The East Carolinian, January 10, 1980






concert, Court Action Pending Against Former
liay ciash Officer In Greenville Marijuana Case
I
v.Rll NxBOROAP) A concert
promoter ms he "leaning
toward" holding a concert in the
eciiofo c otiseum the same day
ot an anii-ku Klu Klan march to
the facilit)
Lawrence Toller, promoter for
the Danville, Vabased Anew Pro-
ductions, says he's considering
whether or not to cancel the concert.
The Feb. 2 Mobilization Commit-
tee is planning to hold the march
from downtown Greensboro to the
coliseum on Feb. 2. The group was
denied a parade permit Monday
because City Manager Tom
Osborne said Toller's option on the
coliseum kept him from issuing the
permit.
Toller said he'll meet today with
Lucius Walker of the International
Foundation for Community
Organizing, one of the groups wan-
ting to hold the rally.
A spokesman for the Southern
Christian Leadership Conference
says the group is considering
withdrawing support for the rally
because of insufficient community
support.
The march was scheduled in the
wake of the shooting deaths of five
Communist demonstrators at a
"Death to the Klan" rally last Nov.
3 in Greensboro.
In related developments:
The U.S. Civil Rights Commis-
sion has concluded that southern
regional director Bobby Doctor
acted "within his bounds" when he
remarked that the Nov. 3 shootings
sent Greensboro's race relations in-
to a tailspin.
Rep. Richardson Preyer, D-N.C,
had asked the commission to in-
vestigate the comments.
Guilford County District At-
torney Michael Schlosser says he'll
seek a delay in the trials of the 14
men charged in connection with the
shootings. He says the postpone-
ment is needed because the FBI is in
control of most of the physical
evidence in the case.
Inside Today
Job Prospect BrighterP�ge3
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In Defense Of Star TrekPage
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Court Action Is Schedule
.for former city policeman
Computer Aids Paper
Court
Upholds
Ruling
RALEIGH (AP)�The state
Court of Appeals has upheld a rul-
ing by a Wake County Superior
Court Judge that dismissed a con-
stitutional challenge to North
Carolina's liquor-byhe-drink law.
The Court of Appeals found
Tuesday that the case was properly
dismissed on all grounds but one '
the court found the judge erred in
addressing the constitutionality of
the law in ruling on the motion to
dismiss.
The appeals court didn't make
any finding on the 1978 law's con-
stitutionality. The law allows com-
munities with ABC systems to hold
lcal referendums on mixed-drink
sales.
Four persons had filed the suit
last January against the state Board
of Alcoholic Control, the state at-
torney general and others. It asked
the law be declared unconstitu-
tional.
Judge James H. Pou Bailey
dismissed the case last March. He
concluded the plaintiffs had no legal
standing to sue in the matter. The
appeals court said that to have stan-
ding, the four would have had to
show that the law would invade
their legally protected interests and
would cause them immediate harm.
But the appeals court ruled that it
was improper to decide the constitu-
tionality of the law in ruling on a
motion to dismiss.
Today's issue of The East Caroli-
nian is the first to be produced with
the aid of a new computer system
which makes us the "best equipped
college newspaper in the state in
the words of Senior Editor Marc
Barnes.
The $30,000 system has made the
typewriter almost obsolete in The
East Carolinian newsroom. In the
past, staff employees had to type
their stories before giving them to
the typesetter to be processed into
print. With the new system, stories
may be typed directly into video
display screens and edited elec-
tronically before going into the
typesetting process, which is now
done automatically by a central
computer.
According to Barnes, The East
Carolinian's video display terminals
are state-of-the-art print media tools
which are becoming indispensible to
modern newspapers. The new
system was specifically designed for
use by small newspapers, although
systems like it are used by all major
newspapers in North Carolina, said
Barnes.
The equipment consists of three
video display terminals, a wire
recorder that encodes Associated
Press copy for later retrieval, and a
�� V yS i.
' � ,
:����
�gaaj
central computer which processes
the stories into reproducabk print.
Manufactured by the Com-
pugraphic Corp. of Decatur. Ga
the equipment represents a major
step upward from the previous pro-
duction facilities which were intend-
ed for educational use in high school
graphic arts classes.
Barnes noted that the funds for
the purchase of the system will be
drawn exclusively from The East
Carolinian's advertising revenues.
The $30,000 price tag also included
training sessions for the
newspaper's staff and all installa-
tion charges.
The capabilities of the new equip-
ment have also made possible cer-
tain changes in the paper's layout
style, notably in the design of the
paper's name, in a more readable
typeface, and in the flexibility in
choosing type sizes and styles.
Barnes said that there were also
other advantages in the equip-
ment. "This newspaper exists for
basically two reasons-first of all to
inform the students and faculty of
the university. Its other function is
to teach students the essential skills
of journalism. Systems like the one
we are using now are becoming
practically indispensible to modern
commercial newspapers, and
students who learn their way around
this kind of equipment will have an
advantage over those who do not
Photo by JILL ADAMS
Compugraphic VDT's
awaiting eager newspaper staff
Scanner Will Aid Diagnoses
By DOUG HINSON
ECU Medical Writer
A fast, safe and painless pro-
cedure that provides detailed
diagnostic information and reduces
the need for exploratory surgery is
now available at Pitt County
Memorial Hospital in conjunction
with the East Carolina School of
Medicine.
The computed tomographic scan-
ner, or CT scanner, is a
sophisticated device which produces
cross-sectional images of the body
to detect diseases, tumors, blood
vessl damage and other disorders.
The CT scanner not onlt produces
detailed pictures of organs but
replaces many painful and risky
diagnostic methods previously used,
according to Dr. William Trought,
ECU clinical assistant professor of
radiology.
"Ordinary x-rays give us only
two-dimensional view and do not
reproduce subtle variations in tissue
density said Trought. in some
cases, a lesion may be hidden or
overshadowed by another struc-
ture
"But with a CT scanner, we're
able to get marvel ously precise pic-
tures of internal organs. They are
highly accurate and efficient, and
the noninvasive technique makes it
more attractive to patients because
there is no pain.
One risky and painful test which
the CT scanner eliminates in some
cases is the pneumoencephalogram,
and x-ray mehtod in which cerebral
spinal fluid is replaced with air to
provide contrast density.
The procedure, which employs
principles from physics,
mathematics and computer science,
takes less than an hour to perform,
with the actual scanning process
lasting only five to 10 seconds. A cir-
cular scanner that sends and detects
x-ray beams revolves around the
body and takes multiple "looks" at
the anatomy from 270 angles.
The information r transmitted to
a computer which integrates the
data and reproduces it a? a picture
or "slice" of the area. The image is
usually very clear.
"It's very much like getting a pic-
ture from Mars said Trought.
"The computer is the key. It deter-
mines a math formula, then solves it
and puts it on a screen similar to
television
According to Trought, the CT
scanner is particularly useful for
diagnosing brain abnormalities. It
can accurately identify and locate
tumors, blood clots and birth
defects. Such accuracy is important
because symptoms of some diseases
are the same, but treatment is dif-
ferent.
Trought noted that because of its
fast efficiency, the scanner is ex-
tremely valuable in emergencies.
The CT scanner may pay off in
other ways -too. "I think it's impor-
tant for ECU and Wtt Hospital to
have the newest and most modem
radioiogk methods available
Trought say.
By JFRRY ALLEGOOD
The following article is reprinted
from the Raleigh Sews and
Observer, Jfea. 0, !9�n
Five men convicted in an attempt
to sell 8,500 pounds of marijuana in
Pitt County last summer hae
received prison terms, but action is
still pending against a former
Greenville police officer and four
others in the case.
Superior Court Judge Henry L.
Stevens III on Monday imposed
fines and prison terms ranging from
three months to two years on the
out-of-state defendants who plead-
ed guilty to possessing or conspiracy
to possess with intent to distribute
the controlled substance.
The marijuana was seized on July
23 on property owned by Douglas
H. Ross, a sargeant with the Green-
ville Police Department who was
suspended after his arrest. Ross,
who is planning to take a lie detector
test, was hospitalized recently with
circulatory illness, court officials
said.
The five sentenced by Stevens had
pleaded in Pitt County on Oct. 18.
Stevens ordered the arrest and
forfeiture of $60,000 bond for a
sixth defendant who had pleaded in
October. Manuel A. Garcia of
Miami, Fladid not appear for
sentencing.
In addition to Ross and Garcia,
charges are pending against Ross's
wife Marga and his sister-in-law,
Louise Johnson Whitehurst of
Winterville. Conspiracy charges
were dismissed against two others.
Assistant District Attorney
Thomas Haigwood said Ross pro-
bably would be tried within the next
30 days and Mrs. Whitehurst, who
has pleaded guilty to one charge,
will be sentenced later.
State, federal and local law en-
forcement officers arrested eight
people in a raid on Ross's land near
Greenville as more than 150 bales of
marijuana were being moved from a
rental truck to a trailer. The mari-
juana was valued at $3.5 million.
Ross and his wife were arrested
several days after the raid. Defense
attorneys have asked the court to
suppress evidence gained during a
search of the premises because they
contend that the search was illegal.
According to a search warrant
issued prior so the raid, Ross was
linked to the operation by a con-
fidential source.
The applies: icn fcr the A2rr.?�.
prepared by SBI Agent J 1
Wilson, vaid federal and slate of-
ficers had observed other defen-
dants in the case on Ross's propem
before the raid.
The search warrant said a special
agent of the U.S. Drug Enforcement
Administration identified one of the
defendants, Armando Abreu, as a
principal in at least 33 separate drug
investigations involving felony
violations.
"The confidential source stated
that Abreu is closely associated with
and is receiving inside information
and protection from a sargeant who
is on a police force in or around
Greenville and that Abreu is also
associated with the wife of this of-
ficer the application said.
The application further said that
Abreu was in the Greenville area to
distribute about seven tons of mari-
juana, most of which was stored "in
a building on the premises of the
police sargeant who is providing the
protection It also said agents
observed Abreu and associates
opening doors of a truck body or
outbuilding located behind Ross's
residence.
Ross's attorney, Milton C.
Williamson, argued in a pretrial mo-
tion that the search was illegal
because the warrant did not specify
the buildings that were searched, the
reliability of the source was not
known and because electronic
surveillance allegedly was used.
Abreu, 35, received a two-year
prison term and $10,000 fine for his
involvement.
Other defendants and their
sentences included Daniel Lee Cui-
nand,23, of Homestead, Fla a
five-year split sentence with three
months active and the remainder
probation and $5,000 fine; James
Robert Bohanon, 42, of
Camelsville, Ky a five-year split
sentence with four months active
and the remainder probation and
$5,000 fine.
ECU Professor Dies
During Holidays
An associate professor in political
science at ECU died of leukemia
over the holidays.
Dr. Oral E. Parks, 48, was a
member of the ECU staff for the
past 11 years.
Dr. Parks died in Duke University
Hospital on December 30. His death
came as a shock to his colleagues.
"His death was very tragic and
very sudden. He had been suffering
from leukemia for five years, but no
one in the department knew about
it said Dr. Tinsley E. Yar-
borough, chairman of the political
science department.
"I suppose he wanted to keep it
within the family at least in part so
that people wouldn't treat him any
differently said Yarborough.
Dr. Parks was born in Draw,
Texas and earned his bachelor's
degree from Texas Technological
College in 1957. A Fulbright scholat
in the Phillipines during 1959-60,
Dr. Parks went on to receive his
master's in 1960 and his doctorate in
1972 from Michigan State Universi-
ty.
Dr. Parks joined the staff here in
1968 as an assistant professor. His
specialty was in party systems and
political methodology.
An officer in the North Carolina
Political Science Association, Dr.
Parks also served as editor of that
organization's journal. He was also
a member of the American Political
Science Association.
Dr. Parks is survived by his wife,
Helen, and a son. A memorial ser-
vice was held on January 2 in Green-
ville.
As was his bequest, Dr. Parks'
body was cremated and his ashes
spread over the Teton Mountains, a
part of the Rockies which ranges
between Idaho and Wyoming.
1$ ra&rog HeW T oosy
J� Wright Auditorium
I
V





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 10, '980
ECU Manuscript Collection
Receives Family Letters
The personal papers of
the only father and son to
serve as lieutenant gover-
nors of North Carolina
have been donated to the
East Carolina Manuscript
Collection in J.Y. Joyner
Iibrary.
H. Pat Taylor Jr a
prominent Wadesboro at-
torney, served as lieute-
nant governor from 1969
until " 1973. His father
Hoyt Patrick Taylor Sr.
held the office from 1949
until 1953. ECU has.
received more than 20,000
items of personal cor-
respondence, speeches,
reports, political cam-
paign files, clippings,
photographs and other
materials reflecting the
public affairs of the
Tavlors between 1918 and
1973.
NAACP
Charges
Brutality
GREENVIl LE(AP)�The Pitt County branch of the
NAACP has written state officials to complain about
the Pitt County Sheriffs Department's "blatant police
brutality' against blacks.
D D Garrett, president of the Pitt County branch of
the National Association for the Advancement of Col-
ored People, complained about the problem in letters to
state community relations officials, the news media and
Sheriff Ralph Tyson.
Garrett cited one incident in which he said a sheriff s
deputy struck Julius Wright of Greenville in the mouth
with a flashlight without provocation. Garrett said the
deputy was questioning Wright in connection with a
stolen property investigation.
Tyson declined to discuss the incident because of pen-
dine court actions.
Wright was charged with possession of stolen proper-
tv Nov 29 but the charge was voluntarily dismissed
D. 13. After a warrant was issued Nov. 29, Wright
was convicted of resisting arrest.
The warrant said Deputy Lee Pascasio was trying to
arrest Wright for possession of stolen property but that
he resisted "by swinging a wooden chair at the otiicer.
Wright was sentenced to two years on probation but
he has appealed the conviction to Superior Court.
Garrett also said that Stanley Daniels was injured by-
officers seeking information. Daniels is scheduled to go
on trial in Pitt County Superior Court on charges ot
breaking and entering and receiving stolen goods.
According to Manu-
script Collection Director
Don Lennon, "The
Taylor papers constitute
two extremely important
state political collections.
ECU is extremely for-
tunate to receive these
significant research
materials which will be in-
valuable to anyone study-
ing state government and
state politics between 1936
and 1973
Taylor Sr. (1890-1964)
served as an offficer with
the 371st Infantry in
France during World War
I. As a result of personal
heroism in combat, he was
awarded the Purple Heart,
the Silver Star and a cita-
tion from General John
J.Pershing. Taylor later
served in the N.C. General
Assembly (1937-1944) and
held prominent positions
such as legislative assis-
tant to the governor (1945)
and chairman of the
Senate Finance (1939) and
Appropriations (1945)
committees.
Taylor Jr. was a Marine
Corps officer before and
during the Korean War.
He subsequently practiced
law in Wadesboro and
served in the General
Assembly for a decade
before being elected
Speaker of the House in
1965.
He was elected lieute-
nant governor in 1968, 20
years after his father.
Robert W. Scott, whose
father had been governor
during Taylor Srs term,
was elected governor in
1968.
The collections will be
properly arranged and
described for research
purposes. They will be
housed with other
manuscript holdings in
Joyner Library. The ECU
Manuscript Collection is
open to the public Mon-
day through Friday from 8
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 10. 1990 3
A Maturing Work Force Comes Of Age
By ROBERT REINHOLD
Reprinted from The New York Times National
Economic Survey, Jan. 6, 1980.
Odd as it may seem after so many years of having to
cope with unemployment, the next decade is likely to
mark the beginning of a major labor shortage for
American business and industry. Because of a continu-
ing decline in the birth rate that began with the "birth
dearth" of the 1960's, fewer people will enter the labor
force in the I980's than did over the last 20 years when
the post-war baby boom generation matured and swell-
ed the ranks of workers.
With fewer young people going to work, the
American labor force will increasingly be dominated by
older workers, a reversal of historic trends. By 1990, ac-
cording to Labor Department projections, the number
of workers between 25 and 54 years of age will swell to
83 million, a 40 percent increase over the 1977 figure.
This will mean that there will be a surplus of skilled
older workers in the 1980's, limiting the opportunities
for promotion and movement at the top end of the labor
scale.
Adding to that trend will be the impact of the 1978
law that pushed the mandatory retirement age from 65
to 70 years old. Faced with the growing difficulty of try-
ing to live on fixed incomes in the age of steep inflation,
many older workers may be forced to stay on the job
longer, further clogging a system already top-heavy with
older workers.
The decline in the number of young people entering
the job market will presumably open up more oppor-
tunities for women and minority groups. It will also
create a shortage of workers to take lesser-skilled jobs,
the kind that young people 16 to 24 years of age usually
help to fill. This could spur further immigration, both
legal and illegal, from Latin America and the Carib-
bean.
It could also solve the problem of teen-age unemploy-
ment better than the most massive of government pro-
grams. But the birth rate of blacks has not fallen nearly
as fast as that of whites, meaning that the number of
black teen-agers looking for work will not decrease
substantially for many years. And even if suitable jobs
are available, black youngsters often do not live where
the jobs are likely to be.
This period of change for the American workforce in
the 1980's will follow a decade in which even more
radical upheavals took place: Women, freed from the
burden of large families and impelled by the rising cost
of living, took paying jobs in massive numbers in the
1970's. Additionally, blacks and other members of
minority groups made greater strides in obtaining skill-
ed well-paying jobs than in any comparable period.
Women took more than 60 percent of the increased
number of jobs generated over the decade, and today
half of all women over 16 years old hold jobs. In addi-
tion, about six of every 10 women with school-age
children and four of every 10 with preschool youngsters
are working. Women now bring in on an average about
30 percent of family income where there are two work-
ing spouses. This has helped considerably in the fight to
maintain standards of living in the face of inflation.
The huge infusion of women helped raise the nation's
total labor pool to more than 100 million in May 1978, a
20 percent rate of growth in a decade during which the
population grew by only about 8 percent. Unfortunate-
ly, there were not enough jobs for everyone in the 1970's
and unemployment became a chonic problem.
Moreover, new female workers, who entered the market
relatively unskilled, were competing for the same kinds
of jobs normally taken by minority-group teenagers.
Thus the unemployment rate among black male teen-
agers grew from 28 percent in 1970 to about 40 percent
today. This occurred even as the proportion of
employed black adults working in white-collar, profes-
sional and managerial jobs increased markedly, sug-
gesting that the gap between successful and unsuccessful
blacks is widening.
Most experts do not expect women to continue enter-
ing the labor market at the high rate of the 1970's. But
Ralph E. Smith of the Urban Institute, estimated that 52
million women will be working or looking for jobs by
1990, about 10 million more than are doing so today.
Currently, more than 40 percent of the American
workforce is female, and that share is projected to rise
to 45 percent by 1990. However, a major question for
the coming decade will be whether women can break out
of the traditional "female" jobs in which they still
predominate and whether they will reach pay parity with
males when today their salaries average only 60 percent
that of men.
Russians Threaten Veto
UNITED NATIONS
(AP)�The United States
was successful in its drive
to arraign the Soviet
Union before the General
Assembly for its military
intervention in
Afghanistan, but the Rus-
sians announced that they
would veto any resolution
in the Security Council
calling for sanctions
against Iran.
With Security Council
action on Afghanistan
blocked by the Soviet
veto, the council adopted
a resolution Wednesday
night asking for an
emergency session of the
152-nation assembly to
deal with the situation in
the Central Asian nation.
Secretary-General Kurt
Waldheim announced that
the assembly, which ended
its regular 1979 session on
Monday, would meet at 3
p.m. EST today.
The emergency session
is expected to last several
days, and the debate is ex-
pected to be a replay of
the debate in the Security
Council last weekend,
with most of the members
attacking the Soviet action
in Afghanistan and the
Soviet Union and its com-
munist allies defending it.
The United States and
its allies were reported
confident that they could
muster the two-thirds ma-
jority necessary for adop-
tion of the resolution
Scott's Funds
Trail Hunt 9s
RALEIGH(AP)�For-
mer Gov. Bob Scott's
campaign for governor
has raised approximately
one-twelfth the amount of
Gov. Jim Hunt's re-
election campaign, but
Scott says he's just started
money-raising efforts.
In its annual financial
report filed with the state
Elections Board on Tues-
day, Scott's committee
showed it has collected
$57,103.11 in contribu-
tions and has spent more
than $31,000.
Hunt's re-election cam-
paign reported raising
$707,937.99.
Scott's report shows
that more than 21 persons
have contributed $1,000
or more each to the cam-
paign. The list of con-
tributions includes $1,500
from Scott's wife, Jessie
Rae, and contributions of
$250 to $300 from each of
his four children.
The former governor
said Monday he hopes to
raise $250,000 before the
May 6 Democratic
primary.
"Jim Hunt has the
ability to raise large
amounts of money simply
because he is the incum-
bent said Julian Mann,
Scott's campaign
manager. "We've only
held one fund-raiser to
: date, and most of the
! money has come un-
solicited from old Scott
' allies
Scott said he is confi-
dent enough money can be
raised to "put on a credi-
ble campaign
"He (Scott) has said we
could run a viable cam-
paign on $250,000, and I
think we can said
Bryant Haskins, Scott's
press secretary. "We will
just have to spend our
money wisely
Hunt's report showed
his committee has spent
$238,000 and has put
$450,000 in high interest-
bearing savings cer-
tificates.
Republican state Sen. I.
Beverly Lake Jr. of
Raleigh reported raising
$65,375.50 for his guber-
natorial campaign.
Another candidate for
governor, Republican
Charles J. Carstens Jr
reported that he has
received $50 in contribu-
tions.
vetoed by the Soviet
Union in the Security
Council. The big-power
veto does not apply in the
assembly, but adoption of
the resolution will have
only moral and propagan-
da value since the
assembly has no power to
order punitive action.
The resolution deplored
the armed intervention in
Afghanistan and called
for the withdrawal of all
foreign forces.
The opponents of the
Soviet action took their
case to the General
Assembly under a pro-
cedure established in 1950
to deal with situations in
which a veto prevented the
Security Council from
taking action to preserve
or restore peace.
The resolution asking
for the assembly session
was submittted by the
Philippines and Mexico,
and the vote in ?kw
15-nation council "was
12-2, with the Soviet
Union and East Germany
voting no and Zambia
abstaining.
The council vote Mon-
day on the resolution call-
ing for withdrawal of the
Soviet troops had been
13-2, with Zambia voting
with the majority. But
that was an issue of
substance on which the
negative Soviet vote
counted as a veto, while
the resolution to go to the
General Assembly was a
procedural matter exempt
from the veto of the five
permanent council
members ' the United
States, the Soviet Union,
Britain, France and
China.
Meanwhile, Tass, the
official Soviet news agen-
cy, announced that U.S.
plans to get the Security
Council to vote sanctions
against Iran were doomed
to defeat.
"As regards the USSR,
it will not tolerate any in-
terference from the out-
side in the internal affairs
oTTran, ana win not allow
the United States to im-
pose a decision to apply
economic sanctions
against it said Tass.
MARCH OF DIMES 1980 National
Poster Child Betsy Burch repre-
sents more than 250,000 babies
born annually with birth defects.
Betsy, 6, from Stone Mountain,
Ga was born with webbed fingers
and a malformed right leg. She
has had 14 operations to correct
both problems.
Support The
Diamonds for Any
and All Occasions
(Lose or Mounted)
Complete Line of Quality Jewelry
14kt Gold, Sterling Silver,
and Gold-filled Chain
-Sold by the inch-
J.O. Pollack Fraternity
and Sorority Jewelry
March
Of Dimes
WE PAY CASH FOR
GOLD and DIAMONDS
IN STORE SERVICE
758-2452
Floyd G. Robinson
Jewelers
407 Evans Mall
Floyd G. Robinson
Vafarie Hawis
Downtown, Greenville
Mike Robinson
Rhonda Marsh
Your Independent Local Jewelers
STOP RUBELLA and other messages about prevention of birth defects
are circulated by members of Future Homemakers of America (FHA).
Blindness, deafness and other birth defects caused by rubfilla can be
prevented if the rubella vaccine is given maximum use
DAIRY CUP

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SI?e iEaat (Earolinimt
Serving the campus community for 54 years.
Marc Barnes, semorEduor
Diane Henderson, Managing Editor
Richard Green, copvEdnor
Anita Lancaster, production Manager
Terry Gray, , u�
ROBERT M. SvVAIM, Director of Advertising
STEVE CGEARY, Business Manager
Charles Chandler, sponsEduor
KAREN WENDT. Features Editor

r�
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THURSDAY, JANUARY 10. 1980
PAGE 4
This Newspaper's Opinion
The Angry Bear
p
Rarely has a world started out a
new year, and a new decade with so
many things wrong in the world.
American hostages are still being
held in the American embassy in
Tehran, and the situation in
Afghanistan worsens before our
eyes each night on the six o'clock
news.
For the first time since 1945,
Soviet troops, which some estimates
places as high as 100,000 blatantly
walked across the Afgan borders to
install a puppet ruler into power. It
was the first time since World War
II that Soviet armies have been used
to dictate the Kremlin's will on a
foreign country that was not
previously under Soviet control.
Immediately, President Carter ac-
cused Soviet Communist Party
Chief Leonid Breshnev of making
the false statement that Afgan
laders had invited the Russian army
into the country. In turn, the Soviet
state controlled press establishment
said that Carter's comments were
"bellicose and wicked
Carter then went into a week of
consultation with his top aides. An
unprecedented Carter administra-
tion move saw the American
diplomat recalled from Moscow �
a move that some saw as a growing
indication of a new American
toughness in that troubled region of
the world.
President Carter, in one of his
toughest speeches yet on national
television decide to cancel remain-
ing Soviet fishing privileges and
cultural exchanges brought strong
protest from the Soviets.
Yet, what other options did
Carter have? He could not have
launched a massive military attack,
because this would have only started
World War III. He could not have
ordered troops into the bordering
countries of Pakistan and Iran,
bcause of how his actions would
have been seen by the Soviets.
The Solutions
The only solution we can forsee is
for the United States to hold off, if
possible, further Soviet intervention
in the Middle East until we can
develop technology to free ourselves
of foreign oil. We have for too long
been at the mercy of foreign powers
who hold the pursestrings to our
economy � pursestrings which, if
pulled too hard, will wreck the
economy of the United States,
Japan, and the countries of eastern
Europe.
Invasion Of Privacy
It has long been a common prac-
tice at ECU for fraternities,
sororities, student government and
numerous other student organiza-
tions to ask the administration to
verify whether their members have a
minimum gradepoint average of
2.0.
Normally, a list of names or I.D.
numbers are submitted with the
question: Do these people have a
2.0 or does this person have a 2.0?
That is why Congress passed the
Family Educational Rights and
Privacy Act of 1974.
The major thrust of this law is to
prevent administrators for revealing
a students grades to a third party.
More often than not the un-
suspecting student does not even
know that his grade point average
has been somewhat revealed.
The law is very specific in stating
that administrators and faculty
members may have access to a
I
Washington Merry-Go-Round
ino
Pop's People
New Year's Resolution
students records without the
students prior written consent, but
that's as far as it goes.
Administrators and faculty
members have no right whatsoever
to reveal a student's grade point
average to a third party, and such
revelations are in violation of
United States law.
The ECU administration should
give serious thought to revising
some of its procedures in answering
inquiries from student organiza-
tions about how high or low an in-
dividual student's grades are.
Any student who wishes to seek a
position or an elected office that re-
quires a 2.0 could simply sign a
release form. This would protect the
unsuspecting student from having
his grades revealed with out his con-
sent.
Invasion of privacy is a grave
constitutional concern, and the
right to privacy must be protected at
all costs.
By LARRY POPELKA
It's a new year, and time for us all to sit
down and draw up this year's crop of New
Year's resolutions.
New Year's resolutions have always
played an important role at my house.
Every New Year's eve we'd all gather
'round our ktchen table and Sis and I
would resolve to get better grades in
school, Mom and Dad would vow to go
on a diet, and we'd all throw in a few
more noble thoughts, like resolving to
have more fun.
Of course, none of it ever made any dif-
ference, because New Year's resolutions
� like politicians' promises � are never
meant to be kept. My Mom and Dad
weigh no less now than they did 20 years
ago. Sis and I never did any better in
school. And none of us really had that
much more fun.
The nice thing about New Year's
resolutions is that they sound impressive
when you make them, but two or three
weeks later you can forget all about them
and no one will ever give a hoot. That's
the whole point.
So in the spirit of the new year I've
come up with a few "meaningful" resolu-
tions for 1980. Since this is also a new
decade it's a particularly important year
for resolutions. Therefore, I've been
working extra hard on these. If you're
having a hard time with your own resolu-
tions, feel free to take any of mine and
adopt them as your own.
1. Jog one lap around my refrigerator
every night.
2. Never get up before 9 a.m.
3. Swear more in front of my mother.
4. Never move to Cleveland.
5. Get drunk more often.
6. Never tour a nuclear plant during a
meltdown.
7. Gain lots of weight and belch alot.
8. Never buy a kissing Barbie doll until
they make a kissing Ken.
9. Buy some plaid pants and a plaid shirt.
10. Never go to a Who concert in Cincin-
nati.
11. Hang out in a sleazy bar at least once a
week.
12. Never let Mr. Hand show me how to
make a milk shakeOhhh Noooo.
13. Seduce Bo Derek and fly to a tropical
island for a month.
14. Never visit Iran while the Shah's on
vacation.
15. Learn how to smoke stogies.
16. Never buy pas for less than SI a
gallon.
17. Seduce Linda Ronstadt and fly to
South America for a week.
18. Seduce Suzanne Somers and have her
autograph my Ace power drill.
19. Never seduce Elizabeth Ray.
20. Never watch a TV show sponsored by
Gentoi. (
21. Pick my nose every Tuesday morning.
22. Never listen to disco music at White
Sox park.
23. Never trust a politician who makes
things "perfectly clear
24. Never trust a politician who has a
brother who drinks beer and belches alot.
25. Never trust a politician.
26. Buy a Ronco egg spinner.
27. Never let Mike Wallace interview me.
28. Never let a fat kid in a fraternity try to
sell me 10,000 marbles.
29. Never let my readers talk me into
shaving my head.
30. Buy a "Kill the Bee Gees" T-Shirt.
31. Throw a "Thank-God-the-Bee Gees-
broke up" party.
32. Never drink purple Kool Aid.
33. Earn a 0.0 grade point average or bet-
ter this semester.
34. Never buy an Oldsmobile without
looking at the engine.
35. Never buy an Oldsmobile.
36. Subscribe to Hustler magazine.
37. Never try to make Egg Foo Yung in
my sister's Easy Bake Oven
38. Cheat on my taxes.
39. Never fly a DC-10.
40. Sleep in the nude more often.
41. Buy a Mr. Tea machine.
42. Never eat dead cats tor breakfast.
43. Brush my teeth at least once a month.
44. Never drink Perrier water without a
twist of lemon.
45. Quit school and become a Chicago
bus driver for S20,000 a year.
46. Never try to have sex with a hampster.
47. Buy a copy of the Pope's album and
play it full blast at 2 a.m. on Sunday mor-
nings.
48. Never read another newspaper article
about the highlights of the '70s.
49. Ask the National Weather Service to
name a hurricane after me.
50. Never make another resolution un-
til 1981.
Letters Policy
Letters to the editor must include
the name, address, phone number and
signature of the author(s) and must be
typed, double spaced, or neatly
printed.
Letters should be limited to three
typewritten, double-spaced pages. All
letters are subject of editing for brevi-
ty, obcenity and libel.
Personal attacks will not be permit-
ted. Names of authors will be
withheld only when inclusion of the
name will cause the author embarrass-
ment or ridicule, such as letters con-
cerning homosexuality, drug abuse,
etc. Names will be withheld only on
the author's request.
Nixon Named Panhandler Of The Year
By Jack Anderson
and Joe Spear
WASHINGTON�In this holiday
season of charity and giving, profes-
sional panhandlers enjoy a harvest
of handouts with their hard luck
stories. We're generally a soft touch
for most of them. But we'll have to
draw the line in this column on our
nominee for professional
panhandler of the year.
The well-heeled winner of the
award is former President Richard
M. Nixon who has his hand out for
more dollars from the U.S.
Treasury to subsidize his life in
political exile. Since resigning from
the White House in disgrace, the
unindicted Watergate conspirator
has luxuriated at his San Clemente
estate on the shores of the Pacific
with the government picking up the
tab for his office expenses. It's been
costing the taxpayers about
$300,000 a year.
With the wanderlust of a deposed
shah, Nixon has decided to abandon
the sunny clime of California and
move to New York City. As a
former chief executive, the pardon-
ed ex-president is entitled to collect
eight dollars a square foot for office
space to house a staff, seclude
himself in writing self-serving
memoirs and make phone calls to
still sympathetic adherents.
Nixon has discovered that office
rentals in Manhattan amount to ap-
proximately $30 a foot. He wants to
be compensated for his more expen-
sive high-rise Ivory Tower. Addi-
tionally, he's trying to put the bite
on the government for moving his
operations for the West Coast.
Members of Congress are quietly
getting ready to rebuff Nixon's
panhandling approach, especially
since he's been reluctant to pay up
to $66,000 he owes the government
for fancy improvements to the San
Clemente property he sold for a
substantial profit.
Nixon's solicitation for more
public largesse is now being weigh at
the White House. It will be up to
Jimmy Carter whether to request
Nixon's extra funds form Congress
in the budget he sends to the Hill in
January.
Expensive Protection
The unwanted shah of Iran is also
bemoaning his high cost of living
now that he no longer sits on a
Peacock Throne padded with his
country's oil millions. Members of
his family confide that the shah may
have to sell some of his real estate
holdings to maintain his luxurious
life style in Panama or elsewhere if
he moves on.
On of his new expenses is for a
security guard which used to be
taken care of by the Iranian govern-
ment. The rabid revolutionary
regime that supplanted him has
threatened openly to assassinate
him. The warning took on a deadly
serious aspect when the shah's
nephew was gunned down recently
in Paris by boastful agents of the
Ayatollah Khomeini.
To protect his life, the shah has
hired Jack O'Connor's Protection
service, a high-priced agency run by
a former New York police detective.
During the shah's stay at the New
York Sloan-Ksttering Hospital
Center, two of O'Connor's heavily
armed men stood guard outside the
convalescent monarch's 17th floor
medical suite. His private quarters
were shielded by specially installed
steel dors and bullet-proof win-
dows.
Another six guards, half of them
O'Connor's agents were positioned
around the clock inside the shah's
room itself. All wore bullet-proof
vests and they kept handy a bomb
blanket in the event someone tried
to kill their client with a bomb or a
grenade.
When the shah slipped out of this
country to Panama, eight of
O'Connor's most trusted operatives
accompanied him to the island sanc-
tuary. They were instructed to be
ready to travel anywhere in the
world at a moment's notice. They
coordinated their security precau-
tions with the Panamanian govern-
ment which provided additional
help.
O'Connor's protective blanket is
now extended to all members of the
shah's family. Among those being
shielded are a son at Williams Col-
lege in Massachusetts, a daughter at
a Connecticut boarding school and
three other children at private New
York schools.
JudiciaUollity
There wasn't much ho-ho-hoing
at the Christmas party tossed this
year by the nine brethren of the
Supreme Court for their law clerks
and other underlings. The press
corps which covers the Court was
excluded and only a few select out-
side guests were invited.
We've learned however that there
was precious little jollity in the wake
of our disclosures of the hair-pulling
that goes on among the justices
behind the velvet red curtain that
separates the public chamber and
their private quarters.
The fare for the festive occasion
was gallons of spiked punch,
catered gourmet appetizers and fan-
cy pastries. The invitations to the af-
fair gave the impression that the
justices had paid for the Christmas
goodies out of their own pockets
and a court spokesman insisted to us
this was so.
The employees, however, were
aware that the party was funded at
least partially by profits from ven-
ding machines located around the
building. Most of the nickels, dimes
and quarters in the machines come
from snack-hungry employees and
tourist visitors.
Watch On Waste
A University of Wisconsin resear-
cher has found a Shangri-la project
in the Andes of Ecuador at the ex-
pense of the American taxpayer.
The Nationaal Science Foundation
last year coughed up$30,000 for
Prof. Richard Mazess to study why
the natives in the mountains manag-
ed to live so long. Many of the peo-
ple claimed to have been born more
than 100 years ago.
Mazess discoverd fro his on-the-
spot research that the Ecuadorean
elders were fibbing about their ages.
Church records showed they were
younger than they claimed.
Nonetheless the federal agency
doted out an additional $26,000 for
Mazess to pursue the Foutain of
Youth in the Andes.
Copyright, 1979, United I'eatrues
Syndicate, Inc.
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Carter Fights Illiteracy
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 10. 1980
WASHINGTON
(AP)�The Carter ad-
ministration, grappling
with the stubborn youth
unemployment problem,
is mounting a frontal
assault on functional il-
literacy and bankrolling
the campaign with a 50
percent boost in spending.
Informed administra-
tion sources said President
Carter will unveil a new
approach to youth
joblessness Thursday bas-
ed on attacking functional
illiteracy�the inability to
read, write or do simple
math. Coupled with this
will be a broad effort to
bring the nation's schools
into a battle that has been
waged largely through
Labor Department job
training programs.
The proposal will con-
tain the only major new
program and one of the
largest spending increases
in the budget Carter sub-
mits to Congress Jan. 28.
The proposal results
from a nine-month study
of the $4-billion-a-year
youth employment pro-
grams by a task force
under the direction of Vice
President Walter F. Mon-
dale.
The sources, who re-
quested anonymity, said
the president will call for
additional spending of
$1.2 billion in fiscal 1981
and $2 billion in fiscal
1982. If Congress ap-
proves, that will bring
total spending to $6 billion
in the 12 months beginn-
ing Oct. 1, 1981.
An unstated side benefit
for a president challenged
for renomination is that
the proposal may shore up
his support among lalor,
urban, civil rights and
other Democratic Party
constituencies.
The target is four
million youths, aged 14 to
21, who face serious
employment problems in
the 1980s. Half have
already dropped out of
school and are
unemployed; of those, 40
percent are minorities.
The other two million are
still in school, but in the
poorest districts and in the
bottom third of their
class. Carter's planners
hope the new program will
reach three million of
these youths.
Administration sources
said the task force made
three discoveries about the
seemingly intractable pro-
blem of joblessness among
the young: it will be worse
in the 1980s for some
youths and some com-
munities; employers say
their biggest problem is
finding youths who have
mastered the three R's;
and they base their hiring
of such youths mostly op a
record of reliability in a
previous job.
The shift of the
economy from blue- to
white-collar jobs has been
dramatic. In 1950, 34 per-
A Jangle In Your Pocket,
A Tiger In Your Tank
WINSTON-SALEM(AP)� A
pocket full of silver will buy a lot of
gas at a Leon Cooke's Shell station.
Cooke is offering $18 worth of
gas for $1 in silver coins as long as
they're real silver. That means coins
minted in or before 1964.
The offer started last Saturday,
and Cooke originally pumped $15
worth of gas for $1 in coins. But he
increased the amount to stay in line
w ith the rising price of silver.
In silver markets in New York
Tuesday, the precious metal closed
at $31.75 an ounce. A dollar's worth
of siKer coins weighs about three-
quarters of an ounce.
Cooke flashed a grin when he was
asked how the offer was going and
quickly produced two silver dollars
from his pocket.
"We collected $20 worth of silver
dimes on Monday he said. "
People like a good deal
Cooke said he had been thinking
about trading gas for silver for quite
a while but had held back until silver
prices began to rise. He admits to
making "a little extra profit" on the
deal.
For the most part, he said,
customers have reacted with sur-
prise when they learn of the offer.
Some tell him they are going home
to get their silver; others seem a little
skeptical, he said.
But Cooke said he thinks more
people will begin bartering metals
such as gold and silver for gas and
other items.
"With the economy the way it is,
this could develop into a trend in
this country he said.
cent of all jobs were open
to workers without a high
school diploma. By 1970,
only 9 percent were, but
the high school dropout
rate has remained at 13
percent.
"Once there were more
such jobs than dropouts;
now there are increasingly
more dropouts than jobs
for them one source
said.
The problem for
business was illustrated by
a telephone company that
told the task force it has to
interview 12 to 15 persons
to find one qualified to
take orders for
telephones.
The task force found
the heavy emphasis on
previous job experience
left youths who had never
had a job in a Catch-22
situation, but almost as
bad off were those who
had worked only in
government-financed job
programs.
As a result, the Carter
program will add a Basic
Employability-Skills
Training program in the
new Department of
Education. Of the new
money, Education will get
$900 million in 1981 and
$1 billion in 1982; Labor
will get the remainder.
Carter's planners hope
the Education segment
will reach one million
youths in junior highs and
high schools through these
five components:
cIt will finance the
teaching of basic reading,
writing and mathematical
skills. The task force
found that federal aid to
education has left a big
gap between the pre-
school Head Start and
elementary school Title I
programs, on the one
hand, and a series of col-
lege aid programs, on the
other.
cIt will provide money
for school systems to hire
employment counselors to
set up part-time school,
part-time work programs.
The task force found such
programs are attractive to
youths and can provide
private job experience.
cIt will pay for school
systems to develop classes
and information about
local labor markets.
"Everybody's out there
telling kids to become key
punch operators, but
those jobs will decline in
the 1980s one source
said. "We hope schools
will bring in local person-
nel managers to talk about
their needs
cIt will pay for training
teachers in literacy in-
struction. "More than one
teacher told us something
like, 'I'm a biology
teacher and I don't know
how to teach reading
one source said.
cIt will provide money
to expand and integrate
existing vocational educa-
tion throughout local
school districts. "Public
vocational education has a
good track record with
kids and private in-
dustry a source said.
At the Labor Depart-
ment, three youth pro-
grams will be combined
into one, giving local of-
ficials more flexibility.
Announcements
AFOQT
The r Force Otter Qualifying Test
FOQT) mil be adminMered on Jan. 16
jnd M ai 8 W a m , m nghl Annex, room
:) This test n open 10 all qualified in-
dividuals desiring io enter the Air Force
ROTC program during their last to sears
at ECU and all FROTC CMC cadets
Those people interested ir uking the AFO-
QT program should ontac captain Moser
757 MT.6598 or stop b Wright Annex.
room 209
Learn
art program for increased learning effi-
-cincs ill be offered by Dr. George
WcN!und begmnning Januars 2 There vsill
be t�o groups, one meeting MVt at I 00
P m and one meeting TTH at 1:00 p.m. in
room J0J V right Annex The class is
available to all students Attendance is
:ars no tormal registration is re-
jutred
NTE
The National Teachers Examination (NTE)
�iU he gr.en at the Fast Carolina Lniversits
Tevting tenter on Sat Feb 16 Bulletins
Je-ihing registration prt:edures and con-
taining registration forms mas be obtained
from the ECL Testing Center, room 10?
Speight Building, or direvtls from the Na-
onai Teacher examination. Educational
Testing Setsice. Box 911. Princeton NJ.
iMV4l The deadline lor registration is
lanuar 23 .
SINGERS � DANCERS -INSTRUMENTALISTS $190 to $230week
TECHNICIANS�$155 to $190week
Seasonal Performers being auditioned for
KINGS ISLAND, Cincinnati, OH KINGS DOMINION, Richmond, VA
lAROwlNDS, Charlotte, NC Hanna-Barbera s MARINELAND, LA.
Preliminary Auditions
East Carolina Univ Greenville, NC
Music Bldg AJ. Fletcher Recital Hall, Tues Jan. 15; 4-7 P.M.
Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Student Union, Rms. 213 & 215, Wed Jan. 16; 4-7 P.M.
Preliminary and Call-Back Audition
Carowmds. Charlotte
Paladium Complex. Sat & Sun Jan. 19 and 20.2-7 PM.
Round-trip airfare paid for hired performers traveling over 250 miles To work at the parks
ICINGS PRODUCTIONS. Cincinnati. Ohio 45219
CAROLINAl
PORTRAITS
TEN
RESUME
PHOTOS
$5.00
Extra Bonus of Two 5x7's FREE
With Every Order
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
10. 1980 PM6
Student Union
Films Committee
Plays The Hits
LAMPM.
ANIMAL IMUtV
Close Encounters, Superman, Animal House
a few of the free flicks this Spring
By KAREN WENDT
Features F.ditor
The Student Union Films Commitee has released
"their schedule of films for the spring semester, and the
list looks incredibly good. The commitee will be offer-
ing a variety of films to students with the schedule show-
ing a multitude of films varying from love stories to
science fiction.
The first film of the semester will be "Superman"
which will be shown at 7:00 and 9:15 on Friday and
Saturday nights. The film stars Christopher Reeve,
Margot Kidder, Marlon Brando, Gene Hackman, Glen
Ford, and Jackie Cooper.
The films brings to life a 'hero' that we have all
known since childhood realisticly and with remarkable
special effects. As they said in the commercialsyou'll
believe a man can fly A film well worth going to, as
anyone who has seen it can tell you.
Another of the films which will appear in January is a
box office blockbusterClose Encounters of the Third
Kind
Called " one of the most spectacular movies ever
made the film employs an incredible variety of special
effects to achieve an audience belief that there are
creatures from antoher world who have the ability to
come to this planet and communicate with human be-
ings.
As Frank Rich of Time magazine stated "At the end
of 'Close Encounters' the audience is sitting with him
(Steven Speilberg, Director) in the lap of the universe,
ready and witing for new magic to fall into their lives
This film will be appearing on January 18 and 19, also
at 7:00 and 9:15.
The last film of January will be "Clockwork Orange"
directed by Stanley Kubrick and starring Malcom
McDowell, Patrick Magee and Adrienne Corri. -
Kubrick, who was also the creator of "Dr
Strangelove" and "2001: a Space Odyssey" helped to
create what Rex Reed of the New York Sunday News
called " one of the few perfect movies I have seen in mv
lifetime
A chilling film with futuristic photography and set-
tings.
Also in the month of January the films Hearts and
MindsThe Forgotten American and a Detective
Double Feature, showing "Death on the
Nile"and"Murder by Decree"will be shown.
In February the commitee will be showing the films
"Hooper "Halloween "Last Tango in Paris,
"Blazing Saddles and "Dracula
Special attractions will include "Days of
Heaventhe Unquiet Deaths of Julius and Ethel
Rosenberg "Beware of the Holy Whore" and a sixtie
double feature fauturing "Carnal Knowledge" and
"Getting Straight
March will highlight the films "Godfather" and
"Love at First Bite
Special features will include "Citizen Kane a
Shakespeare double feature including "Henry V" and
"The Taming of the Shrew " and also the film "Day for
Night
April will spotlight the films "Animal House which
is expected to be a tremendous crowd pleaser, "Gone
with the Wind and "Monty Python and the Holy
Grail
Special feature will include a concert double feature
which is expected to draw a large crowd featuring Rod
Stewart and the Rolling Stones, and "The Diary of
Adam and Eve
For exam week they will be showing "Fantastic
Planet
The films are free to most students and all that is re-
quired for admittance is an activity card and a valid I.D.
Sfciy Q,le in Accontvinv PRINCIPLES OP
It's Just Another
New Year's Eve
�� hi i
Study Qnfc � Actt-npatn
litu in
!
AM
Study Ciwte t f(-omp,im PRINCIPLES
ce lie eMMHu�
��
Buying Books Once Again
Photo By KIP SLOAN
Humor
Welcome Back Sucker
9
By KAREN WENDT
Features Editor
Oh the joys of moving back into
the dorms.
Everyone should be coming back
to campus today, if they are not
already here, and what do we have
to look forward to?
Well ther arc the joys of drop-
add. Waiting in line to get inside a
building to wait in line for a little
longer to find out that the class that
will fit into your schedule closed out
l
two people before you and the only
one left is underwater basketweav-
ing. Ah the joys of college.
Then there is the first day of class
when all of the professors put the
fear of God into all of the unsuspec-
ting freshmen and transfer students.
Not by all means fair, but effective
for about the first half of the
semester.
Then there is buying books.
More fun for all of you folks who
like to stand in line, but with an ad-
ded plus: you can spend money too.
How much joy can one person take
in a day (or two, or three, or four).
By this time the first of the
semester letters to home is about
due. " Dear Mom and Dad, How
arre you. Please send money. Your
loving son:daughter. The nesxt joy
comes when you get the answer.
NO.
But seriously ther are some things
to look forward to in the coming
semester. I just can't think of any of
them right now. 'But after ail
tomorrow is another day.
By Jay Stone
Staff Writer
I rolled back into Greenville on a
fine sunny Monday, December 31 to
the biting throb of "Physical Graf-
fiti. "Ah, Rock-n-Roll won't you
show me the way.
I did not particularly suprise me
to discover that Greenville was
almost entirely deserted- utterly
devoid of its student population.
"For God's sakeI thought,
"What a dismal prospect. New
Years Eve in this ghost town
I proceeded to unload all of the
Christmas presents I had from the
car and stash them in my house, and
then to rush over the a neighbors
house and exchange Christmans
tales and wine. New Years Eve was
almost upon us.
We had come to the realization
that the only intelligent thing to do
was to see this thing through
together, and besides she knew of a
couple of parties and by combining
forces we could double our options.
It was upon that optimistic note
that I left to get a celebratory bottle
of champagne. As I turned into the
"Pirate Pit Stop" I spied � an
ominous message. "Roxy New
Year's Eve Party- Monday, Dec.
31
Seeing it glaring out at the passers
by like it was, I knew that it would
certainly attract a crowd. I would
probably be among them.
By and by both myself and my
New Year's Eve comrade began to
achieve that fine high mental
plateau of intoxication that one
seldom attains more than once in an
evening. 1 took it as a sign. An in-
telligence far more evolved than
mine was obviously trying to tell me
something. I downed my last glass
of champagne and left to get dressed
for the first party that my friend and
I had slated for the evening.
It is difficult to fully grasp all of
the ramifications of getting dressed
for a New Year's celebration until
one is confronted with it. 1 felt that
it would be necesary for my clothes
to convey my message. But my
message was obscure even to me. f
wanted to communicate a general
theme of optimism for the decade
ahead and perhaps scam, yes, even ,
loathing for the one we would be
leaving behind. Finally my mind
spoke to me and it told me what it
wanted me to do.
It was with such a relief to have
the dilemna of my wardrobe cleared
out of the way that I rushed back to
my friends house only to discover
that she was facing the same issue
with only moderate success.
Finally aftger some deliberation,
she seemed satisfied with her reflec-
tion and we left for a small private
sort of gathering at the home of an
aquaintance.
When we arrived we discovered
our contemopraries sitting in a loose
half circle sipping gin fizzes and
bobbing rythmically to some man-
ner of heathen background music.
Out of nowhere paraphenalia
materialized and hemp incense filled
the air. The condversation became
patently abstract, but we were all
following it- if for no other reason
than to see where it would lead. My
friend however was becoming
restless in an obvious way and that
was our cue to wind it up and leae.
or perhaps take wing would be a
better terminology here. Ana �e
bid our farewells and proceeded te
the house of Omens where I had
been told we could find some
amusement.
We knocked on the door in eage-
antic pat ion. After a few minutes a
handsome man with a mustache and
a long kaftan answered the door and
made a sign that seemed to beckon
for us to come in. As soon as c
walked thorugh the door my friend
and I knew we had come to a
strange place.
In the center of the room wa a
steaming jacuzi with a lot of nilde
people splashing aroung in it. On
one side of the room was a beautifu
woman clad in a diaphanous robe.
She looked at me and winked, while
at the same time our congenial host
in the kaftan led my companion to
the jacuzi. We seemed to me sim-
See EVE Page 7, Col. 1
Fans Loved,
Critics Hate
By PAT MINGES
(Writer
Earth to EnterpriseEarth to
EnterpriseScotty, beam me up.
There is no intelligent life among
critics on this planet.
It is a sad commentary on the
cinematic arts when a movie as
grand as "Star Trek" is panned
almost universally for all the wrong
reasons. "Star Trek" is one of the
most intelligent and entertaining
movies in its genre and one of the
most significant films of our
lifetime.
The problem may be that each
endeavor is expected to live up to
the criteria establishes by its
predecessors. Why can't a film be
judged in terms of its own value
"Star Trek" suffers from endless
associations with "Star Wars "
Obviously, not being totally ob-
jective is my big flaw, but "Star
Trek" is not Just another space fan-
tasy movie. It is a homecoming!
"Star Trek" is not a cult; it is a
religion. The trekkies have made
their pilgrimage, have met with their
apostles aboard the Enterprise and
have emerged fulfilled.
Perhaps the finest moment in the
movie comes when Capt. James
T.Kirk once again greets the love of
his life-the Enterprise. His expres-
sion of delight is only matched by
the glee of the viewers.
The criticisms are many and often
reflect a tack of understanding on
the part of the critics. The movie is
overindulgent. In an effort to go lot
the big bucks of "Star Wars til
motion picture industry forced their
cheap thrills technology on Gene
Roddcnberry. The movie could have
been produced on half the budget
but so could most of the production
from Hollywood!
The motion picture was made
mainly lor children; thus ovcrem-
�eSTA� TUtm Fag CaL I
-
I

:
former chief executive, the pardon- January.
V-CTOHt, �-���





Album Review
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 10. 1980

I
:
t
i


Top Albums Of 1979 According To Critic
By Pat Minges
Features Writer
It just seems the thing to do
Each year critics seem compelled to thrust down a
suspecting puohe's throat their own selection of the best
Thif?L 8 ? thC Precedin year. In their ignorance,
f ,L USKally W0� before the year is out and
often the.r choices are premature. Before feelings of in-
adequacy overwhelm me, I would like to inflict me '
selections upon you, just to cajol you
Let's call these awards The Jukes, after a notorious
family known for their corruptness and stupidity.
Maybe if we revolt against such egomania, these critics
would go out and get a real job.
So . . here we go. . . the first international Jukes
award goes to the following for excellence in their
chosen field.
Top Male Artists
1 The Clash (honorary)
2.Stevie Wonder�The "Little blind boy" is the
greatest phenomenon in the recording industry.
3. Neil Young and Crazy Horse-Still crazy after all
these years.
3. The Who�Who is still the greatest rock and roll
group in the world.
4. Frank Zappa�The most prolific genius in rock.
5. Talking Heads�Pairs the Doobies danceability
with perhaps the most complex rock of the year.
Top Female Artists
1. Donna Summer�You have got to have acute
discophobia not to admire this lady's tremendous
talent.
2. Barbra Streisand�A perenial favorite
3. Joni Mitchell�Her ventures into jazz are im-
pressive.
4. The Roches�Once called the Andrews sister on
acid, this trio produced one of the most lovable albums
of the year.
5. Rickie Lee Jones�Leader r the doo-wop divi-
sion.
Top New Artists
1. The Buzzcocks�You probable have never heard
of these guys, but you will.
2. The Police�Honky Reggae at it's best.
3. Instant Funk�Thank vou for funkin' up my
life.
4. Rickie Lee Jones
5. Dire Straits-Flash in the pan category.
Black Artists
1. Stevie Wonder
2. George Clinton�No competition in this
category.
3. Donna Summer�Here she is again.
4. Chic�Tops of the pops.
5. Earth, Wind, and Fire�The basic elements of
good music.
6. Teddy Pendergrass�Ten million times a night,
fo1ks go to bed with Teddy.
7. Rick James�The philosopher of punk-funk.
Country Artist
1. Waylon Jennings�Walks away with this one.
2. Kenny Rogers�Has made the crossover well.
3. Dolly Parton�She crossed over the other way
country to pop
4. Willie Nelson�Would've been higher, but over
extends himself.
5. Emmy Lou Harris�Should have had her picture
on the silver collar.
Artists
1. Pat Metheny�The best thing to hit jazzing in a
while.
2. Chick Corea�Not his best year but still strong.
3. Flora Purim�The best female jazz singer.
4. Al Jarreau�Top male vocalist.
5. McCoy Tyner�The finest instrumentalist.
Best Albums
1. No Nukes�Various Artists�Muse Concert
2. Journey through the secret life on plants�Stevie
Wonder
3. American Garage�Pat Metheny
4. Joe's Garage�Frank Zappa
Fear of Music�Talking Heads
Armed Forces�Elvis Costello and the Attrac-
Eve Seen Through Bleary Eyes
Continued from page 6
patico with each other and knew
that we would stay here for a while.
Two hours later we emerged from
the house of omens, our karma very
much intact and progressing splen-
didly. My friend and I exchnged a
warm hug. We were allies against an
indifferent world and we had reciev-
ed an omen together.
We had no other recourse under
the circumstances, but U. proceed to
the Roxy New Year's Eve party.
After quickly dispensing with the
five dollar cover charge we becam
immersed within the dark, smoky
bowls ofthe Twin Rinks Skating
facility.
Strange people in aluminum foil
masks forged about unihibited, ex-
ercising wreckless abandon as if it
were a yoga asana.
At the stroke of midnight
everybody hugged and kissed
everybody and there was some
general partying and merriment. At
some point my friend and I manag-
ed to wish each other a happy New
Year after which we lost track of
each other.
I left and on my departure I
looked skyward at the moon. It
hung in the sky seeming detached
from the concerns of mortal men yet
inextricably linked to them. Behind
me someone screamed something
profane and yet something pro-
found "Happy FNew Year and
may the 80's be a hell of a lot more
interesting and dramatic that the
70's
Star Trek Is Not Star Wars
Continued from page 6
phasis of a point was necessary at
rimes. What lags into monotony for
most adults is appealing to the in-
tellectual facilities of a youngster.
The movie was stimulating both
intellectualy and philosophically.
What a Time critic called boring
"metaphysical meandering" seemed
to me interesting dialogue about
technological and human values.
In one moronic comparison to
"Star Wars critics have decried
the lack of a sinister evil being like
those which terrified us in "Star
Wars" and "Alien Who needs it0
The old good versus evil theme is in-
finitely more shopworn than the
"Star Trek" premise.
The tenet behind "Star Trek" is
more intelligent, that of the forces
of good attempting to overcome
that which they do not understand.
Is that not the ultimate goal of all
scientific, religious and academic
pursuit"
The evil in life greets us everyday.
Darth Vader was the most popular
character in "Star Wars Are these
the positive human values we would
like our children exposed to0
There is one thing that has con-
sistently disgusted me about
Hollywood's attempts to portray
characters from other worlds. Are
we such egotists that we expect alien
creatures to be humanoids0
Speilberg's creature in "Close En-
counters" looked like an infant with
a thyroid problem. "Alien's"
monster resembled Jimmy Carter in
leather drag, and Darth Vader let a
cloak and mask girth his humanity.
"Star Trek" presents a creature so.
vast a�4 complex tha�, it is almost
beyorrtt man's capacity for
understanding; yet it was created by
man. The alien in "Star Trek" is
boih innovative and attractive and
deals with the aforementioned pro-
blem very well. Persis Khimbassa
sure don't look like no alien.
The critics wailed about the
absence of big battle scenes in "Star
Trek" as well. Must we have
violence to be entertained0 If these
guys want violence, we'll send them
to see "Dawn of the Dead
perhaps that will satiate their
desires. They would probably never
ask for violence again. "Star Trek"
leaves the battle scenes at home, and
1 applaud them for it. Hopefully it is
the dawn of a new day.
Best Song and Dance
1. Oil industry
2. Nuclear Industry
3. The Shah of Iran
4. Brett Melvin and his S.G.A.
5. Pat Minges
Rickie Lee Jones�Rickie Lee Jones
Rust Never Sleeps�Neil Young and the Crazy
5.
6.
tions
7.
8.
Horse.
9. Briefcase Full of Blues�Blues Brothers
10. Minute by MinuteDoobie Bothers
11. Evolution�Journey
12. Bad Girls�Donna Summer
13. Flag�James Taylor
14. Parrallel Lines�Blondie
15. Down on the Farm�Little Feat
16. The Roches�The Roches
17. Everyday;Everynight�Flora Purim
18. Outlandos d'AmourThe Police
19. Single Going Steady�The Buzzcocks
20. Mystic Man�Peter Tosh
20. Into the music�Van Morrison
Top New Wave
1. The Clash
2. Talking Heads
3. The Buzzcocks
4. The B-52's
5. The Police
Tops in the Third World
1. Bob Marley
2. Peter Tosh
3. Peter Grant
4. Steel Pulse
5. Ayatollah Khomeini
Missed the Most
Welcome Back
Dancers!
Grand Opening Sale
at our New Location
20-50 OFF
Leotards Warm-ups
Skirts Milliskin tights
At Barre, Ltd.
422 Arlington Blvd.
756-6670
A BEAUTIFUL SALE:
20 OFF ALL BEAUTY
SERVICES
�The perfect perms
�We feature precision haircuts
�Up to date styling techniques
�Highlighting, Hennas, Frostings and
Color
1. Jackson Brown
2. Bruce Springsteen
3. Al Green
4. Steely Dan
5. Fleetwood Mac
20 discount good AAon Tues.
Wed. for 2 weeks only.
and
THE HAIR SALON
756-2355
HELP US
STRIKEOUT
BIRTH DEFECTS
MARCH
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THIS SPACE CONTRIBUTED
BY THE PUBLISHER
Yfciws-Q
ECU, buy a single
hamburger at regular price
get another for
plus tax
Cheese and tomato extra
Otter expires Jan. 31, 1980
Good at participating Wendy's
in Raleigh, Durham, Wilmington,
Goidsboro, Greenville and Jacksonville
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M





8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 10. 1980
MUSE Concert Better Than Woodstock
By PAT MINGES
Features Writer
Never before has there been anything like it. The
Monterey Pop Festival wasn't. Woodstock may have
been a lot of things, but it really wasn't. Altamont cer-
tainly wasn't. George Harrison's Concert for
Bangladesh was really the closest thing ever to it. What
it was. was a concert � the Musicians United to Save
Energy concert, held in Madison Square Garden from
September 19-23 last year. Never in the history of
dern music has an event procurred such a sparkling
galax) of influential musicians.
Yet never has there been such a severe threat to the
well being of humanity. The menace of nuclear pro-
ition is perhaps the greatest of all social evils: it
t cuts the possible elimination of our society for the
mization of corporate profits. It poses the threat of
h to hundreds of workers involved with the nuclear
kiustr and the chance of genetic abnormalities for
ett offspring.
The numbers in the loss category are insignificant
when compared to the tremendous financial gains
associated with the power industry. These are the same
guys who are destroying the economy and well being of
the United States through their manipulation of the oil
industry, the same ones who are forging the Third
World War. The Iranians are not mad at the people of
the United States; they are mad at the corporations who
have lobbied the government into support of what
Amnesty International described as "one of the most
violent regimes in the history of mankind" and possess-
ing "the worst record on human rights in the world It
is not the United States who should be brought to trial
but the corporations. We must stop them, before they
stop us. Perhaps the fight against the nuclear industry is
the first spark of Karl Marx's predicted proletariate
revolution.
If the anti-nuke protest is the spark, then MUSE is the
kindling. The struggling artists of the '60s have bonded
together to take their commitments to the streets, and
the politically and socially motivated youths of the '70s
George Burns, Lee Strasberg, And Art Carney
movie review in next issue
will no longer just protest. As the Doobie Brothers put
it, "You, telling me the things you're gonna do for me
Well, I ain't blind, and I don't like what I think I see
Takin' it to the streets The musicians and artists of
MUSE are united to give our children's children a
chance to enjoy the beauty of our world, troubled as it
may be. They deserve it.
The concert at Madison Square Garden was a gather-
ing of the most impressive artists of the decade. When I
first saw the promotion for the concert in the Villiage
Voice, 1 was astounded and delighted at the array of
stars and tried to get tickets, but they were sold out
within 24 hours. I chanced to see a benefit concert for
the Palmetto Alliance in South Carolina last spring
featuring Jackson Browne, David Lydley, and John
Sebastion in an all acoustic concert. It was more than
just a concert, it was an event of truly social
significance.
The MUSE concert featured The Doobies, Jackson
Browne, Crosby, Stills and Nash, Bruce Springsteen
and The E. Street Band, James Taylor, Carly Simon,
Grahm Nash, Bonnie Raitt, Tom Petty and The Heart-
breakers, Raydio, Nicolette Larson, Poco, Chaka
Kahn, Jesse Colin Young, Ry Cooder, John Hall, Gil
Scott Heron, Sweet Honey In The Rock, and a host of
studio musicians and technicians. Th proceeds of the
concert and those of the upcoming motion picture go
toward the fight against th nuclear armageddon.
The concert has now been released in the Bread and
Roses format of three albums, packed together in one of
the most valuable production efforts ever released.
Along with the albums comes an enlightening 16-page
booklet on the MUSE organization, the concert and,
most of all, on the nuclear threat. It also features a
mindful of superb photographs and short essays from
the stars themselves. It is the best deal that has ever
come out, and all of the proceeds go to a non-nuclear
future.
There is not a bad song on the album, and it has many
positively brilliant moments, but the biggest triumph o
the concert was none other than the Boss himself, Bruce
Springsteen. He certainly asks a lot of questions for so-
meone from New Jersey! The critics were not over-
whelmed with the concert, but they all sang praises o
the mystic from Asbury Park. His rocking rendition of
a Mitch Ryder medley included on the Vo Nukes album
is the finest point of the album and shows that Springs-
teen was far from an overnight sensation. He is the most
dominant influence to emerge from the corporate rock
decade of the '70s. Bruce and Tom Petty are the future
of traditional rock 'n' roll.
There are man) other fine moments on the album.
Perhaps the finest single cut on the album is John and-
Johanna Hall's "Power" featuring The Doobies and
James Taylor. It is a dynamic tune that perhaps best
sums up the concepts behind the album. Almost
everyone joins in and the song's strength will bring tears
to vour eyes it does to these old cynical eyes, at least!
Jackson Browne is the person who seemed to possess
the material which seemed to best fit the scenario of this
endeavor. His "Before The Deluge" has become the
themesong of the anti-nuke movement because of its
poignant lyricism and powerful presence. His new song
"Crow On The Cradle heretofore unreleased, shows
that Jackson is the top songwriter to emerge from the
last decade. It is a frightening tune. David Lyndley's
violin is at it's searing best, making one weak at the
knees.
The album also greets us with the homecoming to the
stage of one of the finest vocal groups in rock history -
David Crosby, Grahm Nash and Stephen Stills. Their
vocals are not as tight as in the days of Deja V'u, but it is
just nice to hear these guys again. Their "Teach Your
Children" has just as much place in the zetgeist of 1979
as it did in 1969. No Nukes is the album of the decade!
Time was when we would let vested interest groups
weave their wicked magic in the halls of Congress, and
all-we would do is protest. Time was when people did
not matter, only profits. Time was when we were so
busy searching for our identities that we lost touch with
our national one, which soon became subordinated to
corporate interests. Well as James, Carl and Grahm
� put it, "The Times The Are A-Changin' We are tak-
ing it to the streets, and the cause is "Depending On
You
features Individual Weekly
Course Material for the
� Busy Woman
� Working Person
� Family Meal
Planner
� Fast Goal
Getter
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I'





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
JANUARY 10, 1980
Page 9
Martin Top ECU Signee
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
In announcing the signings of
twelve high school players a few
days ago. East Carolina head foot-
ball coach Ed Emory said he was
"glad to have them on our side
'We have a good cross section by
positions noted Emory, "and I'm
Mire they'll all go on to successful
careers
Heading the group of the early
Pirate signees is running back James
Martin of Evergreen. The 5-11,
2(X)-pounder rushed for over 2,000
ards last fall in leading West Col-
umbus High School to its third
straight league championshhip.
Martin gained 1,702 yards during
the regular season and eclipsed the
2.000 barrier in his teams' two
playoff contests. He also lead the
team in scoring, with an amazing 30
touchdowns to his credit.
Among the other top prospects
signed by the Pirates is nose guard
Tony Smith of Laurinburg, who
was included on a number of lists
naming the top prospects in the state
as named by the media.
Emory, who came to the Pirates
after this season from Georgia
Tech, also lured two top prospects
frc, the Peach State to Greenville.
Defensive ends Jeff Autry of
Covington, Ga. and Derrick
Strickland of Atlanta, Ga. both
have earned recognition from
several major colleges.
Also among the early Pirate
recruits is kicker Ted King of local
J.H. Rose High School.
Though recruiting has been first
and foremost on Emory's mind, he
has also been busy putting together
a coaching staff. The new staff,
though still incomplete, includes
three coaches who have served in
similar capacities at East Carolina
before.
Holdovers from last year under
Pat Dye include Frank Orgel,
recently named defensive coor-
dinator, and Henry Trevathan, a
longtime ECU aide who will handle
the wide receivers.
Returning to the Pirate fold is
Wright Anderson, named offensive
coordinator by Emory. Anderson
was an assistant at ECU under Dye
three years ago before leaving to
take a similar post at the University
of Illinois. Anderson was among
the coaches who put in the wishbone
during Dye's first season at the
Pirate helm six years ago.
Other recently named Pirate
assistants include Jim Gudger, who
will handle the offensive line.
Gudger comes to ECU from Lenoir
Rhyne. Jim Holland will coach the
outside linebackers. Holland was
an assistant at Clemson while
Emory was there and was most
recently the head coach at Garringer
High School in Charlotte.
The new defensive line coach is
Rob Sanders. The one-time head
coach at Fayettville's Douglas Byrd
High most recently served with
Emory as an assistant at Georgia
Tech.
Ex-UNC defensive standout Rod
Broadway and Ron West were nam-
ed as part-time assistants. While at
UNC, Broadway became one of the
great defensive linemen in Tar Heel
history.
Expected to be named to the
Pirate staff this week is former
William and Mary assistant Steve
Schanll. Also mentioned as a possi-
ble future staff member is Tommy
Bowden, son of Florida State coach
Bobby Bowden. The younger
Bowden is also under consideration
at several other colleges seeking
assistants, including the University
of New Mexico.
Rams To Become ' 'New Jets9'?
Remember Super Bowl III when
Joe Namath and the New York Jets
; of the upstart American Football
: League upset the powerhouse
1 Baltimore Colts of the established
J NFL?
If you do, then keep it in mind as
Super Bowl XIV approaches. It is
possible that some similarities could
show up.
The "super" matchup this year,
featuring the powerful Pittsburgh
Steelers and the much less potent
Los Angelas Rams, has many of the
same ingredients thai the Jet-Colt
matchup had.
One of the teams is from a con-
ference that is much less powerful
than the conference of its oppenent.
The National Football Conference,
of which the Rams are members,
rates far below the American Foot-
ball Conference in nearly every
category. The Steelers, of course,
are members of the AFC.
The 1968 Colts, 16-7 losers to the
Jets in the third Super Bowl, were

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Charles Chandler
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considered one of the game's
greatest teams of all time going into
the contest. There was simply no
way the Jets could stay in the game
with them for the first half, much
less the entire game.
The Colts had perhaps the game's
greatest quarterback ever in Jonny
Unitas and a super backfield headed
by Tom Matte. The Colt receivers
were great, too, with Jimmy Orr
and John Mackey on hand to haul
in Unitas passes.
The defense of the Colts was also
hailed as great with all-pros like Roy
Hilton, Bubba Smith and Mike Cur-
tis on hand to chase away op-
oonents' points.
The 1979 Pittsburgh Steelers are
now in the position that those '68
Colts were in. They are the
established power of the NFL, with
both a super offense and defense.
They are preparing to play a team in
the Rams that is at least a ten point
underdog.
Is it possible that Terry Brad-
shaw, Franco Harris, Lynn Swann,
Jack Lambert, Joe Greene and the
rest of the Steelers could become
complacent and lose to the Rams?
It appears that this is the only way
the Californians could win, right?
Wrong.
Just as the Jets were taken lightly
by the fans simply because they were
not an established power does not
take away from the fact that they
were a great team.
Much the same can be said for the
Rams. They have fought adversity
all season long to end up in
Pasedena for the Super Bowl.
Injuries to key players throughout
the season kept the Rams from put-
ting together a decent record, as
their final 9-7 mark attests.
Without those injuries Rams may
well have finsished with as many as
12 victories.
Despite the fact that the Steelers
are the defending champions and
the favorites to retain their Super
Bowl title, it must be remembered
that the Rams are not patsies. They
ar? capable of play.i.n
championship-caliber football.
Super Bowl XIV should not turn
out exactly like Super Bowl III
simply because the Steelers of '79
could probably defeat any team that
ever played the game. But, in case
the Rams do pull an upset, com-
parisons to the feat accomplished by
the Jets over a decade ago will surely
come from all over.
Photo By CHAP GURLEY
Mike Gibson Moves On NCSU
Lady Pirates
Bounce Back
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
;r a disappointing fourth-
place finish in the Carolina
Christmas Classic in which the Lady
Pirates lost to currently 19th ranked
Clemson (83-78) and then 20th
ranked Mercer (81-66), East
Carolina's Lady Pirates bounced
back to claim a trio of victories dur-
ing a tour of West Virginia and
Virginia.
ECU began the northern visit
A t Oral Roberts
Pirates Lose Thriller
TULSA, Okla For the East
Carolina basketgball team it was a
case of "so close but oh so far
away" last Monday night when it
suffered a heartbreaking 83-82 loss
to Oral Roberts.
The Pirates trailed by as many as
11 points in the first half before nar-
rowing the margin to two at
halftime, 48-46. Two free throws by
George Maynor in the opening
moments of the second half tied the
score at 48.
ECU went on to build as much as
State's Nevitl And Parzych Battle
ECU'S Szymanski And Miles
an 11-point advantage in the final
half before succumbing to a late
surge by the Titans.
Trailing 82-81 with nine seconds
remaining, ORU signaled for a
timeout. Moments later several
Titan shots fell short before An-
tonio Martin was fouled while going
up for a rebound by ECU's George
Maynor with but two seconds left in
the contest.
Martin made both ends of the
one-and-one situation that he faced,
putting the Titans up by one and
forcing Pirate coach Dave Odom to
call a timeout in an attempt to set up
a last-ditch attempt at victory.
Odom's plan was never given a
chance as the Titans stole the ensu-
ing ECU inbounds play.
The Pirates shot n astonishing
66.7 per cent from the floor, but
suffered greatly from their poor per-
formance at the free throw line.
ECU missed its final eight attempts
at the charity strike, a cardinal sin
when playing on the road against an
established team such as the Titans.
ECU was led by swingman Herb
Krusen's 23 points, most of them
coming on long range bombs. For-
ward Herb Gray followed with 18
points Maynor added 14 while his
running mate at guard, Tony Byles,
tallied 10.
Martin led the Titans, now 4-6,
with Ms 16-point, 13-rebound per-
formance.
The Pirates, 6-7 following the
loss, travel to Baptist College for a
game tonight (Thursday) before
returning to Greenville for a home
matchup with Atlantic Christian
College on Saturday. Gametime for
that contest in Minges Coliseum is
7:30 p.m.
Duke Loses
By The Associated Press
Minutes after his 18th-
ranked Clemson Universi-
ty basketball team pulled
off its upset of the year '
an 87-82 overtime decision
over top-ranked and
previously unbeaten Duke
Tiger head coach Bill
Foster felt a little like jok-
ing.
"Ah, just another dull
win he said, directing
the comment at those who
had questioned his easy
December home schedule.
"One of these days, we're
gonna have to get
somebody in here who can
play this game
Duke coach Bill Foster
admitted it was "one
heckuva ballgame. I think
it goes to show what we all
have been saying all along
' there are an awfully lot
of good teams in the coun-
try
In other games Wednes-
day involving Atlantic
Coast Conference teams,
15th-ranked North
Carolina downed Wake
Forest, 72-68, and
Georgia Tech defeated
Western Carolina, 70-60.
Duke came into the
game with Clemson with a
12-0 record and a No. 1
ranking. Clemson, mean-
while, sported a 10-1
overall record and a 2-0
Atlantic Coast Conference
mark. The Tigers had
struggled into the Top 20
two days earlier.
A week ago, the Tigers
gave Duke advance warn-
ing of their capabilities
with a 93-76 upset over
See TAR HEELS Page 12, Col. 4
Duke-Clemson Box
Duke?MP FG FT RA F Pt
Banks � 43-11-20 9-10 75 4 31
Dennard38 3-6 3-4 52 5 9
Gminski43 13-20 4-4 100 4 30
Bender43 3-8 0-0 45 5 6
Taylor40 2-6 2-2 33 5 6
Suddath4 0-0 0-0 00 0 0
Engelland7 0-1 0-0 01 3 0
Williams7 0-0 0-0 00 1 0
Totals32-61 18-20 30 16 27 82
Clemson?MP FG FT RA F Pt
Nance40 6-11 2-5 111 3 14
Wyatt37 4-10 0-1 33 3 8
Campbell31 9-13 5-5 71 4 23
Conrad25 1-4 8-8 17 1 10
Williams41 8-14 3-5 47 3 19
Wiggins12 1-3 0-0 42 1 2
Dodds21 3-4 3-4 04 1 9
Gilliam10 0-2 0-0 20 0 0
Ross4 0-2 0-0 20 0 0
McKinstry4 1-2 0-0 00 0 2
Totals33-65 21-28 37 25 16 87
Duke43 2 16-82
Clemson4125 21-87
Turnovers: Duke 14, Clemson 10.�
Technical fouls:None.1
Offfcaals: Wirtz, Nichols, Knight.1
Att: 13,500.I
with a narrow 63-59 triumph over
Marshall January 3 in Huntington,
W. Vir. Fran Hooks' lay up on an
inbounds play with 5:35 WfOrerIn-
termission gave the Lady Bucs a
25-14 lead, but the Thundering
Herd cut the margin to six with :58
remaining.
All-American candidate Rosie
Thompson netted a pair of free
throws and a field goal and
freshman Mary Denkler added a
field goal to make the score 37-25 at
the half.
Thompson talluxi 25 points on the
night to lead ECU to victory despite
a second half comeback in which
Marshall cut the gap to two with
9:45 left in the contest. Denkler pro-
vided 13 points and grabbed a game-
high 12 rebounds.
"This is the worst win we have
had to date said ECU coach
Cathy Andruzzi. "The floor was
really slippery and we weren't able
to run the ball as well as we would
have liked to. Offensively, we
weren't getting the easy shots off.
We just didn't play a good fun-
damental game
The next game of the series was to
be more pleasant for the Pirate
nomads. West Virginia University
fell to ECU 67-56, but actually had
the game tied with 4:59 before
halftime, 21-21. The Lady Bucs
managed to build to a 31-23 advan-
tage at the half.
WVU hit the first bucket of the
decisive second half, but ECU rattl-
ed off the next 13 points and cruised
to victory behind Thompson's 23
points and Kathy Riley's 17. Center
Marcia Girven grabbed 12 caroms
to claim honors in that department.
"We knew if we played the way
we did against Marshall we would
be in trouble commented Andruz-
zi. "When mistakes were made, we
came back down the floor and made
adjustments
After building to a seemingly in-
surmountable 43-20 halftime edge,
East Carolina appeared to be out
for one of their most impressive vic-
tories, but the Gobblers had other
ideas. The Pirates lead increased to
as much as 25, but VP1 quickly cut
the gap to 64-49 on a three-point
play by Sandy Berry with 6:18 left in
the contest.
East Carolina struggled defen-
sively, while VPI surged on offense,
but time ran out as the before the
Gobblers could deny the Lady
Pirates their 11th win against three
defeats.
"I think by far this is the best
game we've played in a long time
said Andruzzi following the game
played at the Blacksburg, Va. cam-
pus. "We ran a tot of variations on
our zone defenses today�you're
going to win on defense.
"We've had a tough season so
far. Were really pleased with the
record (H-3 so far.
.






10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 10, 1980
ECU Grapplers Finish Third
1980 March of Dimes
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
Having claimed third
place in the 'Rose Bowl of
wrestling the Wilkes
Open, East Carolina's
grapplers return to the
friendly confines of
Minges Coliseum Satur-
day for a 2p.m. match
against perrenial power
West Chester State.
Seniors D.T. Joyner
and Butch Revils climed
championships in their
respective weight classes;
only the second time ECU
has captured two cham-
pionships at the Wilkes
tourney.
Joyner, a fifth year
heavyweight who missed
the 1978-79 season due to
a football injury, also
claimed the Most Pins
Award in the tournament
by pinning five opponants
in as many matches.
Joyner's record now
stands at 20-2 on the
season, with one of his
losses to the number one
wrestler in the NCAA.
Revils captured the 177
pound division with
superior decisions
(winning by over eight
points) over each of his
opponants.
"Revils really
dominated his weight
class said Steers.
"Joyner had very strong
competitionby no
means were his matches
easy
Steers also lauded Steve
Goode for his third-place
effort in the 177 class and
Jay Dever in the 190 divi-
sion.
The first year coach ad-
mits that his team "can be
beaten by a well-balanced
attack.
"We have to have a
well-balanced attack to
win said Steers.
"They (West Chester
State) have two outstan-
ding guys in Jorge Leon in
the 118 division and John
Licota at 167. Both are
national qualifiers
The Pirates are at home
again next Tuesday at
7:30p.m. against East
Stroudsburg.
Scoreboard
Wednesday's College Basketball
By The Associated Press
FAST
MbanvSt ,N Y.64, RPI 56
Alfred 66. Hobart 50
Allegheny 82. Wash. � Jeff 67
Bethans.vj.Va. 58. Thid 54
Boston U. 72 Colgate 65
Bridgeport 61. Kings. Pa. 59
Brossn 65 Providence 64
BticVnell 64. BloomsburgSt. 5J
Carnegie-Mellon 75. John Carroll 73
Catholic 72. St. Anselm's 65
Clark 62. Coast Guard 46
Dartmouth 78. Amherst 41
fcdinboroSt. 102. Darmen 77
Fairfield 86, Marist 79
Kairleigh Dickinson 64. Morgan St. 50
Fordham 66. Vermont 63
Gannon 95. Behrend 77
I aRoche 69, California. Pa. 78
1 aSalle III. W. Chester St. 70
Maine 68. Biscay ne 56
Mercyhurst 72, Westmnstr, Pa. 68
Memmack 73 U of Hartford 71
MonmouthCol 71. Dovsling62
e� Hampshire Col 98 Bentley 80
Niagara 95. Hofslra 88
Northeastern 78 Suffolk 54
Pace 77, Colby 65
Pittsburgh 82, Geo. Washington 61
Ptti-Jortnstossn 69. Slippery Rock 45
Ramapo 74. kean 60
Robert Morns 94. Tow son 66
St. Bonasenture89. PennSl. 75
Si Peters60. St Francis, NY. 4t
Seton Hall "6. Manhattan 62
Siena 67. CCNY 57
Syracuse94. Baltimore64
Trenton St. 85. Rutgers-Nessark 7
Villanosa 92. Massachusetts 59
York 93. Kings Col 73
SOUTH
Aseretl 52. Greensboro 48
Birmingham-So. 78. AubMontgomery 71
Campbell 77. Baptist 60
Clemson 87. Duke 82, OT
Clinch Valley 94. Emory Henry 87, OT
Coastal Carolina 78. S. Caro-Spartanburg 71
Col of Charleston 74. Pfeiffer 57
Columbus 73. Shorter 65
Fairmont St. 92. Alderson-Broaddus 71
Florida So. 83, Holy Cross 81
Georgia Tech 70. W Carolina 60
Hampen-Sydney 89, Haverford 67
Kentucky 79. Mississippi 73
LaGrange 68, Georgia SW 66
- Lnuuiana, Iecii6?. S. Mississippi 62 -
Mfswsippi St. 88. Georgia 75
Morehouse88. Fisk 7g
Muskingum 71, Adrian 55
N. Carolina 72. Wake Forest 68
N Carolina-Wilmington 61, Appalachian St. 44.
N Georgia 63. Georgia Col. 54
Piedmont 54, Southern Tech 51
Radford 65. Virginia St. 63
Richmond 101. Oglethorpe 85
St Augustine" s 85. Hampton lnst 80
S Alabama64. Jacksonville63
S Carolina 74. William � Mary 67
Southwestern. Tenn 80, Sessanee 74
Tennessee 69. Florida 58
Transylvania65. Berea 58
Va. Commonwealth 87. Navy 67
Virginia Tech 73, West Virginia 71, OT
Virginia Union 78, St. Paul's 70
W Maryland 95, Washington Col. 64
Scores
MIDWEST
Ball St. 73, E.Michigan 58
Bemidji St. 76, MinnMorris 57
Bluffton Col. 77. Wilmington, Ohio 67
Chadron St 65, Mars Col. 63 .
Dana75.Tarkio73
Doane72, Peru St. 66
Evansville 88, Xavie Ohio 75
rindlay 69. Defiance 62
Howard 58. Dayton 56, 2 OT
III -Benedictine 95. Rockford 76
Indiana St. Evansville97. N Kentucky 76
Kansas 69, Missouri 66
Kansas St. 60. Oklahoma St. 59
Kearney St. 83. Hastings 73
McNeeseSl.6l, WisParkside 51
Marian 69, Goshen 49
Miami, Ohio 62, Bowling Green hi
Millikin84. Illinois Wesl 72
Missouri Western 47. Wayne St . Neb. 46
Ml. St. Mary's 93. Naarelh 50
Nebraska 58. Iowa St. 50
N.lllinois67,KentSt.61
NE Illinois 91. Wis-Platteville69
NE Missouri 76. Westminster. Mo. 54
NW Missouri 78. Missouri-Kansas City 75
Northwestern. Iowa 91. Midland 81
Nation
By
Boston
Philadelphia
New York
Washington
New Jersey
Atlanta
San Antonio
Houston
Cleveland
Indiana
Detroit
Basketball As
At A Glance
The Associated
Eastern Conference
Atlantic Division
W
30
29
22
18
18
Central Division
25
22
19
19
18
10
sociation
Press
I
10
I I
22
20
24
17
21
22
24
24
3 3
Pel. GB
.750 �
.725 I
00
.474
.429
10
I I
13
.595
.512
.463
442
429
.233
3'
5'
6-
7
15
Oberlin 54, Capital 52
Ohio Wesl 73. Denison 55
Ottcrbein 76. Marietta 62
Phillips 69, NE Oklahoma 66, OT
Roosevelt 99. Trinity Chris 75
St. Joseph's, Ind. 90. Butler 88
Toledo69.OhioU.62
Upper Iowa 78, Mount Mercy 76
W.Illinois 107, William Penn 83
Westmar 67, Belles ue 56
Wittenberg 87, Ohio No. 63
Wooster 74. Baldwin-Wallace 73
Wright St. 84, Indiana Central 74
SOUTHWEST
Angelo St. 62, E. New Mexico 60
Bishop Col. 83,1 angston St. 81
Denver 86. Ft. Hays Si. 79
Houston Baptist 90, Paul Quinn 72
t amar 91, S. Carolina St. 70
SW Texas St. 104. Texas Lutheran 86
FAR WEST
N. Arizona 69. U.S. International 59
So.Colorado 99. Fort I ewis74
EXHIBITION
St. Joseph's. Maine 75. I aval of Quebec 53
A FAIRWAY FRIENDSHIP is budding between March of Dimes 1980
National Poster Child Betsy Burch and Arnold Palmer The two have
much in common, especially a desire to see the threat of birth defects
removed. Palmer is National Chairman for the March of Dimes whose
mission is prevention of birth defects Betsy 6, of Stone Mountain, Ga
was born with webbed fingers and a malformed right leg She represents
more than a quarter of a million babies born annually with birth defects
National
At
By The
Hockey Iraguc
A Glance
Associated Press
Campbell
Patrick
Conference
Division
W L
Philadelphia
NY Rangers
NY Islanders
Atlanta
Washington
26
18
16
15
10
2
16
16
18
23
Smvthe
Western Cinference
MidwestDivision
Kansas Cits2619.578
Milwaukee2519568"
Denver16283649'
Chicago1426.3509
Utah133030212
Pacific Division
Seattle2913690t
Los Angeles2914.674.
Phoenix2616.6193
Portland2323.5008
San Diego23.500a
Golden State�g3283IT15'
Tuesday '�' Games�.
Philadelphia 111, New York 108
Houston 118. Cleveland I15.0T
San Antonio 137, Denver 134
Chicago 110. Milwaukee 102
San Diego 124. Kansas Cits 116
Utah 124, Detroit 110
Indiana 122. Portland 118
W ednesdav sGames.
New York at Boston
Cleveland at Atlanta
New Jersey at Philadelphia
Los Angeles at W ashington
San Diego at Milwaukee
Denser at Houston
Golden State at Phoenix
Indiana at Seattle
rhursdav's Game
Chicago at Kansas C its
Chicago
Vancouver
St. Louis
W'innipeg
Colorado
Edmonton
Buffalo
Boston
Minnesota
Toronto
Quebec
Division
15 13
Wales
Adams
15
15
12
12
9
Conference
Division
26
21
20
17
16
Division
19 16
18
16
13
9
19
19
24
23
20
II
II
9
18
17
13
13
I
19
Norrls
Montreal
Los Angeles
.Pittsburgh
' fee'trolt "
Hartford
Tuesday's Games
Moscow Dynamo 5, Washington 5, tie, exh
New York Islanders 3. Vancouver 0
Atlanta 2, Winnipeg 0
St.Louis 6, Los Angeles 3
Boston 2, Colorado 2. tie
Wednesday's Games
New York Rangers at Detroit
Vancouver at Pittsburgh
New York Islanders at Buffalo
Montreal at Toronto
Edmonton at Quebec
Hartford at Minnesota
Los Angeles at Chicago
Thursday's Games
St.Louis at Boston
Winnipeg at Philadelphia
T
10
7
6
5
6
12
7
6
5
4
9
3
6
8
4
6
6
8
I i
7
10
Pt
s GF
62 163
43 158
38 131
35 127
16 118
42 115
37 129
36 120
29 107
28 127
27 129
55 152
48 140
48 156
38 141
38 124
44 132
44 166
43 140
33 12$
28 120
GA
116
150
127
136
147
115
134
135
158
149
165
107
108
111
149
131
139
150
139
I 33
142
STEEPLECHASE
CAFETERIA
Daily Specials
Thursday1.14 Spaghetti w Meat Sauce
$1.49 F Roast Turkey D W wDressing
Friday $1.14 Fish cakes w Tartar sause
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Sunday$1.14 Creole Spaghetti
$1.49 Choice of Chicken
Monday $1.14 Smothered Liver
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Chioce of: Steamship Round Roast Fresh Pork
2 vegetables, salad and beverage $2.49
SIGMA TAU GAMMA
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ifeetT
Wednesday, January 16th 8 p.m. - Until
TWIN RINKS East 14th St-
Greenville, N.C.
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Free Beverage
Also
1st ANNUAL
tet iBwta Contest
INTRODUCTORY
OFFER
ATTENTION PARTY
GIVERS
Overtones is now offering a wide selection of draught
beer in half barrels and pony barrels
Buy your draught beer at Overton's low, low prices
7
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pony barrels $23.99
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�H�
m





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 10, 1980
11
Pirate Swimmers Return
ECU Swimming Action
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
After a conditioning
trip to Florida during the
break in classes, East
Carolina's swimming
team returns to action
tonight at 7p.m. at Minges
Natatorium in a meet
against the University of
Maine.
Coach Ray Scharf
points out that the
members of the squad
paid their own way to the
'sunshine' state, with
many of them driving
their own cars.
"The kids had a
wonderful time and
they're really ready for the
season says Scharf.
The Pirate tankmen
trained in Florida from
December 28 through
January 6, and according
to Scharf, each swam a
total of about nine miles
in that period.
There is good news and
bad news for followers of
ECU swimming, though.
Standout freshman
Mike Triau and steady
senior Bill Fehling have
been ruled doubtful for
the matchup with Maine.
Both reportedly were
taken sick while in
Florida.
When the 'world goes to
Moscow' for the summer
Olympics, East Carolina
could be represented.
John Tudor, who com-
pleted his East Carolina
eligibility in the 1978-79
season, had already
qualified for the Olympic
trials in the 200 meter
freestyle and has been
joined by Kelly Hopkins.
Hopkins qualified in the
100m breaststroke with a
time of :57.2 and in the
200rr v east with 2:06.00.
Both will have to make the
final Olympic team when
trial are held at Austin,
Texas in May.
Scharf reports that
Tudor has since beat the
defending national cham-
pion with a time of
1:39.00.
To defeat Maine, the
Pirates will have to over-
come a 16 point deficit
which will exist as soon as
the competition begins.
Though rich in swimming
heritage, ECU has no
diver�a situation which
may cause the Bucs to lose
meets which they could
have otherwise won. "Their men are
"Maine is exceptionally outstanding he said.
improved over last year
says Scharf. "Last year
they shaved - for us and
made it a real close match.
I think we've got a shot at
them
The Pirates will host
South Carolina Saturday
at 1p.m but Scharf ad-
mits his club has a limited
chance at victory.
"They beat North
Carolina last year. We're
very much of an under-
dog, but don't count us
out.
"If we get beat, it won't
be because of a lack of
conditioning. It will simp-
ly be because the other
team is better than we
are.
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Debbie Meyer Speaks Out
By WILLGR1MSLEY
AP Special Correspondent
Debbie Meyer, once the
queen of the world's
swimmers, has seen the
best and the worst of the
Olympic Games, yet feels
that the great interna-
tional sports spectacle
should be kept free from
government interference.
"Unless you have given
the belter part of your life
to the Olympic movement,
as I have, and unless you
have actually lived in the
Olympic Village, you
shouldn't be too quick
make a decision on the
boycott idea says the
dimpled heroine of the
1968 Games.
"Once you're inside the
gates, there is a whole new
attitude. There are smiles
and handshakes and
camaraderie. No matter
what language you speak,
there is communication 8
Lady
Pirates
Travel
Having been victorious
in a three game road trip
through West Virginia and
Virginia, the Lady Pirate
roundballers travel to
Clemson, S.C. to par-
ticipate in the Clemson In-
vitational Tournament
Friday and Saturdav.
The Lady Bucs open
against Mississippi
University for Women
Friday at 6 p.m. in famed
Littlejohn Coliseum, the
sight of NCAA top ranked
Duke Blue Devils'
loss of the 1979-80.
first
ECU, now 11-3 on the
season, returns to the
friendly confines of
Minges Coliseum January
16 for an NCAIAW mat-
chup with the Tar Heels of
North Carolina in their
first home game since
December 10.
it's eye contact.
"You forget politics.
All the international
boundaries are down.
Ideological rivalries are
forgotten. If it were left to
the youth of the world,
there would be no wars
Debbie, 27, of
Hayward, Calif won
three gold medals in Mex-
ico City, where days
before army troops were
shooting down students in
the streets. The Soviet
Union had just invaded
Czechoslovakia.
Four years later at
Munich, as a part-time
journalist, she saw the
West Germans strive to
erase the memory of
Adolf Hitler and for 16 of
the 19 days stage the most
pleasant and relaxed
Olympics of all time.
They festooned their
streets with pastel colors
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at reasonable rates. Call 752 2724.
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FOR SALE: Albums and (track tapes
for$)andS2 Artists Range from A
(America) to Z (ZZ Top). Come by
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PUBLIC SALE: Stereo, sewing
machine, cassette recorder and
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major preferred but not required. Apt.
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758 8529
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ed. Call 758 3541
instead of nationalistic
flags, while security police
moved through the Village
like Miami Beach vaca-
tioners in their white flan-
nels and blue blazers ' not
a gun or stick in sight.
Then the Arab terrorists
moved in on the Israelis in
an ugly adventure that left
16 people dead and almost
resulted in cancellation of
the Games.
"I'm glad they didn't
cancel them Debbie
said. "The Israelis, most
of all, would have insisted
that they go on. You can't
let the Games become
hostage to violence. That
way, you lose
everything
Debbie can speak with
authority. The Olympics
have taken up most of the
years of her young life '
first as a competitor, win-
ner of 19 national cham-
pionships and setter of 20
world records in freestyle
swimming, then as a part-
time coach, commentator,
advisor to the U.S. Olym-
pic Committee and now
good will ambassador for
one of the corporations
sponsoring the U.S.
Olympic effort.
The company is Life
Savers, Inc.
Soon with figure skater
Dorothy Hamill she will
launch a multimillion
dollar campaign for U.S.
Olympic funds.
"We're going to dump
91,650 packages of gum
drops and candy on Lake
Placid for the Winter
Olympic athletes she
said. The sweet tooth has
no international boun-
daries.
Debbie was asked if she
felt that nationalism in the
Games should be
downplayed by using only
the Olympic anthem and
symbols.
"I don't know she
replied. "I got goose-
pimples when I stood on
the victory stand and saw
the American flag raised. I
felt a part of the youth of
America

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Leather Handbags
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Shoes Repaired to Look
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ill West 4th St.
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Friday Saturday Midnight Special Box Office
"Harold and Maude" Opens 1130
ATTENTION ECU STUDENTS
YOU MAY BE ELIGIBLE FOR A TWO YEAR AIR FORCE ROTC SCHOLARSHIP THE SCHOLARSHIP
INCLUDES FULL TUITION, LAB EXPENSES, INCIDENTAL FEES, A REIMBURSEMENT FOR TEX-
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7S8-S71






12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 10, 1980
Tar Heels Down Wake
Photo By CHAP GURLEY
Pirate-Wolfpack Cage Action
Continued from Page 9
then fourth-ranked North
Carolina.
At the half, the Tigers
trailed Duke 43-41, losings
a 10-point lead late in the
first 20 minutes of play.
The Blue Devils led by as
many as five points with
12:17 left.
Forward Al Wood
scored 16 points to lead
15th-ranked North
Carolina to a victory, but
Wood's most spectacular
contribution may have
been a steal he converted
into a four-point play.
Wood appeared ready
to dunk the ball when
Wake Forest's Benny
McKaig grabbed his waist.
Nonetheless, Wood threw
up a desperation shot that
dropped through the
basket.
Because it was an inten-
tional foul, Wood receiv-
ed two shots and sank
both.
"I have clowned
around, but you never ex-
pect to hit a shot like
that Wood said after-
ward.
Miki. O'Koren, whose
stea' Jinched the victory,
ag l. "You make a
funy shot like that, it
kin 1 of hurts you (Wake
Forest), mentally and on
the scoreboard, too he
said.
The teams remained
within four Doints of each
other throughout most of
the second half.
Tar Heel co-uh Dean
Smith, praised Wood and
O'Koren. "We wanted to
get Al the ball more in the
second half. Wake did a
good job defensively in
the first half of keeping
the ball away from'him
Smith said.
The Tar Heels entered
the game 0-2 in the ACC
and 6-3 overall. The
Deacons are now 6-6
overall and 0-3 in the
ACC.
Top scorers for Wake
Forest included Guy
Morgan with 14 points,
David Morris with 12 and
Will Singleton with 11.
Len Horton scored 22
points to carry Georgia
Tech past Western
Carolina. The Yellow
Jackets K-ld a 29-22
halftime lead and increas-
ed it to 50-35 with 6:41 left
to play.
Rob Noyes added 15
points for Georgia Tech,
including five in the last
1:37.
For he Catamounts,
sop'nomor Greg Dennis
led the scoring with 26
points. Freshman Ronnie
Carr added 15.
Tech is now 4-8 while
Western Carolina dropped
to 8-4.
Forward Eddie Talley
turned out a valiant
26-point effort, but it was
not enough to help wjnless
Baptist as Campbell
defeated the Bucanneers
77-60 in a college basket-
ball game Wednesday
night.
Braves Favor
Pitchers In Draft
Johnson, Threeths
Back Says DeVoe
KNOXVILLE,
Tenn.(AP)Tennessee
Basketball Coach Don
DeVoe has lifted the
suspensions of two of his
ballplayers in time for
tonight's game against
Southeastern Conference
rival Florida at
Gainesville.
Saying they have been
punished enough, DeVoe
on Tuesday welcomed
back to the squad his top
scorer, Reggie Johnson,
and reserve center Chuck
Threeths.
The suspensions, for
sneaking out of motel
room in Memphis against
coaches' orders last week,
were to have run through
Thursday.
"I think Reggie and
Chuck have been penaliz-
ed enough DeVoe said
Tuesday after meeting
with the two players in his
office. "Basically, I don't
want to do anything that's
going to hinder our
chances of winning
another important basket-
ball game
Playing without
Johnson and Threeths,
Tennessee upset then
second-ranked Kentucky
49-47 last Saturday to
emerge alone at the top of
the Southeastern Con-
ference standings with a
4-0 SEC record and a 9-3
mark overall.
One of those losses, a
70-68 defeat by 19th-
ranked Indiana a week
earlier, came when
Johnson and Threeths
were out on suspension
for missing a team meal in
San Diego.
"1 thought we had
taken care of it when we
were out in California
Devoe saidBut I believe
merit a return to tne
squad
Johnson, a 6-foot-9 for-
ward and the Volunteers'
leading scorer with a 19.2
point average, and
Threeths, a 6-foot-6
reserve forward averaging
better than 5.2 points,
were suspended last
Thursday after an assis-
tant coach spotted them
out after hours.
As part of their punish-
ment, they were not allow-
ed to practice with the
team two days last week
and they were put on a
disciplinary running pro-
gram.
"Geez, they've handled
it beautifully DeVoe
said. "They've been there
every morning and gone
through a real workout
every day everything from
Jonnson will start against
Florida, who will have a
new coach behind the
bench for the game.
Coach1 John Lotz was
fired after the Gators'
82-62 loss to Auburn last
Saturday and assistant Ed
Visscher was named as
Lotz interim replace-
ment.
"We're looking for-
ward to playing Tennessee
like I am to meeting the
Ayatollah Visscher said.
ATLANTA (AP)�The
Atlanta Braves picked
four college pitchers in
Tuesday's winter draft of
free agent amateur
baseball players.
The first pick was Joe
McMurtry, a 20-year-old
right-hander from Troy,
Texas. The 6-foot-5,
195-pounder from
McLennan Community
College in Waco, Texas,
was the fourth player
chosen.
Atlanta's second-round
choice was David Chiono,
19, a 6-foot, 170-pound
right-hander from Yuba
Junior College in
Marysville, Calif.
The Braves picked Scott
Patterson, 21, a 6-foot-2,
175-pound right-hander
from Long Beach Junior
College in California, and
Daniel McFaddert, 19, a
6-foot-3, 180-pounder
from Spartanburg
Methodist College in
South Carolina, in the
secondary phase of the
draft for players who were
previously drafted but
never signed.
Three Georgia players
were chosen in the draft,
all of them in the regular
phase. They were Richard
Felt, a pitcher from
Snellville, chosen by Mon-
treal in the first round;
Timothy Greene, a pitcher
from Macon, and William
Taylor, a pitcher from
Boston, Ga selected by
Minnesota and Texas,
respectively, in the second
round.
McMurtry is "a big,
strong young man with an
above-average fastball
said Braves scouting direc-
tor Paul Snyder. "He has
a sinker and a slider. Like
most young, hard
throwers, control is his
problem, which is to be
expected
"We'll make him an of-
fer and try to sign him
right now, but I think he'll
want to play this season"
at McLennan, Snyder
said.
McMurtry was second
on the Braves' list of
preferred prospects,
behind right-hander Colin
McLaughlin of Connec-
ticut, who was chosen first
in the draft by Toronto.
Atlanta retains negotia-
tion rights to McMurtry
until the summer draft in
June.
Campbell, now 5-5,
placed four starters in
double figures, led by
senior guard Fred Whit-
field with 16 points.
Campbell jumped out
to an early 14-4 lead with
15 left in the half and led
by as much as 13 before
Baptist cut the advantage
to seven, 35-28, at
halftime.
The Fighting Campbells
maintained a comfortable
lead throughout the se-
cond half and out scored
Baptist 18-8 in the final
three minutes to claim the
victory.
The Bucanneers are 0-8.
xfffic
THUR. I HxMym
FR1. Aft. ZSfAZE 25
ifruik!SatJ EAZE
I sunday DIXIE ROAD
DUCKS
Imonday FULL CIRCLE
East
Carolinian
they both understand now basketball to weighthfting
that they must abide by to sprinting
the rules. Their efforts in DeVoe said he still has
early morning workouts not decided whether
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 10, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 10, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.29
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Permalink
https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/57238
Preferred Citation
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