The East Carolinian. December 4, 1979






"Were it left tome
to decide whether
we should have a
government without
newspapers or
newspapers without
government, I
should not hesitate
a moment to prefer
the latter
�Thomas Jefferson
The East Carolinian
If you have a story
idea, a tip, or a
lead, please tele-
phone us.
757-6366
757-6367
757-6309

Vol. 54 No. �S
14 pages today
Tuesday, 4 December 1979
Greenville, N.C.
Circulation 10,000
66
Tve had a tremendous amount of fun coaching at ECU .probably
more than I will have anywhere else. Everybody here is so hungry-
the players, students andfansto win. It's a great feeling to go places
like Carolina as underdogs, yet knowing that your people really believe
that you 'regoing to win p
Dye resignation a shocking blow
Internal problems cited as main cause
(Photo by Chap Gurley)
Brewer responds at Scott
By TERRY GRAY
Assistant .ews Editor
In an informal question and answer session at Scott
dormitory Monday night. Chancellor Brewer said that he
expected the North Carolina General Assembly would
wait until the 1981 Fall session to raise tuition rates in
the state's university system, but that an increase in
student fees might come sooner.
Brewer said that he was "very much afraid that
we're going to go up in fees. Our fees have remained at
the same level for several years, with the exception of
parking fees, but student organizations such as the
Student Union, the SGA and the Transit Authority all
want more money
A group of approximately 35 students questioned the
chancellor on a wide range of topics during the hour and
a half meeting, which was arranged by the Scott House
Council.
Referring to the possible fee increase, Brewer said
that the administration "would like to avoid having fees
and tuition go up in the same year
On the topic of the WECU-FM radio station, whose
construction permit is currently pending before the
Federal Communications Commission, the chancellor
mentioned his support while offering suggetions on the
station's format.
Brewer said that he thought the station should not
rely too heavily on album rock or on classical music, as
See BREWER, page 6
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
After leading the East Carolina football team to six
straight seasons, including a win in the 1978
Independence Bowl, Pirate head coach Pat Dye shocked
the city of Greenville and the ECU community when he
announced his resignation last Thursday.
Dye immediately became the leading candidate for
the N.C. State head coaching job, recently vacated by
Bo Rein, who accepted the head job at Louisiana State
Friday.
Dve met with the N.C. State selection committee last
night and said yesterday that he expected to know
something definite about his chances of moving to
Raleigh sometime this week.
Should Dye not be selected for the Wolfpack job, he
will reportedly accept a similar position at the University
of Wvoming. The Cowboys are members of the Western
Athletic Conference. The program at Wyoming is
supposedly on the rise, with millions of dollars being
pumped into it by supporters.
Dye's success at ECU has been phenomenal. Many
students, in fact, look at him as sort of a "living
legend" His record over his six-year tenure is 48-18-1.
Since his ECU career began in J974, the Pirates have
gone 7-4, 8-3, 9-2, 8-3, 9-3, and 7-3-1.
His personal tenacity for the game is regarded highly
by others, and reflected by his players, as evidenced by
the fact that the 1979 team fought back from a 1-3 mark
to end up 7-3-1.
Dve announced his resignation at a hastily called
press conference in Scales Field House. He said at the
time that he had known for some time that he would be
leaving ECU.
"I think it is in the best interests for me and East
Carolina University if I resign now Dye said. "I've
known since the first of the season that I probably
wouldn't be back
Dve did not say so at the conference but la
revealed that internal problem- had been th
his resignation.
The head coach and his athletii director, Bill (.am.
have had their conflicts in the pasl tnd it was these
conflicts that led to Dye- resignation.
"At one time Dye -aid. "I coul
myself staying at East Carolina for 10 to 15
the school and could see us continuing to build up the
program, helping it grow
Dve said that finances were not a problem at h!
"I could be financially secure here he said. "I could
have left any year that I was hero. Just last year,
Mississippi State made a very lucrativi r and
evervone � my staff, my family � wanted I � up
and go. Every year I always looked for a g ison to
stay.
"This time he continued, "1 didn't oven bother. 1
knew I couldn't be enthusiastic like 1 was in the past. 1
knew I needed a change of scenery. a new challenge.
The reason- why Dye needed thi
go back to hit conflicts with Cain. For example, the
head coach 'omplained constantly of the Pirate
schedule, which included home games again no-name
opponents.
"We need to get some big people to day in Fieklen
Stadium he said. "We need South Carolina, Wake
Forest, Duke or somebody like that to come in here. Our
plavers deserve this much
Two unrelated incidents also seemed to verify Dj
beliefs that he should leave ECU. In 1978 he submitted
the budget for the upcoming season to Cain. The
athletic director then cut the budget by S30,000 -
Dve, without informing him of the move. Dye -aid Cain
then handed this to the school's athletic committee
See DYE RESIGNS, page 14
REAL student volunteers
negotiate increased bill
Violence spreads to Puerto Rico
Servicemen ambushed
By LUIS R. MATOS
Associated Press Writer
PUERTO RICO (AP)-
Unidentified gunmen am-
bushed a busload of U.S.
Navy personnel this mor-
ning in a barrage of pistol
and shotgun fire, killing
two servicemen and
wounding 10 other per-
sons, authorities reported.
The wounded included
three women. One of the
women and two or three of
the men were hospitalized
in serious condition.
No one claimed im-
mediate responsibility for
the attack, the First fatal
assault against the U.S.
military in Puerto Rico in
almost a decade. Violence
by underground pro-inde-
pendence groups generally
has been limited to attacks
on property.
Rear Adm. Arthur K.
Knoizen, senior U.S. naval
officer in the Carribbean,
called it a "heinous crime
we cannot tolerate
The Navy said names
of the victims were being
withheld until next-of-kin
could be notified. But local
authorities said the two
dead men were the bus
driver and a radar tech-
nician.
The attack occurred at
6:20 a.m. 5:20 EST as the
servicemen were riding to
work at a naval commun-
ications facility in Toa
Baja, 10 miles west of San
Juan on Puerto Rico's
north coast, in a yellow
school bus with Navy
markings, said Lt. Steve
Chesser, public affairs
officer at the Navy's
Roosevelt Roads Naval
Base.
He said none of those
on the Navy bus was
armed. Police said the
attackers abandoned their
vehicle, a white van, not
for from the scene of the
attack, and apparently fled
on foot. Police forces
spead out through the area
in search of the fleeing
terrorists, a police spokes-
man said.
Small pro-independ-
ence groups have bombed
federal facilities and
ranches of mainland banks
in the bast, but such
attacks have usually oc-
curred in the hours
between midnight and
dawn, and there had been
See ATTACK, page 6
By KAREN WENDT
News Editor
The Student Volunteers for REAL
received a $600 appropriation at the SGA
meeting on Monday.
The bill was written by SGA President
Brett Melvin, who had vetoed a similar
bill after the last SGA meeting. The first
bill had asked for a 1400 appropriation.
The money was to be appropriated for
such things as Student Counselor training
and publicity for the center.
Melvin had vetoed the previous bill
because the money would have gone
directly to the center and not the student
organization involved in the center. He
also cited that there were organizations on
campus which offered the same services.
However, Michele O'Bard, president
of Student Counselor training at REAL,
said that the center is different from
on-campus organizations because they
offer 24-hour hotline and counseling
services, while on campus the student
must have an appointment. She also
pointed out that the counseling given at
REAL was confidential, while that offered
on campus often was not.
The center also offers to come to the
person in an emergency.
When asked to estimate the number of
students the center helps during the year,
O'Bard cited a figure of 45 percent.
The bill was passed with a clear
majority of the SGA.
The legislators also passed a bill which
was meant to compliment Head Football
Coach Pat Dye. The bill reads:
WHEREAS: Pat Dye has been one of
the most successful coaches in the history
of East Carolina University and in addition
one of the most successful coaches in the
nation,
WHEREAS: He has provided out-
standing service and provided nationwide
recognition to ECU and to the city of
Greenville and all of Eastern North
Carolina, and his presence will be missed
greatly,
BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED: It is
with sincere gratitude that we wish him
the best of luck and the most success
possible in the future. Unless he goes to
State.
After the meeting, some of the
legislators seemed to regret passing the
bill in this form, but the bill was passed
by acclamation.
Doug White presented a bill before the
legislature for a new organization, to be
known as SAVAK: Students Allied for a
Victory Against Khomeini. White was
asking for no funding, only for recognition
of the organization by the SGA.
The motion failed by an 18 for, 19
against and 4 abstention vote.
The legislature also passed a
resolution to try to begin a student book
exchange.
See SGA, page 6
For the second time this
year, Brett Melvin helped
a bill overcome his oun
veto.
Special Insert Today-Pirate Basketball '7980
1
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r jr r - i-
jt � T.?.





Page 2 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 4 December 1979
People,
places,
arid
I sit ! i 4-li club
Students who are in-
terested in applying for
positions on the student
residence hall staff for
summer or next fall should
file their applications be-
tween now and Jan. 31. To
be eligible for this em-
ployment, a student
should be enrolled full-
time and have a real
interest in residence hall
living. Hall advisors are
paid for two hours of work
each day. Monday-Thurs-
day, and have duty every
other weekend.
Application forms are
available in the directors'
offices or in the Residence
Life office, 214 Whichard
Building. All applications
should be turned in to the
Residence Life office.
i � K ct
All members interested
in participating in the
Christmas project at Uni-
versity Nursing Home
should meet in the lobbv
of Belk Building at 3:4b
p.m. on December 3. For
more information contact
one of the advisors in the
social work department.
ittf i�li� i �
The Student Union
Major Attractions Com-
mittee will meet Mon
Dec. 3, at 5 p.m. in Room
238 of Mendenhall Student
Center. All members are
urged lo attend.
On Wed. 4 Dec, in
Brewster B wing, room
104, at 7:30 p.m. the ECU
College Republicans will
hold their final meeting of
the semester. The featured
speaker will be John Guy,
candidate for state legis-
lator. All interested per-
sons are invited to attend.
Refreshments will be
served.
I II II ill
All students who plan
to participate with the
men's or women's team
handball clubs should
contact Susan Jeffrey,
intramural-club sports
trainer, at 757-6387 to
schedule their physical
examinations. Physicals
should be scheduled prior
to the Christmas break.
The Collegiate 4-H
Club will hold their final
meeting of this semester
on Dec. 3, at 6:30 p.m. at
139 Green Mill Run
Apartments. It is impor-
tant all members attend.
For more information, call
752-9820.
i i nip
A ski trip to Massa-
nutten, Va. Jan. 10, 11,
and 12 is available to any
M.R.C. or W.R.C. mem-
ber. Lodging will be
provided at the Holiday
Inn in Harrisonburg, Va.
for Thursday, Friday, and
Saturday nights. For these
accomodations as well as
two full days of skiing,
including rentals and lift
tickets, the price is only
868.50. A ski school is
available for a $5.00
charge. For those inter-
ested in attending a $25.00
deposit (refundable) will
be required by Dec. 17.
For reservations, or more
information, please call
752-9569.
art
The Student Union Art
Exhibition Committee will
meet Wed Dec. 5, at 6
p.m. in Committee Room
233 o Mendenhall Student
Center. All members are
urged to attend.
There will be a man-
datory meeting of the
Christmas Snowshoe Ski
Group n Dec. 6 at 4:00
p.m. iri Memorial Gym
108. All participants need
to be present for room
assignments-travel plans-
some still need rides.
siiii I
New ECU Ski Club
forming for next semester
Meeting will be held Dec.
6, Thurs. afternoon. Of-
ficers will be elected. All
that is needed is a genuine
interest. Memorial 104.
fiii �
The Student Union Films
Committee will meet
Dec. 6, at 3:30 p.m. in
Room 242 of Mendenhall
Student Center. All mem-
bers are urged to attend.
classified
h
9
FOR SALE: Alvarez 5014
Guitar, one year old. Good
condition. $160. or rea-
sonable offer. 758-8687
Ask for Johnnie.
FOR SALE: Military Field
jackets, $40; electric type-
write $75; Girl's 10 speed
bike $35. Call 752-1514,
752-1750.
FOR SALE: Used furni-
ture. Used small ap-
pliances and other mis-
cellaneous household
items. Call 756-5413.
tor if qi
FEMALE ROOMMATE:
To share 3 bedroom
duplex. Call 758-0267.
WANTED: Creative, en-
lightened person to share
two bedroom house and
expenses. $80 per month
plus half utilities.
Come by 1207 Co-
tanche St. or call Chan-
elo's Pizza 758-7400 and
ask for Jay or leave name
and number and your call
will be returned.
ROOMMATE WANTED:
Working Graduate female
needs responsible room-
mate to share two bed-
room house near campus.
$85 plus utilities. Call
752-8965 9-6, 758 6887
after 6:00.
MALE ROOMMATE:
needed to share 2 bed-
room apt. at Tar River.
Rent is $210 per month,
split two ways, plus 12 of
utilties. Call 756-6897.
MOVING OUT? I'm look-
ing for a one bedroom apt.
unfurnished near campus
w southern exposure
avail. Jan. 1. Please call k.
758-6162.
m
NEED X- TRA CASH:
Fair prices paid for gold
and silver and silver coins.
Mixed Media. 120 E. 5th
St. Phone 758-2127.
HORSEBACK RIDING:
Day or Night, individual or
groups. Tri-County Stables
Grimesland call 752-6893.
TYPING: Reliable and
sp � pist at reason-
a.
-all 752-2724.
3005
�. 10th St.
ltaacccroJJ.����iT��'TTir-P�Jg:�j'g
Z
758 8550
December Specials
Sirloin
gravy and potato
S2.19
Wednesday 1: $2.49
MondayChop
Tuesday
Filet of Chicken
Steak and potato
ushroom gravy and potato
mushroom gravy ana potato
Thnrsdavs,lces of Beef $2.59
�� -lkJWfT peppers and onions or
Friday steerburer $1.39
Saturday Sonp and Sa,ad $1.79
Sunday 8Woto6o"U $2.49
Monday and Wednesday STUDENT SPECIALS
5()f off any item on the menu board
THE COMPLETE
STUDENT
ALL YOU CAN EAT
SPECIALS
4:00-8:00 � WCAMITOUT
SALAD�50� EXTRA
ASST. VAR. t-fOQ
PIZZA . .only I
WITH FRIES & COLESLAW
FRIED
CHICKEN ��
WITH GARLIC BREAD
ITALIAN $499
SPAGHETTIqnlyI thur
WITH FRIES & COLE SLAW
22? 1"
FISH . . .�!u. fhi
'hats the easiest way to complete your
plans�no matter what you're planning?
By making one convenient trip to your
Kroger Sav-on where you'll find
everything from apple cider to transistor
radios to footballs and more all at
cost cutter prices. No matter what your
plans, complete them with one easy trip
.to your Kroger Sav-on.
A
TIMEX
WATCHES
7V
Records and
Tapes
AMP
iMSCmiNTEDl
OFF MANUFACTURER S
SUOQESTEO RETAIL
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
ach of thaaa advartlsad ttams Is raquirad to b� rsadily available for
its in sach Krogar Sav-on Stora axoapt aa apacWteally notad in this
J Hwa do run out of an advartlsad itam.wawiHoflar you your cholca
f a comparabia Ham, whan available, raflacting tha sama savings or
ralnchack which wW antttta you to purchase tha advartJaad Ham at tha
advacHaad prtca wttMn 30 days.
NONE SOLD
TO
DEALERS
OPEN 7 AM TO MIDNIGHT
OPEN SUNDAY
9AM' O 9PM

FOOD, DRUG, GENERAL
MERCHANDISE STORES
Prices Effective Tues
Dec. 4, thru Sun Dec. 9, 1979
600 Greenville Blvd. � Greenville
Phone 756-7031
i





4 December 1979 THE EAST r.AROLINIAN Page
i
Greek New
Kap
rU RICKI GUARMIS
ek (orrespondent
h
Pi K;
he n Nap s intra-
mural season has been
ven successful. Pi Kappa
Phi- finished the regular
season at 15-1 in howling.
rhe are also in the
playoffs in Team Hand-
1 he Pi Kaps are having
their annual Christmas
; sith their Little
Sisters this Friday, Dee. 7.
The Lambda Chi Alpha
- closed this week
initiation. The
fraternit) held its First
nnual Beet 'n Burn
Party.
They have been busy
installing their first wood
stove this week. Anyone
interested in this idea may
call the house at 752-5325.
In order to raise money
for a basketball court for
their back yard, the
Lambda Chi's will be
selling raffle tickets. The
tickets may be purchased
from any brother or
associate member. A Big
Brother, Little Brother
Pancake Break is in the
planning stages. The date
of the Pancake Break will
be announced at a later
date.
The Lambda Chis wish
to thank the IFC for an
excellent Winter Greek.
They also congratulate the
new IFC treasurer, Tim
Dodson, Lambda Chi
Alpha.
The Sigma Phi Epsi-
lons had their annual
Christmas Dance Saturday
at the Tar River Club-
house.
Sig Ep elections were
held on Sunday. New
officers are Terry Peter-
son, president; Mike
Kindt, vice president;
Mike Wetherington, con-
troller; Pat Young, corres-
ponding secretary and
Hardee Whitehurst, re-
cording secretary.
The Sig Eps would like
to congratulate all of the
new officers and wish
them luck through the new
year.
In the upcoming week,
the Sig Eps will have an
Alpha Phi Social on Wed-
nesday and Little Sister
Installation on Thursday at
8 p.m. Next week, they
will have their annual Cag
Gift Party and a Tree
Trimming Party with their
Little Sister.
On Dec. 1 in New
Bern, the AOII's held their
annual winter formal Rose
Ball. Thanks go to Ann
Sineath for a successful
weekend. Among those
presented were IIOA's,
the honorary members of
AOII, Robert Fletcher,
Larry Speed and Jeff
Betcher. Also presented
were the new AOII
pledges Patty Jackson and
Brenda Foley.
Awards given annually
at this time went to the
following girls: Best
Pledge, Cindy Heins; Best
Sister, Sandy Skellie and
Founder's Day Award,
Miss Dunn. Also, Linda
See. GREEK, page 6
� -
AYKROYD-NED BEATTY-JOHN BELUSHI LORRAINE GARY MURRAY HAMILTON CHRISTOPHERLEE
TIM MATHESON TQSH1R0 MIFUNE WARREN OATES ROBERT STACK TREAT WILLIAMS
roductonalA SRELBERGMiV fj'K t i
urn alien
EDDIE DEEZEH BOBBY B.C1CC0 DtANNE KAY SLIM PICKENS MM JO SPERBEH UH SIM tecta ot Rxsow. WBEW
v �, � � '� Ea AraPioducef
ZEMEO I

.

COMING FOR CHRISTMAS
Plaid Woven
Shirts
$9.98 Values
$4.90
Look for
the Union
label.
The Student Union offers a
variety of social and cultural
events to help tie up loose
ends.
m
mm
Also
Striped Brushed Acrylic
V-Neck Sweaters
$10.98 Values
Now Only $D
Down-town Evans Stroot Mall 7S2-896S Carolina East Mall 756-8242
ATTIC
N.C. No. 3 1 Nightclub
ue. Slay Dorm
Free
Wed.
Warehouse
Thur. CHOICE
Fri. & Sat.
HEROS
Sun. Badge
Frl. 3:30-7:00
LZ &0KT
Afternoon
Delight
Christmas Specials
at
Ayden Golf
and Country Club
Izod Shirts
and Sweaters
Foot joy Golf Shoes
and all Golf Clubs
SX
East Carolinian
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J
i
i,





The East (aroli
Editorials
6?0p
inions
Tuesday, December4,1979 Page 4 Greenville, N.C.
Pat Dye is a victim
Pat Dye is gone. Nothing will
change that, so we must resign
ourselves to the fact that one of the
most resourceful coaches ECU has ever
seen has faded from the long afternoon
shadows of Ficklen Stadium. The days
of the reign of Dye have come to a
close, and it's unfortunate for us who
will have to live through the rebuilding
of a program we have seen grown and
nurtured � a program which saw its
climax in last season's win in the
Independence Bowl, and this season's
ranking as number one in rushing �
ove, such other teams as Nebraska,
Oklahoma and Penn State.
Dye is a victim, unfortunately, of
changing fortunes and priorities within
the athletic hierarchy here at East
Carolina. Reports of funding conflicts
with Athletic Director Bill Cain have
certainly colored the departure of Dye.
Dye reportedly left after a disagreement
surrounding a cut in funding in the
football program. We feel that several
points should be brought out and
discussed, in light of recent events:
�Football is important. To the region,
the only two things that people
recognize about East Carolina is the
football team, and this newspaper,
which appears on several newsstands
around Greenville.
� Football is famous. Good publicity
from the school can be generated by
sportscasters who follow the progress of
American Journal
the Pirates during the season. This
publicity can lead to a feeling of
oneness on the part of the people of the
region � a feeling that they are a part
of the university community, even
though they may have never been a
student here.
�Football is followed by academics. We
can't help but notice that schools with
fine athletic programs often have had
success with academic excellence as
well.
�Football can benefit those who are far
from the playing field. One large
university went to a bowl game � and
the proceeds from that game went to
provide financial aid for minority
students who could not otherwise afford
to go to college.
The list goes on and on. Many of us
have not considered the difficulty a new
coach may have � if he runs into the
same funding conflicts Pat Dye
supposedly encountered. This factor
must be weighed considerably by any
coaching candidate.
Oru thing is for ce; :ain � a cutback
in athletics now � especially a cutback
in the biggest revenue producing sport
in the university � will have
devastating effects for the future of
athletics here at East Carolina.
And as athletics go, all too often,
also go contributions to academic
programs. Where will we be then?
Jobs versus nature
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
If ever two groups of
people have seemed at
impossible loggerheads,
they are environmentalists
and workers. Environmen-
talists, according to a
stereotype popular among
working people, are those
high-toned types who love
the trees and birds, but
look down their upturned
noses at mere humans.
And workers, according to
a similar notion among
ecology activists, are those
benighted slobs who will
chop down, churn up,
pave or pulverize any-
thing, anywhere, for a
paycheck.
Those are the stereo-
types, and like all en-
grained ideas, they die
hard. They are beginning
to give a little, though, as
environmentalists and
workers discover that each
has something to teach the
other. Belatedly, environ-
mentalists are beginning
to understand that the
workplace is part of the
environment. For their
part, working people (and
a few unions) are starting
to question whether the
big money projects belov-
ed by corporate America
really provide the safe,
plentiful jobs industry
spokespeople claim.
"The myth that the
workers 'have no right' or
'are not interested in'
environmental issues is
dangerous and wrong. In
fact, the working class is
the most affected when
the environment is ravag-
ed. Who lives in the most
polluted areas of the
world's huge cities? Who
bears the heaviest noise
levels? Who lives in the
least congenial areas? The
less endowed, of course
So writes Jack Mundy,
former head of the New
South Wales Builders'
Union, and a communist.
Mundy helped spark the
Australian Green Bans, in
which workers refused to
work on projects they �
and the communities for
which the projects were
planned � decided were
ecologically unsound.
As a communist,
Mundy's concrete com-
mitment to environment-
alism is all' the more
remarkable. Rooted in
19th-century European ra-
tionalism, strict construc-
tionists of Marxism-Lenin-
ism have long had an
almost mystical belief in
the efficacy of science and
the desirability of tech-
nological progress. This
has carried over to the
present where, in the
U.S the left has been
noticably slow to recognize
the importance of the
ecology movement, and in
the Soviet Union, where a
long term commitment to
nuclear energy has helped
ensure the entrenchment
of socialism with a techno-
cratic face.
According to figures
compiled by the Sierra
Club, Environmentalists
For Full Employment
(EFFE) and other groups,
however, it is precisely
those mammoth technolo-
gical projects required to
build nuclear power and
coal-conversion plants that
poison the biosphere and
throw people out of work.
Highly centralized, spec-
ialized industries, they
rely on automation and
often transient experts,
having little need of less
skilled locals.
In industry parlance,
nuclear, coal-conversion
and petro-chemical com-
plexes are capital-inten-
sive, requiring extremely
high levels of investment
to produce what jobs they
do create. According to
EFFE, clean, decentralized
solar energy projects could
produce four times as
many jobs as nukes built
at the same cost. And the
ratio of regular workers to
experts in the solar field
would be much higher.
There would be nine
carpenters, say, or sheet
metal workers for every
highly trained solar engi-
neer, creating jobs for a
broad range of people. In
the nuclear field, the ratio
is two to one.
In the face of in-
creasing evidence to the
contrary, corporate spokes-
people insist that it's
either the environment or
jobs, and that interfering
with business will wreck
the economy. To advocates
of social change, that
argument has a familiar
ring. It was used to
oppose workmen's com-
pensation, unemployment
insurance, even child labor
laws, when those reforms
were seen to threaten
profits.
Environmentalists fur-
ther point' out that the
American economy is
hardly booming as it is.
The current recession is,
for example, the sixth and
most severe slump since
World War II. Retooling
the economy to both
protect the natural workd
and create jobs is possible
npw, they say, beginning
with eliminating wasteful
habits of production and
consumption. As proof
that it can be done, they
point to places like
Saugus, Mass where a
trash disposal plant that
services 300,000 people
also manages to pay for
itself.
What kinds of jobs
could be created in a
conservation-minded eco-
nomy? According to
Letters to the Editor
Students riled over Dye issue
EFFE, a study by the state
of Colorado "has esti-
mated that 17 million
private homes in America
need caulking and weath-
ering; 10 million need
storm windows Includ-
ing apartments and com-
mercial and industrial
buildings, the Colorado
study says, such basic
alterations could put up to
487,000 people to work.
Add to that the creat-
ive job possibilities gen-
erated by community re-
cycling centers, the trans-
fer of auto workers to
public transit programs,
the construction of more
energy-efficient equip-
ment, and the need for
ecologically attuned archi-
tects, engineers and other
workers, and the outline of
a safe, labor-intensive
economy begins to appear.
Most such jobs, ecology
activists contend, would
employ medium-to-low
skilled people on the small
scale most favorable to
democracy.
That profound trans-
formation of the American
economic and social sys-
tem is a long way off. But
at least something like it is
being discussed in embry-
onic alliances of environ-
mentalists and labor. The
Humphrey-Hawkins Bill,
to cite an example, calls
for a reduction to three
percent unemployment by
1981, and the conversion
to a real peacetime
economy. It would autho-
rize jobs in childcare,
health and recreation, the
rehabilitation of decayed
urban areas, and federal
funding for the handi-
capped and elderly.
Editor's Note: David Arm-
strong is a syndicated
columnist.
To the Editor:
Like many Pirate faith-
ful I was very disappointed
to find out about the
resignation of coach Pat
Dye. First of all I would
like to publicly thank
Coach Dye for putting
ECU football on the
national map, the man did
a great job at East
Carolina and will be sorely
missed.
Now comes the ques-
tion, Why did coach Dye
resign? Most of us would
have left before Coach Dye
did if we were in his
position. No doubt there
were major conflicts be-
tween Coach Dye, Bill
Cain and Thomas Brewer.
I am sure it hurt Chan-
cellor Brewer when he was
not known around the
state of North Carolina like
Coach Dye. Could the
problem be identity?
One must realize Dye
has been at ECU for six
years and Brewer for only
two. Second of all, who is
the Chancellor at Ohio
State? Michigan? Or Army
for that matter. Ask the
same question about the
football coach at those
schools and see if most
people know the coach or
the chancellor.
Yes, granted Brewer
comes from a school that
hasn't had a winning
season since George
Washington left the White
House. Chancellor Brewer
was probably widely
known at TCU and granted
he is widely known now at
East Carolina but for what
I do not know.
Also let us look at what
Bill Cain has done for East
Carolina. He reportedly
cut the football budget
$30,000 without informing
coach Dye first. Where
does the money for the
rest of ECU athletics come
from? Also next time you
go to a home football
game and see teams like
The Citadel, and Rich-
mond opposing ECU stand
up and let Cain know how
well you like the opposi-
tion.
Now, who are you, the
students and loyal Pirate
fans, going to back: Coach
Dye or the administration?
Neal Spivey
To the Editor:
The following was written
as an open letter to former
Pirate football coach Pat
Dye.
I'm a student here at
ECU and an avid fan of
yourself and the ECU
football teams which
you've built here. While
watching the news tonight,
I heard of your resig-
nation. It kind of took me
off-guard, instead of hear-
ing more bad news from
Iran there was now a
tragedy in Greenville. By
the quickness of your
decision it seems evident
there is nothing that could
be done to change your
mind. I only wish there
was.
Your title here is Head
Football Coach, but you
have become much more
than this to the students at
East Carolina. There's no
doubt you've supplied us
with plenty of thrills on
Saturday afternoon and an
installment of pride which
we will never relinquish,
but your honesty, frank-
ness, and your true
concern for your players
and for ECL's upward
struggle in this state is
something we admire the
most.
In closing, we wish you
the best, whether it be at
Wyoming or for that
matter anywhere you
"are" the best! 1 only
hope you never forget this
little town in N.C be-
cause there's not a chance
in hell that it will ever
forget you.
Bill Sawver
Chansky
roasted
To the Editor:
In rebuttal to the
column of Art Chansky
from The Durham Herald I
would like to voice my
opinion. I have a great
deal of loyalty to East
Carolina University even
though there are many
factors which pull me in
other directions. I live
within 10 miles of Chapel
Hill and have grown up
with "Carolina Fever" all
of my life. My father is a
graduate of UNC and my
mother works in Fowler's
Food Store which has been
serving the Tarheels for
many years.
I, in my pre-college
days, was a devoted
Carolina fan and was as
"sick" with the "fever"
as all Chapel Hillians are,
but now, having gone to
further my education at
East Carolina University, I
am converted to the proud
lot of Pirate fans.
1 also find that, having
been the !�n
The Peace Times (Pea
College, Raleigh. C), in
my judgem the
column. Mr. Chansky
stoops tn m. re libie . ws
in order to suj ind
defend hi- bias
the Tarl - The infer-
ence that Leander Creen.
ECU's niarterback, is i
an All-American type be-
cause he i- black and
5-foot -7 is a form
bigotry and
sionalism which 1 would
not expect 's'
paperman 01 "r
Chansky's caliber -
this general plane of
thought Mr. Chanskv re-
ferred to other ECl
players as "black and
bowlegged and "third-
string kicker whose
father owns a hot dog
stand in Wilson This
type of low grade pre-
judice is surprizing in a
supposedly professional
column and is in very poor
personal taste. I might add
that the use of such a
mud-slinging journalistic
approach has shown the
public the stuff of which
Mr. Chansky is really
made
My fina 1 ana 1 y sis
comes to Mr. Chansky-
insinuation that ECU luck-
ed out in a tie score. It is
evident to me that he is
merely using his column
as a pouting session tor
his sour grapes attitude.
East Carolina and INC
played an excellent game
in which there was no
winner, no loser, and no
"easy defeat Mr.
Chansky, it is time for you
to eat humble pie.
Marianne Harbison
r
The East Carolinian
MANAGING EDITOR
Richard Green
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Anita Lancaster
NEWS EDITOR
ASST; NEWS EDITOR
FEATURES EDITOR
ASST. FEATURES EDITOR
EDITOR
Marc Barnes
DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
Robert M. Swaim
ASST. DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
Terry Herndon
ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR
Cheryl Holder
BUSINESS MANAGER
Steve O'Geary
Knren Wendt
Terry Gray
Bill Jones
K.C. NeerJham
SPORTS EDITOR
ASST. SPORTS EDITOR
COPY EDITOR
AD TECH. SUPER.
Charles Chandler
Jimmy Dupree
Diane Henderson
Paul L. eke
THE EAST CAROLINIAN la the student
newspaper of East Carolina University
sponsored by the Media Board of ECU
and Is distributed each Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic year
(weekly during the summer.
Offices are located on the second floor of
the Publications Center Old South
Building. Our malting address la: Cm
South Building, ECU, Greenville, NC
27834.

The phono numbers are: 757-S366, 6987
Subscription, ore $10 annually.





Tuesday, December 4,1979 Page 5
Other Opinion
ruest Editorial
Let's thank Iran
Editors' Note: The following guest editorial was written
by Paul Miller, a special student preparing to enter
graduate school.
As people walk down the streets in protest, or as
banners are hung calling for the deportation of those
Iranian students here and in other parts of this country,
we should take the time to give thanks � thanks to
those militant students abroad, thanks to Ayatollah
Khomeini, and thanks to those students in this country
at whom we have chosen to direct our anger. It is they
who symbolize that which we have no control over.
Finally, and most importantly, we should thank those
victims held against their will � those victims that are
powerless so that we may be powerful.
A drastic change in my routine has taken place in the
last couple of weeks. Whereas I'm usually assured that
the Aeus and Observer will be there most any time
during the day that I choose to read it, of late I have
found the slight inconvenience of either getting it early
or not getting it at all. I would suppose this means that
more people are taking an interest in the daily news. In
class, at meals, or under a shade tree, the print is held
close to the face. People are eating the latest word of
news about the personal, diplomatic, international, and
economic hardships surrounding the holding of those
sixty American citizens. A cruel and inhumane act by a
barbaric people, with the support of a religiously crazed
ruler.
So today it was nearly 7:00 in the evening before I
able to acquire a paper, and at that it was in
ua
econd-hand condition. But the day was not wasted. I
sat down, relaxed, and read the notorious bathroom
walls that surrounded me. The East Carolinian has
already run a story on the quality of ECU's graffiti in
the year 1979, and I see no value in duplicating that
piece oi journalistic investigation.
Interesting though was the sense of irony I felt,
sitting among those slanted words oi' witless men: the
rise oi social and national consciousness �
reverberating from the chants oi passioned protesters �
on the one hand, and the walls of writing that
surrounded me on the other. Sixty held against their will
is so terrible that we immediately tell the Iranians here
in this country "to go to Hell We follow the drive of
our patriotic spirit, speaking loud and clear, "This
country has been pushed around too long We speak
out in the name of freedom and righteousness. Then we
go to our walls and read, kill the nigers and castrate the
fags.
Yes, we should indeed thank the Iranians. They have
given people something to identify with. We are now,
once again, united. As students, our youth, our energy,
and our ideas can once again be directed. And as one
student put it, "Ya know, it's fun to protest when you're
in college. It gives you something to do
I could continue with the argument that the Iranian
students who are here peacefully for the purpose of
getting an education (something they may not be able to
get in their homeland), should be allowed to do so.
Indeed, they should be given a hand, with the
knowledge that they are people with stress and tension
upon them. I could ask you not to take away the very
rights from them, that you are asking to be given to
those Americans overseas. This, however, would be a
wasted effort on my part, for you will hold your attitudes
long after you read anything I have to write.
The Iranian situation will come and go. People will
say and do what they feel is right. Finally, one way or
the other, the issue will be resolved, and though my
concern for those violated is real, it is not the reason I
write.
The sad fact (perhaps because I see it every day) is
that we really do have the Iranians to thank for our
spurred unity. They have become the target for public
opinion. And just as it sprang forth with energy, it will
fold back again with apathy. We are a people of crisis!
The double standards we live with every day are only
inspected after they become explosive. We will again
tolerate the wrongs that are in front of our very noses.
The black will remain a nigger and we will continue to
laugh at the fag � the challenge of understanding and
accepting either will remain latent!
Iran's real hostages:
Americans or Iranians?
Iranian student leaves NC State
RALEIGH. N.C. (AP) � Iranian Pirooz Zelli, a
-tudent at North Carolina State University, left the
United State Monday, a move he hopes will enable him
to return soon.
But he's heading for Switzerland instead of his
homeland. He hopes the L.S. embassy there will be
sympathetic to his plight and help him obtain a proper
S. student visa.
The 19-year-old Zelli, a student at North Carolina
State University, has remained in the United States
since his visa expired in 1978. His departure comes just
days before investigators from the Federal Immigration
ind Naturalization Service are to visit the school to
check the status of Iranian students.
Zelli withdrew from the university Friday.
"It I stayed, they would have tried to deport me
he said in an interview. "I think I have a better chance
of returning to the United States as a student if I leave
now and try to get a student visa
He entered the country on a tourist visa in July,
1977. When his visa expired 14 months later, he stayed
on unnoticed by authorities.
If the Iranian situation had not reached crisis
proportion, Zelli, the son of a retired oil executive,
might have been able to continue the ail-American
college life he was living.
Zelli said he will not return to Iran soon. He isn't
ure he would be welcomed after converting to
Christianity, and an uncle who was at the time a
government official in Iran was jailed for several months
after the revolution.
By JACK ANDERSON
and JOE SPEAR
WASHINGTON - Ay-
atollah Khomeini and his
rabid mobs scrawling their
"Death to the Shah" and
virulent anti-American slo-
gans on the walls of the
U.S. embassy in Tehran
are blinded by hate to far
more ominous handwriting
on the wall for themselves
and their country. The
message spells out the
prospect of economic dis-
aster for the Iranians.
Expert authorities on
the Middle East now
believe that Khomeini hid
behind his guise of Mos-
lem fanaticism and deli-
berately inflamed his fol-
lowers into precipitating a
world crisis by the hostage
seizure as part of a callous
scheme to conceal the
days of economic ruin that
lie ahead for his wild-eyed
government.
Khomeini's govern-
ment inherited an eco-
nomy that had one huge
asset � oil. Experts we've
talked to predict that
won't be enough. The
ayatollah and his revo-
lutionary followers face
unemployment, a broken-
down economic system
and chaos that bodes ill
for his regime.
Small wonder that the
militant students holding
American embassy person-
nel captive were able to
muster marching, shouting
masses to demonstrate
outside the embassy. One
out of every three Iranians
is unemployed and has
time to clench fists and
hoist impassioned ban-
ners.
The ayatollah, accord-
ing to our sources, also
was confronted with the
necessity of raising taxes
next vear. In some in-
stances, they say, the
taxes on the people must
double and Iran must keep
oil exports between 2 and
a half and 3 and a half
billion barrels a day just to
keep aloat financially.
But intelligence esti-
mates we've seen indicate
the output is well below
the 3 and a third barrels
daily the Khomeini gov-
ernment claims is being
exported. And, they add,
even if they are kept high,
Iran will have to borrow
heavily from abroad in the
coming year.
Iran's credit rating is
near zero after the United
States ordered a freeze on
its bank assets in this
country and the Khomeini
government declared it
won't pay debts incurred
under the shah in foreign
circles.
The Iranian Air Force
and the countrv's trans-
portation system is des-
tined for collapse now that
the United States has cut
off further sales of spare
parts. The oil fields are
likely to become dust
bowls without technical
help and equipment from
abroad.
The entire nuclear
reactor program will have
to be canceled. The gov-
ernment's television and
radio programs are ex-
pected to be blacked out
for budgetary reasons.
Once long ago, decadent
rulers such as Nero and
Caligula threw Christians
to the lions and staged
gladiator fights to conceal
from their people the
pending fall of the Roman
empire. In the same
tradition, Ayatollah
Khomeini is using hos-
tages and Islamic zealotry
to divert his unwitting
followers from awareness
of the pit of poverty that
lies ahead of them.
NIXON'S ABUSES:
With indirect thanks to
Richard M. Nixon, the
godfathers of the Mafia
are now able to thumb
their noses with impunity
at the government's anti-
crime strike forces.
In the wake of Water-
gate, Congress took action
to curb the White House
from using the Internal
Revenue Service to punish
or threaten political ene-
mies of a president be-
cause of the sordid
chronicle of Nixon's use of
the government's tax
agency.
Because of the Nixon
abuses, legislation was
enacted after Watergate to
restrict what the IRS can
do with its voluminous
files of intimate data on
individual Americans. For
the law-abiding, it was a
long overdue reform to
prevent vindictive White
House occupants from
punishing those they
deemed as enemies.
Unfortunately, the new
law provided a happy
escape hatch for the
Mafia. Often, Internal
Revenue agents picked up
evidence of crime, graft
and corruption. In the
past, they could provide
their information to the
FBI and prosecuting attor-
neys.
Now their hands are
tied. They must notify the
person under investigation
that information on him
has been sought by a law-
enforcement agency. This
obviously tips a big-time
criminal that he's under
investigation and he can
cover his tracks.c
Federal investigators
have complained privately
to us that the drive against
organized crime has been
hurt by the Nixon-inspired
limitation. Statistics show
the number of organized
crime cases triggered by
tax information has fallen
from 620 in 1974 to 221
last year.
Before the law took
effect in 1977, the Justice
Department checked out
6,500 tax returns as part
of its criminal investi-
gation. Now only about
2,500 returns are under-
going scrutiny this year.
WATCH ON WASTE:
Lots of government bu-
reaucrats succumb to
Potomac fever. At the
Federal Aviation Adminis-
tration recently, a group of
the agenev's big wigs
were seized with Poconos
fever. The FAA held a
conference for their top
East Coast officials at a
plush country club in the
scenic Poconos ostensiblv
J
to ponder management
techniques. The flyers
inviting participants to the
conference failed to em-
phasize the management-
technique sessions. They
offered instead the de-
lights of boating, fishing,
swimming and tennis. The
tab for the taxpayers:
$60,000.
The Federal Aviation
Administration also re-
cently underwrote a trip to
sunny Honolulu for 25 of
its officials in the guise of
a conference.
The Health, Education
and Welfare Department
picked up the bill for 142
government employees at
a lavish resort. The
purpose of their get-
together was to study the
problems of poverty.
Footnote: Those who
are aware of government
extravagance should write
to Jack Anderson's Watch
on Waste, P.O. Box 2300,
Washington, D.C. 20013.
I I'pvnght !979
Cmted Feature Syndicate Inc
ATTIC
THE E. C. U.
FRATERNITIES
AND
SORORITIES
ATTIC
PRESENT THE FOURTH
GREAT
GREEK
CONCERT
J
WEAR YOUR GREEK JERSEY
AND RECEIVE A REDUCTION ON ADMISSION PRICE
s
�� �
A
�?3 9 S3 2 2
V
i
-r �
i m





Page 6 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 4 December 1979
Brewer , .
(com. from pg. 1)
I
various groups have suggested, but should develop a
broad format that would include many types of music
and services. He also put forth the idea that a full-time
professional might be desirable for the fledgling station.
Along the same lines, Brewer said that the university
needed to develop a communications major for students
interested in broadcasting and journalism. At present
there are only minor degrees offered in these fields.
Dr. Brewer told the assembled students that a
research group would soon be making recommendations
to the administration regarding improvements in parking
facilities on campus. He said that one possibility might
be the construction of parking decks over the present
an improved food service could be developed.
Communal dormitory kitchens might also be built, he
said.
�Suggested that it might be better to fund separately
the SGA, the Media Board and the Transit Authority
from student fees which are presently paid in a lump
sum.
�Said that the UNC system's present court battle
with HEW, which has charged the system for having
unequal facilities in its predominantly black universities,
might take three years to settle and may cost taxpayers
as much as SI.3 million in legal fees.
�Estimated that ECU is receiving seven to eight
research grants each month.
�Said he would not oppose the sale of alcoholic
Greek
lots at the bottom of College Hill Drive and near beverages on campus if the present state law forbidding
Mendenhall Student Center. Brewer estimated the cost ;t were repealed.
of such structures at around $3,000 per space.
When asked whether his program to raise the
academic standing at ECU would be carried out at the
expense of the school's athletic programs, Brewer
responded that he didn't "agree with the dichotomy that
says you can have one but not the other. Why can't you
do both? That's wha we're going to do. We haven't
scratched the surface for the budgets on either one.
We're going to have excellent academics and excellent
athletics
On other topics, Brewer:
�Raised the possibility that cooking in the dorms
might eventually have to be phased out, during which
In his closing comments, Brewer also urged student
organizations to take advantage of the expertise which
exists in the faculty.
Throughout his remarks, Brewer noted that he was
raising all of the suggestions only as points for
discussion, and stressed the role of planning and
development in translating them into future realities.
The chancellor told the group that he would like to
hold similar meetings with students in the future, and
that he would go to "any dorm that wants me" to open
the communication between students and
up
administrators.
Attack
(cont. from pg. 1)
SGA
The premise of the bill is that if the
students could try to sell their books in a
flea market type atmosphere, both the
sellers and the buyers could get better
prices on their books.
Al Patrick, who presented the bill, suggestions as
tu m� �f a hnnV whirh football bring them to his office anytime,
cave the example ot a book wnicn � :���.
He desires a lot ot student input.
Sherrod is the student representative
to the selection committee.
The legislature also welcomed a new
member, William Dickson, who was sworn
in at the meeting.
no injuries until today.
The FALN-Armed Forces
for National Liberational-
so has staged bombing
attacks in the United
States.
Some of the pro- originallv cost $10 which the bookstore
independence groups had would buy for $5 and would sell again for
vowed vengence of the $7.50. Patrick said that with this new idea
death of Angel Rodriguez the person selling the book could sell for
Cristobal, who was found $6.25 gaining themselves more money,
dead in his cell at the and saving the buyer mone;
federal prison in Talla-
hassee, Fla three weeks
ago. Prison authorities
said he apparently hanged
himself.
Rodriguez Cristobal was
among 21 persons arrested
and tried for trespassing
on Navy target beaches on
the small offshore island
of Vieques. Nineteen were
convicted. Protests have
been held on the island in
an attempt to force the
Navy ti stop its target
bombardment and am-
phibious exercises. The
Navy maintains the island
is vital for trai- ng the
Atlan neet.
Patrick said that the bill was aimed at
, f cutting the costs of the students,
(cont. from pg- 1) The bil) passed with Hule debate.
Cheryl Felbinger brought a message to
the legislator from SGA Vice-President
Charlie Sherrod, who was in a meeting to
attempt to find a new football coach.
Sherrod asked that students with any
to the future of ECU
(cont. from pg. 3)
Evans and Alice Martin
won the Certificate of
Honor Awards.
Special congratulations
go to Cindy Rogers, co-
captain of the ECU gym-
nastics team who was first
all-around on the ECU
team on their first meet.
The AOII's also con-
gratulate Sherry Jones for
winning the A.J. Fletcher
Music Scholarship and for
her performance as a
finalist in ECU's Concerto
Competition.
The Alpha Delta Pi's
are sponsoring a "Football
Sunday" at the Attic on
Dec. 16, starting at 1 p.m.
and lasting until about 6
p.m. There will be reduc-
ed prices on beverages
and free refreshments.
The afternoon entertain-
ment will feature a giant
television screen to watch
the Dallas Cowboys �
Washington Redskins
game. Various door prizes
will be given away. Ad-
mission will be 50 cents
The Chi Omegas will
have their annual Christ-
mas party on Sunday, Dec.
9, at 7 p.m.
The spring pledge class
of Chi Omega locked the
sisters out of the house
this past weekend to trim
the tree and surprise the
sisters with a beautifully
decorated house. Thanks
go to the pledges!
The Kappa Deltas are
busy celebrating Christ-
mas at their house.
Last week, they made
educational games for the
children at Crippled Child-
ren's Hospital in Rich-
mond, Virginia. Support-
ing the children is their
national philanthropy.
Monday, Dec. 3, the
East
Kappa Deltas held a rush
tree-trimming party- T�
night, they will hold their
annual gag gift party for
all sisters and pledges.
Alpha Xi Deltas had
a winter cocktail party at
the Ramada Inn Saturday
night, December I. Inis
annual dinner dance is
given to honor Alpha Xi s
alumni. The sisters and
pledges had a tree tr.mm-
,ng party at the house las
night. The Alpha Xi s
seniors are having a
Christmas Party Happy
Hour at the Chapter X
Tuesday night, Dec. 4.
Come join in the tun.
The Sigma Sigma Sig-
ma's held their elections
last week. The new
officers are Eva Pittman,
president; Ruth Bazemore,
vice president; Joy Stroud,
treasurer; Lynne Words-
worth, secretary; Sandv
Burke, rush chairman and
Martha Lambert, educa
tion chairman. Congratula
tions and good luck to all
the new officers.
The Sigmas tree trim
ming and alumni Christ
mas Dinner will be held
Wednesday night at the
house. Thursday night
Virginia Minges is hosting
a party at her homt
honor the seniors.
Sigma's would like to
welcome their two nev
pledges, Jill McAllister
and Lela Miller.
Carolina Playhouse
presents
SAAD'S SHOE
REPAIR
113 Grande Ave.
758-1228
Quality Shoe Repair

ARMY-NAVY STORE
jField, Deck, Flight, Snorkel
Jackets, Peacoats, Parkas,
Shoes, Combat Boots, Plus
1501 S. Evans Street .
PI KAPPA PHI
Little Sister Rush
Tuesday Dec. 4,1979
8:30 At the house
803 Hooker Road
Phone- 756-3540
PART
TINE
JOB
Looking for i part-time
job with flexible hours
and real business
experience? Northwest
Mutual Life Ins. Co.
has openings for college
agents. Call before noon
for appointments!
752-4080
THE CHILDREN'S HOUR
by
Lillian Kellman
From one of America's
foremost playwrights
a powerfully moving
drama about the evil
that a lie can do
Directed by
Travis Lockhart
November 28 through December 1
December 3 through 8
8:15 p.m.
Studio Theatre
Tickets are $2.50
ECU Students $1.50
For reservations and information
call 757-6390
between 10 and 4
Monday through Friday
BEST EATIN'ALL AROUND,
"
w.
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Jerk
s�!
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UNIVERSAL PICTURES PRESENTS
AN ASPEN FILM SOCIETY WILLIAM E. McEUEN
DAVID V. PICKER PRODUCTION
A CARL REINER FILM
STEVE MARTIN
IfiejERK
in
BERIMADETTE PETERS, CATLIN ADAMS JACKIE MASON
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���"�





The East Carolinian
man. 1 �
features
Tuesday, December 4,1979 Page 7
Greenville, N.C.
"I love it � it's loud,
and I can just hang
right there
Joyce Kennedy
Mothers Finest took
everyone another
mother further
M album out
:our behind it
� that's good, they
't have to guess. '
nn Murdoch
By RICHARD GREEN
and STEVE BACHNER
"It was a professional consideration
That's how one person backstage
explained the billing of Mothers Finest
before Nantucket at Saturday's concert at
Minges. He went on to say that Nantucket
was much more popular in this area and
that three members of the group went to
ECU.
If that's a professional consideration, it
was a poor one. The reasoning should
have been that MF is ten times the
superior to Nantucket, and MF should
have appeared after the home boys. But
they didn't.
As it turned out, MF blew everyone
away with their high-energy tunes, a
skillful blend of old and new, and a
dvnamic stage presence led by lead singer
Joyce Kennedy. Nantucket, as would any
other second-rate rock group propelled by
a local following, provided a horrible anti-
climax to what could have been a great
night (I can't wait for those cards and
letters).
The flawless musicianship of the Mr
players is testimony to their more than ten
years together (only the drummer has
changed since the beginning). They
churned out "Baby Love" and "Fire"
with exceptional fluidity and drive, and
the old Steppenwolf tune, "Magic Carpet
Ride never reached the excellence of
the Finest arrangement. Lead guitarist
"Mo" flashed licks reminding me of vocal
and saxophone solos, weaving unique
jazz-rock smokin' around the driving
melodies. And while not as flashy, "the
Wizard" kept the bass line in high gear,
playing his unique "thumb up" style
(which reminds me of a character in a
famous novel).
Then it was time for the home boys,
and the crowd was ready. I really cannot
decide whether they really liked
Nantucket's music or they simply
appreciated the fact that the group is from
North Carolina. I certainly hope it is the
latter.
Nantucket's performing abilities are
adequate enough, but their lyrics, and
even the lack of diversity of melodies, are
an ample cure for insomnia. It was quite
evident that they tried to match MF's
drive � and failed � but the crowd did
not seem to mind too much. E ERY song
was about some fairy-tale love affair gone
sour, and every song featured a worn-out
guitar solo echoing the late sixties.
Originalitv is not one of Nantucket's
shining points. Tommy Redd's stage attire
outdistances his song-writing and guitar-
plaving abilities (though I'm sure most
mothers wouldn't allow him inside their
homes).
If vou left before the end of the
concert, you probably enjoyed it that
much more.
Interview
(Photo by
Following
Mothers Finest's perfor- young appeal - they'll always have the
ristmas building up
Bv K.C NEEDHAM
Assistant Features If riter
Have vou ever felt that
Christmas Day itself is an
anticlimax after all the
pla and gaity of the
Christmas season? Many
ECU students do, and the
majority of those cite valid
reasons for feeling that
way.
"It's tough to take
Christmas seriously wnen
the street decorations go
up before Thanksgiving
a -ophomore complained.
"I can remember when
the week before Christmas
was the big build-up.
People started to get in
the mood for it a senior
commented. "Now, the
whole idea of Christmas is
thrown on us the first of
December and by the time
the twentv-fifth arrives I'm
kind of numb
"I'll admit it another
confessedI love the
Christmas shows on T,
but it spoils it when they
put my favorites on during
the first week of Decem-
ber
"December is sup-
posed to be a month long
season of good cheer these
days, and I'm here to tell
vou that nobody can stay
in a good mood for a
whole month on junior
muttered.
The street decorations
bear witness to the fact
that Christmas is coming,
while radios blare the
countdown of shopping
days left and Santas begin
to appear in department
stores. Some students
resent the commercial-
ization.
"It used to be that
Christmas was seen as a
time to spend with your
family and be happy on
student said, "but now it
just seems like a pro-
motional thing for stores
"There's too much
emphasis on presents
another agreed, "and not
enough on what we're
truly celebratingChrist's
birth. Sometimes it seems
like the value of Christmas
is placed totally on ma-
terial things
Part of the long,
drawn-out build-up of
Christmas that so many
students feel and dislike
has to do with the fact that
they are students.
"Here at EC, you have
to get hyped up on
Christmas long before it
actually is so you can
share it withvour friends
a junior noted. "Once
exams start, no one has
time to be feeling Christ-
masy, and after exams are
over, everyone's gone
home'
"We have to have our
Christmas parties before
exams another said. "1
mean, I hate to rush the
season as much as anyone,
but I can't have Christmas
with a lot of my friends
unless I do it ahead of
time
Of course, there are
always those students who
would be happy if the
build-up of the holiday
season lasted year-round.
"I love it one
laughed. "Every time
those decorations come out
I get so excited I can't
stand it. The build-up is
the best part
use prodm
The opening production
of The Children 's Hour by
Lillian Hellman, was pre-
sented by the ECU
Playhouse cast and crew
with exquisite, artistic
execution.
Excellent casting by
Director Travis Lockhart,
brought about a realistic,
personalized view of child-
hood treachery. Seven
giggling, nagging school-
girls introduce the first act
of the play. Their sassy,
nonchalant attitudes give
the audience a chance to
reminisce about their per-
sonal schooldays. How-
ever, this scene is abruptly
ever, this scene is abruptly
interrupted by the en-
trance of classmate Mary
Tilford, played by Paige
Weaver.
Mary's irresponsible
talk about an "unnatural"
relationship between
Karen, played by Debra
Zumbach, and Martha,
played by Shauna Holmes,
depicts the good verses
evil theme Hellman creat-
ed. Mary's unjust accusa-
tions about the two women
who run the schoolhouse
eventually involves black-
mailing her schoolmate as
well as convincing her
grandmother of her lies.
Consequently, the very
dramatic and skillful dia-
logue between the charac-
ters proves to be detri-
mental for everyone.
The difficulty of play-
ing the monstrous child
that Mary is, did not
prohibit Paige Weaver
from staging a brilliant,
convincing performance.
Mary's malicious attitude
was magnified by the
certainty with which Sallie
Clodfelter imitates Rosa-
lie's innocent character.
Mrs. Mortar, played by
Hazel Stapleton, lives in a
dream world of her past
stage experiences. Her
pettish, unsatisfied ways
are imitated so accurately
that the audience begins
to resent her as much as
her niece does. There was
an amazing resemblance
between Grandma Tilford
and the grandmother that
we know. Being over-
protective, overbearing
and biased to her grand-
child are all characteristics
Mrs. Helen Steer portrays
with abandon.
The Children's Hour'
will be showing through
Friday in the Studio
Theatre. Tickets are on
sale in the Drama Building
Box Office from 10 a.m. to
p.m. The price is $1.50
for ECU students with ID
and Activity Card, and
the general
$2.50
public.
for
C�

d
$o
V


Sj
'
o
&
$
mance, we talked with Joyce Kennedy and
Glenn Murdock, lead singers for the
group. MF recently toured Europe, at
times with Gruppo Sportivo, a new wave
group from Holland, and said they were
one of the finest groups MF has toured
with. Somehow, we digressed, and the
subject of disco entered the discussion.
East Carolinian: Disco began in Europe
and came over to the United States. Do
you think it will be around for a while?
Joyce Kennedy: Europe hates disco. You
ten-year crowd. Actually, all they did was
pick up a brand new audience. So I think
thev were businessmen, as far as that was
concerned.
Murdoch: Yeah, with a group like that,
vou just don't need to (come out with a lot
of albums) � as long as you keep giving
people something.
Kennedy: They've got their audience.
EC: Album sales are off, according to
statistics, and at least three record
companies have raised prices to
(now ACDC is considered a disco band Peop e justtaren t buyingalbumsso
SWEDISH
Swe dish Summer, a
travel-adventure film by
Dick Reddy, will be
shown in Hendrix The-
ater on Thursday, Dec.
6, at 8:00 p.m.
BORGE
Victor Borge, the
"clown prince of the
piano will perform in
Wright Auditorium,
Dec. 10, at 8:00 p.m.
The performance is
sponsored by the Stu-
dent Union Artists Ser-
ies.
MADRIGAL
Mendenhall's Madrigal
Dinners begin tonight
and continue through
December 8.
in Europe? Let me tell you about disco in
Europe � forget it. They don't
particularly care for disco there.
EC: So you like ACDC?
Glenn Murdock: Yeah, they're great!
�C.What, their energy?
Murdoch: They're just not buying albums
they have to guess on, that they think
thev're going to like.
Kennedy: But with inflation, they're going
right to what they know is good, and they
put that money there rather than buying a
Kennedy: That's right. Dog e' dog! I love lot of groups that might be good, and they
it - it's loud, and I can just hang right don't know nothing about.
"here There's some people that are loud EC: Well you have your foot in the door in
and I can't hang no more than two or that respect.
three songs, but thev're so loud and so Murdock: Yeah, right. We ve got good
good you just can't'leave. You just let management, good tours - or this album
goou, yuu j mportant to let people hear
EC- rhyo7:orrraymabout ending up like you. To put ot an album and then tour
Emerson Uke and Palmer, or the Eagles, behind it - that's good, they don t have
fohat matter - one album every two or to guess. Then, they go out and buy the
three Years? album' and the re pretty mU satisf,ed
Kennedy: No, you see, the thing about - if you're good If you're: noi?
the Eagles - what happened with a lot of EC: Do you think most of your appeal is
those biff groups, like Fleetwood Mac � on stage. u
s the disco thing. And when vou're in Murdock: It's the initial thing that gets
hi business, vou get to a certain point, people to start buying, so when they start
you have to deal with it as a business. It buying, then other people are going to
is not only fun and games. You have to hear
get yourself organized and pace your
career because it can go down in a
second. If you don't make the right moves
and the right decisions
Murdock: And the right albums
Kennedy: and the right albums. And
while disco was doin' its thing, it had the
whole business in an uproar. It would
have been absolutely stupid for them to
put an album out at that time.
Murdock: So they just stayed away from
it
Kennedy: and just waited it out
EC- or they could have done what the EC: Oh, by the way, how did the name of
Stones did? the group come about?
Kennedy: That's because they have a very Kennedy: Mother-� ers.
Kennedy: yeah, because sometimes
word of mouth is alot more important than
radio.
EC: Are you under pressure to produce,
or are you pretty relaxed?
Kennedy: We're still growing. It would be
different if we were already over.
EC: You're not worried about peaking too
soon?
Kennedy: We're still a baby.
Murdock: We just have a good time.
Kennedy: We're looking forward
everything.
to
LfAMIOr A Boor C0LU6� -rwc MftKP W
&i Dwo AJoiueii
t
i. ,5-
-� V �
i - -�-





Page 8 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 4 December 1979
Weekly Album Review�Latest Releases
By PAT MINGES
Features Writer
Little Feat � Down On The Farm
This is the last real record album from one of the
most progressive groups of the seventies and one of the
best live bands in existence.
Lowell George was with Frank Zappa, having played
on Reuben and the Jets and Weasels Ripped My Flesh,
when he played his truckers theme song, "Willin" for
Frank. Zappa said he was impressed, but he thought the
material was not appropriate for the Mothers, and why
didn't Lowell start his own band. Zappa helped Lowell
start up Little Feat, and they released their first albums,
Little Feat and Sailin' Shoes, which were not met with
great commercial success. The band was on its last legs
when co-manager Bob Cavallo found a studio in
Maryland cheap enough for Feats to afford.
D.C. nightlife and the release of Feats Don't Fail Me
Now in 1974 made LoweH George and Little Feat
national sensations. The Last Record Album and Time
Loves A Hero were both tremendously successful, and
the live album Waiting For Columbus was perhaps their
finest endeavor yet, receiving four stars from the
Downbeat critics, quite a remarkable feat for a rock
group. Lowell George died last summer, perhaps a
victim of the vicious rock-and-roll lifestyle, and Down On
The Farm is a posthumous tribute to one of the most
unique and creative forces in his genre of rock.
Down On The Farm is, if I am permitted for once to
ascend to Olympus, the best Little Feat album ever
released. Little Feat is the most dynamic assemblage of
musicians in rock, and joining Feats are Fred Tackett,
David Lyndley (of LyndleyCooder fame), Sneaky Pete,
Robben Ford, Bonnie Raitt, Rosemary Butler (one of the
finest female vocalists in the business) and Fran
Payne. Need I say more? Of course!
The compositions on the album are splendid, ranging
from the "Deadish" "Six Feet Of Snow" to distinctly
Feat's "Straight From The Heart "Front Page News"
and "Be One Now" are very tender songs, and "Feel
The Groove by drummer Sam Clayton and Gordon
DeWitty, has something to say to us all.
"Negative
Attitudes
Like a fire that's burning
All the things you should be learning
And positive
Attitudes
Help you in growing
Towards the things you should be knowing"
Tell the Ayatollah to look that up in his holy book.
Cliff Richard - We Don't Talk Anymore
True rock and roll never dies, as geeksters like
Chuck Berry, Jerry Lee Lewis and now Cliff Richards,
continue a legacy as they are reappearing on the charts
after twenty years in the recording industry. Cliff
Richard had his first million seller in 1959 with "Living
Doll his next hit was "Devil Woman" in 1976, his
first in the U.S. after 49 in the U.K and his current hit
is "We Don't Talk Anymore rapidly rising on the
singles chart.
He was born Harry Webb in Luckow, India, on Oct.
14, 1940, and likenesses were made between Richard
and the late Elvis in that both were deeply religious
superstars. To look at Cliffs picture on the cover, you
could scarcely guess he could easily be your father. The
music on the inside would continue to amaze you, as
therein lie some of the most modern and pleasing
melodic structures of this year in the rock-and-roll
format. The album was recorded in Paris and did well
on the European market and, hopefully, will do well in
the United States. The single "We Don't Talk
Anymore" reminds one of Todd Rundgren, and "You
Know That I Love You" resembles Robert Palmer, but
most of the album is very original and palatable. It's a
nice one.
Dan Fogelberg � Phoenix
Dan Fogelberg was the son of two professional
classical performers, and has worked with Van Morrison
and Jackson Browne. His first album was released in
1972 entitled Homefree, featuring the first pairing of
Eagles veterans Joe Walsh, Don Henley and Glen Frey.
Souvenirs and Captured Angel were arguably his finest
endeavors, and with the release of Netherlands,
Fogelberg's recordings began to take a mysterious turn.
He began to undertake increasingly elaborate
productions, lunging into self-indulgence that appeared
once again in Twin Sons Of Different Mothers, an album
that received horribly critical reviews. Weisberg clearly
outshone Fogelberg, and the album wasn't so bad; it
was perfect for Muzak.
Phoenix has a few nice cuts, but altogether it is not
that impressive. Fogelberg is perhaps trying a little too
hard, for one can only stand so much sugar in his tea, or
it starts to taste like medicine. Fogelberg's strength lies
in his lyrical imagery, and his compositional skills are
also pleasant, but he needs to lighten up on the
production end. Too many tears make your pretzels
soggy. The proceeds of this album go toward
anti-nuclear and pro-solar activities, but where was Dan
at the MUSE concert in Madison Square Garden (soon
to be released as an album, a la Bread and Roses).
Fogelberg has risen from the ashes on Phoenix, but
he certainly doesn't fly.
The Emotions � Come Into Our World
Known for their singles and for their association with
Maurice White and Earth, Wind, and Fire, this is a trio
of talented vocalists. There are plenty of dance tunes on
this album, a few popular ballads, and several songs
penned by Maurice White. These are definitely the best
cuts on the album. The personnel lineup features
Paulinho da Costa, Ndugu, Steve Ferrone, David Foster,
Dave Paich and almost a hundred other musicians.
The best songs are "On and On" and "The Movie
but I am sure the most popular will be the dance tunes.
There are none as strong as "Best of My Lov- but I
think this album would please those interested in soulful
dance music or prefer the sound of the dynamic Earth,
Wind and Fire.
Aerosmith � Night In The Ruts
These guys have come a long way from their thirty-
dollar-a-night gigs in New Hampshire. They are one of
the forefront bands of the teen rock scene of the Kiss,
Led Zep, and Ted Nugent. This album surprises me, for
I let it sit for two weeks without hearing it, and then I
heard it for the first time at a party Friday. It was a big
Greenville partv like 1 have not seen in a while, full of
"veterans and rNervbody was rocking out and wearing
a big smile. Who am I to argue with such a prestigious
group of hipsters It ha, to be a good-selling album.
Not having much of a preference for this type of
hard-rock jam, it was weird to find out the more I
listened, the more I liked it. Steve Tyler 8 flapjack lips
surpass even Mich's floppies and could possibly such on
former staff writer Sissy Hankshaw's enormous thumbs.
This m.ght be a last gasp for these guys as thev trv to
get back to their ruts. Definitely for the rockers.
SAVE THE
CHILDREN
OF
A
CLIFF'S
Seafood House and Oyster Bar

WiWor �
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AIX YOU
$a.9s CAN EAT!
MONDAY-THURSDAY
TROUT, FLOUNDER,
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TEA is included with meal
800-243-50751
WSave
I the
Children

CLIFF'S SUPER
SPECIAL
WEDNESDAY
CRAB CAKE SPECIAL
Z Golden Fried Crab Cakes
French Fries, Slaw, and
Hushpuppies. �)�c
Grade 'A' Whole Fryers
41 Lb.
Rich-N- Easy Cake Frosting
Reg. 99 Value Choc.
Vanilla 15oz 21.00
Pepsi-Cola
10oz- Ctn.of6 78
Plus deposit
Soft 'W Pretty
Toilet Tissue
4 Rol l Pkg, 78
Bounty
Paper Towels Giant Roll 48
with this coupon and
$7.50 food order excluding specials
expires Dec. 8. Without coupon 88
Limit one per customer.
Clip this Coupon
Duncan Hines Yellow Cake Mix
17 oz. Box 58 with coupon and
$7.50 food order excluding specials.
Without coupon 78s
Ortega
Taco Shells
10 Count
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LeSeur
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1 303 Can 38
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Golden
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4 lbs. $1.00
ftlllf'o Clip this Coupon
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With $7.50 food order excluding specials.
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Expires Dec. 8. Limit one per customer.
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10 DISCOUNT ON ORDERS OVER $15
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name
ID
i





4 December 1979 THE past CAROLINIAN Page 9
Campus Spice
Pom
TV
Pots, Mugs, Bowls,
- and other functional
v iteru a well as
n tional A corative
- v ill be on sale to
. iblic at East Carolina
v( sit) Dec
ECl Ceramic
will have its animal
I rtristmas show and
10 a.in until 7
W i ight Auditorium
W . rk to he
n the sale were
� b ei amics students
ECl S� hool ol rt.
ds from the sale
sed l the Guild
enrichment
amics programs
Recognition
I oordinator
hild nursing in
� - Carolina Univers-
? ! Nursing, is
� 21 nurse admin-
im the I S and
ted ut-
rial per-

gnized
urses in a recenl
included nurse
t r 14
from Nova
- i Id nursing
at ECU, Ms.
,i a liai -
� . ult members
fract
u d i n g I -
public health
ents, physician's of-
I da) i
-he is
en-
ini with the Piti
and i-
� � lop-
�� - .
th the ECl
M
n a mem-
N.C. Dep;
an Resoui
Health Program Develop-
ment, chair of the com-
mittee on Nurses in School
Health and a governing
councilor of the American
Puhlu Health Association,
Award
on
painting hv illiam
Holle) . chairperson ol art
education inthe East Caro-
lina I niversity School of
rt. was -elected tor a
rth Carolina National
k Purchase Award at
1 U Semi-Annual
Juried Competition ol the
W atei oloi Society ol
North Carolina
Di Holley's painting.
Pi hide to V inter as
� 16 vorks chos( n tor
the exhibition from more
than 300 entries.
Juror tor the exhibition
w as Doris V lute of the
National Academy ol De-
sign and the American
W atercolor Society.
The 36 exhibited v orks
are on view in the Duke
Museum of Art at Duke
I niversity and will remain
there through the month
No ember.
Clarinet
Deborah Chodacki,
inet instructor in the
East Carolina University
Scho �1 Music has
ipleted a series ol solo
� chamber appearances
in the Chicago area.
She was chamber solo-
in 'The Daphne
ariations a composition
lancers and tour
musicians, in a perform-
sponsored bv tlie
ional Endowment for
In a recital ol works by
nposer Dennis Lovin-
�mposer-in-resi-
University ol
Nebraska, Ms. Chodacki
I his solo clarinet
work " Arioso" and per-
i in the premier
amber work. "Pro-
She also appeared in a
chamber ensemble at teh
Second Annual Concert of
Minimal and Conceptual
Music at Northwestern
University, Evanston, 111
where Ms. Chodacki re-
ceived the Master ol
Music degree in clarinet
performance.
Deborah Chodacki is an
alumna of the Eastman
School of Music and has
performed concertos with
the Eastman Musica Nova
and the Pierre Monteux
Donmaine School Orche-
stra in Maine.
She has been principal
clarinet with the Chicago
Friends of Music Chamber
Orchestra, the Park Forest
Symphony Orchestra, the
Spoleto (Italy) Festival of
Two Worlds and the
Colorado Philharmonic
(rrhchestra.
Winner
Dena Harrell, depart-
mental secretary for the
East Carolina University
School of Music, is the
winner of the Greenville
Business and Professional
omen's Club "Young
t lareerist" Competition.
Winners in the annual
competition are selected
onthe basis of professional
activities, career goals,
and performance in indi-
vidual interviews, panel
discussions and brief bio-
graphical speeches.
Judges for this year's
local competition were Dr.
Dorothy Muller, assistant
professor in the ECU
School of Education; Boh
icke district manager
for .letter-on Standard Life
Insurance Co and Anne
ortham of Farm Man-
agement-Real Estate De-
velopment. Henderson.
The "Young Careerist"
award is the Business and
Professional W omen's
Club highest professional
recognition for women
between the ages of 20
ami 30 years. Ms. Harrell
and other winners from
other area local compet-
itions will enter a district
competition in Tarboro
March 23, 1980, and
district winners will be
judged in a statewide
event in Winston-Salem
June 13-15.
Dena Harrell is a
native of Richmond, Va
and the daughter of the
late Charles R. Viverette
and Mr. and Mrs. Robert
D. Staton or Shaw nee
Estates, Powhatan, Va.
She is the grand-
daughter of Mrs. Rena
Hodges of Scotland Neck.
Appointment
Dr. G. Earl Trevathan
has been appointed pro-
fessor of pediatrics at the
East Carolina University
School of Medicine, ac-
cording to Dr. Jon B.
Tingelstad, chairman of
pediatrics.
Trevathan has been in
private practice in Green-
ville for the last 25 years.
He opened his first office
in 1954 and in 1960 started
a group practice, Green-
ville Pediatric Services. He
has a special interest in
pediatric neurology.
A native of Pitt County.
Trevathan has been active
in many community or-
ganizations, including the
Pitt County Medical Soci-
etv, Pitt County Tuber-
culosis Association, Pitt
County Mental Health
Association, Greenville
Rotary Club and the Sierra
Club
He has served as chiet
of staff at Pitt County-
Memorial Hospital and
chairman of the Mid-East
Comprehensive Health
Planning Committee. He
currently is a member oi
the N.C. Commission on
Health Services.
Trevathan received his
undergraduate degree from
the University of North
Carolina-Chapel Hill and
his M.D. from the L'ni-
versitv of Colorado.
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A grant of $5,300 has
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Wardrep of the ECU
School of Business faculty
for a study of real estate
advertising.
Wardrep's project,
"Media Effectiveness of
Real Estate Advertising
received funding from the
Realtors National Market-
ing Institute, a division of
the National Association of
Realtors. The grant to
Wardrep was one of five
such grants to colleges
and universities across the
U.S.
The objective ol the
project is to test the effec-
tiveness of various adver-
tising media on the key
market segments of a
residential realty firm,
Wardrep said.
These key groups in-
clude home buyers (local
and out-of-town), home
sellers (local moves and
out-of-town moves), and
sales associates.
Wardrep formally ac-
cepted the grant at the
recent meeting of the
National Association of
Realtor- in New Orleans.
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airline meals , transfers, & baggage handling,
& hotel accomodations. (Sign up before Jan. 7
to avoid another price increase)
The Student Union Travel Committee
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An ArtCarved Representative will oe at
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DATE: mon. - wed. dec. 3,4,5
W
t





Page 10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 4 December 1979
TWO local poets will Support
East Carolinian
highlight reading
Photo b Diane Rathbun
Reading machine
for ECU's blind
B FRANCEINE I'KKK
ECL eu s Bureau
- f-times it-was-the-worst-of-times
he vicinity ol Easl Carolina I niversity's
a Center who recent!) overheard these lines
inicalh read aloud in "synthetic English"
lered t a robot were beginning Charles
I 7al( oj In 0 Cities.
�.nnal" and "robot-like" are two of the terms
ribe the of the Kurzweil
Mai the Blind, a desk top microcom-
tnted material to spoken
KRM's synthetic English take- great
omprehend, at least at first, it
ward tor ECl - blind
n- Braille books. I ntil now.
lo others to n ad these maten.il aloud
i them on sound tape.
d users ol ECl 's Joyner Libran ma
inted page on the KHM screen and
n It tl hine's pronunciation oi a
lear, the u in push a button and the
� I
he most exciting libran media
years. We're reall glad to have
! Vnn Watson, coordinator oi the
.1 ('enter.
is able to read b scanning the
lution camera, then trans-
1 trical impulses v hich it
she explained.
ids are taken from a tape casette and
� is, the KRM identifies
. - 1 hem into w 1 �rds, using
guistic rule- and 1,500 e
- : bet ause the
lion marks
said thi - inds spoken b the
machine's speech synthesizer
udspeaker lo ated nearby.
re orded on reeb
blind to the KHM s stem.
: item d I r readers
lirments 1- ECl 's V isualtek
the standard
. 'T. w hich projects printed
1 tele ision screen t"r
ttes large s olumes and ran
typewriter, so that a visually-
parh read tie1 typed material on

12 ,000 for the purchase of the
ment tor the blind originated from
igh the NLC. Department i Human
i b ECl Foundation funds and some
iversit) administration.
the other two campuses with KRM
, been designated b the state Division
- � regional centers tor program- for
ti 1UM1IW0I4 titlhl
Two local poets will
highlight a multi-media
poetrj reading scheduled
for Thursday evening in
Jenkins Fine Arts ("(Miter
Dianne Rathbun ol
Greenville ami Margaret
Boothe Baddour oi Golds-
boro will read their poems
on 'The Family
Rathbun vas a visiting
artist at both ance
Granville Community Col-
lege (ll77 78 and Wayne
Community College (1("B-
7')), and she has worked
a- a graphir designer tor
the NC.SI Extension Ser-
ice.
lso a graphir artisl
and photographer, Rath
bun sees as her goal "to
develope and understand-
ing and appreciation tor
contemporary graphics
with the fine art- a-
common denominator
Baddour is president ol
the North Carolina Poetrj
Society and has served as
the direi tor ol the Com-
munity rts Council in
Goldsboro a ne !ount
tor tun years. She has
arranged, directed and
performed in reader's
theater produi tions ol The
Jf nrltl or Carl Sandburg
and I Christmas Wassail.
Baddour's poetry
awards include the l('7o
Tarheel ntcrs Round
table Award tor " Hie Mad
liner" and a ')7() Irene
Lea he Ward lor "W hat
Color I- The Sun?"
1 tit- reading begins al
8:00 p.m. Thursday in the
second-floor auditorium oi
the Jenkins Fine Arts
Center. I here v ill also be
a workshop, and Forum
nihrr- are in ited to
i poems 'ii th- subject
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T





The East Carolinian
lian � �
sports
Tuesday, December 4,1979 Page 11
Greenville, N.C
ECU players saddened
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
"He's like a father to us. He's always there when
you need him
But "he" is on the way out. Afters six years as head
coach of the East Carolina Pirates, Pat Dye is moving
on. Behind him, he is leaving a group of players who
look at him as more than a football coach. As ECU
guard Wayne Inman put it above, they look at him as a
father.
Most of the Pirates have said that they were very
shocked by Dye's abrupt resignation Thursday, but that
in a way they were expecting such a move.
"I kind of felt it coming said Inman, a junior who
will return next season. "The last couple of team
meetings before he resigned you could tell something
was up. He was so emotional
Inman said that he felt that Dye really hated to leave
East Carolina. "I know he does Inman said, "because
he's the type of coach that gets very close to his players.
I guess some problems with administration forced him to
leave
Before Dye announced his resignation officially
Thursday at 4:30 p.m he held a meeting with the team
amidst rumors that had spread throughout Scales Field
House claiming the coach was going to make a drastic
move. He called the meeting at 3:30, exactly one hour
before the resignation.
With all the rumors that were going around that
Davenport
Inman
said split end Vern Davenport, "we sort ot
expected that he would resign. But I went in there
hoping he wouldn't say it
The meeting was a very emotional one, both for the
coach and his players. "It really hit all the players
hard commented Inman. "All the guys were hanging
their heads � just kind of shaking their heads like it
couldn't be happening
Naturally, the meeting with the team was a very
emotional one for Dye. "There's no way I could come
out of there dry he said later in the day.
The mood in Scales Field House after the resignation
was a somber one, to say the least. "It was almost like a
funeral there for a while said senior defensive Wayne
Poole. "It all happened so quick. I guess everyone was
in sort of a state of shock
The thing that bothers the Pirates the most now that
they have "accepted" Dye's resignation is the question
of who the next ECU head coach will be.
"The committee needs to move quickly said senior
safety Ruffin McNeill. "The guys who are coming back
next year are kind of lost. They need someone to turn
to
And Davenport, a senior who could come back next
season because he has a year of eligibility left, said the
selection had better be a good one. "We don't want just
anybody to come here said Davenport. "We don't
want anybody who plans on using ECU as a stepping
stone. Wexneed somebody who will stay here and devote
themselves to making this program as good as
possible
Most of the Pirate players, and Dye, would like to
see assistant coach Dick Kupec get the job. "I can think
of no one more qualified than Dick said Dye.
"I would like to see Coach Kupec get the job
because the change wouldn't be so great said tackle
Matt Mullholand. "He's very knowledgeable and is
definitely qualified
Other than Kupec, names that have been rumored as
being considered by the selection committee include
Citadel coach Art Baker, Western Carolina coach Bob
Waters, ex-N.C. State assistant Jim Donnan,
ex-Clemson coach Carl Reese, Missouri assistant Kenny
Wheeler, ex-ECU assistant Carl Reese and ex-pro
quarterback Roman Gabriel.
Pat Dye looks ahead
Brewer appoints committee
Chancellor Brewer
(Photo by John Grogan)
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
Less than 24 hours after the abrupt resignation of
heralded ECU football coach Pat Dye, Chancellor
Thomas B. Brewer called a special press conference to
announce the formation of a committee to find a
successor.
Brewer read excerpts of a letter to Coach Dye dated
November 30, the day after the six-year Pirate
helmsman announced his departure.
"In expressing our appreciation to you for
your outstanding efforts in behalf of our
football program at East Carolina
University, I want to speak for the
trustees, administration, faculty, staff,
students, alumni, friends and supporters
of East Carolina University. Your teams
deported East Carolina University at its
finest, both on the field and off the field,
and you have brought to us a sense of
identity which allows us to compete with
the major universities with dignity,
knowing that we have a chance to win.
Our University is extremely grateful to
you.
We know that we have your best wishes
for the continued development of athletics
at East Carolina University along the lines
which you hae set forth. We intend to do
our utmost. All East Carolinians, and all
friends of East Carolina University wish
for you and your family the greatest of
happiness and success in the years
ahead. "
Brewer restated the University's commitment to the
pursuit of athletic excellence, and cited that although no
date has been announced for the announcement of a
new head coach, he assured it would be "as quickly as
possible
"We know that the university football program must
have leadership immediately Brewer said in a
published statement to the media. "The recruiting days
are upon us.
"I have formed a committee to recommend a new
coach and have asked them to proceed with all judicious
speed
The names of the members of that committee, unlike
the one formed to find a new head basketball coach at
the end of the 1978-79 season, were" released by Brewer
and were as follows:
Clinton Prewett, assistant to the Chancellor,
chairman of the athletics council; Clifton Moore, athletic
council, vice-chancellor of business affairs; Bill Cain,
athletic director; Jerry Powell, president of the ECU
Alumni Association; Ernie Schwartz, department of
physical education; Janice Faulkner, faculty representa-
tive to the athletic council; Tommie Little. Pirate Club
Plank Owner ($2000 annual); Max Ray Joyner. athletic
council, Pirate Club Plank Owner; Ashley Futrell. vice
chairman of the ECU Board of Trustees; Charlie
Sherrod, vice president of SGA; and Jack Minges, Pirate
Club Plank Owner.
"At the college and university level. I recognize the
unique value that athletics has for an institution
Brewer stated. "Athletics enables a broad spectrum of
people to get together and support a school for a
common cause.
"I understand all this, for I lost my voice, too, for
three days after the Chapel Hill game, which I consider
one of the most exciting contests I have ever
witnessed he mused. "It is our intention at East
Carolina University to build teams in football that will
enable us to play any team and not have to worry about
a last-second field goal beating us.
"We hope to have the situation sufficiently in
command so that this will not matter
When asked if the football budget would be
increased in order to entice candidates to seek the
position, Brewer replied that "we're going to have to
increase the budget for inflation if nothing else
"My personal commitment to quality athletics t
unswerving he affirmed. "Outstanding high school
players are beginning to make their choice, and we want
this to be a great recruiting year at East Carolina
University.
"Our mission at East Carolina continues
Pirates capture
Clemson Tourney
By JOHN NOLAN
Staff Writer
The ECU wrestling
Pirates pulled off a major
upset this weekend by
winning the Clemson In-
vitational wrestling tour-
nament. ECU outscored
their nearest opponents,
Georgia, by thirteen points
en route tc an impressive
team victory.
'This was a big
tournament for everyone
commented first year ECU
mentor Ed Steers.
Steers added that he
was a little surprised
about his team's victory,
but insisted this team has
the talent to compete with
anyone.
"This team has a lot of
pride and they all work
together both on and off
the mats. Although wrest-
ling is basically an indi-
vidual sport, it really helps
when everyone is pulling
for each other
Another positive note
for the team is that only
nine wrestlers entered the
tournament while the other
teams entered the maxi-
num of 10 allowed to
�articipate. Of the nine
vrestling for ECU, Frank
'ruitt was forced to
vrestle eight pounds over-
veight and still finsihed
ind impressive fourth.
"We have had some
njuries which have slowed
iome of the wrestlers
down. Frank usually
wrestles at 150 pounds but
since we needed him at
158 he moved up
ECU had three wrest-
lers win their individual
weight classes. Butch
Revils placed first at 177
pounds and
named the
wrestler of
was also
outstanding
the tourna-
ment. Other winners were
Steve Goode at 167 pouhds
and D.T. Joyner who
wrestles in the unlimited
category.
"I was very impressed
with the three winners
especially since this is the
second time they have
placed first this year
said Steers. All three of
the Pirate matmen dom-
inated their weight div-
isions in the Monarch-
Civitan Open.
Other wrestlers placing
in the tournament were
John Brennan (118), Char-
ley McGimsey (126), Scott
Eaton (142), and Frank
Shady (150) who all
finished third.
Although the Pirates
have gotten off to an
outstanding start this sea-
son, Coach Steers clearly
wants to avoid any binding
sta-jments.
"I am very, very proud
of everyone on this team. I
really don't want to amke
any predictions about the
team at this time. Yes,
they have surprised me
and I think we'll do well in
the future but is is still too
early in the season to
predict any championships.
The Pirates travel to
Maryland next weekend
for the Morgan State
University tournament.
According to Steers, Ken-
tucky and Hofstra repre-
sent the best talent in the
tournament and will be the
teams to beat is ECU
hopes to continue their
winning ways.
All in all, the 1979-80
season looks promising for
the Pirates. This year's
team definitely has the
talent and experience a-
long with a lot of pride to
surprise many teams.
However, the threat of
injury still looms big as
perhaps the one thing that
can soundly defeat the
pirates this season.
Although Steers con-
tinues to maintain his
low-key approach it is
obvious that the Wrestling
Pirates will once again be
a team to reckon with and
may even be the team to
beat.
VCU spoils Buc opener;
split in Spider Classic
FrankHobson(33) rebounds
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
East Carolina defeated little known
West Virginia Tech 92-79 Saturday night
in the consolation game of the fourth
annual Spider Classic in Richmond, Va.
The win followed a narrow 72-71 ECU loss
to Virginia Commonwealth in the
tourney's opening round Friday.
Guard George Maynor, who was
named on the all-tourney team, scored 23
points, 19 in the last 12 minutes, to aid
the Pirate victory over WVT. The Golden
Bears led by as many as seven points in
the second half before Maynor's heroics
saved the Pirates.
The Golden Bears jumped on the
Pirates for an early 17-6 lead, as the ECU
starters looked lackadaisical to say the
least. ECU coach Dave Odom then made
wholesale substitutions with what he calls
his "second group of regulars
This combination of Mike Gibson, Kyle
Powers, Mark McLaurin, Dave Underwood
and Tony Byles brought the Pirates back
quickly, outscoring the Bears 18-0 in a
period of just under five minutes to give
ECU a 24-17 lead.
"I'm very pleased with the way they
came in there and picked us up Odom
said. "Our first five was just totally flat at
the outset
The reason for the lackadaisical play of
the Pirates probably came from the
disappointment of the heartbreaking 72-71
loss to VCU just one night earlier.
"We worked on mental preparation all
day long Odoun said. "Maybe we
overdid it. I knew West Virginia Tech was
better than our guys were giving them
credit for
The Pirates opener with Virginia
Commonwealth was in every sense of the
word a thriller.
The game came down to a last second
shot by Clarence Miles that was blocked
by a VCU defender.
As in the game with WVT, the Pirates
fell behind the Rams in the earlv going.
VCU led by as many as 13 points, at
37-24, before the Pirates began getting
their act together.
The lead was cut to four at 43-39 by
the half, thanks a great deal to the
aggressive play of reserve freshman guard
Bryant Wiggins.
The second half was tight all the wav
as neither team led by more than four
points.
The Pirates lead 71-70 on a Herb
Krusen jumper with 35 seconds left in the
contest. The Rams then immediately
called two back-to-back timeouts.
Senior guard Danny Kottack drove the
lane and put up what turned out to be the
winning shot with 16 seconds left in the
contest, putting the Rams up 72-71.
The Pirates quickly moved the ball
past the half court line and called timeout
with ten seconds remaining. When the
designed play failed the Pirates called yet
another timeout with four seconds' left to
try and set up the winning shot.
'The plan said Odom, "was to draw
a foul. Every man who got the ball was to
have double-pumped. We planned this
because Virginia Commonwealth is so
blocked shot-conscious
When Miles got the pass, he failed to
"double-dump" as Odom had planned,
and his shot was subsequently blocked.
"Clarence was not sure bow much time
was left Odom said, "he felt that He
didn't have time to do what we had
planned
A
M





Page 12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 4 December 1979
Lady Bucs succumb to Devils9power
By JIMMY DuPREE
Asst. Sports Editor
DURHAM - After trailing 45-40 at halftime, the Lady
Pirates of East Carolina rallied behind forward Rosie
Thompson and guard Lydia Rountree to fight back in the
second half but lost to Duke nonetheless, 76-75.
The Lady Bucs trailed by as much as 11 with 2:54
left in the first frame but fought back to the five-point
deficit at the half as Rountree swished a pair of field
goals, and point guard Laurie Sikes and reserve center
Mary Denkler connected on two free throws each.
Rountree netted eight of her 26 points in the opening
eight minutes of the second half, as East Carolina
forged to a 56-55 lead with 12:12 remaining in the
battle.
The lead exchanged hands three times before the
Lady Blue Devils powered their way to a 62-58 lead with
6:51 remaining. Thompson sand a field goal to cut the
margin to two and followed with a driving lay-up, on
which she was fouled by Duke center Lisa Warren.
Thompson's free throw gave ECU a 65-64 edge with
3:33 showing on the clock.
Duke took the lead with an outside shot by guard
Kim Matthews, but Rountree answered with a 20-foot
jumper.
East Carolina stole the ball and had a chance to gain
a three-point lead, but Matthews fouled Rountree to
prevent ECU from widening the gap.
Rountree missed the front half of a one-and-one and
husky Barb Krause grabbed the rebound for the Devils.
Tara McCarthy popped a 15-footer as the 30-second
clock ran out to give Duke a 68-67 advantage with 2:32
remaining.
After an ECU timeout, Thompson took a back-door
assist from center Marcia Girven to again put the
Pirates out front.
McCarthy and Rountree traded baskets, and with
1:10 left, Rountree stepped to the line after being fouled
by fiesty point guard Patti Thomasson.
Rountree missed, and Girven was fouled ont the
i 'bound by Leslie Earnhardt. The drama continued to
unravel when she too was unable to score and Matthews
rebounded for Duke.
The cat-quick Sikes swiped the ball from Thomasson
and sped down-court for a lay-up, as ECU claimed a
73-72 lead with :40 remaining.
The Lady Pirates' defense was late setting up, and
McCarthy sprinted through the land, and the lead again
shifted.
ECU took a time out with :20 left in order to set up
what could have been the last play of the game.
Earnhardt Fouled Thompson with :16 left to save a last
effort ol the Devils.
Thompson, the game's leading scorer with 29, sank
two free throws to close out the Lady Bucs scoring.
Thomasson again drove on the permeable ECU
defense but was undercut en route to the goal by Sikes.
Thomasson hit both attempts for the final 76-75 spread.
The Lady Bucs had one final chance to win with :06
showing on the clock, but time ran out as forward Heidi
Owen squared to the goal to shoot.
"We didn't make it difficult for them to get the
ball explained ECU coach Cathy Andruzzi. "We
allowed them to get the ball inside too much.
"They (Duke) played with a lot of intensity. We need
to work much harder on defenseI can see that now.
When the picks were set we didn't help each other. Our
defense had to work for us to win, and it didn't.
"I don't think we took thet game lightly. We lost it
in the first half. We came back and that's good, but we
shouldn't have been behind.
"I think Lydia played the best game of her career
site praised. "She played very good fundamental
basketball
With this loss, the Lady Pirates drop to 4-1 on the
season and remain idle until they face James Madison
University Friday at 7:30 p.m. in Minges Coliseum.
ECU (75)
Thompson 12 5-5 29, Riley 5 0-1 10, Girven 2 0 1 4.
Sikes 1 2-2 4, Rountree 12 0-4 26, Denkler 0 2-2 2, Ow
0 0-0 0, Hooks 0 0-0 0. Totals 33 -15 75.
Duke (76)
Krause 7 2-3 16, Matthew 2 1-1 5, M arren 1
McCarthy 13 2-3 28, Thomasson 3 2 2 8. Earnhardt 2
4, Monroe 1 0-0 2, Rose 2 0-1 4, Rokus � 0-0 0, Wal-
0-0 0. Totals 34 8 12 76.
Halftime: Duke 45. ECU 10. Fouled -ut: Warren,
Rilev. Total fouls: Duke 20. ECU 15. Technical none
A-350.
Lydia Rountree struggles
CROW'S NEST
7:30 p.m.
Monday Dec. 10
1979
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Don't take a chance on Santa Claus
take a chance for our cause
1st prize- Attic & Elbo Room
5 month free pass $250 value
2nd prize- Apple Records $60 value
3rd prize- Traffic light pair of ECU jeans
$27 value
other sponsors:
California Concept
Cliff's
Coffman's
Kentucky Fried Chicken
King & Queen
Newby's
Pizza Inn
Tree House
Western Sizzlin
13 prizes valued at over $400
Money goes to underprivleged children of
Pitt County and War on Winter campaign
Price of Ticket 50
Purchased from any PHI BETA LAMBDA member
In ECU Book Store Lobby, Th. & Fri. 10-1
White Cloud
4pack bathroom tissue
89c
Bounty towels
jumbo roll
59fc
G.E. Light bulbs-
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4 December 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 13
X
Pirate gymnasts
fall in opener
ECU's gymnastics team
-uttered their first loss of
the 1979-80 season Friday
against a strong UNC-
Chapel Hill squad, the
final score being 122-107.
Top performers for the
Pirates included Cindv
Rogers with a second
place finish in the floor
exercise (7.55) and a
fourth in the balance beam
i), kim Lowe, a fourth
the vault (7.6), and
Susan Mi Knight with a
fifth in the uneven parallel
bars (7.15).
Coach Jon Rose also
-ft! Carol Layton for
her performance in the
tnce beam, Lisa Red-
n in vaulting and
ii�eth Jackson in
vaulting and floor exer-
Tm pretty
ised with our
performance1
well
overall
said Rose.
The ECU girls did a
repectable job, but
-till didn't reach the
: 115 to 120 points
h I had set for us.
1 he have some hard
tk ahead to be where I
em to be. YJ e've
'ome a polished
the remainder of
- ason.
"Chapel Hill is in the
ear of their program.
the 're prettj com-
(Photo by Kip Sloan)
Pirate gridders named
to Independent squad
Three East Carolina
University players have
been named to the first
team of The Associated
Press All-South Indepen-
dent football team.
Running back Anthony
Collins, offensive guard
Wayne Inrnan and line-
backer Mike Brewington
were named to the 24-man
squad. Brewington is a
senior and Collins and
Inman are juniors.
Collins became the first
ECU player to gain 1,000
yards under head coach
Pat Dye while Brewington
lived up to his pre-season
All-America laurels. This
marks the second straight
year that Inman has
received the honor.
Three ECU players �
offensive tackle Matt Mul-
holland, fullback Theodore
Sutton and defensive back
Charlie Carter � were
named to the second team.
South Carolina landed
two berths on the first
team and Virginia Tech
one. Florida State domi-
nated the selections with
seven first-team picks.
The Gamecock selec-
tions were offensive tackle
George Schechterly and
defensive tackle Steve
Bernish, while Virginia
Tech's berth was landed
by punter Dave Smigelsky.
One noticeable player
left off the teams was ECU
quarterback Leander
Green, who received hon-
orable mention.
Rein heads to
Louisiana State
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IN HOI GE(AP)-
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He was expected to talk to
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Of the assistants,
Mood) and Morrison had
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Belu is an offensive
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D
)





Page 14 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 4 December 1979
Dye resigns
continued from page 1
(tic coach's official request.
H the end of the season, the football staff had run
out i't money, going over their set budget by 816,000.
rhis forced D- to have to apply for a personal loan.
The final incident that locked Dye's decision involved
the transfer of quarterback Aaron Stewart to Duke
iversity. Stewart applied tor his release from ECU
summer, a request that was firmly debated by Dye,
but w as granted bj Cain.
I didn't want Aaron running our offense against
Duke's all of preseason Dye said, noting that the Blue
Devils first game was against the Pirates. "I explained
n- to Viron. hi- family and Tom Butters (Duke AD),
and told them that 1 wouldn't allow the release
( ain nevertheless went ahead, and with Chancellor
Records fall at
Penn St
u JIMNH DuPREE
1 - s v rts h d it or
ss it two
swimmers to
the H'( men's
am -til! man-
seventh place
P ;in State
and se1 five new
records in the
C lina State
meet title,
I NC, West
I Penn State
the �
and
; swimmers
I � . I
Ray
irth
in
-�
Knu-
i knocked
18.41
�I the
by a
I a
! Scharf.
:
ance
he besl
Relays
. - �� II in the
back-
is well as
n and
The hack relay team of
Bjorn Johansen, David
Evans, David Giovine and
Neal ITlman posted the
new time of 3:47.97, while
the fly relay unit ol
Johansen, Perry Newman,
John Akright and Mark
Lovette clocked in at
3:35.96.
The 400 1M relay
brushed five seconds of!
the old record with a
3:39.86 performance. Nie-
nian. McDonald, Hopkins
and Mike Triau scored a
fourth place finish for the
Pirate- in the event.
The final record was
set in the 200 medley relav
with a tune of 1: W.36 for
a sixth place finish.
Johansen. Knubowitz.
Lovette and Mark Medei
participated in the new
portion of Pirate history.
This was really a big
improvement over our
performance last year,
said Scharf. "1 think West
Virginia looked very strong
this point ot the
season.1
'The gul- didn't lair
so well he added. "V e
I a lew sick girls up
there- swimming.
"They swam against
some real tough competi-
tion so I think the trip was
valuable from that apect.
They LT'�t a reall) good
look at what top level
competition is like.
"While it wasn't all
that we had expected, it
wasn't all that had
her
Thomas Brewer's approval, went through with the
release.
Despite all the problems, though, Dye said that he
would always be loyal to ECU. "Heck he said, "I feell
like an ECU alumnus.
"I've had a tremendous amount of fun coaching at
ECU he continued, "probably more than I will have
anywhere else. Everybody here is so hungry 8 the
players, the students and fans � to win. It's a great
feeling to go to places like Carolina as underdogs, yet
knowing that your people really believe that you're
going to win
The fact that Dye's resignation is so controversial,
mainly because of the release of the conflicts with Cain,
Is of concern to the coach. "I hate to leave in such a
swirl of controversy he said. "You'd think this thing
was a bitter controversy, but it's not. Sure there were
disagreements, but there were the good times too
Dye said that he felt it was unfair that he had
received so much credit for the Pirates' success in
recent seasons. "That's a said thing he said. "After
all, I'm just a small part of a big machine. The assistant
coaches and players should get the credit.
"They've helped create the type of program that
exist- here now Dye continued. "And there's no
doubt in my mind that East Carolina has a bright future.
The tradition is great and winning will definitely
continue to be a part of East Carolina football
Dye promoted a member of his staff as a possibility
for his successor. "1 can think of no better man for the
job than Dick Kupec he said. "He is a very intelligent
man and has all the tools of a great head coach
There has been speculation that the selection
committee would go outside, as it did when Dye was
hired from Alabama, and hire a member of a staff from
a national powerhouse.
The names most prominently mentioned yesterday
were Citadel head coach Art Baker, Western Carolina
coach Bob Waters, ex-Clemson coach Red Parker,
Ex-NCSU assistant Jim Donnan, Ex-ECU assistant Carl
Reese, Missouri assistant Kenny Wheeler, ex-pro
quarterback Roman Gabriel and Kupec.
Members of the selection committee include Clinton
Prewett, assistant to the chancellor; Clifton Moore, vice-
chancellor of business; athletic director Bill Cain; Jerry
Powell, president of the ECU Alumni Association; Ernie
Schwartz, P.E. professor; Janice Faulkner, faculty
representative to the athletic council.
Also, Pirate Club member Tommie Little; Pirate Club
President Max Ray Joyner; Ashley Futrell, vice
chairman of the ECU Board of Trustees; SGA Vice-
President Charlie Sherrod; and Pirate Club member Jack
Minges.
ECU chancellor Thomas Brewer said in a news
release that the committee would proceed with
"judicious speed" in selecting a new head coach.
The children
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Monday, December 10,1979 8:00 PM
WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
East Carolina University
ADVANCE TICKETS- PUBLIC: $7.00 ECU STUDENTS: $4.00
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Title
The East Carolinian. December 4, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
December 04, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.26
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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