The East Carolinian, December 11, 1979






"Were it left to me
to decide whether
we should have a
government without
newspapers or
newspapers without
government, I
should not hesitate
a moment to prefer
the latter
�Thomas Jefferson
The East Carolinian
If you have a story
idea, a tip, or a
lead, please tele-
phone us.
757-6366
757-6367
757-6309
3l5
Vol. 54 No. Zf
14 pages today
Tuesday, 11 December 1979
Greenville, N.C.
Circulation 10,000
SAVAK-SAVI
Name changed due to feedback; hear Coach Odlim
Student legislators
sit on mall set for Wednesday
B) KAREN WENDT
Vetvs h.ditor
SAV K has changed its name, but the
purpose is the same.
I in- organization known as SAVAK,
Student- Ulied for Victory Against
Khomeini, has taken a new title because
of negative feedback.
The group is now called SAVI,
Students Allied tor Victory in Iran.
� a meeting held b) two of the group
lers Thursday night, the name change
u a- announced.
Plan- were made at the meeting to
hold what is being called a "sit for 50 in
silent protest The sit is scheduled for
December 12 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on
The poster that is being passed out
ntes all students who are interested in
tin- to protest peacefully, and to bring
books ami Hags but no alcohol.
Drinking became quite controversial
after the last demonstration. "That
doesn'l accomplish" anything. It just
embai the university -aid Brett
Melvin, SGA president and a founder of
SAVI.
The sit is expected to be held
itewide at all major universities.
Melvin presented the idea of having a
-it to the North Carolina Association of
Student Governments on Sunday. It was
passed unanimously.
Student- are urged to wear white
armbands in support of the American
posil tncerning the hostages.
Armbands will lie available at the sit.
and donation- to the organization will be
greatl appreciated.
About twenty people attended the first
formal meeting of the group. Members
stressed that the organization is open to
input and suggestions.
"We hope to do a lot with this
organization said Melvin.
The group has received one outside
donation from an outside source � SGA
attorney Charles MeLaughorn.
The group was organized to promote
"intelligent and.rational thinking" among
students about the situation in Iran and
the differences in culture. SAVI also
hopes to sponsor speakers on the subject.
The term "victory" in the organiza-
tion's name has evidently aroused some
controversy. Melvin said the word refers
to the United States "not losing face
Doug White, another founding mem-
ber of the group, feels victory pertains to
the "battle of nerves" with Iran.
"A victory is peace said Melvin.
SAVI will also be sponsoring three
speakers on Tuesday night.
Dr. John Howe, of the political science
department, Dr. Unesh Gulati of the
economics department, and Dr. Duane
Longue. a professor at ECU who has
written a song about the Iranian situation,
will be speaking at Hendrix theatre,
beginning at 7:30 p.m.
Students who are interested in the
situation in Iran, and in SAVI, are asked
to attend these informative lectures. They
are also asked to watch the national news
before the lectures so that they will have
the latest information on the crisis.
fter being denied immediate funding
at Monday's SGA meeting, Sune
commented, "That will not stop us
Doug White, one of the founders of SAVI, is
interviewed by Channel 9 News during an SGA
meeting ivhere he later spoke about the organization
and its request for funding.
(Photo by Chap Gurley)
Christian students for Cambodia
Petitions being signed for aid
By KAREN WENDT
News Editor
Dave Odom, head basketball coach at ECU, received
a standing ovation before the SGA legislature at their
Monday meeting.
"We've tried to change some things said Odom,
referring to changes made within the program since he
took the job.
"I am very pleased with student support he added.
Odom spoke briefly about the program and then left
to attend the South Carolina at Aiken vs. ECU
basketball game.
In other business, the SGA approved 'he constitution
for a new organization on campus, to be known as S 1,
or Students Allied for Victory in Iran. The constitution
was brought up because of a name change which
executive council members felt would lead to such
approval.
SAVI was denied a motion, however, to suspend the
rules in an attempt to get $100 in SGA funds in support.
The group also distributed copies of a news release
which has been sent to all of the newspaper and local
radio stations.
The release read, "We want to stress that we are
interested in rational, informed protest. We do not want
flag burnings, effigies, chants, drunken marches, etc.
We want people to understand what they're protesting
and why Sune said
During the meeting, Melvin brought up the point
that the hostages are being held by students, about the
same age as ourselves.
In the news release, he also stated, "Students are
just as incensed at Khomeini as the rest of the public �
perhaps moreso. We sincerely believe that our actions,
in combination with similar activities across the nation,
will influence Iranian militants here and in Iran
There was debate as to the organization's lack of a
faculty advisor, but the bill reads that its passage was
pending the naming of a faculty advisor.
A resolution presented by Jeff Triplett welcomed a
new football coach, Ed Emory, to ECU. In part, the
resolution read that the legislature would like to extend
"a heartv weocome home" to the new coach, an East
Carolina alumnus.
Charhe Sherrod, SGA Vice President, who held a
seat on the selection committee for a new coach,
explained some of the reasons that Emory was chosen
and said Chancellor Brewer and Coach Emory should
excellent coach and good for the university
Mark Franke of the Christians for Cambodia group
read their statement before the legisoature and asked
legislators to sign one of the petitions identical to those
being passed around campus earlier in the day.
Charles Sune
(Photo by Chap :
lirett Melvin
(Photo b) John Grogan)
(Photo by Pete Podeszwa)
Santa Claus slapped,
kidnapped; Christmas
'
fl
By MARC BARNES
Editor
Santa Claus has been
kidnapped.
Claus, age unknown, a
six foot' tall mechanical
fellow, was kidnapped
from the dining room at
Wendy's on Tenth Street
last Saturday night.
But that's not all.
Sunday morning,
thieves took the Christmas
tree off a Christmas float
which was parked in the
back parking lot.
"It was about 7:30
Saturday night when they
took Santa said Wendy's
manager Robert Clements.
"The assistant manager
said he noticed cars going
through the drive several
times � and then two or
three people came in and
hauled Santa away
"We had borrowed the
Santa from Pepsi-Cola �
it wasn't even ours
Clement said. "It was
a hundred
worth about
bucks
Sunday morning, Cle-
ments continued, the
Christmas tree was taken
from the float. "It was
(assistant manager) Rob-
bie McGlohon's tree he
said. Apparently, McGlo-
hon had lent the tree to be
used for the float during a
recent Christmas parade.
When he returned for his
tree later on Sunday, the
tree was gone.
"Ronnie was pretty
upset Clements said.
"First, Santa Claus is
stolen during his shift, and
then his tree is gone the
next day. He was going to
take the tree home and
put it up in his apart-
ment.
This is not the first
indignity Santa had had to
endure in the Wendy's
dining room. After the
Santa was placed there,
See SANTA, page 6
By KAREN WENDT
News Editor
"Ueaders of the world,
lay aside your pride in
your conquering political
ambition. Put down your
swords! Stop the murder!
Stop the suffering
These words begin a
petition sponsored by an
organization known as
Christians for Cambodia.
The petition, signed by
students and non-students,
is aimed at appealing to
the pride of the nations to
aid the Cambodian refu-
gees.
According to an infor-
mation sheet passed out
by petitioners, "the situa-
tion, already one of horror,
is intensifying
Robin Carson, spokes-
man for the organization,
recently attended a
"rally" in front of the
United Nations building in
New York City. Carson
claims that similar move-
ments are occuring at
every major college cam-
pus in the United States.
Christians for Cam-
bodia is a nationwide
organization which is bas-
ed in Albuquerque, New
Mexico.
Copies of the petition
were sent to ambassadors
of the United States,
United Soviet Socialist
Republic, Vietnam and the
United Nations in general.
"We were hoping
through them to be able to
distribute them (the peti-
tions) to the most coun-
tries said Carson.
When asked why the
United States should help
the refugees, Carson re-
plied, "They're people
people in need
Carson also claims that
much of the action in
Cambodia is for political
rather than social gain. He
calls the refugee issue
both a moral and a
political issue.
He claims that in Cam-
bodia, people are commit-
ting "genocide in a
country for political gain
He later said, "That
scares me
At the rally, most
people appeared to be ig-
noring the petitioners.
After rebuffing one peti-
tioner, a student was
heard to say, "I don't
See PETITION, page 6
New GREAT garage
may aid ECU transit
By TERRY GRAY
Assistant News Editor
Inside today
Library hours pftge 3
I Help them
page 4
Exam schedule page 6
The party's over page 7
A new coach
page 11
"Oh Lord, won't you
buy me a Mercedes-
enz
Leonard Fleming sang
the opening phrase of this
famous song Monday as
he looked over the $5,500
maintenance bill that the
SGA Transit Authority has
racked up since July 1979
for its Ford and Inter-
national buses.
Fleming, operations
manager for the ECU
transit system, said that
the high cost-of-maintain-
ing the school's buses was
not entirely due to brand
names. Part of the prob-
lem, he explained, involv-
es the rates charged by
Hastings Ford in its
agreement to service the
vehicles.
Fleming said that Hast-
ings Ford, which charges
$21 an hour for labor,
"can't be blamed because
they're in business to
make money � ey
charge us what they
charge everyone else.
If things go well, this
situation may change next
year when Greenville op-
ens a new maintenance
yard for its GREAT buses.
According to Fleming,
preliminary talks with
Greenville Transit Mana-
ger Fred Haley indicate
that the ECU system may
be able to have their buses
serviced by city mechanics
when the yard goes into
operation. This would
bring considerable savings
in overall costs in upkeep,
Fleming said.
Haley also noted Mon-
dav that until now, dis-
cussion of the idea has
been very tentative, since
the federal grant to help
build the city's facility
arrived only this week.
If a "fair arrangement
to both Greenville and
ECU could be worked
out he said, "then I
think it could be possi-
ble
A consultant from the
North Carolina Depart-
ment of Transportation
who visited the university
recently has even suggest-
ed that the school take a
look at long-range plans to
merge their transit system
with that of Greenville,
according to Fleming.
Such a move would
mean a high capital outlay
in the beginning, -aid
Fleming, but it would pay
for itself in the long run.
The SGA transit sv-
tern, which has been ap-
propriated close to $60,000
this year, represents the
largest single expense
from student funds
annually.
"The cost of our
system will hae to go up
everj year said Fleming.
The transportation con-
sultant also suggested that
the SGA Transit Authority
make a thorough survey ot
ridership patterns to deier-
See TRANSIT, page 6
The SGA transit system has been fighting recurring
accidents and rising costs to keep the two
remaining bus schedules runnin�- . �. , .
(Photo by Chap Gurley)
S
3 i
I 1 '33 i aaiisti i





Page 2 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 11 December 1979
Pecple, places, arid
�lt
The Pharmacy College
Admission Test' (PCAT)
will be offered at East
Carolina University on
Saturday, February 9,
1980. Applications blanks
are to be completed and
mailed to the Psycholo-
gical Corp 304 East 45th
Street, New York, N.Y.
10017, to arrive by Jan.
14, 1980. Application
blanks are available in the
Testing Center, Speight
Building, Room 105.
I nl
A ski trip to Massa-
nutten, Va. Jan. 10, 11,
and 12 is available to any
M.R.C. or W.R.C. mem-
ber. Lodging will be
provided at the Holiday
Inn in Harrisonburg, Va.
Thursday, Friday, and
Saturday nights. For these
aeeomodations as well as
two fu days of skiing,
including rentals and lift
tickets, the price is only
�68.50. A ski school is
available for a $5.00
cha For those inter-
sted in attending a $25.00
deposit (refundable) will
he required by Dec. 17.
F r reservations, or more
information, please call
2-9569.
11 i I�1 i
I ii III
Phi Beta Lambda (the
ness club) will meet at
4:00 p.m. on Dc 11 for
the raffle ticket drawing.
Please bring your ticket
-tubs. Anyone who would
like to buy a 50 cent raffle
ticket can either buy one
in "he morning in front of
,� Student Supply Stare
,r tali 752-5076 and ask
for Sharon.
act
The American College
Testing (ACT) will be
offered at East Carolina
University on Saturday,
February 16, 1980. Appli-
cation blanks are to be
completed and mailed to
ACT Registration, P.O.
Box 414, Iowa City, Iowa
52240. Registration dead-
line is January 18, 1980.
Mr. Childers, Director of
Testing at ECU, reminds
candidates that deadlines
occur during the holiday
break, so they should take
care of this matter before
leaving school. Applica-
tions may be obtained
from the' ECU Testing
Center, Speight Building,
Room 105.
I!tici
Students who are in-
terested in applying for
positions on the student
residence hall staff for
summer or next fall should
file their applications be-
tween now and Jan. 31. To
be eligible for this em-
ployment, a student
should be enrolled full-
time and have a real
interest in residence hall
living. Hall advisors are
paid for two hours of work
each day. Monday-Thurs-
day, and have duty every
other weekend.
Application forms are
available in the directors'
offices or in the Residence
Life office, 214 Whichard
Building. All applications
should be turned in to the
Residence Life office.
National Teacher Ex-
aminations will be offered
at East Carolina University
on Saturday, February 16,
1980. Application blanks
are to be completed and
mailed to the Educational
Testing Service, Box 911,
Princeton, N.J. 08540 to
arrive by January 23,
1980. Application blanks
are also available at the
Testing Center, Speight
Building, Room 105.
rcsl
�cj
artists
I ic t-�Mit�
PRC T-Shirts will be
here Tuesday, Dec. 11,
1979. Those in the Curri-
culum may pick up the
shirts in the PRC building.
ARTISTS: Register now
until Dec. 20 for the Rebel
Art Contest and Show
which will be held January
11-19 in the Kate Lewis
Gallery. Prize money pro-
viced by the Attic and
Jeffries Wine and Beer.
Categories: Drawing,
Printmaking, Painting,
Black and White Photo-
graphy, Color Photography
and 2-d (hangable) Mixed
Media. You may register
in any two categories at
the Rebel office or Men-
denhall Information Desk.
One dollar registration fee
will be collected on
January 11 when you
deliver your work.
financial aid
All students who are
interested in applying for
financial aid for the
1980-81 school year are
encouraged to attend a
meeting on Wednesday,
December 12, at 4:00 p.m.
in Wright Auditorium. The
purpose of the meeting is
to distribute applications
and disseminate informa-
tion concerning financial
aid for the 1980-81 school
year.
The North Carolina
Student Legislature will
meet Monday, Jan. 14 at
Mendenhall Rm. 221. This
is a very important
meeting and all members
are urged to attend.
Topics will be the Jan.
I.C. and the legislative
reception to be held Jan.
22.
�cea
The SCEC will sponsor
a most exciting Christmas
program Tuesday, Dec. 11
at 7:30 p.m. The Caswell
Choir will be singing
Christmas music at the
Walter B. Jones Alcoholic
Rehabilitation Center
(Falkland Hwy, next to the
old-hospital). Please come
and share the festive
evening. Refreshments
will be served.
The Society for Col-
legiate Journalists will
have its Christmas dinner
on Tuesday, December 11
at 5:30 p.m. at the S&H
Cafeteria. All members
and pledges are urged to
attend.
management
The Graduate Man-
agement Admission Test
will be offered at East
Carolina University on
Sat Jan. 26, 1980.
Application blanks are to
be completed and mailed
to Educational Testing
Service, Box 966-R,
Princeton, NJ 08540 to
arrive by Jan. 4, 1980.
Applications are also
available at the Testing
Center, Speight Building,
Room-105, East Carolina
University.
�cec
The SCEC will sponsor
a most exciting Christmas
program Tuesday, Dec. 11
at 7:30 p.m. The Caswell
Choir will sing Christmas
music at the Walter B.
Jones Alcoholic Rehabili-
tation Center (Falkland
Hwy, next to the old
hospital). Please come and
share the festive evening.
Refreshments will be
served.
t II It ill
All students who plan
to participate with the
men's or women's team,
handball clubs should
contact Susan Jeffrey,
intramural-club sports
trainer, at 757-6387 to
schedule their physical
examinations. Physicals
should be scheduled prior
to the Christmas break.
icfcel
The Rebel is extending
the deadline for literary
submissions to Dec. 20.
Address manuscripts to
The Rebel, Mendenhall
Student Center, Green-
ville, N.C or bring sub-
missions by the office.
PART
TINE
JOB
Looking for i part-time
job with flexible hours
and real business
experience? Northwest
Mutual Life Ins. Co.
has openings for college
agents. Call before noon
for appointments!
7SS-4080
4emcciat�
The Young Democrats
of ECU will hold a dinner
tonight at Jason's up-
stairs. All members are
urged to attend. This will
be the last meeting of the
semester.
located above I
the Jolly Roger!
Use the Reade I
Street I
entrance and I
avoid the I
downtown I
traffic I
Looking for that
special gift
Try
Cable & Craft Yarns
812 Dickenson Ave.
Across from Diener's Bakery
V
tchell s Hair Styling
Pottery
Leather
Silk Scarves
Jewelry
Handwoven Items
f P,rt Pt.i. SKoppl C�i'�
7562950
Call today for Complete Hair Care
SPECIAL FOR THE
WEL iv
P.P.T. � Mendex
Reg. $6.oos4.5o Conditioner
lVOWONLYS3.50aPS3.00
Frosty Morn sliced
� �: �
12oz.
Brawny towels
ii
SUPER MARKETS, INC.
Where Shopping Is A PLosure
II
jumbo roll
J.F.G. Salad Dressing
Qt.size
21.00
Scrub Streng
Hunts 44oz ketchup
'hick ric"
ketchup
Western Boneless
Chuck Roast
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72oz. King
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2 litre Pepsi Colas
Carolina dairies
12 oz onion dip
Cracker Jacks
1 oz boxes
71.00
sgr-
Cracker
Jack
i





11 December 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Pace 3
l"
Extended Library hours during exams
Fri Dec. 78 AM - 11 PM
Sat Dec. 89 AM - 11 PM
Wed Dec. 128 AM - 3 AM
Thurs Dec. 138 AM - 3 AM
Fri Dec. 148 AM - 11 PM
Sat Dec. 159 AM - 11 PM
Sun Dec. 162 PM - 3 AM
Greek news
Alpha Xi Delta All-Sing successful
Mon. Dec. 17
8 AM - 3 AM
Tups Dec. 18 8 AM - 3 AM
Music Library hours
during exams
Dec. 12, 13, 16, 17, IS
Extended Hours to 11 PM
Dec. 19 Regular Hours
By RICKI GL1ARMIS
Greek Correspondent
Response for the 19th Annual Alpha Xi
Delta All-Sing has been great so far. The
Alpha Xis remind everyone to hurry and
turn their songlist inthe sooner, the
better.
Alpha Xi Delta won the sorority
division in Intramural Bowling last week.
Sigma Sigma Sigma held its annual
tree trimming and Christmas dinner last
Wednesday night. This festive occasion
was highlighted by the presence of five
new pledges. Tri Sigma welcomes these
five girls.
The Alpha Delta Pis would like to
remind everyone of the "Football
Sunday" on Dec. 16 at the Attic from 1
p.m. until 6 p.m. Tickets will cost 50 cents
in advance and 75 cents at the door.
Door prizes will be given and beverage
prices reduced. Free refreshments will be
provided as well. Afternoon entertainment
will feature the game between the Dallas
Cowboys and the Washington Redskins to
be shown on a giant television screen.
Everyone is encouraged to attend this
exciting Sunday afternoon.
The Alpha Omicron Pis would like to
congratulate Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity
for receiving their charter Friday and wich
them continued success as a brotherhood.
Special acknowledgment goes to IIOA
Jeff Betcher who received the award for
Most Outstanding Cicizenship given by
the Little Sisters.
The AOII pledges worked hard on the
house and yard Sunday in fulfilling their
duties so they can be initiated soon.
On Monday, the AOIIs will be
celebrating their Founders Day. The
traditional Christmas dinner and the
opening of the presents will be held
Tuesday.
Congratulations to Patsy- Willis for
being accepted into Gamma Beta Phi
honor fraternity. We would also like to
give special recognition to Cynthia Ann
Simons who will be leaving ECU to pursue
a career.
The AOIIs extend best wishes to all
the fraternities, sororities and students for
a Merry Christmas and good luck on the
upcoming exams
Saturday night the Phi Taus held their
annual Christmas party. Holiday snacks
and drinks added to the festivities, as they
were entertained by a live band.
Sunday night the Phi Taus held their
elections for executive offices. Elected
President w�s Mike Newsome, Vice
President Steve Mattocks, Treasurer Bill
Hilliard, Secretary Scott Elmore, and
Sergeant-at-Arms Mike Prencipe. The Phi
Taus would like to congratulate these
people and thank the out going officiers
for the outstanding job they have (June
The Phi Taus will be holding their
"Gag Gfts" tonight, aftrr which they plan
to see the Fat Alman's Band at the Attic.
Greensboro attorney
has evidence problems
Mendenhall to stay
open during exams
Students who will be
tudying into the wee
hours of the morning
during the upcoming exam
period can look forward to
a new service offered by
the Mendenhall Student
Center.
A spokesman at Men-
denhall said Monday that
the student center will be
staying open until 3 a.m.
on Dec. 12 and 13, and
Dec. 16 through 18, and
will offer facilities and
services which will make
studying there easier.
The extended hours,
which coincide with the
longer exam-period hours
at Joyner Library, have
been suggested in-order to
"try and provide, a comfor-
table place for people to
study according to the
spokesman.
The snack bar will
reopen at 11:00 p.m. on
the above dates, and will
selling coffee and light
snacks until 2 a.m said
the spokesman. In order to
accomodate the students,
themulti-purpose room will
also be set up with tables
and chairs, and the
conference room will be
opened for those who want
to study in groups, he
added.
The center will also be
selling a limited assort-
ment of school supplies
during the extended
hours.
The spokesman said
that these new services
are being offered for the
quit y.ttwuiiftge.ti atuflsate
.mvyuiiagsti atudeataLamp
ike advantage of tne to tn
to take advantage of ttie
comfort and companion-
ship that are so helpful
while pulling all-nighters.
GREENSBORO, N.C. AP
Guilford County Dstrict
Attorney Mike Schlosser
says he's running into
some problems producing
evidence against 15 per-
sons charged in the five
shooting deaths at an
anti-Ku Klux Klan rally on
NOv. 3.
Schlosser says some
spectators and participants
at the rally don't want to
discuss the case.
Five members of the
Communist Workers
Party, which sponsored
the event, were shot wile
people were gathering for
the rally. The 15 persons
charged in connection with
the deaths are self-pro-
claimed Klansmen and
Nazis.
Schlosser said resi-
dents of Morningside
Homes, the predominantly
black housing project that
was the scene of the
shootings, have "express-
ed .apprehension- oncoming-
tar4
discuss details of the event
and "Ku Klux Klansmen
take vows of secrecy not to
inform on each other
Members of the CWP
have requested they be
allowed to hire a private
prosecutor but Schlosser
has insisted on handling
the prosecution himself for
what he calls political and
philosophical reasons. He
admits the case has him
walking a legal tight rope.
"The whole world is
watching and asking if
there is justice in Greens-
boro he said. "I'm
confronting the myth that
Southern justice is differ-
ent from justice else-
whereI'm caught in the
middle in a no-win situa-
tion
Schlosser added that
he's having to make
complex legal interpreta-
tions including a decision
on whether to use televi-
sion films of the shootings.
Under state law the
in
trod
licet
Ml lllefr
and the Nazis
He said CWP members
have refused repeatedly to
tuuia cau t
only as corroborative evi-
dence, or as evidence to
support testimony by a
witness.
Hurry, we can't
start without you
Now is the time to get involved. The Student Union will be accepting applications
for the following positions on the following dates.
Student Union President
�tudent Union Committee Chairperson
Student Union Committee Members
Nov. 26-Jan. 16
Jan. 18-Feb. 1
Feb. 4-Feb. 18
The Student Union is responsible for sponsoring social, recreational, fine arts, visual
arts and cultural presentations for you, the entire University community. There are
many events going on, and lots of places to go
come on, join in s
mm
"Do I take chances and
risk taht, if the judge
allows me to use the
film the Supreme Court
won't reverse him on
appeal?" Schlosser asked.
Steeplechase cafeteria
Pitt Plaza
(formerly Balentines)
2 Specials Daily
One item in each column on special
99
$1.29
Meat Loaf
Stuffed Peppers
Beef w Macaroni
Lasagna
Liver & Onions
Chuckwagon Steak
Spaghetti w meat sauce
Tuna Casserole
Ham & Noodle Casserole Broiled Fish
Cabbage Rolls Fried Chicken
Chicken & Dumpling BBQ Chicken
Turkey & Dumpling Broiled Chicken
Open face beef sandwiches
Open face turkey sandwiches
open face pork sandwiches
w two veg. & roll
w two veg. & roll
l.lll
I�ii �t��l I
Weekly Specials for Lunch & Dinner
Open Sunday 11:30-2:00
Phone 756-0885
.
Students Supply Store

Wright Building
Your on-campus supplier of Texas Instrument,
Sharp and Hewlett -Packard Calculators.
J
We offer free 30-day replacement
of any defective calculator. If we do
not have in stock the calculator
you want, we will be happy
to order it at no extra charge.
Stop by for ail your calculi tor
and calculator accessory needs.
,
I
i
S





he East i.aroli
Jiditorials
& Opinions
Tuesday, December 11, 1979 Page 4 Greenville,N.C.
They need our help
Here we are at the end of the
International Year of the Child, but
thousands of children are starving in
Thailand.
These children are Cambodian
refugees. They have been forced to
leave their country not because of
anything they have done, but because
of military action that their parents
began.
According to information from
Oxfam-America, over eighty percent of
Cambodia's children are suffering from
the worst forms of malnutrition.
There are ten deaths to every birth.
Thousands of tons of food and
medical supplies have been shipped to
the area, but it may not be enough.
Within the next six months these
people will need 165,000 tons of rice
alone to survive.
Adults may recover completely from
the absence of food for this lengthy
period of time, but children under the
age of four may be suffering permanent
brain damage and bone deformation as
a result of malnutrition.
Several agencies are attempting to
help the refugees, including OXFAM
and the Save the Children Foundation.
Save the Children is now caring for
100.000 refugees, OXFAM has shipped
over 6,000 tons of food to the refugees,
and both are in the process of sending
more.
But these amounts cannot possibly
save all of the refugees from starvation
and disease.
Yet this tragedy, which has been
called the Auschwitz of Asia, has been
almost ignored by the press and the
American people. We have been
concerned with other things, such as
the crisis in Iran and who will be
running for president.
But these people need help. They
need help in the form of money and
time.
Five dollars will buy a twenty-five
pound bag of rice, which will feed ten
Cambodians for a week. Ten dollars will
give an orphan a supplementary diet of
rice sugar, edible oil and vitamins for
one week. Twenty-five dollars will
provide 40 pounds of soy bean seeds
and four hoes to help plant for a spring
harvest.
Many people may say that they are
not our responsibility. Yet the United
States as well as many other nations
were involved in the Vietnam War. The
fighting that still goes on is partly due
to our intervention in a war that was
none of our business.
Other countries are also trying to
help the refugees. Australia, Great
Britain, Canada, Norway, Austria and
others are cooperating and aiding social
organizations to get food and other
necessary supplies to the people.
Yet food alone is not enough. With
people so hungry they are forced to eat
seedlings out of the fields, there will
not be much of a harvest in the near
future, so the problem will continue
unless there is massive aid given.
Everyone has the ability to help in
one way or another. Any contribution
you are able to give is welcome,
whether it is money, time or merely
your signature. The help is desperately
needed.
No one should have to spend
Christmas starving.
Letters to the Editor
Paper said to be 'repulsive'
Will board control?
In reading over the proposed
amendments to the constitution of the
Media Board, we can only remember
that old song by Simon and Garfunkel:
"I'm just one step ahead of the shoe
shine,
Two steps away from the county line
I'm just trying to keep my customers
satisfied
Satisfied
We at the newspaper feel that way.
We feel that we are just one or two
steps away from having some
old-fashioned things taken away from
us � those things being such various
items as freedom of the press, and the
freedom of the editor to make his own
choices concerning who he wants
working I the paper.
Specifically, one of the proposed
amendments calls for the Media Board
to choose the editor, AND the chief
business officer. This means that for
the business side of the newspaper �
the side that pays the bills and sees
that everyone else gets paid � the
editor has no choice whatsoever in the
matter.
This is wrong, we feel, and entirely
out of the board's jurisdiction. The
board was set up originally to remove
newspaper funding from the treacher-
n s reaches of the SGA � tat
organization which in Us former lives
threatened funding to the newspaper if
the newspaper dared to print the truth
about them
To begin with, the burden of
responsibility in The East Carolinian
lies on the shoulders of the editor. He
is responsible for everything that
appears in the newspaper. He should
be an accomplished journalist, with at
least a smattering of management
background.
Therefore, since all responsibility is
his, the editor should be allowed to
name his own team. He should search
around for his staff, recruit those who
are the most qualified, and manage
them once they are hired. If they get
out of line, he should fire them. If they
do well, he should praise them.
What will the Media Board do next
year? We don't know yet, but like the
young man who had his hair dyed, we
are afraid to look. Next year, we can
see visions of the Media Board deciding
that the editor is unqualified to pick his
own managing editor. The year after
that, the board will decide that he does
not have enough sense to pick his own
sports editor, or features editor. Finally,
the editor will have to lead his troops
into battle with an entire staff of
sergeants who were handpioked by
someone else.
So here is the editor � ten years
hence. He has all of the responsibility,
and none of the control.
We hope that ECU journalists of the
future are a lot more foolish than they
have been in the past.
I Candidates for editor would have to
be, to take the job.
To the Editor:
About the only thing I
will credit The East
Carolinian (or Fountain-
head) with is repulsive
consistancy in reviewing
music. On June 22, 1978, I
wrote a letter to the
Fountainhead expressing
views that will likely be
repeated in this letter.
�j
First of all, my opinion
of Mother's Finest is a
high one and the group
deserves every bit of the
attention they are getting.
It is a shame that their
popularity had to sky-
rocket in Europe and
result in the production of
their "Live" album in
order to get recognition
somewhere other than the
southeastern U.S.
My sentiments concern
the unwarranted reviews
of, first, Nantucket's debut
album and, second, the
concert here Dec. 1st.
Green and Bachner (one of
which may be the guy on
the staff that Mike Uzzell
blew away at an after
concert party) not only
exceed in under-rating a
top band, but are evident-
ly very poorly informed.
However, to say that
Mother's Finest is ten
times superior to Nan-
tucket is, at the least, a
very unpolished an misin-
formed judgement. The
"professional considera-
tion" of Nantucket playing
last is a result of
friendship and considera-
tion between the two
groups. Nantucket never
referred to themselves as
having top billing -the
agreement was reached
because the night before
(in Florence) Mother's
Finest had closed the
show. There was no
conflict between the
groups-why should there
be a battle of the bands
attitude about a good
concert? You evidently
weren't present or weren't
listening when "the home
boys" started playing "Is
it wrong to Rock and
Roll?" and the crowd
roaredwith the opening
lines that Larry Uzzell
sings, it was enough to
make anyone that knows
their history cry.
1 am sick of the
opinions about Rommy
Redd and his lyrics. As I
told Chris Farren (who so
disgustingly reviewed the
debut album), Tommy's
lyrics "involve a no frills,
natural approach to rela-
tionships with women"
and he has been asked to
write for other popular
artists. He is ,one of the
most creative and imagina-
tive people in music today.
He can afford to dress any
way he wishes.
You also state that
originality is not one of
their best points-why do
you think Epic signed
them to begin with? It
certainly wasn't just be-
cause they were from
North Carolina. They
sound like no one else.
Furthermore, at least two
magazines this month-
"Grooves" and "Hit
Paraderhave great arti-
cles on Nantucket, calling
them "Epic's brightest
new hope
Take a look, consider,
and compare; next time
maybe you'll be ade-
quately informed
Debra Page
To the Editor:
The East Carolinian" s
article on and interview
with Mother's Finest has
prompted me to write this
letter. I can not sit idlev
by and read superlatives
being tossed around about
pure trash. Mother's
Finest is just like Disco. It
is too loud,overbearing tnd
written by a bunch of no
talent bums. The inter-
viewer asked if Mother's
Finest might end up like
Emerson, Lake, and Pal-
mer; "one album every
two or three years?" No
such luck!
For one thing, ELP has
had three albums in the
last three years. Most
important, Emerson, Lake,
and Palmer is the world's
most professional rock and
roll band and that is one
distinction that Mother's
Finest will never hold.
Ronnie Stallings
Goolsby praises SGA
To the Editor:
The student body of
East Carolina University is
super. Having been on the
band staff at University of
Notre Dame and the
University of Georgia, I
have, many times, been
frustrated with apathy
apparently resting with the
students in regard to Band
half-time shows. It is
certainly different at ECU.
Not only is the band a
great deal better, but the
audience (especially the
students) response
support makes all the time
devoted worthwhile. The
first time the students
gave the band a standing
ovation, it did more for
morale than any "pep
talk" I could ever have
given.
This is my first year
on the faculty and the
support from my collea-
gues in the School of
Music, the Athletic
Department, and the Uni-
versity Administration has
made for a very pleasant
year. I especially would
like to thank the Student
Government Association,
led by Mr. Brett Melvin
for their support. All of us
sincerely appreciated the
Resolution passed by the
SGA Legislature entitled:
"Thanking the Marching
Pirates During my first
week in Greenville, Mr.
Melvin came by my office
to introduce himself, and
on behalf of the students
welcome me and offer
support to the band.
Melvin has held true to
that assurance, and obvi-
ously represented the stu-
dent's true feelings.
The Marching Pirates
plan to continue to repre-
sent East Carolina Univer-
sity as best as we possibly
can, and look forward to
an even better season next
year. Thank you all.
Sincerely,
Tom Coolsbv
Director, Marching Pirates
The East Carolinian
MANAGING EDITOR
Richard Green
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Anita Lancaster
NEWS EDITOR
A88T. NEWS EDITOR
FEATURES EDITOR
ASST. FEATURES EDITOR
EDITOR
Marc Barnes
DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
Robert M. Swaim
ASST. DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
Terry Herndon
ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR
Cheryl Holder
BUSINESS MANAGER
Steve O'Geary
Karen Wendt
Terry Gray
Bill Jones
K.C. Needham
SPORTS EDITOR
ASST. SPORTS EDITOR
COPY EDITOR
AD TECH. SUPER.
Charles Chandler
Jimmy Dupree
Diane Henderson
Paul Uncke
THE EAST CAROLINIAN Is the student
newspaper ef East Carolina University
sponsored by the Media Board of ECU
and Is distributed each Tuesday and
Thursday during the
weekly durlno the summer.
Offices f located on the
the Publications Center Old South
Building. Our mailing address Is- Old
South Building, ECU, Greenville, NC
27SS4.
The phone
�re: 7S7-S3BS, 6367,
�� S18 annually,
-





Carter
lauds
efforts
By BROOKS JACKSON
Associated Press Writer
w shi(;ton ap-
President Carter Monday
enthusiastically endorsed a
national effort to reduce
world hunger over the
next two decades.
Carter spoke as he
officially accepted a presi-
dential com mission report
trt.it said a global food
crisis, worse than present
energ) woes, is likely in
iho nexl 20 years unless
the I nited States and
other nations take bold
action
"This i an opportunity
for our nation to embark
upon a long-range, excit-
challenging, princi-
pled effort to alleviate the
problem of world hunger
over the next two de-
cades the president
said.
Hi predicted "a recep-
tive American response as
an educational program is
pursued to explain the
hunger problem.
The report said the
hunger problem is getting
worse instead of better.
and that correcting it will
require rare political cour-
age in the I nited States
and elsewhere to correct
underlying social and poli-
tical problems.
Even after three
straight years ol good
harvests, hunger around
the world is -till growing,
the panel said, and called
the Cambodian famine but
a vivid reminder of the
larger problem.
Th commission, head-
b) Carter's special
Mideast peace envoy. Sol
Lino wits, said. Even
ailer three years oC
successive good harvests,
the world food situation is
still precarious
State authorities to investigate
11 December 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 5
ECU student has legal woes
ECU petitioner
(Photo by Pete Podeszwa)
By TERRY GRAY
Assistant News Editor
When she started cut-
ting people's hair in her
room at Umstead dormi-
tory, Marlene Young never
thought that anyone would
get upset about it.
However, someone is
complaining to the author-
ities. And what at first
seemed like a simple way
to earn a few extra dollars
is now threatening to
square off into a con-
frontation over Marlena's
constitutional rights.
It's not that the ECU
sophomore isn't qualified
to cut hair; Marlene said
she went through 1200
hours of instruction at
Troutman's College of
Hairstyling in Raleigh to
get her license. She then
worked for three salons in
Raleigh before coming to
East Carolina University in
September, 1979.
The problem is that
ECU is a coeducational
institution. If it were an
all-female school, Marlena
wouldn't be breaking the
law by her part-time work.
A phone call in early
November started the
trouble. Marlene had been
advertising her hair-cut-
ting service by index cards
placed on campus bulletin
boards, and someone call-
ed her to say what she
was doing was illegal.
"They said that it was
against the law and that I
should stop before 'some-
body does something a-
bout it she said.
The caller identified
himself as a Mr. Boyd, of
Boyd's Barber and Hair
Styling in Greenville, ac-
cording to Marlena. When
Melvin Boyd, Sr. was
asked later about this, he
stated that no one in his
shop had made such a
call.
"We didn't do that.
Whoever it was was using
our name said Boyd.
"But if she's cutting hair
over there, it's against the
law to do that in this state.
ATTIC
N.C. No. 3 1 Nightclub
Wed. SUGAR
Thur.
6th ANNUAL
BRICESTREET
HRISTMAS PARTY
Over $500 in Door
Prizes Including a
FREEtro trip to
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� 79 5
Tues. 18
DUSTY RUFF
Thurs. 20 RULL
WAnother $500 Giveaway
with a FREE Trip to
Busch Gardens
Fri.RRICESTREET
at. PEDESTRIAN
Sun.JERRY THOMAS
Fri. 21 Columbia
Recording Artists
THE AMAZING
RHYTHM ACES
Sat. 22
THE
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X�i3
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cse1
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919-852-3775
Other locations: 1Qam 6pm Sat.
Boone, NC r
TpmtllSpmSun.
10am til 9pm Mon. - Fri.
For one thing, you have to
have rooms at least 14 feet
wide with running water
and bathrooms to operate
a barber shop
A few days later, on
Nov. 8, Marlena said she
received a letter from the
North Carolina Board of
Barber Examiners. The
letter stated that she was
I "in violation of the law
and should discontinue the
practice upon receipt of
this letter
By now, Marlena had
taken down all of her
advertisements on the
advice of Dr. David B.
Stevens, the university
attorney at ECU, since
advertising private ser-
vices violates the solici-
tation policy at ECU.
"I can understand the
policy because they
wouldn't want the bulletin
boards filled up all the
time said Marlena, "but
no secretary every called
from downtown to com-
plain about students who
advertise for typing
Dr. btevens, who had
looked at the state laws
regulating private business
on public property, said
that "solicitation for a
business is illegal, but
students are exempt if
they don't advertise
So Marlena kept cut-
ting hair.
However, when the
people at the N.C. Board
of Barber Examiners were
contacted, they said that
the 1979 state legislature
had changed a previous
law that allowed students
to practice barbering, add-
ing that Marlena was in
violation of the law.
Marlena replied to the
charge, saying that "first
of all, I've been falsely
accused because I never
advertised to do barbering
services � I'm a cosme-
tologist, and barbering
and cosmetology are two
different things
The law agrees on this
point, since the regula-
tions concerning the two
occupations are separate.
But when Catherine Munn
of the N.C. Board of
Cosmetology Art was con-
tacted, she said that
Marlena was indeed in
violation of the law, but on
entirely different grounds
than those given by the
N.C. Board of Barber
Examiners.
Munn quoted a North
Carolina general statute
which states that only
students who attend
"female institutions of
learning, who defray the
cost of such attendance
by the occasional practice
of cosmetology art" may
cut hair.
The penalty for viola-
tion is a maximum fine ol
$100 and up to 30 days in
jail. Where it applies, the
person's license may also
be revoked.
Mrs. Munn added that
she had also received a
complaint about Marlena
recently, and the board
would have to investigate
See HAIRCUT, page 6
The world is waiting.
If you've got talent, we want to see it. And then
we'll let you show it to the world at The Old Country
Busch Gardens, in Williamsburg, Va.
During our 1980 Audition Tour we'll be looking for
more singers, dancers, musicians, costume charac-
ters, mimes, jugglers, puppeteers and light and
sound technicians than ever before
Show off your talent to thousands of visitors
daily in one of seven stage productions or six
"street shows" in our unique European theme
setting. And with the addition of our brand new
country, Italy, our world just got bigger. And so
did yours.
You'll work with other outstanding talents and
earn a good salary while you're at it.
So get your act together and show it to us
Audition dete: Ti�
Greenville, North Carolina -Sl
Fri. Jan. 11,1-5 p.m.
East Carolina University
A J. Fletcher Recital Hall
Then get ready to show it to the world.
Accompanist, record player and cassette recorder will be available
An equal opportunity employer MFH
Jlpp&'locotids
208 EAST 5th SI
"Home of the Discount Top 100"
GREENVILLE, N.C. 27834
PHONE 758 1427
-Jhe
Country
lAwwu wAtUbtmaA ECU
The Staff at Apple
Records would like to
wish all of you hard work-
ing students a most enoy�-
able Christmas Holiday
vacation. We would also
like to express our sincere
appreciation for your
continued support in
these times of inflation
and uncertainty.
aso w hih r - s 9 G�
NEW YEAR! y g- �
Wed. Dec. 12th Carolina Opry House proudly Presents In concert
DOC WATSON
Also Plum Hollow
Two shows 7:00 pm & 10:00 Ppm. for advance ticket information
call 758-3943 only 450 people admitted for each show
Student tickets available at door for $4.00 with student I.D.





Page 6 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 11 December 1979
EXAM SCHEDULE
Times Class
Regularly Meets
Time and Day of Examination
8:00
8:00
9:00
9:00
10:00
10:00
11:00
11 :00
12:00
12:00
1:00
1:00
2:00
2:00
3:00
3:00
4:00
4:00
MWF
TTh
MWF
TTh
MWF
TTh
MWF
TTh
MWF
TTh
MWF
TTh
MWF
TTh
MWF
TTh
MWF
TTh
11:00- 1:00,
11:00- 1:00,
11 :00- 1:00,
11:00- 1:00,
2:00- 4:00,
2:00- 4:00,
2:00- 4:00,
2:00- 4:00,
2:00- 4:00,
2:00- 4:00,
8:00-10:00,
8:00-10:00,
8:00-10:00,
8:00-10:00,
8:00-10:00,
8:00-10:00,
11:00- 1:00,
11:00- 1 :00,
Monday, December 17
Tuesday, December 18
Wednesday, December 19
Thursday, December 13
Thursday, December 13
Friday, December 14
Monday, December 17
Tuesday, December 18
Wednesday, December 19
Thursday, December 20
Thursday, December 13
Friday, December 14
Monday, December 17
Tuesday, December 18
Wednesday, December 19
Thursday, December 20
Thursday, December 13
Friday, December 14
HAIRCUT

continued from page 5
the matter. She would not
say who had filed the
complaint.
Charles McLawhorn,
an ECU attorney who
often counsels students on
their legal rights, thinks
that such a law may be in
violation of the consti-
tutional right of equal
protection as outlined in
Amendment 14.
"If they can proscecute
her for something that
SANTA
would otherwise be legal
at a girl's school, then it is
clearly discriminatory he
said. McLawhorn added
that the 14th amendment
guaranteed that all citizens
be treated equally for the
same crime.
Marlene is still cutting
hair.
"I went all the way
through cosmetology
school and a special
haircutting school, and I'm
not going to throw it all
away for some silly law
that I don't believe in. I'm
not going to conform
she said.
TR 4NSIT
continued from page 1
mine the most efficient
use of the buses.
Fleming stated that
such a survey would be
done after Christmas
break.
For the present, Flem-
ing pointed out that he is
helping to cut maintenance
costs by purchasing some
replacement parts for the
buses from a local auto
parts dealer instead of
paying the higher costs at
Hastings Ford.
"For example, Hast-
ings would have charged
us $6.60 a gallon for
antifreeze, but I got �
across the street for
he
Fleming
12
th.t the' buses require
gallons of �nti-freeeG
Haley said that Green
viUe officials expect com-
riocateon 14.H
Street, in late 1980
continued from page 1
GOOD LUCK!
one customer came up and
slapped Santa on the face.
One of Clements' employ-
ees who was working in
front witnessed the inci-
dent and almost started to
cry.
"I think it is sad
Clements said. "Someone
slapped old Santa Claus,
man � is nothing sacred
anymore?"
"We were just trying
to be in the Christmas
spirit Clements said.
"That's really in the
Christmas spirit, man �
to slap Santa Claus
"It was really neat,
until this happened
Clements said.
"I am just looking to
get the things returned �
I am just looking to get
them back Clements
said.
PETITION
continued from page 1
know what he wants me to
do about Cambodia. I
didn't create it
According to a recent
news release, the Save the
Children Foundation is
now caring for 100,000
refugees. OXFAM inter-
national has shipped more
than 6,000 tons of food to
the refugees and is in the
process of sending more.
At this point, there are
ten deaths to every birth
Children under the age
of four may never recover
from possible brain dam-
age and bone deformation
caused by lengthy periods
' without food.
In some places, people
are eating the seedlings
out for the fields, which
will create future problems
for the refugees if not
enough food is growing to
feed the people in the
future.
Carson pointed out that
aid for survival is not
enough. There must be
increased amounts of food,
or malnutrition will still be
prevalent.
STUDENT UNION
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ft Alt students, faculty, staff,
alumni and their families
are welcome.
Available in JONES CAFETERIA
January 7, 8, 9th
9:00 am- 5:00pm
mm
Servomation Corporation
�v�.i.v Student Union Travel Committee
V
i





The East Carolinian
man l
features
Tuesday, December 11, 1979 Page 7
Greenville, N.C.
The decade
is nearly over
By SAIL PETT
AP Special Correspondent
The decade is about over, and who is sorry? A new
decade approaches, and who is optimistic?
Clearly, these are not the best of times nor the worst
of times. Mostly, the color is gray, a stubborn,
frustrating gray we can't seem to shake. The trouble
with our times, someone said, is ,hat the future isn't
what it used to be.
It used to be un-American to think that. Probably
more than any other nation in historv, this one has been
propelled by a sense of the future.
For 300 years, with the possible exceptions of the
Civil War and the Depression, we moved through good
times and bad with a sense that things would get better.
The next valley would be greener, the line on the graph
would climb, problems would be solved, technology
would save us, the right man would come along to lead
us.
But in the 'TO's. something new, something alien,
crept into our psyche. We woke up one morning and
didn't recognize ourselves or the world around us. We
began telling the pollsters, for the first time, that the
next five vears likely would be worse than the last five.
We said that our lives have been better than our
fathers1 but we don't expect our children's lives will be
as good as ours.
Among thinkers, the pessimists say this view is a
malaise that goes with the downhill slope. Thinking
optimists saj no: it is, a long last, a sign of national
maturity. John W. Gardner, a thinker and a doer, says
we have lost and will never regain our "morning
eagerness and, he says, this is just as well. The facts
of life, discovered by older nations long ago, are that the
line on the graph cannot go forever up.
In the last century, Toequeville, the acute French
observer, found Americans to be totally convinced that
"their whole destiny is in their hands Forty years ago,
Henry Luce was proclaiming the start of "the American
century Nothing so knocked hell out of either idea as
the decade now ending.
Buffalo chips fall in Alaska
Folks are feuding
Snow!
With Christmas approaching, the desire for that fun,
white stuff grows stronger. Perhaps next semester
nature will favor us with a few days of snowball
weather. (Photo by Kirk Kingsbury)
By ROXINNE ERVASTI
Associated Press Writer
JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) - Folks up
north in Buffalo Center and Delta Junction
are butting heads over where the chips
should fall.
the bison have grown aecu- i to the
noise, and to the helicopter id posses
on horseback that have chased them.
"It's nothing to see a herd of 100
buffalo 50 to 60 feet from your front
door says farmer Lee Spears. "VI hen
you get up in the morning, you don't want
That's chips as in buffalo chips, just to stagger out with your eyes closed
Nun wins Nobel Prize
one of the annoyances that have people
feuding over their local bison herd.
The bison are the ever-prospering
descendants of a Montana bunch imported
to the Fairbanks area in 1928 for the
pleasure of big game hunters. To the
people of Buffalo Center � named for the
huge beasts � they are a joy.
"They're fantastic animals says
Greg Cooke, executive director for the
Fish and Game boards. "They gallop,
their baby calves in the spring are so
graeious to look at, they're a sociable
animal, motherly, pairing off, well,
they're the romance and mystique of the
last frontier
But they are a plague to people in
A few bison are lost each winter.
clobbered by cars along the foggy Maska
Highway, which is sort of a divider
Farmers grow barley to the north of it.
and the buffalo are supposed to stick to
the south, where the Legislature this year
set aside 72,000 acres as a buffalo
preserve.
The idea, as one legislator put it, was
that "the state will plant barley and
grasses for the buffalo at one place �
they won't eat the people's barley in
another place The Legislature decide
to give it a three-year chance.
But Bob Palmer, who works in the
governor's office and also heads the Delta
Farming Project, says the Fish and Game
Delta Junction, which has acres of barley people planted the buffalo barley too (
thriving under the midnight sun and the to the people's barley. He told Gov. Ja
care of a state-sponsored agriculture Hammond to halt the project.
By PAUL CHUTKOW
Associated Press Writer
See DtCADt, pe tt
OSLO, Norway (AP) -
The Norwegian Nobel
Committee today delivered
the 1979 Nobel Peace
Prize to Mother Teresa of
Calcutta, praising the Ro-
man Catholic nun who has
devoted her life to India's
poor for her respect for
the individuals she helps.
In a speech prepared
for delivery at the award
ceremony in Oslo, the
chairman of the commit-
tee, Prof. John Sanness,
Taid mmer-T&vsr-msv
served the prize "because
she.promotes peace in the
most lundamental manner
� by her confirmation of
human dignity
The year's 10 other
Nobel laureates, five of
them Americans, were to
receive their prizes today
at a ceremony in Stock-
holm.
Recounting the 33
years Mother Teresa has
spent tending the poor and
the sick in the sprawling
slums of Calcutta, Sanness
recalled she once said:
"In these years of work
being can experience
"She believes San-
ness said, "that the worst
disease today is not
leprosy or tuberculosis,
but rather the feeling of
being unwanted, uncared
for and deserted by
everybody.
"The hallmark of her
work has been respect for
the individual and the
individual's worth and
dignity
Sanness said the Yugo-
slav nun, the sixth woman
project. The bison periodically raid the
barley fields.
And then there are the chips. Says one
resident:
"Chips. Ha! They're something else.
They call 'em Delta Frisbees. But they're
People now accuse Palmer of "waging
a hate campaign against bison
"I like buffalo myself Palmer says
"But this was enticing them to the
fields
In addition, soldiers from Fort Greeley
more like giant chocolate drops, and they are to plant barley patches next spring
freeze solid. Makes the road rough. One
guy in charge of plowing the airport
runway tells of almost being thrown
through the window when he hit one of
them chips. You curse the buffalo, but
you love 'em.
along a recognized buffalo migration
route. Palmer says the state will pay the
Army up to $30,000 for seed and fertilizer.
Some say that's an attempt to thwart
the buffalo range idea, spoil the
three-year experiment and take over more
The war between the two villages is, at land for barley.
ajnoa0the people, I have . to win the Peace Prize,
come more and mor$to shares the standard of
' lattffiSl�r �TrS?8Stng another Nobel laureate:
unwanted that is the worst the "veneration of life" of
disease that any human the late Albert Schweitzer.
this stage, still a war of words. But Rep.
Pappy Moss of Delta Junction warns with
a smile, "We're keeping our powder
dry
The only shots fired in the battle have
been automatic noise charges blasted over
the fields every few minutes. Trouble is,
'It disturbs us, it's like the old salami
thing, one slice at a time and pretty oon
you've just got the string left a-
trapper Charlie Boyd, chairman of the
Delta area Fish and Game Advisory
Committed t f
See FOLKS, page 10
Dorm meals can be nutritious
inexpensive and good-tasting
Bv TERRY POLLOCK
"and ED MOLNAR
"It would take two
hours to fix dinner in this
room. Let's just run to
McDonalds
Surprise! You can pre-
pare a meal that's good-
tasting, inexpensive and
even nutritious, right in
your dorm room, and do it
using a hotplate, toaster
(Photo by Kirk Kingsbury)
Fruit or any kind of food normally eaten at a meal are
the suggested snacks from the Student Dietetic
Association.
CORRECTION
In David Miller's
article, The Sounds of
the Seventies Revisited,
which appeared in last
Thursday's edition,
Steve Hancock wished
to include Lou Reed's
Rock'n 'Roll Animal as a
16th selection in his list
of favorites.
Animals used to aid sick
By CHRIS ROBERTS
Associated Press Writer
Walking in the moon-
light one quiet night many
years ago, the monk
overheard the young tough
� who wouldn't talk to
the school psychiatrist �
pouring out his troubles to
a Russian wolfhound.
So, officials at Lincoln
Hall, a home for wayward
boys run by the Christian
Brothers outside New York
City, acquired some dogs
to do what people
couldn't.
Today, dogs and other
animals, from ants to alii
gators, are being used
extensively in the psycho-
logical care of the emo-
tionally disturbed, the
mentally retarded, the old.
"Whether it is a dog,
eat, lizard or mouse, pets
do not react to the color of
a person's skin, his
uncombed hair, his dirty
clothes, or substandard
speech says Dr. Boris
M. Levinson, a psycho-
logist and pioneer in the
field.
"A child who finds it
most difficult to tell us
how he feels about his
dreams and relationships
finds his tongue when he
has to discuss his prob-
lems with a dog Another
pioneer, Dr. Samuel Cor-
son, puts it this way: "A
dog is a man's best friend
because he wags his tail
and not his tongue
The results of pet
psychotherapy, or pet-
facilitated psychotherapy
(PFP as" it is now some-
times called), can be
startling, if not completely
understood.
Take Jed, who in 1949
was admitted to the Castle
Nursing Home in Millers-
burg, Ohio, after suffering
apparent brain damage in
a fall. Doctors believed the
accident had left him deaf
and mute. For years, he
grew old in silence.
Then in 1975, Corson,
a psychiatry professor at
Ohio State, took his
"Feeling heart dogs" to
the home. Corson says Jed
stroked the fur of a dog
named "Whiskey" and
smiled. "You brought that
dog the old man said.
They were his first words
in 26 years.
"You can walk through
a whole ward in some of
these homes and they
don't even know you're
there" Corson says. "It's
like walking through a
See ANIMALS, page 8
oven or whatever cooking
equipment is available.
Most people would
agree that feeling great
usually goes along with
being healthy, and good
food is basic to health.
What we might really
need to know is just what
is meant by "good" food.
A suitable definition
might mention that a day's
worth of chowing down
should include the follow-
ing: a wide variety of
foods from the fruit,
vegetable, milk, breat and
meat groups. Making this
variety part of one's diet is
not as difficult as it
sounds.
A good day begins with
a good breakfast. Eating a
morsel is better than
eating nothing until lunch.
Breakfast does not
have to be bacon and eggs
or cereal. A cheese and
tomato sandwich, peanut
butter toast, a banana
could do nicely. More
traditionally, a bowl of
oatmeal or cream of wheat
(with milk, brown sugar)
can usually be prepared
and eaten quickly. Both
are low-cost and provide
essential nutrients like B
vitamins.
Lunchtime soups, sand-
wiches and salads are
easily prepared and even and, if put in a glass jar,
faster if a little pre-plann- will remain fresh-tasting
ing is involved. Tuna for about 2 weeks in the
salad, made with canned icebox.
tuna (drained), mayon- By now, it's time for
naise, pickles and celery dinner. The real experi-
can be stored in a covered ment begins.
plastic container in the Julie Child says that in
refrigerator. cooking, "you've got to
Boil several eggs for have a what-the-hell atti-
about 7 minutes, peel and tude
refrigerate for munching You might begin by
anytime. They're great stocking up on a few
alone, seasoned, in salads staple foods that form the
and even sliced into basis of many meals. High
sandwiches. protein, low cost items
Peanut butter sand- include canned tuna,
wiches with a hand full of chicken, mild and medium
raisins tossed in provide cheddar cheese, mozza-
protein and iron. rella cheese, whole wheat
Adding milk to canned macaroni,
soups gives them more Cook the macaroni, and
heartiness and nutrition, add shredded cheese and
Remember that milk is a a little milk for a very
good source of many filling dish,
important nutrients at a Keep rice around to
cost of about 15 cents per cook and combine with
glass. chicken or tuna, onion and
Some green pepper canned peas for a tasty
sliced into a bean-based casserole,
canned soup compliments Cheese added to any
the flavor while boosting food enhances protein and
the vitamin C content, calcium, not to mention
Speaking of vitamin C, flavor,
many people fail to get Other supper staples
enough each day. Keep include canned vegetables
orange juice handy or such as tomatoes (tastier,
oranges themselves, which cheaper than the hot
don't require refrigeration, house kind), lima, green
Tomato juice is another
good vitamin C source See MEALS, page 10
Humor
Welcome to Exam Week, peasants-
May I begin by saying that it is rawther difficult to
even be thinking in semi-humorous terms on the eve of
exams.
I've been sitting here, pondering the week in front of
me and I realized that only someone with an extremely
warped sense of humor can find anything amusing about
exam week. The atmosphere of paranoia and panic u
simply not conducive to a good laugh.
So I guess I won't even try.
I will however make a comment, just in passing, on
the phenomena of the pre-reading day drunk. I pull one
every year, and am heartily in favor of the practice. It's
a nice way to relieve tensions (for a little while) and
start exam week out with the degree of respect it so
richly deserves.
. At any rate, I'd like to point out that the Christmas
holidays are thundering in on the veritable heels of
exams and I, for one, am looking forward to that with a
passion Saint Nicholas would have admired.
I'll gain back every pound I lost while chewing
No-Doze in an orgy of eating home-cooked food again.
I'll drink an amazing amount of alcohol in an effort to
wipe out the painful thoughts of grades and I'll sleep so
much people will fear for my health. I'll watch TV until
I'm blue in the face and will read all the trash novels I
never have time for. I will, in short, live my allotted
three weeks to their fullest.
Which brings me back to the unfortunate realization
that I'm not home free yet. Dammit.
Anyway, let me go ahead and take this opportunity
to wish the rest of you guys the best of luck on
you-know-what and happy holidays too. Check you again
Spring Semester for another round of Academia.
So much for humor this week.
Yours,
775134
LeAfWi htwr Colccgc -rwr ftau Wai
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ShORT MM� MDI0
twc (OMOsfHeaT, fao com
LOrOG UMVt (Ufc� AM. MPrO)
60CS THWOGH THf
OUTCfc

MiCr0 MftCflO rW.
i I





Page 8 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 11 December 1979
AN I MA IS
room lull ol stones.
"Bui it you bring in i
pet, the) brighten up. Vn
inim ! offers a patient
� . ittention and accep-
r vvil hout ci iticism.
I In reci nt
studies i" show jusl how
in institutions are us-
as therapeutic
n d u et ed a
i 972 that
he psveho-
irk state
- Hie sort
Vnd
vania a
b the
i for the
Cruelt to
the same
to ilog,
illigators,
snaus
.j eold
am
I PFP
I
-
I
.1
�' -
. PFP
th a big,

lias vritt
subject
nted
Child Psychotherapy
In his office, the
goateed psychologist
would introduce his young
patients to Jingles. Then
the youngsters would ask
the dog to shake hands
and dance, l.evinson says
sometimes cookies were
offered to the dog as an
incentive.
"One child said to me,
T am also Jingles. I also
want to dance" Levinson
recalled in a paper pre
sented to the American
Psychological Association.
"This chili! got down
on his knees, started to
hark like a dog, and asked
me to give him a cookie.
In great joy and glee, he
then puked up the waste
basket, scattered its con-
tents, put it on his head
ami started howling like a
wolf.
"This apparently re-
lieved him and he went on
with his pla as usual. He
then said to me, "w hy
. an'l you have two dogs
and whj can't you take me
as one of them?"
"Interspersed with his
request were questions
about myself � whether 1
had a wife; how many
children 1 had: how big
they were
"It was clear that the
child wanted to become
part of my family. It the
human com lenient was
full, the dog complement
was not, and he would like
to be considered, it a
vacancy existed
There arc some 740
patients at the South
Mountain Restoration Cen-
ter near Waynesboro, Pa.
They've come from state
retardation centers or
mental hospitals with a
chance to return someday
to life on the outside.
Down the road is the
Antietam Humane Society.
managed by Ted Thomas,
a 26-year-old sociology
major and animal lover.
Lately, he's been taking
the shelter animals up to
the center.
"I'm not sure why it
work but it 0 he
says. "Even the quiet
ones begin yapping with
the dogs
'Feeling heart dog
� or "seeing heart
dog as Levinson calls
them � have been lis-
tening to kids' problems at
Lincoln Hall, the school for
wayward hoy for the last
20 years.
When Joe. a sullen
13-vear-old, entered the
continued from page 7
990-acre facility 40 miles
north of New York City, he
was a hulk of hostility and
silence. Three years later,
according to school offi-
cials, he was a well-
adjusted, cooperative,
above-average student.
He attributed the
change to a Labrador
retriever named "Lucky
one of three "social
worker" dogs in his
cottage.
"Before Lincoln Hall,
people meant a mother
who deserted me, kids
who hated other kids, cops
who chased me, and
judges who sentenced
me Joe says.
"Lucky needed me for
food and affection � the
first thing that ever did
classified
tor �
ROOMMATE WANTED: ROOMMATE WANTED:
Support
East
Carolinian
Advertisers
FOR SALE: 27" 10 speed
J&B Cycles of Miami Book
Carrier and car bike rack.
$95. Call Lou at 758-9791.
TOYOTA '71: Man new
tires, 10 miles. Good
condition. $700 firm.
752-0787.
FOR SALE: Used furniture
used small appliances and
other miscellaneous
household items. Call
756-5413.
jtorwnt 8
WANTED: Female desires
to move in immediately
with one or two females in
an appartment or house
close to campus. Call
Janice at 758-2424 be-
tween 3 and 6 p.m. or
Debbie at 746-4704 be-
tween 9 and 10:30 p.m.
RESPONSIBLE FEMALE:
To share 3-bedroom house
Spring semester. Within
walking distance of cam-
pus. $75 rent and 3 of
utilities. Need bedroom
furniture. Call 758-2850.
To live in large two-story
country home located sev-
en minutes from campus.
Grad. Student andor
working professional who
enjoys privacy and saving
money. Must be respon-
sible adult who plans to be
in area one year or more.
For a talk 'call 758-3151
(ext. 233) between 8-10
a.m. or 2-5 p.m. After 5
p.m. call 752-2791.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED: To share two
bedroom duplex !75 per.
mo. plus V2 utilities. Close
to campus. Call 752-8621
and leave a message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED: Half of rent
and utilities. Call 752-7616
FEMALE ROOMMATES:
Two needed to share
3-bedroom trailer located
about 2V2 miles from
ECU. Call Bonnie at 758-
5316 or collect at 793-4129.
$50.00 per month three
says plus V3 utilities.
MALE ROOMMATE:
Needed to share two-bed-
room apt. at Tar River.
Rent is $210 per month,
split two ways, plus ' 2 of
utilities. Call'756-6897.
Young professor or pro-
fessional. Dynamite new
house in country. Must be
cool must be house
broken. $150 mo. plust ! 2
utilities. Call 758-5590
after 9 p.m.
TWO ROOMMATES
NEEDED: To occupy V
bedroom house on Chest-
nut St. IVi miles from
campus. Rent and utilities
and full house privledges
$85 mo. Call Jodj at
758-3524.
ROOM FOR RENT: Spa
cious room for smoking
female. Kitchen privileges.
Across from Jari Dorm.
$90 per. mo. 752-5528.
FOR RENT: Two bedroom
apt. available alter Dec. 20
for sublease. Contact
758-1019.
ROOM FOR RENT: Fur
nished with private bath.
no kitchen priviledges, 175
per. mo. Call 758-2585.
D
TYPING DONE: Term
papers, thesis, resumes,
etc. Reasonable. Call Jane
Pollock at 752-9719.
NEED X-TRA CASH Ka.r
prices paid for gold and
-ilver and silver coins
Mixed Media. 120 E. 5th
St. 758-2127
LOST: Gold bracelet with
Nancj engraved on the
front. It found please call
752-8245 or come by room
1 12 Jarvis. Reward!
LOST: Leather checkbook
between Fifth Si and
Flanagan. Reward Offer
ed. Contact Flip al
181
HORSE RACK RIDING
I)a or night, individuals
or ' groups. rri-Countj
Stables, Grimesland Call
2-6893.
I PING: R lial b and
speedy tvpisl at reason-
able rate Call 752-2724.
GOOD DOG FREE 1 � -
person. Thomas. Prel
female owner needs
Call 756-6644 after 6 p.m.
B RTENDERS KND
STRESSES NEEDED
For new night club. 1
daj for applications
12th between 3 and 6 p.m
at 10th St. Station, Ri
Bluff Road. For more info,
call 758-7912.
,ML3
ABORTIONS UP TO 12TH
WEEK OF PREGNANCY
$175.00 "all inclusive'
� gnancy test birt�i control and
problem pregnancy counseling Forj
further intorn e 00 call 832-0535 (to
free number 800-2?i-2568) between
9AM-5PM weekdays
Raleigh Women's Health
Organization
917 West Morgan St
Raleigh. N.C. 27603
roiMTSitJ
THE COMPLETE
STUDENT
ALL YOU CAN EAT
SPECIALS
4 00 8 00 PM
SALAD-50 EXTRA
99
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Phone 756-7031





Watson's decade
11 December 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 9
music is
unique
One of the few cultural
phenomenon this country
can truly claim is the rich,
unmistakeable tradition of
the music of the South.
The type of music tht has
been built around the
influences of artists like
Doc Watson.
The legendary Watson
and son Merle aren't
mere interpretersthey're
the real thing. They
continue to dedicate them-
sleves to teh form that is
as much a part of our
heritage as baseball, the
Grand Canyon and steam-
boats on the Mississippi.
They've been wrongly
lung into different cate-
gories at different times.
Some have called them
folk artists while others
have confined them within
the country boundaries.
But, the Watsons are
multi-talented, creating a
spectrum of moods.
With the coming of the
'60's and the folk music
boom. Doc became a
favorite of the devout
folkies' who cherished the
pure, unamplified sound of
the true Southern music.
Doc was suddenly
thrust into the forefront of
a musical trend. The
authenticity of his material
ami performance was the
key. The unique quality of
both placed him among
the leaders of his field.
His subtle wit and warm
personality charmed
audiences, but his adept
musicianship held them in
a spell.
Even now, as Doc and
Merle tour the country,
audiences get caught up in
the mastery of Watson as
he tells the tales of his
time, of our time.
Doc Watson will be
appearing at the Carolina
Opry House on Wed. Dec.
12. at 7 and 10 p.m.
continued from page 7
Relentlessly, Vietnam shredded our omnipotence,
and Watergate befouled our trust in government.
Inflation picked our pockets without mercy, and abroad
the mighty dollar staggered like a collapsing drunk
chased bv a lynch mob.
The oil shortage gave us our first shocking taste of
limits and made our foreign policy hostage to foreigners.
Miasmas like Guyana defied our very understanding of
human nature. In the United Nations, which we started,
we found ourselves pilloried and outnumbered.
In Iran, for weeks, we found ourselves helpless to
free Americans held captive in our embassy, this near
the end of a decade which would not let go of violence
to our pride and self-perception. . (
In the middle of the decade, a brief shining hour, as
telling for its warmth as for its brevity. July 4, 1976, and
didn't it feel good feeling good again? Wasn't it nice
that everybody behaved? Nobody marched in protest,
nobodv raised'hell, nobody took a shot at the president,
nothing desecrated the moment. On our 200th birthday,
we were allowed a sense of family, for a day.
The previous decade, the bloody, mind-rattling
cacophony called the Ws, also had its shining hour
when we and the world, with a breathless sense of
community, watched men walk on the moon. We had
parted the curtain of an eternal mystery, we had beaten
the Russians, American technology had prevailed and
there was a promise of mastering the universe. Except
for our part down here.
Like the golden hour of the' '70's, it was quickly
forgotten in a parade of earthly miseries and recalled
only be negative refrain: Why can't a country that could
put' a man on the moon solve the problems of the cities,
pollution, energy?
Ironv, it seemed, had been built into the calendar.
Late in 1959, Look Magazine took the public pulse and
found that most Americans were "relaxed, unadventur-
ous, comfortably satisfied with their way of life and
blandlv optimistic about the future Their kids'
opinions, Look said, mostly mirrored their own and there
was no sign of a generation gap.
Then came the '60's.
On the third day of the '70's, Gallup published a poll
in which Americans were asked whom they admired
most in the whole world. Richard Nixon, they said,
followed by Billy Graham and Spiro Agnew.
It was a hard time for prophets.
If you were middle-aged in the '70's, you belonged
to a generation that was asked to absorb more change
than probablv any in history.
When we married, we married forever, we thought.
Wives would be content to be wives and mothers, we
thought. Our kids would do better emotionally than we
did because we were better prepared to be parents than
ours were.
It was as if you built a house at the end of the
railroad line, built it of brick and mortar and heavy
timber, and suddenly the railroad wasn't running there
anvmore.
Suddenly, you couldn't find your children anymore or
the road signs you grew up with or, for that matter, the
Boston Braves. Suddenly, there was alienation, the new
math, a new wrath, pot, acid and rock, and who
remembered Tommy Dorsey? Suddenly, somewhere in
the '70's, the youth uproar subsided and , it seemed,
the kids might be coming home.
But they weren't marrying and they weren t having
children and the thing called the American way of life
now had to include the fact that nearly half of our
marriages were ending in divorce.
Suddenly, the money you earned was not what you
took home and what you took home was not what you
kept and what you put in the bank on Tuesday was
worth less on Thursday. ,
Suddenly, while you're still looking for the Boston
Braves-were they in Milwaukee or Atlanta?�it turns out
that baseball gloves now come from Taiwan, the big
hotel downtown belongs to the Arabs, the Russians are
buying up our grain, the British now own Gimbels and
the West Germans and British have bought the
birthplaces of two American presidents in old Virginia.
We are told to take heart, that this kind of thing reflects
the confidence of foreign investors in our stability, but
who will keep the Grand Canyon out of Saudi hands?
Suddenly, it seems, we are all aware of the disparate
world, rich and poor, fat and hungry, which it alwasy
was, except that now instant communications make the
hungry instantly aware of the well-fed. A world divided
by nations ending the 20th century and by nations just
entering it. � (
Change, change. Nothing holds still. Yesterdays
solutions become today's problems. "Modern society
wrote columnist George Will, "is like a Calder mobile.
Disturb it here and it jiggles over there
The need for clean air collides with the need for coal.
Black progress runs into white rights and the singular,
frustrating combination of inflation and recession defies
everything we learned in Economics 1.
Welfare, we begin to see, may always be with us;
government spending now accounts for more than a
third of the gross national product in the mecca of free
enterprise; Uncle Sam tries to bail out Chrysler, and in
Detroit, where they still remember the bloody sit-down
strikes, the union now holds a seat on the company's
board of directors.
"There is an almost overpowering temptation to
believe says John Gardner, "that somewhere along
the line we made on big mistake, forgot one truth,
overlooked the one key to salvation.
"We want a simple answerBut the pat formula will
never appear. Many things are wrong. Many things
must be done
Students Allied for Victory In Iran
Today
Tomorrow
America at Sit for SO
r in silent protest
Gunpoint
The first in a series
of lectures
on the campus mall
rhe first in a series
of lectures I 11 �"� -4 p.m.
8 p.m. Hendrix Theatre Please, no alcohol.
The First
Miss East Carolina
University Pageant
Wright Auditorium
Tues. Jan. 22,1980, 7:00 p.m.
Girls must be sponsored
by an E.C.U. organization
If you would like to enter
phone 752-5543
or come by Kappa Sigma House
700 E. 10th St.
Deadline Jan. 15,1980
Support
East Carolinian
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i
i





Page 10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 11 December 1979
Weekly Album Review Latest Releases
By PAT MINCES
Features Writer
Pat Metheny Croup � American Garage
American Garage is the best jazz album of the year
and rivals Journey Through The Secret Life of Plants as
the best album of 1979.
Five years ago a friend of mine from Boston raved
about a young guitarist named Pat Metheny, whom he
had heard in clubs, and this guy would get real ezcited.
Buying Metheny's second album, Bright Size Life was a
turning point in my musical growth for never had I
heard anything so different and yet so damn good.
Pat Metheny is one of the second generation of the
new wave of jazz artists bringing music that is both
aesthetically dynamic and yet has tremendous popular
appeal.
The Pat Metheny Croup is perhaps the finest band to
come out of the "me generation" of the '70s. This band
is the antagonist of such an ideal. These guys know how
to give of themselves to achieve popular acclaim without
giving too much and losing their dignity as a jazz
medium.
American Garage is not as good as last year's Pat
Metheny album mainly because Lyle Mays uses more
synthesizers than in his previous endeavor. It is still a
superb album, with the Beatles' influence once again
showing up in the title cut. You will probably hear a lot
of this album on the commercial radio, which is great
because radio needs a shot in the arm like Pat Metheny
can give. If you have heard Pat Metheny, you have got
to love him. If not, American Garage will bring him to
you.
The best!
The Bar-Kays � Injoy
These guys are hot, and this album is a scorcher. If
Michael Jackson's Off The Wall wasn't the finest black
album on the charts, Injoy would certainly be the
number one Soul release in the nation. It contains good
funk, some excellent dance music (the word disco is out)
and a few nice ballads.
Maybe it is just me, but there seems to be a strong
Clintonesque feel to the funk in this album, especially
on the hit single "Move Your Boogie Body The
percussion on Injoy is superb, and the horn and string
arrangements are perhaps its distinguishing facets
adding a subtle but dynamic support. The Bar-Kays are
a relatively large group, and this allows for a wide
ari of instruments and vocal harmonies.
I really like "Running In And Out Of My Life and
you gotta like Injoy.
Frank Zappa � Joe's Garage Acts II & III
Well, my house is pretty well secured, I have got a
big dog, no children or wife and have hospital
insurance, so I guess now I can say something bad
about Frank Zappa, even though I love him with all my
heart.
This album really has very little to offer and perhaps
should never have been released, especially in the
double album format. If this is the kind of stuff Zappa
Records is going to release thanks, but no thanks.
Frank Zappa is a musical genius, and perhaps the
greatest composer of the last fifty years, but I think that
perhaps he was preoccupied with his new movie "Baby
Snakes which will open soon in New York.
Joe's Garage, last summer's entry, was an excellent
album which predicted the kind of catastrophe that
happened last week at The Who concert in Cincinnati as
one of the evils of music. Acts II & III details further the
story of poor old Joe and his terrible fate at the hands of
the scourge of future mankind, music.
Since not everyone is the same, legislators pass laws
making almost anything illegal, and this process of
"total criminalization" makes everyone crooks, just like
former presidents and corporate executives.
Joe goes to an appliantology disco where he picks up
a Sy Borg, a machine like your very own toaster, with
which to have sex.
Joe's golden shower shorts out Sy Borg, and Joe is
sent to prison for destroying public property. (The disco
was owned by the government � clever means of
intrapment, heh?)
Joe's life becomes a daily gang bang from corporate
executives, and he carelessly dreams his life away with
imaginary guitar solos. The same horros can happen to
you if you fall prey to the demon music.
Acts II & III has a lot to say thematically but not so
much musically. Frequently it just drones on, not
seeming to go anywhere at all, and that may be the
point, but I doubt it. Zappa's guitar playing is perhaps
as grand as it has been on any album. The
compositions, however, are not up to par with what
Zappa usually produces and sometimes seem to flog the
proverbial dead horse. The musicians are as good as
ever, but perhaps Zappa should have saved their efforts
for a more worthwhile endeavor.
Pink Floyd - The Wall
Saturday Night Fever will soon fall from the ranks of
the top-selling albums so that there will not even be a
rival to Pink Floyd's Dark Side Of The Moon for the
longest current best-selling album (on the charts for an
earth-shattering 287 weeks).
Pink Floyd's follow-up to this tremendous album was
dismal, and their latest endeavor, The Wall, is pretty
weak. The boys from Cambridge just seem to have lost
that spark of genius that propelled them to messianic
proportions in the late '70s.
The Wall is a very nice production package, but as
always you cannot judge a book by its cover. If you buy
the album, you can pull the sticker off the front, and it
gives you a nice window sticker, which I think is a nifty
idea.
The album cover itself is" kind of freaky, and the
concept behind the album, the walls which we build up
between us, is also commendable. The music on the
inside is mostly humdrum material that would put all
but a diehard Pink Floyd fan to sleep.
The album is dominated by electric and acoustic
guitars. This is logical because only Roger Waters on
bass and Dave Cilmour on guitar are left from the
original foursome.
The driving percussion and the special effects
keyboards are gone, leaving only a spooky ghost where
there was once a terrifying Nazgul.
Roger Waters writes all the tunes, and bass players
tend to write morose ditties. The Wall is made up of
bricks. Once again, an epic effort that winds up
crumudgeon of mediocrity.
Ppfffllltt.
The Inmates � First Offence
Man, these guys really do bite the big one. I was
disappointed in this album. It has sold a lot in all the
right places and came highly recommended from the
guys at the record store. It was bad enough when The
Knack got famous copying The Beatles, but these guys
carry the joke a bit too far.
This is the first generation of Stones' clones, because
if this isn't an exact copy of the late sixties Stones, I will
go out on a date with Ron Wood.
This is enough to make me start "Fighting In The
Streets To take what talent one has and prostitute it
by cloning someone else's music is the ultimate sin. It is
alright for a group at the Attic to do this, but how could
a major recording company promote such balderdash? If
you like the Stones, you might like The Inmates, but
probably you will be appalled.
It may be their First Offence, but I say call on the
Ayatollah to admister some Islamic Justice on these
criminals.
Albums courtesy of The Record Bar, Carolina East
Mall and Pitt Plaza, Greenville.
Support
East
Carolinian
Advertisers
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MEALS
continued from page 7
kidney beans and
en and blackeyed peas.
Canned versions of peas,
whole keraal corn, loma
s and beans can always
added to lettuce, onion
and carrots for a tasty
salad.
Canned goods store
anywhere, and while fresh
tables are best, few
students can grow produce
in their window sills.
Onions and potatoes, hw-
ever, keep well in their net
- in a dry place.
Onions are high in
some trace minerals and
certainly perk up many
dishes. Sauteing (brown-
ing in a little oil) makes
them friendlier.
Learn to eat potatoes
with peels attached. Wash
and slice or chop so they'll
cook faster. Season them
and top them with cheese.
Experiment!
Highly salted foods
such as potato and corn
chips, Cheetos, or snacks
that are high in sugar
content should be left out
of your basic diet. They
are expensive and un-
healthy.
Acceptable snacks are
popcorn, dried or fresh
fruit, oatmeal cookies,
yogurt or anything that
you might have at a meal.
Beginning next semes-
ter, the Student Dietetic-
Association of ECU will
have a "Dear Abby" type
of column in The East.
Carolinian. The SDA is lhe
student organization for
Foods, Nutrition and Insti-
tution Management majors
or anyone interested in
nutrition.
Drop your questions
concerning food or nutri-
tion off at The East
Carolinian office in the
publications building, care
of the Features Editor.
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FOLKS
continued from page 7
There have been suggestions that the buffalo be
!ared "domestic" so they can be turned over to
cattle ranchers who want to breed them for "beefalo
But that seems an unlikely proposal.
"id say 99 and 44-100ths percent of the people want
them kept free ranging says Cooke. "They're
extremely emotional about them. It's like people who
went bananas over the buffalo and Indian head nickel
Cooke says the buffalo amble up to softball fields,
halting the game action as fans and players stand
transfixed. "Where else do you find that?" he asks.
"People tell all kinds of stories about them says
game biologist Bob Larson. "Buiialo will fall down wells
and the guys come along with wreckers and pull 'em
out. My gosh, those bulls weigh a ton and they're the
size of a Volkswagen
Moss champions the buffalo in the Legislature but
admits they have caused him problems.
'Momma and I got a homestead on the west side of
tne Delta River, and we stacked 20 tons of hay around
the chicken house to keep the chickens from freezing.
The darn buffalo came and ate it, kind of like the Three
Little Pigs
But, insists Moss, "The people will get rid of the
politicians before they'll get rid of the buffalo
PIZZA BUFFET
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MonFri. 11:30-2:00
Mon. fiP Tues. 6:00 8:00
Evening buffet 0Z.B9
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it
"When Clara Barton started
American Red Cross back in
the 1880's. its big job was to
aid people during major
disaster.
I
'Over the years. Red Cross
has taken on lots of other jobs
jobs right around home.
"But never forget that right
along with all these important
neighborhood jobs. Red Cross's
v itai national job has never
changed.
Thank you very much for your
business in 1979
MERRY CHRISTMAS
and
HAPPY
NEW YEAR
Keep Red Cross ready.
U.B.E
to all ECU students 6gAvillejSc
i





I'he Kasl (Carolinian
sports
Tuesday, December It, 1979 Page 11
Greenville, N.C.
ECU downs
USC-Aiken
by 96-64
BVRLES (II NDLER
Sports Editoi
levision commercial states 'Thanks, I needed
lasl night, East Carolina basketball coach
rid basically the same thing to his players.
Pirates gained a much-needed big win by
- ,tl I arolina- Viken -64 as five ECU players
louble figures. The win followed a 92-73 loss
� 1 Duke, ending Odom's worries that the
ight suffer an emotional letdown after facing
.ht Blue Devils.
� their history Odom said, referring to the
Pirates seemed to have emotional lapses the
seasons. "But I ran see that we are growing
� rhis was a verj big win for us in that we
keep up our intensity for almosl the full U)
Pirates jumped off to a quick 34-19 lead in the
the game, despite the fact that
ge Maynor -at on the bench tor ten
the Pirates' fast -tart was the shooting of
, , right of those first 34 points.
- never got closer than U
ime, ECU came out somewhat
� saw it- load dwindle to 13 at
- pie dunk with 14:02 left. It was
t1 the Pirates reestablished the
been theirs in the first half. In the
p Seiple's dunk, the) outscored the
ehind the shooting oi Herb Graj and
lead reached a peak of 34 points with
te left as George Maynor hauled in a pass
. and calmly slid it behind his bark l a
. Miles, who slammed it homo, much to
the Minges Coliseum crowd, giving ECl a
Odom noted thai the comlortable
i most of the game allowed
, night � semi-relaxation. " Uter
. Said, "it was a pressure-free game.
� hange
Pirates1 59.7 accuracy from the field must
so been a "welcome change" to the rookie coach,
, the team ha- had several sub-par games
shooting in a row.
"We definitely shot well early, said Odom. It -
really g1 to see (Herb) Krusen and (Kyle) Powers
me out of their shooting slumps.
Both saddled with problems for the last lhr�
tnd Powers combined to connect on
an the field last night.
ird Herb Gray led Pirate scoring with 17 point
ime-high 11 rebounds. Mso �rum
r EC1 was Krusen and Powers with
( rwood I I and Mark McLaurin with
.s than 11 Pirates played at least 17 minutes
piaye i any more than the 22 logged by
finished the game with (our assists
I all along that we have a lot of people who
timed Odom. "And I'm very glad that
s, e a good amount ol time tonight.
Pirates, now V-2. face James Madison at 2 p.m.
- turdav in Minges Coliseum and. says Odom. the game
hard-fought one. "They will come in here
:� he said. "They're just crushing p ople
Following the Madison game, the Pirates will I si
.erful Old Dominion next Tuesday night.
Ed Emory
New Pirate helmsman
set to assume duties
(Photo courtesy of Tommy Forrest)
Nen football coach Ed Emory
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
After over a week of
speculation and contro-
versy surrounding the
resignation of head foot-
hall coach Pat Dye,
Chancellor Thomas B.
Brewer Saturday announc-
ed the selection of former
Georgia Tech assistant Ed
Emory to fill the vacancy.
Emory had served at
Duke, Clemson and Wake
Forest after a successful
career in the high school
ranks.
The Lancaster, S.C.
native compiled an 80-12-4
record during stops at
Grainger High in Kinston.
Wadesboro and Bowman
Highs in Wadesboro and
Brevard High, as well as a
92-10-2 mark in wrestling,
72-10 in track and 38-6 in
tennis.
Emory is an alumnus
of East Carolina and
reportedly that weighed
heavily in the final deci-
sion between him and
Pirate assistant Dick
Kupec.
"1 am delighted that
our next coach is an ECU
alumnus said Brewer in
an address to the media
and a gathering of Pirate
staff and supporters.
Quoting Chan Tlor
Emeritus Leo W. Jenkins,
Brewer stated, "Vv e will
play anybody, anytime.
anywhere but added his
own corollary in support ol
athletics by saying, "ve
will WHIP anybody, any-
where, anytime
Emory attended Cam-
den (S.C.) Military V a
dem w here he ��� i -
captain ol the football
team tor two years and
all-Southern i- a senior.
- a collegiate, Emory
was selected co-captain his
senior year and won third
team All- Amen an honors
He w as all-conferem e
three seasons, and was
named the top lineman
and top blocker twice
Emory said that he
plans to continue to use
the wishbone attack which
paved the way tor the 1979
the
I
"Wh

Car
the
Easl
plai
"You've it to hv patient, Vftcr all
I waited 20 years for a chance to ome
back here a roach
Kcl Enion
Pirate- to be ranked first
nationally in rushing
fense, second in ti
offense and third
scoring ffense.
"1 am an option fo
ball coach Emon -
"1 havi lion
for 18-20 years n
Emory �1 it d that the
reason Georgia rech
switched from the wish-
bone to the I-formation
was that they did not ;
h
Now that he has be n named head coach ol the East
Carolina football team. ex-Georgia Tech and Clemson
assistanl Ed Emory finds himsell under the microscope.
This doesn't bother him in the least, though.
"It a helluva challenge Emory said, "but that s
to be expected Fhe I960 EC! graduate pointed to the
fact that the Pirates would lose man) players to
graduation before next season, that the 1980 schedule
was very tough and that due to the resignation oi
ex-head man Pat Dye the school was behind as tar as
recruiting is concerned.
"Combine all that and you've got some work to do, '
said the Lancaster, S.C. native
One of the first matter- ol work tor Emon is
assembling a staff and getting them on the recruiting
ra,l n s in the process now ol interviewing and
narrowing down candidates for assistant coaching
positions as qui kly is possible, in hope- ol salvaging
some -on ol recruiting success.
Emory is very serious about recruiting, an area that
he i- known to be successful in, and is in a hum to
secure some top notch pro-pert
"Because he said "great prospects are like
?eautiful women � if you ignore them somebody else
will get them
For this reason, Emory is planning a tug recruiting
extravaganza this weekend, with anywhere from 15 to 20
high school player- expected to come to Greenville.
The appointment of the robust Emory as Pirate head
coach mark- the end ol a long road. "I've used every
Freshman Denkler stars
Emory ft
-
r
�-7
iL
sV
X
�mm
.31
SL
ULJ
experience I've had for the opportunity to come back
he said. It's the greatest thrill of my hfe to be able to
corae back to my alma mater a, head football coach.
"I've always dreamed of it he continued. 1 ve
tried to prepare myself tor the time when something like
this might happen: 1 -till haven't come off of the cloud
etWhat kmd of coach will Emory be? To find that out
OIU. should know first what kind of man he is,
�Tm a tierce competitor he said. "I'm a tighter, a
scrapper. Whether it be playing, recruiting or coaching
I've always thought that vou should get after em.
V, expect togsee a hustling bunch of Pirates when
they take the field next season; that is, they take after
their each. And, Emory says, that shouldn t be a
problem.
"I've always felt like the
given me all they've had he i
plaved inspired football. 1
instil! tl �� - ii ie type
Emon says that h
alw iv- like- '
explained, "is to know
At least then you're one
-land.
here Emory stands i I
the head football at a un - -
program i- blessed with a
tall bet ause of the respect that
of hi- present and former colh
"I guess you'd say he a
m recruiting says ECl Cl
"I've had many assistants I
coaches -aid Georgia Tech head co
Emory's boss last season, "and
as any ol them.
- far a- any pressure that he m
these compliment- and the expe
who are accustomed to winning
there i none.
"I don't think I'll feel at
Emory. "There's not as much press
there would be if I were taking over
"Heck he continued. "1 felt a
1 wa- a high school each. "I felt that I
That's just the competitor in me
Lady Pirates pound Bucs
(fhoto by Bob Hodges)
(irav (left) dunks over Banks
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
Last Carolina forward Rosie Thompson tired in 23
points and grabbed 1 1 rebounds as the Lady Pirates
downed the Bin cancer- ol East Tennessee State 73-63 at
Minges Coliseum.
Forward Marcia Cowart and guard Sharon Allen kept
the Buccaneers close in the early stages of the first half.
East Carolina maintained a slim margin throughout
the first half behind the 13 point effort of forward Rosie
Thompson, buiding to their biggest lead of 33-25 with a
Mary Denkler turnaround jumper on an assist from
Laurie Sikes.
Marcia Covvart's 11 kept the Buccaneers in the
contest. Most of her points were on early field goals
when East Carolina was attempting to pull away.
East Tennessee fought back from a 33-27 halftime
deficit and cut the Pirates lead to two on a field goal by
Jackie Phillips with 10:50 to play, and tied the score at
51 a minute later.
Freshman sharp-shooter Mary Denkler came off the
bench for the Pirates and netted her first field goal on a
follow shot with 8:31 to play.
Denkler provided the added offensive punch ECU
needed, netting 16 out of 21 for the Pirates at one stage
of the second half, and tallied 20 in just 14 minutes
plaved.
Sikes, a junior point guard, added 11, connecting
repeatedlv from 15-20 feet.
Guard Sharon Allen paced the Bucs with 22, while
teammate Marcia Cowart poured in 15.
"It seems every week we have a different leader on
the court said ECU coach Cathy AndruzzL "They took
us out of our offense a little in the first half
Andruzzi stated she inserted Denkler into the lineup
primarilv to provide rebounding strength, but the 6-0
ViennaVirginia native proved her offensive prowess
within minutes.
"Denkler is an offensive player Andruzzi said.
"She's a pure shooter and squares to the goal well. 1
knew she would give us offensive strength; she's good
off the ball
Center Marcia Girven snatched a season-high 14
rebounds to lead that department.
"Marcia and Rosie did a good job rebounding
stated Andruzzi. "Thev were much bieeer than us
With the win, the Pirates are now 6-1, while East
Tennessee drops to 2-6.
(Photo by John Grogan)
Thompson looks for pass





12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 11 December 1979
Blue Devils survive Pirate attack
By JIMMY DuPREL
Assistant Sports Editor
DURHAM - The na-
tionally second ranked
Blue Devils of Duke went
into their Saturday match-
up with East Carolina
heavily favored to de-
molish the probationary
Pirates, but had to be
satisfied with a 92-73
second half victory.
For the first four
minutes of the contest, it
appeared that Duke would
easily trounce the Bucs as
they jumped to an 11-2
behind the hot outside
shooting of forward Kenny
Dennard and guard Bob
Bender.
The visitors narrowed
the lead to five, but the
sky-hook and slam dunk of
concensus All-American
Mike Gminski built the
lead to nine at 15-6 with
15:10 before intermission.
Then the Pirate offense
was cut loose to horrify
those who had predicted a
Devil romp.
George Maynor re-
bounded an errant Michael
Gibson shot and followed
with his own version of the
hook shot over the 6-11
Gminski. Strong forward
Herb Gray laved in a
Gibson assist; Gibson con-
nected on a turnaround
jumper; and Kyle Powers
added a layup.
During that span the
Blue Devils had managed
only a Vince Taylor free
throw, and with 12:37
remaining before inter-
mission, the Pirates had
cut the gap to 16-14.
Dennard powered in-
side for a field goal,
followed by a Jim Suddath
20-footer and a Taylor
layup as the Devils built a
22-16 lead.
Maynor's tap in follow
hot, Herb Krusen's 13-
foot swish and a pair of
David Underwood free
throws knotted the score
22-22.
Gminski scored inside
and freshman Chip En-
gelland pumped in a shot
from downtown Durham to
forge a four point margin,
but Underwood answered
with a field goal and two
strikes from the charity
stripe to tangle the score
at 26.
Gray's layup with 3:16
remaining gave the Pirates
the lead for the first time
in the contest.
ECU built to a 37-33
lead on a Gray dunk with
:31 to be played, but Duke
answered quickly with a
Gminski inside move and
Engelland connected on a
22-footer as the horn
sounded to tie 37-37.
The Blue Devils re-
grouped at haiftime and
came out to put on a
dunking clinic over the
dwarfed Bucs.
The first came on a
steal by Taylor as the 6-5
speedster raced down
court and rammed the ball
home with authority.
Gibson retaliated for
the Pirates with a turn-
around jumper to cut the
lead to 48-45 with 15:20
left, but ECU would come
no closer to the seemingly
invincible Duke fortress.
Gminski showed his
versatility with 14:52 to
play as he stole the ball at
mid court and dribbled
through for a two-handed
slam.
A Dennard steal with
just under 13 minutes left
set up the Eugene Banks
version of the Darrell
Dawkins "Chocolat Thun
der" dunk, with the brave
Powers attempting a block
and picking up his fifth
foul in the process.
Action continued in
favor of the Blue Devils
until the 10:40 mark when
Duke coach Bill Foster and
the crowd of 8,564 in
Cameron Indoor Stadium
watched with dismay as
Gminski crumbled to the
floor with an eye injury.
All watched sedately for
approximately four min-
utes until the fallen giant
rose to his feet.
Duke led by as much
as 22 in the late stages of
the game, but reserve
Bryant Wiggens' field goal
closed out the scoring and
set the tinal 19 point
margin.
"They did everything I
asked them to and more
said ECU coach Dave
Odom. "Coaching did not
win or lose this game.
"George Maynor show-
ed he can play with any
guard in any league. I'm
pleased with my kids right
now. I think our season is
more important than the
Duke game
ECU (73)
Grav 6 3-4 15, Under-
sNd 3 1-4 10, Gibson
1-2 9, KruM-n 5 0-0 10.
Mavnor 9 0-2 18. Powers 1
2-2'4. Miles 0 0-0 0, Byies
1 3-4 5. rlobson 0 0-0 0,
McLaurin 0 0-0 0, W,y
gens 1 0-0 2, Bat-on 0 0-0
0. Totals 30 13-19 73.
Duke (92)
Banks 7 5-6 19, Den
nard 5 1-2 11. Gminski 10
6-6 26, Bender 2 0-0 t.
Taylor 9 2-4 20, Suddath 2
0-0 V. Engelland 2 0-0 I,
Williams 1 0-0 2, Emma 1
0-0 2, Tissaw 0 0-1 0,
Corrigan 0 0-0 0, Linney 0
0.0 0. Totals 39 14-18 92.
Haiftime Duke 37, ECl
Yl Fouled out Powers.
CLIFF'S
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
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V-n0ar - (
NC OEi� �� HormCmrax
Team handball
provides upsets
(Photo by Bob Hodges)
All-American Mike Gminski
By RICKI GLIARMIS
Intramural Correspondent
The intramural team
handball playoffs proved
to be exciting and very
fast paced. The early
rounds of the playoffs
provided some upsets as
both top-ranked men's
teams were defeated. Af-
ter Sunday night, the
pairings for the finals were
set. Belk Gola will battle
the Renegades in the
men's division while Alpha
Xi Delta will play the Tyler
Heartbreakers in women's
play.
In the Independent
division, the Six Killers
edged the top-ranked A-
lien 16-14, while the
Renegades defeated the
second ranked King's
Royal Netters, 16-11. In
the independent finals, the
Six Killers beat the
Renegades 16-11 -ith,J
Mike Swartz scoring nine
goals. The Renegades
made the all-campus tour-
nament by winning the
wid card berth.
! In the fraternity divi-
sion, Tau Kappa Epsilon
defeated Kappa Alpha
15-9. while Sigma Tau
Gamma edged Pi Kappa
Phi 16-15. In the fraternity
finals, Tau Kappa Epsilon
defeated Sigma Tau Gam-
ma 13-10.
In the residence hall
division, only two teams
were in the playoffs. The
Belk Gola defeated the
Scott Withdrawals 15-9
with Phil Green scoring
eight goals.
These games set up
the all campus playoffs. In
the first semi-final game,
the Belk Gola edged the
Six Killers, 15-14 in over-
time. Bill Rauss scored
seven and Phil Greer, five,
for the Gola to offset eight
goals by Mike Swartz. In
the other semi-final game,
the Renegades edged TKK
10-9 to gain entrance into
the championship game.
In women's play, the
Tyler Heartbreakers have
not had a close game all
year. The playoffs changed
nothing as they humbled
the Fleming Goalie Trot-
ters 20-5 as Ginger
Rothermel scored 11 goals.
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Knee not
made for
football?
By BRUCE LOW1TT
AP Sports Writer
It is a weekday.
Players are straining a-
gainst the resistance of the
weight machines, pushing
themselves as hard as they
can � grunting, twisting,
stretching
It is Sunday. Whistles
are blowing, bodies are
untangling � and at the
bottom of the pile some-
one is holding a knee,
grimacing in pain. Out
comes a stretcher and off
goes another entry on the
injured reserve list.
Is there a relationship?
Does all that work in the
trainers' rooms work to
the detriment of players
trying to strengthen them-
selves against the possi-
bility of injury?
It has been suggested
that there is a correlation
between weight training
� a fixture among many
National Football League
teams � and knee in-
juries. But Dr. James
Nicholas, the noted ortho-
pedist at New York's
Lenox Hill Hospital, and
other experts disagree.
The knee, Nicholas and
other stress, simply is not
made fcrr pro football.
"I think when God
created man he should
have put us on all fours
jokes Ken Locker, the
Dallas Cowboys' trainer.
"Then we wouldn't have
played football.
The East Carolinian
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�Fresh Green CabbageLb. 9





11 December 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 13
Duke awesome in comeback
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor

DURHAM�"They're too good right now said ECU
coach Dave Odom after the Pirates suffered their second
loss of the season at the hands of the Duke Blue Devils,
92-73.
"The rest of the teams are going to continue to
improve and I just don't see how Duke can be any
better. Certainly they're ahead of where they were at
this stage last year
Odom admitted that part of the ECU strategy against
the nationally second ranked Devils was to allow guard
Vince Taylor and forwards Kenny Dennard and Gene
Banks to take outside shots instead of working the ball
inside to Banks to concensus All-American Mike
Gminski.
Gminski weaved, hooked and dunked his way for a
game-high 26 and 11 rebounds.
"Gminski is Gminski; what more can you say?"
offered Odom. "The heart of the club lies in Bender
(guard Bob) and Gminski. We were playing on the
mentally
In the end, the Duke depth was the clincher, as
coach Bill Foster's Blue Devils forced turnover after
turnover in the second half.
"We came out playing well commented Banks
after thf fifth win of the young season. "They were
getting a lot of rebounds in the first half and that really
kept them in the game
"We stopped concentrating in the first half
explained Taylor, who bucketed most of his shots from
downtown Durham. "It's an easier shot when the other
team is in a zone, like East Carolina was part of the
time.
"You put Mike and Gene down low and try to work
the ball in to them, and if that doesn't work, we have to
shoot outside and draw the coverage. The percentage
shot is inside with them.
"We hit the shots we were getting in the second half
and that's the big difference. We played aggressive
defense and worked our offense
Taylor inherited the starting position from legendary
Jim Spanarkle (now in the NBA), but says he feels no
outside pressure to perform well.
"It's a whole lot of pressure to have good games ami
I just have to rise up to the occasion, but that pressure
comes from within. I want to make my own name and
my own style of play
Gminski, a 6-11 senior from Monroe, Connecticut,
has had to deal with pressure in each of the last three
seasons from the fans and especially the media who
have grown to expect displays such as the one agam-t
ECU.
"You get used to it Gminski maligns. ) much
rather have it this way than with the team losing al! the
time and nobody really caring who Mike Gminki i
(Photo by Bob Hodges)
Dave Underwood pumps
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V
1





Page 14 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 11 December 1979
Lady Pirates
shell Madison
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
Forward Kathy Riley
pumped in 26 points and
Rush Ihornpson added 16
and a season-high 23
rebounds as Fast Carolina
drilled the Duchesses of
James Madison, 72-48, at
Minges Coliseum Friday
night
EC1 's M, i Girven
poured in two e irI field
goals t.i enable the Pirates
to jump n an 8-2 lead in
the opening minutes of thr
contest, and Rile) and
rhompson piled on 12
points as the Bucs built a
21 -point lead u ith l� ss
an 10 it.mutt- expired.
Freshman Man Denk-
added a 15-footer with
2 r fore
intei - ion, but ECU
remained silent from thr
floor until Lvdia Rountree
d in a Laurie Sikc
in the
Meanw hil , Madison s
Marsden and Deana
Meadows had imllt'd their
l
team I striking
listai e at 29- 1,J before
the Rountree basket.
"I wasn't worried a-
bout the dry spell said
ECU's coach Cathy An-
druzzi. "After the Duke
game last Saturday (a
76-75 loss), we concen-
trated on defense all week.
We . didn't even touch
offense until Thursday and
then only for about 45
minutes
Anne Sonoga had 13
points for Madison, 10 in
the second half, followed
by Meadows with 11 and
Cath) Hanrahan's 10.
Rountree aided the
Pirates effort with 12 and
Girven tallied ten.
"This is probably the
best game of the season
for us analyzed Andruz-
zi. "certainly the best
defensively, we knew that
we could be a good team
on defense. This team IS a
good offenshe team.
'The shooting per-
centage (38.4) doesn't
bother me because we did
play well on defense.
"Kathy Riley kept us
in the game offensively
because Rosie was double-
overed most of the night
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Title
The East Carolinian, December 11, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
December 11, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.28
Location of Original
University Archives
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