Phi Sigma lota, the
foreign language honor society. The of-
ficers for the ECU chapter of Phi
Sigma lota for this school year are
Cynthia J. Browning, president;
Michele K. Parish, vice president and
program director; and William R. Jcr
nigan, secretary-treasurer. The faculty
advisor is Dr. Joseph A. Fernandez
Physical Fitness
The next meeting of the ECU Physical
Fitness Club will be held Monday. Feb.
4 in room KM of Memorial Gym. The
club is designed to promote physical
fitness through swimming, cycling,
walking and running. Any student,
faculty, or staff member is welcome.
Spring Skiing
Spring Snowshoe Ski Gtoup will meet
at 4:00 p m. on Thursday. Jan 31 for
the first ski orientation period.
Deposits will not be accepted after this
dale The final payment is due on Feb
7.
Ripple Raiders
SU Flashes
BSPA
The Black Student Psychological
Association (BSPA) will be having its
4th meeting since its organization on
Thursday, Jan. 31, at 3:00 p.m. in the
Psi Chi Library on second floor in
Speight. All members are urged to at-
tend. Any black students majoring in
psychology are welcome.
GMAT
The Graduate Management Admission
Test will be offered at ECU on Satin-
day, March 15 Application blanks are
available at the Testing Center, Speight
Building, Room 105 Registration
deadline is February 22.
The Ripple Raiders are now taking
registrations for a fund-raising gong
show io be held Mon . Feb 11 at the
Attic All participants will receive
prizes To sign up or lor nvore informa-
tion, call 752 9881
SGA Screenings
There will be screening for Student
positions on the Planning Commission
on Jan. 31, Thurs. evening from 4 8
p m. Call SGA offices at 757-6611, ext
218 for more information about the
committees and for appointments.
Weight Lifting
The Intermutal Weigh! lifting club
organizational meeting will be held
Thurs . Ian 31. at 600 p m in room
104, Memorial Gvm
The Student Union Travel Commute
is sponsoring a trip to Ft. Lauderdak
and Disney World for Spring Break
(March 7-16). Only $175 for quad oc-
cupancy. For more information, call
757-6611. ext 266
The Student Union Minority An
Committee will be sponsoring a Jewish
Arts and Intetnational Festival. Feb
3-9.
The An Exhibition Committee an
nounces the showing of the Judaic col
lection of the North Carolina Museum
of Art (Feb 1-28) Also, on Feb 5 at 1
p m , iox and bagels, and at 7 30 p m
Dr Abraham Knoft. a major con
tributor to and curator of the col lee
tton. will speak in the Multipurpose
Room of Mendenhall
UFDC
The University, Folk and Country. I
Dance club would like to invite all who
are interested in folk and country dans
mg to attend meetings of the IIIX
The meetings are every Wednesdav!
night Irom seven to nine pm in
Brewsser D-109. If you're interested,
some on over or call "52-0826
Draft Registration
Interested students are invited M �"
the Greenville Pease Committee in ooi
sidering the upsommg draft regisir.i
i�n Thr mrrtintf hevins with J
pot luck supper at 6.30 p m. Friday
mght at Mi. Urn Street. M Mock
east of the sampus for more intorma
tion. sail 13t 4SJ06 or check with Fduh
Webber in 218 ustin
a
��K -i
$

s)
C-
5.
Thur Allan Handelman will play
Rock and New Wave music
FRI. and SAT. NIGHT LIVE
NEWGROUND
The Best in Country Rock Music
Valentine's Day Cards
Heart-to-heart expressions for those
you love and care for.
Creative excellence is an American tradition.
nRltC, SfORES Inr
MARDI GRAS
MONEY
Paying Cash
for
GOLD & SILVER
TANDY LEATHER
across from
Book Barn E. 5th St.
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Sale starts today!
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Feb. 4-15,1980
THE TOUR
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Qttie !Ea0t Carolinian
Serving the campus community for 54 years.
Marc Barnes, semor m�
Diane Henderson, Managing Eduor
Richard Green, copy Eduor
Anita Lancaster, production Manage
Marianne Harbison, v r,m�r
Robert M. Swaim, otmmnf
STEVE O'GEARY, Business Manager
Charles Chandler, spom Eduor
KAREN WENDT, Features Editor
THURSDAY, JANUARYS 1980
PAGE 4
This Newspaper's Opinion
Aid For Rich
A new law that went into effect
Oct. 1 raised the ceiling on the
amount students are eligible to
receive from state and federal fun-
ding.
The ceiling, which stated that
students whose parents made more
than $25,000 per year were not eligi-
ble to receive insured student loans,
has now been lifted to include all
students. The loans are processed
for the students on a first-come,
first-serve basis.
The necessity for the new loan
program should be clear�inflation
has cut into all groups at all income
levels. We heartily endorse help for
those who need it, although we feel
that there should be more discussion
of investigations and audits to pro-
hibit students who do not need help
from receiving it.
At present, according to the im-
plications of a news article about
the new lab, there are no efforts
underway to insure that people who
really need the money get the
money.
The article stressed that students
get their loans on a first-come, first-
serve basis. This seems to indicate
that a situation might arise in which
it would be more a matter of plann-
ing than a matter of real financial
need in receiving aid. It is con-
ceivable that someone who is poor
and who does not write his letter in
time would be left at the starting
gate when it comes to funding,
while someone who can legitimately
afford to pay for his education
without assistance might get his let-
ter in on time and get a student loan
to help pay his way.
On the one hand, the student
whose father can pay for it gets the
aid, and on the other hand, the stu-
dent whose father can't afford it
doesn't get any help.
With no system for making sure
there isn't any dishonesty in making
applications for loans, the loans
themselves are in danger of being
held up for public scrutiny. Such ac-
tions might jeopardize the entire
financial aid system as we know it.
There must be an aggressive
system of audits for students whose
families make over $25,000 per
year. Such a system need not in-
clude all families, but the checks
could be made at random intervals
to present a threat to would-be
cheaters that they would soon be
found out and exposed.
Penalties should be extended to
those who are found out to have no
need for the loans. We feel that stiff
penalties, such as not letting the stu-
dent register for financial aid for the
next academic year, should be im-
posed.
Such a system of checks and
balances would go a long way
toward keeping the present untar-
nished image of financial aid the
way it is today. More students who
really need the help would be helped
by it, and parents who are strapped
for money would be able to send
their sons and daughters to college,
perhaps to begin building on a bet-
ter future than they themselves had.
Pop's People
Coma Country Revisited
Parking Problems
This parking situation is getting
way out of hand. The staff lot next
to the Publications Center is com-
pleted, despite inclement weather,
and the lot behind Mendenhall is in
the same condition it was a few
months ago. Why? Only the ad-
ministration knows for sure.
To match the absurdity of this
predicament, here are a few equally
absurd solutions.
�Have all students park in Wilson
in the Parkwood Mall shopping
center parking lot and bus them on-
to campus. Classes would have to be
rescheduled, but we don't mind tak-
ing Physics on alternate Tuesdays
and Thursdays when the moon is
full.
�Build a large tent over the un-
finished parking areas behind
Mendenhall Student Center. We
might even be able to get the Baptist
Ladies Circle to put in a few bake
sales over there to make a little
money. With the money we make,
we might eventually be able to build
a few new buildings.
�Turn Ficklen Stadium into a
superdome, and park cars on
top�but only cars that have real
good emergency brakes.
�Turn the first floor of Jarvis into
a parking lot. Make sure said lot is
co-ed, even if you have to kick cer-
tain cars out that already have a per-
mit to park there.
By LARRY POPELKA
For the past three years I've been
avoiding my old friends from high school.
Oh, it's not that we didn't have good
times back then. Never has a crazier bunch
of degenerates been assembled under one
roof. We made the characters in "Animal
House" look like amateurs.
After school we'd often meet at a woodsy
retreat known as "Coma Country" and fall
into sudsy comas under a few cases of brew.
Everybody went. Gunner. Spike. Hard-
core. Java. Everyone on the basketball and
football teams. And all the cheerleaders. It
was the thing to do.
But when 1 went off to college more than
100 miles away, things changed. I felt like a
different person, and I knew all my friends
back home had probably changed too. 1
didn't want to try to go back to old
memories that I knew I couldn't relive, so
whenever I went home for a holiday I
avoided my old friends
But one night during this past Christmas
break I received an eerie phone call.
"Lar, how ya doin'?" said the voice on
the other end.
"Fine. Who's this?" I replied.
"Spike
I remember Spike well � all 4-feet-10-
inches of him. We called him Spike because
he was the only volleyball player in our gym
class who couldn't spike it.
Spike never struck me as the bold type (he
reminds me more of the Radar character on
"MASH") but he called on a whim to invite
me to a party that night at a friend's house.
I didn't want to go. How could I? 1
hadn't been to one of those things in three
years. But I couldn't think of a decent ex-
cuse, so 1 had to go.
What happened for the rest of that night
was enough to make any Coma Country
alumnus proud. This is what 1 remember as
I groggily recover from my coma:
11:30 p.m. I arrive at Hardcore's house.
Hardcore got his name by being such a
hardcore drinker and surviving, and as I ar-
rive he is chugging bottles of Blatz in the
front room with Spike. Spike, who weighed
85 pounds at graduation, now has a beard
and a beer belly and is holding his own with
Hardcore quite well.
"Here, have a beer says Spike, handing
me a bottle of beer foaming over at the top.
1 can tell it's going to be a long night.
11-40 p.m. 1 wander into the kitchen and
find Gunner. Gunner was the gunner on our
championship basketball team. He was also
quite good at gunning beer down his throat.
As I greet him, Gunner is already on his
seventh brew.
We start talking about basketball and
Gunner announces he's going to show me
his new movies. He puts his glass of beer on
a plastic spatula and tilts the spatula so that
the beer flows into his mouth. Just as I'm
becoming impressed, the glass slips and
beer spills all over Gunner's pants.
After sitting motionless for a few minutes
looking at his wet lap. 1 tell Gunner 1 think
he spilled his beer.
"Oh, I did he says. "You were always
on top of things, l.ar
12:30 a.m. I run into Toots, our head
cheerleader who used to double as barmaid.
Toots says she injured her knees playing
volleyball at the University of Wisconsin,
disabling her for five months, and that now
she's developed other interests � like knit-
ting.
12:50 a.m. Gunner steals Toots' beer and
starts drinking it. Toots, who is still dating
Gunner (as they have since high school),
hugs him and asks for her beer back. Gun-
ner says there's no beer left in the
refrigerator and therefore he needs hers.
Gunner finishes the bottle.
1:05 a.m. Spike, who is now done chugg-
ing with Hardcore, turns up the stereo and
begins discussing music with me. For a man
whose musical tastes in high school spanned
no farther than Donnie and Marie, 1 am
quite impressed with his knowledge. He
says his favorites are now Molly Hatchet
and the Outlaws.
1:30 a.m. Now rather exhausted from
discussing music with Spike, I head back to
the kitchen where there is no longer any
beer and things are turning ugly. Apparent-
ly Java, the center on our basketball team,
discovered a pickle in the refrigerator and
attempted to devour the entire thing himself
without telling anyone else.
In an attempt to block this maneuver,
Gunner and another former basketball
player jump on top of him and all three roll
on the floor fighting for it.
After about five minutes have elapsed in
this standoff, Toots decides it's time to
leave and starts shouting at Gunner to get
up and come home with her. Gunner
doesn't hear it; he keeps fighting to get the
pickle. Finally someone takes a bag
from one of the cabinets and dumps it on
the three basketball players as lav i eats the
rest of the pickle.
1:55 a.m. Seeing how there is nov. no
beer or pickles left, one of the basketball
players begins rolling joints and pacing
them around. Gunner, who hasn't left Mth
Toots yet, is sitting next to me. inhaling
deeply and looking quite sick.
2:10 a.m. The munchies strike and -con
another refrigerator raid i in progress.
Hardcore pulls out a two foot roll of
sausage he has stashed away. He says it's
deer sausage, made of deei met- from a
deer he shot. To prove it he brings a huge
stuffed deer head out of the . - and
places it on a chair next to Gunnet liunner
puts a joint in the deer's mouth and tells ;he
deer to take a hit.
Meanwhile. Hardcore stai
sausage and tossing slices to ra-
table.
The slice I get is covered wuhUood
I ask Hardcore if this deer sausage 5
posed to be so bloody.
"No he says. That's not
That's my blood. I cut mwi:
knife. Go ahead and eat it; il
you
I ask Hardcore if he's okay
"I think so he says. "I c
anything anymore. I didn't knovN 1
until I saw it on the meat
2:25 a.m. A wrestling matd break;
on the front carpet between Dud
team's benchwarmer, and Sal. .in ardent
fan.
Earlier, Duck had tried to unbul
pants, to which she retaliated bv - him
firmly on the biceps. But now Duck
at it again, despite the fact thai he -
drunk to fight.
This time Sal counters with a set ies of
ing elbow smashes and a couple
for good measure.
Sal, however, gets carried awa and
cidentally kicks Toots, who is now askep
a chair waiting for Gunner to take
home. Startled, Toots wakes up and K
looking for Gunner again, but Gunner i
now eating some nuts in another room.
2:45 a.m. We all stumble out the front
door in a blurry haze, not knowing wl
car is which. But somehow we find the
ones, pile in and creep home in near
Things haven't changed a bit
Washington Merry-Go-Ronnd
Carter Fears Russian Bear Is Ready To Pounce
By JACK ANDERSON
and JOE SPEAR
WASHINGTON � President
Carter is still reluctant to fly with
the hawks in coping with the Soviet
swoop into Afghanistan and the oil-
rich Persian Gulf. Alarmed by Pen-
tagon strategists, fearing that the
Russian Bear is ready to pounce on
the Western world's lifeline to the
Middle East, have failed thus far to
persuade Carter to take military
measures.
Here is what our inside in-
telligence sources have told us about
the conflict between the president
and the Pentagon activists:
�They've advocated establishing
U.S. bases in the threatened area.
Carter has turned this down. The
most he is willing to do is station
permanent U.S. naval forces in the
Indian Ocean and the Arabian Sea.
�They've advocated using former
Israeli bases in the Sinai Desert.
Carter has turned thumbs down on
the proposal.
�They've suggested close military
cooperation with Red China as our
most effective deterrent to Kremlin
aggression. Carter gave Defense
Secretary Harold Brown specific in-
structions to avoid even token ap-
pearances of military cooperation
during his visit to Peking.
�Some administration strategists
want to step up clandestine radio
broadcasts and even covert CIA
operations to stir up 60,000 Moslem
dissidents within Soviet territory
and along the frontiers with Iran
and Afghanistan. Carter has scotch-
ed any major project other than to
recommend an increase in the
budget for the Voice of America
which can be jammed by the Soviets
almost at will.
POLITICAL CARAVAN: As the
political caravan has moved from
Iowa to New Hampshire, we've
picked up some sideshow notes:
�GOP National Chairman Bill
Brock is willing if any of the
Republicans offer him the vice
presidential slot. "Nothing is im-
possible but it's unrealistic he told
us of the prospect. But as
ringmaster of the party's pre-
convention circus, Brock has been
careful not to antagonize any of the
Republican presidential hopefuls.
As chairman, he is remaining
careful neutral and declared it
would be improper for him to pur-
sue the vice presidential nomination
openly. Nonetheless, Brock would
hearken to any invitations from the'
convention winner to be a running
mate.
�Insiders in the camp of Sen. Ted
Kennedy are finding themselves
outflanked in the Democratic fight
by the political nimbleness of Presi-
dent Carter's emissary, Bob Strauss.
The former Democratic national
chairman from Texas has convinced
key officeholders in a dozen states
to withold endorsements of Ken-
nedy and has persuaded others in
such kingpin states as Illinois, Ohio
and New Jersey to stay available for
a Carter bandwagon.
HARDSHIPS: While American
hostages endured torturous days in
captivity in Tehran, Ayatollah Kho-
meini's Iranian Embassy diplomatic
corps in Washington grumbled
about the hardships they under-
went. The Iranians complained they
couldn't obtain temporary
secretarial help during the crisis and
found that repairmen and
deliverymen refused to respond to
their calls for help.
WATCH ON WASTE: Members
of Congress of both political parties
have returned to Washington for an
election-year session spouting their
perennial political promises to im-
press the voters that they'll cut
federal spending. Don't you believe
it.
Defense and foreign aid spending
will rise in the face of the Iranian
and Afghanistan Cold War II crises.
Rampant inflation at home will
boost spending for essential
domestic demands.
Almost unnoticed will be the
wasteful boondoggles authorized by
the House and Senate and
perpetrated by spendthrift govern-
ment bureaucrats. In an era of pro-
fligate billion-dollar federal
budgets, here are some examples of
waste:
�The nation's bee-keepers are en-
titled to collect $25 from the
Agriculture Department for every
hive they claim is honeyless by the
use of insecticides. Congress last
year appropriated $3 million for the
program after being honey-talked
by the bee lobby.
�A year ago, the Carter ad-
ministration and Congress created a
super Federal Emergency Manage-
ment Agency, known as FEMA for
short, to oversee government
assistance in case of disasters. It cost
$1.5 million to set up FEMA to
coordinate the disaster planning of
the Army Engineer Corps, the Na-
tional Weather Service, and the
U.S. Geological Service. When
flood struck Jackson, Miss last
April, all three agencies operated in-
dependently as usual while FEMA
stood futilely aside before the
deluge. It cost the Jackson area vic-
tims a half-billion dollars in
damages. FEMA bureaucrats now
want an additional $2,750,000 for
another exercise in empire building.
�Thousands of border jumpers
from Mexico and Canada are quali-
i
fying technically as residents ot the
United States by renting flophouse
addresses as mail-drops inside our
borders. This qualifies them tor
supplemental security income
benefits paid by American tav
payers. They spend as little as one
day a month to qualify for residen-
cy. Along the U.SMexican border
alone, an estimated 64.000
freeloaders collect about $96 million
annually from Uncle Sam to spend
south of the Rio Grande
�Ex-President Richard Nixon
finally agreed to accept less costly
rental quarters for his move from
California to Manhattan.
Nonetheless, the U.S. taxpayers are
going to cough up $18 million for
the care and comfort of two former
chief executives. Nixon has billed
the government for car washes, in
surance and plumbing supplies. Ex-
Whue House occupant Gerald Ford
has charged off on his government
expense account such things as
water softeners, swimming poo'
maintenance, fireplace accessories
and even door mats.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
JANUARY 31 1980
Paw 5
Orchestra
Zurich Presents A Show
' 'Not Pleasing To Ear
B STFPHAN1E TINGLER
Staff Writer
Trie Zurich Chamber Orchestra
performance Tuesday night was a
long-awaited treat for musicians
and non-musicians alike.
n early expansion of the dance
Mine genre, the Symphony No. 3 in
C Major by English composer
William Boyce blatantly exhibits its
lineage in the rondeau form of the
�Vivance" and the third movement,
�Tempo di Menuetto The
Stoutz. This work, although
technically demanding, most likely
was not enjoyed by the audience.
Full of "instrumental gymnastics
exploiting the technique of pizzicato
tremolo and col legno. It was not
poser. Well-known to those with a
genuine interest in music, the con-
certi were commissioned by and
dedicated to Christian Ludwig,
Margrave of Brandenburg, and
have retained his name through the
pleasing to the ear, or anything else course of the ensuing two and a half
centuries. No. 3 in G Major actually
consists of only two allegro
movements, joined by two solemn
chords which make up the Adagio.
The zenith of the Orchestra's
musical offering, this piece was
for that matter. One memorable
observation was overheard: "It
could have been the soundtrack
from 'The Killer Bees The failure
of this piece lies in its composition,
not its performance, for the evening
viewed retrospectively in its entirity brilliantly executed by the orchestra
Vivance, ordinarily light and quick, attests to the quality and excellence and expressively conducted by de
was unusually slow, owing to the in-
clinations of the composer.
"The Suite about the Present
limes for Two String Orchestras
by Norbert Moret, premiered in
Zurich (January 1980) under the
baton of the conductor, Edmond de
of this Chamber group. If contem-
porary life is confused and chaotic,
then this piece does indeed effective-
ly illustrate the "Present Times
The Six Brandenburg Concerti
are the embodiment of Johanne
Sebastian Bach's success as a com-
.�
Sallv Fields and Burt Reynolds in "Hooper1
this week's Free Flick
Student Union
Presents Action
Comedy 'Hooper9
Stoutz. It was given flair by the ex-
tended range of dynamics uncom-
mon to the Baroque style, which
were bestowed by the Orchestra.
"Appolon Musagete a com-
position by Igor Stravinsky, was
commissioned in 1927. It is a
notable work in the neo-Classic
style, primarily because of its
"predominant diatonicism The
overall impression of this piece is
one of richness, warmth and sen-
suality (as demonstrated in a cello
solo) and brisk movement (as in
"Variation de Calliope").
The final selection of the Or-
chestra was the "Concertino No. 2
in G Major" by Giovanni Pergolesi.
The Sonata da Chiesa form was
originally intended for cathedral or
chapel performance, but
nonetheless found its way into the
drawing rooms and parlors of the
Italian nobility. The concertino style
was best exemplified in the "Largo
affectuoso where the entire group
("ripieni") alternates with a
smaller, select group of soloists
("concertino"): 2 violins, 2 violas
and 1 cello. The "Allegro" ended
the presentation with playful energy
and sheer delight.
The Zurich Chamber Orchestra
has been in existence for thirty five
years, but had not toured the United
States since 1970. We hope that we
need not wait another decade for
their return.
The Zurich Chamber Orchestra
performed at ECU last night
Tickets Cause Towing
MARK KEMP
Staff Writer
Ticketing and towing of cars has
become a way of life for many
students at E.C.U. Some students
have never been able to fully unders-
tand what is expected of them con-
cerning the parking situation on
campus.
Students who have the biggest
problems with ticketing and towing
are freshmen. It takes time to get us-
ed to te procedures and to finally
get down and read the ECU Traffic
Regulations Manual.
Parking on campus is tough, and
many students are bitter about the
high cost of registration and the
slow progress of the construction of
new parking facilities. Students in-
terviewed on the subject said they
are sometimes forced into towing
situations.
ECU student Steve Williams
saidThere's too many people here
at East Carolina that they offer
parking stickers to, and when.you
On other rare occasions, cars are
towed when someone has blocked in
another car and the traffic officer is
unable to locate the owner. Eddings
also said cars should not be towed
when a day student parks in a staff
lot or when a staff member is park-
pay $25 to register your car, that's ed in a day lot, unless the owner has
just like paying $25 and saying go
ahead and tow my car. I've paid my
$25. Half the time up on College
Hill you won't even find a parking
place on weekends, much less dur-
ing the week.
more than three outstanding cita-
tions.
When asked what the procedure
would be if a freshman were to stall
in an undesignated area or under
any other unavoidable situation,
Campus Police Chief Francis Ed- Chief Eddings saidSometimes we
dings said, "It's done on a 'need to'
basis. Cars that have more than
three outstanding citations,
unregistered vehicles, and freshmen
who park in the dorm parking from
midnight Sunday to 5 p.m. Friday
Student Produces Show
The movie screen at Mendenhall
Student Center's Hendrix Theater
will come to life this Friday and
Saturday night at 7 and 9 p.m. when
the Student Union Films Committee
presents "Hooper Admission to
the film is by student ID, activity
card, or Mendenhall Student Center
Membership Card.
Burt Reynolds is joined again by
Sally Field in this tale of an aging
stuntman trying to remain at the top
of his field while holding on to a girl
who insists that he give it up.
Reynolds, of course, doesn't quit,
but sets out to prove that he can still
be the best in the business. A mighty
tall order when some sharp, young
competition (in the form of Jan-
Michael Vincent) appears to claim
the title.
The movie revolves around the
competition between the two during
the filming of what must be a non-
stop action movie. Robert Klein is
hilarious as the ego-maniacal direc-
tor who exhorts the two stuntmen to
engage in a series of "impossible"
tasks.
"Hooper" is directed by former
stuntman Hal Needham, who was
also between the smash hit
"Smokey and the Bandit But
given a chance to work in a movie
about the men of his former profes-
sion, Needham has outdone
"Smokey" in high-speed, slapstick
comedy.
Boxortice magazine commented,
"If stunting ever qualifies for a
regular Academy Award, 'Hooper'
would be a top contender And
they're right, the non-stop action se-
quences go hand-in-hand with
uproarious comedy to make
"Hooper" one of the best films of
1978.
Telerama A Success
Have you ever wondered what it
would be like to be a director, if
even for only a day or two?
Charlie Sherrod had that chance
last weekend. Sherrod worked with
WXII, channel 12 in Winston Salem
this weekend putting together the
1980 March of Dimes Telerama.
"This was the third consecutive
year that I worked with WXII-TV
and the Forsyth chapter of the
March of Dimes Sherrod said.
The Telerama was televised live
for 18 hours, though it only ap-
peared in the Greensboro and
Winston-Salem viewing areas.
Skip Stevenson, of NBS's "Real
People was one of the stars in the
production. Appearing with Steven-
son were Al Alberts of Philadelphia
and Lee Kirk, a singer from New
York.
"A telerama presents a unique
situation for a talent coordinator.
For 18 straight hours he must ar-
range the production acts, the inter-
views, and what will be necessary to
insure the telerama its continuity
said Sherrod.
An estimated $100,000 was raised
by the telerama.
Sherrod, a junior political science
major, has done some film and
television work prior to the
telerama. He was awarded the
Thomas Jefferson Film Award by
the producers of 69 Minutes, and he
placed third in the golden screens
awards for a film entitled "Laurie
Charlie Sherrod
get some shrewdies, but if it is
legitimate, we will work with the
student
Officers check up on these type of
situations and warn students not to
fake a breakdown of his vehicle
because the student doesn't feel like
walking from the freshman lot, Ed-
dings said.
He emphasized that the parking
guidleines were not set down by the
traffic department. Their job is only
to enforce the rules. "Some years
ago this system was originated by
the upperclassmen It was the
students' decision, so he asks that
students accept the consequences.
Towing companies utilized by the
ECU Traffic Department include
Union 76, Tenth and Evans streets,
Smith Amoco, Tenth and Evans
streets, Dunn's Body Shop, 2907 5th
St and University Exxon, 1101 5th
St.
The owner of the Union 76 was
could not be reached for comment.
Mrs. Dunn, owner of Dunn's body
shop, refused to comment on the
towing situation.
Kurt Smith, owner of the Amoco
station, has been in business with
the ECU traffic department for four
years. He said he tows all vehicles
the department asks him to tow.
When asked what he would do in
See LOOKING, Page 6, Col 5
Seventies Top Movies Chosen
Paul Newman
-The Life and Times of Judge Hoy Bean
��
By DAVID MILLER
Staff Writer
The 1970s was the decade of the sequel in popular
film � fish stories, Hardware Wars, disaster movies,
Bruce Lee Vs. Godzilla's Exorcist.
But a large number of original, highly entertaining
and insightful films were also made in the 70s. These are
the" ones with which this article is concerned.
In addition to listing my favorite movies of the past
decade, I talked to Terry Davis, author of thenovel Vi-
sion Quest, and Jim Shertzer, the film and record
reviewer for The Winston-Salem Journal and Sentinel. I
asked both Terry and Jim to list their fifteen favorite
popular films of the 70s. The following are those lists as
they were given to me.
Terry's List
Terry says of his choices, "I listed my first three
favorites as numbers 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The rest
are in no particular order
1. Smalt Change
2. Close Encounters of the Third Kind
3. Heaven Can Wait
4. Superman
5. Rocky
6. The Godfather
7. The Shootist
8. The Wild Bunch
9. M.A.S.H.
10. Jaws
11. Breaking A way
12. The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean
13. The Deerhunter
14. A Murmur of the Heart
15. Jesus Christ Superstar
Jim's List
Jim's favorites were given in alphabetical order,
chose sixteen, rather than fifteen, films.
1. Amarcord
2. American Graffiti
3. Badlands
4. Barry Lyndon
5. Cabaret
6. Close Encounters of the Third Kind
7. The Emigrants
8. The GodfatherGodfather 11
9. Five Easy Pieces
10. The Last Picture Show
11. Manhattan
12. McCabe and Mrs. Miller
13. Nashville
14. Pat ton �
15. Star Wars
16. Who'll Stop the Rain?
David's List
I chose to list eighteen films, and they are in the order
in which they occurred to me.
1. A Man Called Horse
2. Julia
3. Breaking Away
4. Flesh and Blood, Part I
5. Lies My Father Told Me
6. Hearts of the West
He 7. Kramer vs. Kramer
8. Enter the Dragon
9. Annie Hall
10. The GodfatherGodfather U
11. A Little Romance
12. Deliverance
13. Small Change
14. The Electric Horseman
15. Ohsessitm
16. They Might Be Giants
17. Fiw Easy Pieirs
18. Suftcnnan
���� T
) ,i wmMmmm mym � '��� � J-





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 31. 1980
Looking At Towing
lmiAfi fftm Dean A K t
Continued from Page 5
the case of an owner of the University Exx- not enough security,
returning to his vehicle on, said he charges half Another student,
while in the process of price in the same situa- Jimmy Thompson,
towing, he saidThey tion.
have a law on that. But one student in-
Once you have a chain terviewed claimed tha
hooked to it, the he witnessed tthe same
customer has to pay, or situation, but instead
either the way ECU is of taking a lesser ser-
hooked up, you have to vice charge, the towing
pay a minimum of five company refused and
or seven dollars for the towed the car anyway
said, "My car was tore
all to pieces down
there, so who wants to
park there and get it all
tore up His room-
freshman, and he
thought it weas one of
the times towing was
unreasonable, during
the day when parking
problems are not so
bad.
Towing and the
mate, Danny McClin- parking situation are
tock, said his car was major problems
towed twice. He is a
ECU, but work is being
done. New parking
areas will be opening
soon.
Rising registration
prices most aggravate
students; however, if
the construction ot
larger and better perk-
ing facilities continue,
maybe the high prices
we pay will make etise.
If You've Seen Three of These �� for thetowtrucks
service charge
He said that in this
type of situation, he
would take the five or
seven dollars.
Jackie James, owner
��
ART&CAMERA PLAZA CAMERA
World Record
Breaking Attempt
By ECU Student
526 S. Cotanche St.
Down Town
Pitt Plaza
Shopping Center
Many freshmen are
not satisfied with the
freshmen parking lots.
They claim that there is
much vandalism in
these areas and there is
SAAD'S SHOE
REPAIR
113 Grande Ave.
758-1228
Quality Shoe Repair
Riggan Shoe Repair
across St. bom
Blount Harvey
Downtown
III W. 4th St.
Parking in front and Rear
�4HHHHHHHHMHMMMMM
ARMY NAVY STORE
Backpacks. BM. Bomber

j Field. Deck, Fitqrit Snorkel �
Shoes. Combat Boots. Plus.
� lSOi S Evans Street aj

ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
117S 00 all inclusive
anc test turth con
frol ra procie� Dfi i -
d cotinsel'nq For turtfter
nforra' on call 832 0535
tree M��
800 221 2568 I Df ��� � �
AV SP.M ��� a � s
Raleigh Women s
Health Orqanijation
�17 West Morgan St
Raleigh N C 2603
THERE IS A
DIPFERENi
CEl
ECU students will at-
tempt to break the
world record in
marathon volleyball to
be held in Greenville at
7 p.m Jan. 31, in the
Elm Stree Gym.
Gary Baker and Jeff
Sutton will participate
in the event.
"Support from the
the thing Sutton said.
He participated in a
marathon tennis match
last year which suc-
cessfully broke the
world record in
event.
than 75 hours.
The event is open to
the public, and
everyone is invited.
Two teams of six
that players will be par-
ticipating in the event.
Ttf,M
X
oV
OUR
40th
FAMOUS PIZZA
50 OFF any Pizza with this Coupon
Offer expires Feb. 15. 1980
NOW SERVING YOUR FAVORITE GOLDEN BE ER AGE
PIZZA
Tomato & Cheese
The current record It is expected to end
for marathon volleyball Feb. 3. If play begins
is 70 hours, 33 minutes, on time, the record will
although the teams are be officially broken at
town gets you through expected to play more 5:34 p.m. on Sunday.
TEAM HANDBALL
EAST APPALACHIAN
CAROLINA VS. STATE
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KODACOLOR
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Outside NY State ONLY
CALL TOLL FREE
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HAIR DESIGNS
-0PEN-
M0NFRI.
OREDKENT
The ECU Media Board is
excepting applications for the
following positions:
1) Senior Editor of The East
Carolinian
2) Editor of the Buccaneer
3) Editor of the Rebel
4) Head Photographer for the
Photo Lab
5) General Manager of
WECU
6) Editor of the minority
publication
Deadline for applying is
February 15, 1980. Apply in
person at the East Carolinian
Office, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.
Applications must be full time
students with an overall GPA
of 2.0.
Presents
"Career Cuts"
A New Look In 1980 For Men And
Women. Career Cuts Offer A New,
Sharp. & Sophisticated Look.
Face Framing Colors Called Piping
Colors That Lift Your Own Color
A Couple Of Shades Applied To Give
You A Look Of Individuality
Five Stylists
Call 758-7570
103 EastbrookDr.
Manicures, Eyebrow Waxing,
Luminizing
Delicious Gift Packs are the sweetest wav
to say soniething good,
prices effective through Feb. 6, 1980
SMUCKER'S JAM CRATE
Decorative wooden crate with
three 6oz. jars of jam.
SMUCKER'S SIX PACK
r�48J2NOW$6.39
re.S7.57 NOW $6.59
Five 2oz. jars of preserves and one
I loz. Apple Butter.
SMUCKER'S JAM POT
Ceramic jam pot with lid. tour boz.
preserves and jellies
SMUCKER'S ALL WEEK SUNDAE SET
4 Sundae Glasses. 1 Ice Cream Scoop.
6 Sundae Toppings.
reg. $8.67 NOW $7.45
reg.$13.31 NOW$1l-25
JELLIES
Twelve 1 Ooz. Smuckers Jellies.
SMUCKER'S FRUIT SYRUP and CRUET
Ail natural syrups and two 12oz. bottles.
SMUCKER'S PRESERVES GIFT PACK
Eleven 12oz. Smucker's Preserves and
one II oz. Cider Apple Butter.
reg.$l 3.64 NOW $9.99
reg.$8.64 NOW $6.35
reg.$l 5.70 NOW $11.49
Qualify � Competitive Prices e Service
�11 Dickinson Av�. �th St. A Itemortai Dr.
TStJlfe TSS-mi





ew parking
ll be opening
registration
ki aggravate
however, it
iction ol
better perk
es continue,
U high prices
make � s-
n

s
i z,




ts


. '
�.

s
I
A Sb
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:�.
45
INONX $1 1.25
NOW 59.99
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
JANUARY 31. 1980 Page"?
To lOth-Ranked Pack
Lady Pirates Lose
Photo by KIP SLOAN
Rosie Thompson follows
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
Despite the 24 point effort of
junior point guard Laurie Sikes, the
East Carolina Lady Pirates suc-
cumbed to the N.C. State Wolfpack
81-76 Wednesday at Minges Col-
iseum.
The Lady Bucs came out gunning
in the first half, hitting the first
bucket of the night, but the taller
nationally lOth-ranked Pack
answered quickly.
The Division I NCAIAW match
was tied six times in the first eight
minutes of play, with the Wolfpack
jumping to their biggest lead of hte
first half, 37-30, with 3:20 before
halftime.
Many thought the East Carolina
crew had slumped and would fold,
the roar of the record 2,000 spec-
tators who turned out for Banner
Night inspired the Lady Bucs to hit
on the next three field goals for a
37-36 deficit at the 1:46 mark.
Sikes' 20-fot jumper with :26
before intermission set the margin at
40-38 going into the final stanza.
The 5-6 Marietta, Ga. native netted
14 of her total in the opening frame
on seven out of 10 attempts from
downtown Greenville.
NCSU senior forward Ronnie
Laughlin, who notched her 1,000th
career point late in the contest, con-
nected on a pair of field goals at the
open of the half to help her club bolt
to a 50-40 gap with less than five
minutes elapsed.
Lydia Rountree connected for
ECU and guard Connie Rogers con-
nected for State to maintain the 10
point margin.
At this point, the Sikes-Rountree-
Kathy Riley outside shooting exibi-
tion began.
Sikes connected on a pair of
15-footers followed by two from
Riley, a bomb from Rountree, and
yet another radar shot from Sikes to
cut the gap to 58-54 with 11:45 to
go.
East Carolina took advantage of
the boards with 10:37 to play, tapp-
ing four tries at the rim before Sikes
controlled the rebound and reset the
offense, inciting roars from the
spectators.
Sherry Lawson and Rogers con-
nected on the next three trips down
the floor for the Pack, spreading the
score to an appearantly comfortable
64-54 with just over eight minutes to
their 18th win against four losses
(including a perfect 4-0 in NCAIAW
action).
With 1:36 to play, Riley powered
her way down the baseline cutting
the margin to five. Sikes hit on a
20-footer, but Beth Fielden con-
nected on a pair of free throws to
nullify that effort.
Sikes, who stated before the game
she wasn't sure if she was mentally
prepared, popped from her favorite
spot again two pull the home team
to within reach at 77-74 with :56 to
the wire.
Lawson and freshman Angie
Armstrong stood poised at hte
charity stripe, sinking a pair each to
close out the scoring for the
Wolfpack. Marcia Girven, who net-
ted 10 points on the night hit the
final ECU bucket as the Lady
Pirates dropped to 15-7 on the
season.
Sikes led the East Carolina con-
tingent, while Riley contributed 20,
and Rountree added 19 with 10 re-
bounds.
All-American Genia Beasley led
the Pack with 25 points, and 11
caroms, while Lawson added 11 and
Laughlin and Beth Fielden 10 each.
East Carolina hosts Division II
power High Point Saturday at 7:30
in Minges Coliseum.
Kathy Riley goes for two
Hicks Gives
Scholarship
Face Titans Saturday
Pirates Travel To Detroit
B CHARLES CHANDLER
Sport. Editor
Former East Carolina football
star Eddie Hicks, now a member of
the NFL's New York Giants,
donated a scholarship to the ECU
athletic program this week.
"East Carolina gave me a great
opportunity said Hicks. "I just
want to do something to show my
gratitude
The former Pirate running back
said that he had placed the scholar-
ship in his name. "I wanted
something personalized like that
he said. "1 wanted the people here
to know that I appreciated
everything that East Carolina has
done for me
Fast Carolina 1 would not have had
that opportunity
Hicks said that the scholarship
could go to any eligible high school
athlete, male or female.
"I realize that to have a good pro-
gram, you've got to have money
Hicks reasoned. "I just hope my
donation will help out a little in
keeping the East Carolina program
as good as it is
Along with donating the stipend,
Hicks decided to join the Pirate
Club.
"I guess it's like being patriotic
he said. "I just want to support the
athletic program here as much as I
possibly can
Hicks' action was greeted by ECU
Athletic Director Bill Cain with
open arms. "I think this sets a I
tremendous precedent said Cain.
"It's a great thing for Eddie to do
and shows the character of the
young man
Hicks,a Henderson native, played
for the Pirates from 1975-78. When
he left after the '78 season, Hicks
was the fifth leading rusher in ECU
history, tallying 2,101 yards in his
four-year career.
Last season with the Giants, he
spent most of his time on the special
teams, as injuries hampered his
chances to see extended duty in the
backfield.
Hicks acknowledged that playing
pro football was a great thrill, but
added that he could not have made
it without a little help. "It's a great
opportunity for me to play in the
NFL said Hicks. "But without
Hicks during ECU
playing days
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Kditor
The East Carolina basketball
team comes off a week of rest after,
its big win over UNC-Wilmington
last week with a trip to Detroit for a
Saturday night matchup, one that
Pirate coach Dave Odom sees as a
real physical battle.
"Detroit has the second or third
best starting five that we've seen
Odom said. "They rank just behind
Duke and North Carolina State.
"They're just very, very-
talented he continued. "1 watch-
ed them on film today and was
shocked at how good they are
against the man-to-man defense. I
just didn't realize how very efficient
they are offensively
The Titans success agamst the
man-to-man concerns Odom
because the Pirates have of late been
using that defense almost entirely.
"We've really been executing well
in it lately he said. "We did a
great job against Wilmington
Does Odom plan to stick with his
defensive plan of the past or does he
have a new idea up his sleeve. "It
would be hard for us to play a
zoneclaimed the first-year Pirate
coach. "We've worked on the man
so much that we're way ahead in
that area. But, of course, you have
to be aware of the run-and-jump
game that they play
On. the surface the Titans, 6-9,
would seem to be playing below the
level that won them 72 games in the
previous three seasons. Odom feels
this is not the case.
"Heck, just look at their
schedule he proclaimed.
"They're playing one of the
toughest in the nation
ECU's Herb Krusen carries 12.7 average to Detroit
needs nine points to eclipse 1,000 career mark
Indeed, a look at the De roit
schedule reveals that the Titans have
already faced third-ranked
Syracuse, llth-ranked North
Carolina, Michigan, defending na-
tional champ Michigan State, Il-
linois State and Iowa.
"They did a super job at Syracuse
last week said Odom of the
Titans' narrow 89-83 loss. "And
Syracuse hasn't lost at home in
about three years
Leading the way for the Titans is
6-9 senior center Earl Cureton, a
future NBA draftee last season who
averages 18.1 points and 8.9 re-
bounds per game.
"Cureton's a super ballplayer
said Odom. "He's the second best
center we've seen next to Gminski
(of Duke). He was drafted last year
but I don't think he'll sign before
this year's draft. His stock has really
risen. If he waits, he'll go in the
first round
Three other players are also
averaging in double Figures for
Detroit. Playmaker Wilbert Mc-
Cormick averages 13.9, while his
running mate at guard, Dave Niles
tallies 10.5.
Sophomore forward Jerry Davis,
who Odom calls "one of the best
high school seniors in the nation two
years ago averages
13.5 and is the team's second
leading rebounder with a 6.1
average.
Also in the Titan starting lineup is
6-8 power forward Joe Kopicki,
who along with Davis and Cureton
give Detroit a very physical squad
underneath.
"Rebounding will be crucial
said Odom with a grimace. "We
can't afford not to block out
Leading the way for the l7
Pirates is guard George May nor.
who averages 15 points per game.
Herb Krusen tallies 12 and for-
ward Herb Gray 10.9.
Odom noted that the Pirates had
no plans for a slow-down against
the strong and speedy Titans.
"We're gonna go he said.
"Maybe we can wear them down.
Their depth is not quite a good as
ours
"We're playing together real well
right now. But they are too. It
should be a good one "
Track Coach Carson Gets Lot Out Of A Little
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports r.ditor
Though it may be a little-known
fact, 2ast Carolina track coach has
done something drastic in an effort
to keep the Pirate program in the
national limelight.
Short on funds (the track team is
alloted only $13,000 annually for
recruiting) Carson decided a couple
of years ago to build a team of
sprinters.
"We're an independent school
Carson said, "so we don't have to
worry about conference ties. We
don't have to have an overall track
team
So, Carson reasoned, he'd build a
team of specialists. "We decided we
could do more with quality than
quantity said Carson. "If you
can really excel in a certain area.
you can get much more publicity
and acclaim. There's no doubt that
East Carolina gets more out of the
track team this way
Carson's plan has been a boom-
ing success. Currently, the Pirate
indoor mile-relay team is one of the
top ten in the nation. Members of
the team include Carlton Bell, All-
American Otis Melvin, Shawn
Leney and Stan Curry.
The latest in a long line of
achievments for this group includes
finishing first in the prestigious
Vitalis Olympic Invitational two
weeks ago. The Vitalis meet drew a
crowd of over 15,000 spectators and
was telecast nationwide.
"They (TV) showed about
everything but our win said Car-
son. "I don't know what happened.
I waited and waited for it
Despite the fact that the Pirates
were left off the tube, the win at
Vitalis drew raves from all over.
"By winning Carson noted, "we
were invited to several very
prestigious events. It meant more to
East Carolina than anything we
could have done
Also excelling under Carson's
Miller
new system is Bill Miller, who won
both the half mile and mile in the
Pitt Invitational earlier this season.
"It's really amazing that Bill won
both said Carson, "because he
ran the half first and then the mile.
Usually you run the speed race
last
"1 surprised when he told me that
he would run both claimed Car-
son, "and was really shocked when
he won both. It just indicates that
Bill can qualify for the nationals if
he gets himself together
Miller was not the only successful
Pirate at the Pitt meet. Otis Melvin
won the quarter-mile with a time of
49.4 seconds. Carlton Bell finished
third in the same event with a 49.8
clocking.
Stan Curry won the 600 meters
with a time of 1:10.9, the second
best clocking in the meet's history.
ECU's Danny Scott and Shawn
Leney placed third and fourth in the
same event, respectively.
During the course of the season
ECU has downed such powers as
Tennessee, Maryland, Villanova,
Seton Hall, Florida. Georgia and
Auburn in their specialized events.
Such success could not have been
possible had Carson not made his
adjustment a few seasons ago.
"Whereas I used to give 30 kids
$400 each he explained, "I now
give $800 to 15 kids. I go out and try
to get the best at what we run
The number of events the Pirates
compete in will be reduced even
more in the future says Carson.
"Next year we will have no field
events or distance running
Essentially what Carson has done
is make the best out of a bad situa-
tion.
"I'm not complaining he said.
"You can't cry about a thing like
your budget. But you must stay
within the limits of it.
"What we've done Carson con-
tinued, "is keep ihc pruraw
viable





State Downs Tankers
By JIMMY DtiPREE
Assistant Sports Kditur
East Carolina's men
and women swimmers
72-41 and 82-56 losses
Tuesday evening in
Minges natatorium
would seem like
crushing margins, but
when the competition is
provided by the na-
tionally ranked
Wolfpack of N.C.
State, the results could
have well been worse.
The encouraging
note of the meet for the
I ady Pirates came
from eight national
qualifying times being
met.
Carol Shacklett led
the way for the lady
Bucs, meeting four na-
tional cutoffs including
a pair of relay entries.
Although finishing
third in the running,
the 200 medley relay
team of Shacklett,
Tammy Putnam, Beth
Reen and Cindy Sailor
met national time with
1:56.37.
Putnam, a freshman
standout, added two
other national times to
her already impressive
string. She set a new
varsity record with a
first place in the 200 in-
dividual medley with a
2:13.64 effort.
Putnam also claimed
first and national time
in the 100 backstroke
with a 1:03.63 effort.
Susan Hanks' third
place finishes in the 200
freestyle (2:00.76) and
500 free (5:19.83) gave
her a pair of national
times.
The Sailor,
Shacklett, Lauren
Grimes, Lori Ross unit
sprinted to first in the
200 free relay with a na-
tional time of 1:42.14.
"The girls did super
against the seventh-
ranked team in the na-
tion, considering we are
only classified as Divi-
sion II said ECU
coach Ray Scharf.
The men actually led
NCSU going into the
one-meter diving event,
but again the absence
of a skilled boardman
cost valuable points.
The 400 medley relay
group of Mark
Richards, Kelly
Hopkins, Jack Clowar
and Bill Fehling opened
the match strong for
the Pirates, taking first
with a time of 3:29.82.
State came back to
tie the match at 8-8
after the 1000 freestyle.
Ted Nieman's 1:40.53
first in the 200 free put
the Bucs back out
front, with Fehling's
:21.63 first in the 50
free padding the
margin.
State trimmed the
lead to one after the
200 individual medley
and then took com-
mand with a sweep in
the diving.
Only Hopkins
managed another first
for the Pirates, that be-
ing in the 200
breaststroke with a
time of 2:09.30.
Other top perfor-
mances for ECU in-
cluded; 100 free-
Fehling :47.76 (2nd),
500 free-T. Nieman
4:37.75 (2nd) and 400
free relay-Clowar,
Scott Rawl, Mike
Triau, T. Nieman
3:09.65 (2nd).
"If we had swum
faster in a few events
which I thought we
could have, then we
would of had a shot at
them related Scharf.
"They're a real strong
team�nationally rank-
ed. It's nothing to be
ashamed of, but
nothing to sit back and
be proud of.
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 1, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 01, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.35
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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