The East Carolinian, November 27, 1979






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� -

i .
Th
ast Larohnian
i
'
Gay tjroup
fails to ffet
SGA funds
R

rovernmenl
irolina Ga
N
standol
8 'quest, but
M - Ikins broke the tie
S � Pn sident Brett
h a v i
U n could
w as
Chi
inn
M �
gives its
support
PEKING I P) Cl
Monda) in the Iranian i risis, dei
ol official silence that "accept �'�
should be universalh respe u
The statement, released
expressed concern over the I
early solution can be found
consultation
The statemenl :
ihina may take in a I "
tlic situation, ailed by Sc ' �
Waldheim. The session i is expe l
The Chinese media ha ve indical
government attempts to n
Americans, held at the embas -
b Iranians demanding ' I Shah Mol
Reza Pahla i, now receivirij
York.
" c arc concerned event?
relations between Iran -
merica the statement -aid.
"We alwavs hold that the f eacl
coui
then- should b n
other countries.
B it the - �
guiding interna
diplomatic mini unities should
' ' '� hope thai a reas mable and ap
�: be found at an earh date through peaceful
consultation in accordance with principle-
i ,
' Photo I Fred Midgett)
'�'
. 7j Saturday. De
1 n

threi . Rep Ge n ge H u led
borne were sitting . vere Ivii
� � I.
�.� ge their
pox. he
Hansei stages looked
visited them Sunday. "but tt �
anxious. They would liki
for their families to know the arc wi
Hansen, a self-styled "do-il
was the tir-t American to see the captives since Moslem
militant- seized the embassy Nov. I ding the I v
S e IK Y page I
Best found not guilty
1

� � star witness
ir charj
istees
were
1 ar
with
Best �
"I I
on u nli the same
tnd Best had
.n use.
� ei Assistant
� it the alleged
j " 11 added,
m the account of
- loan account
to believe
human
in ine trial
lion's board
eve on
ligwi � - he jury,
was Rutl
'� n her and
five
oein
you
P" - ' t the D, Ii i Sigma
1 - in
I St -ho was
(Ii a ii sky
blasted
page 4
Play reviewed
page 6
Pirates defeat
Wm and Mary
page1)
Bomb threat forces
library to close
By RICH RI GREEN
Ma Editor
Consumption up, sales down
w i- i male and probabh
b the sound ot the
stu
enl ol the �� � � �
at Si
drinkers,
' (orient as
i n d e i
irh dn
� �
drink
ten items it makes no
dil � who know-
manager much of one item is
we only sell one item
Releasing those figures
ild give away oui
one man
I
ib owners
id i � mil p ress i
eason foi
onsuni)
Heisei

Harbour said cms
clearing the library qui I
students asked w h the librar ��� �-
osed shortly alter 9 dosing early, but the reason was not
'o 20, when an anonymous announced t- avoid a pai
was a bomb in the
building set explode at 10 p.m J�nn Rose, campus -
ibrarian Gordon Harbour. liuU Tuesday night. I �
Campus polio kept students away from -indent- walking i impus iway
until alter ten. but nothing from the library.
bap ' I 15 p.m nt that
V. to Harbour, the call came Inr threat was a hoas fficers
�id nine o'clock and was answered b resumed i
i. libran worker. Tucker
1 ucker rnmnn lot
d excitement
�y. pai ed
ailer said, "Listen was tl
. lo- there's a bomb set ; 'nii' r'
� i Library at ten o'do Ii
this i- word lor-word
I had a chance to st'tunf' ��! "
usually only
u students He
narge ot the hhrar , , . ,
, . placed on bomb tl
the call was received, , .
semi mi turn out to I
pus secuntv liarhmir
, , He -tressed that I
the hhrars would fie ,
I th.
Escaped convict caught at ECl
mn nt
tions
iganton
n the
w as pai ked on the - ast
side ' S






�� '�"���'�vN-
2THE EAST CAROLINIAN 27 Nov�mber 1979
Pecplee 11 � � and
�ltlfl�
Students who are in-
terested in applying for
positions on the student
residence hall staff for
summer or next fall should
file their applications be-
tween now and Jan. 31. To
be eligible for employ-
ment, a student should be
enrolled full-time and have
a real interest in residence
hall living. Hall advisors
are paid for two hours of
work each day, Monday-
Thursday, and have duty
every other weekend.
Application forms are
available in the directors'
oifices or in the Residence
Life office, 214 Whichard
Building. All applications
should be turned in to the
Residence Life office.
pM beta
lamntxla
Phi Beta Lambda will
have a meeting Tues
Nov. 27 at 4:00 in Rawl
103. All members please
attend and get your raffle
tickets. Also, members are
still being accepted if you
would like to join.
lebel
There will be a rebel
poetrv reading on Thurs
Nov. 29 at 7:30. Scheduled
readers include Renee
Dixon, Joe Dudasik, June
Sylvester, and others. The
audience will also be
welcome to read. Refresh-
ments will be served. No
admission will be charged.
I iIHk
Deadline for literature
submissions for The Rebel
is Nov. 30. Address
manuscripts to The Rebel
Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter or bring submissions
by the office (Publications
Building) by Friday.
Ill l �(�
Phi Sigma
language honor
Iota, the
society,
will meet Nov. 28 at 7:30
in the Coffeehouse of
Mendenhall. A slide pre-
sentation on Black Africa
will be shown. All interes-
ted people are welcome to
attend.
I II II nil
An important meeting
of the women's and men's
team handball clubs will
be held on Wednesday,
Nov. 28, at 3:30 p.m. in
104 Memorial Gym. All
interested students are
encouraged to attend.
laV
The ECU Law Society
will be having a meeting
Tuesday, Nov. 27th at 8
p.m. in room 248 Men-
denhall. All members are
urged to attend as we will
be finalizing plans for the
Law of the Sea Seminar
THIS WEEKEND. If you
cannot come to the
meeting, but would be
able to help out Friday
andor Saturday, please
call Lynn Calder at
757-6611, ext. 218 where a
message may be left.
A new National Vene-
real Disease Hotline Infor-
mation and Referral Ser-
vice began operating on
Oct. 15, 1979. The new
program will operate sev-
en days a week from 11:30
a.m. -1:30 a.m. (Eastern
Standard Time). Taped
announcements will be
provided during the off-
hours. This service will
provide venereal disease
information and refer cal-
lers to free or low-cost
diagnostic and treatment
facilities if indicated. Dial
toll free: 1-800-227-8922.
at
Dave Underhill, advisor
for the ECU Ski Club,
invites all interested stu-
dents to attend an organi-
zational meeting on
Thurs Nov. 29 at 4 p.m.
in 104 Memorial Gym.
legislator
Applications are now
being accepted for a seat
as a Day Student Legis-
lator in the Student
Government Association.
Interested full-time stu-
dents with a 2.0 GPA or
above may apply at the
SGA offices in Mendenhall
Student Center between 9
a.m. and 4 p.m. Nov.
26-30. Interviews will be
given Monday Dec. 3 at 4
p.m.
pre
Christmas Social on
Dec. 11 and many other
topics will be discussed at
the P.R.C. Society meeting
Tuesdav, Nov. 20, at 5:30
p.m. in the P.R.C. Bldg.
Refreshments will be
served after the meeting.
Plan to attend.
eec
On Tuesday
p.m. the East
at 5:00
Carolina
Gay Community will have
a Wine and Cheese Party
at the Newman House of
608 W. 9th Street. Bring
your favorite beverage.
pliy�le�
The Society of Physics
Students will hold its
organizational meeting on
Tuesday, Dec. 4 in E303 of
the Physics Building. A
seminar on nuclear energy
will be given by Dr. James
Joyce of the Physics
Department. Refreshments
will be served. The
meeting will start at 7
p.m. All interested per-
sons are invited to attend.
Justice
On Dec. 5 at 5:30 p.m.
Lambda Alpha Epsilon,
the American Criminal
Justice Association, and
Alpha Phi Sigma, the
National Criminal Justice
Honor Society, will hold a
joint meeting at the
Western Steer Restaurant
on 10th Street. Elections
for Lambda Alpha Epsilon
will be held so all new
members and prospective
members are encouraged
to attend. Captain Ben
Richardson of the Rocky
Mount Police Department
will be the speaker for the
evening. Everyone is wel-
come to come out and hear
the speaker.
Electrolysis
Permanent Removal
of Unwanted Hair
Free Consultation
Mrs. Vicki Smith,
Licensed Electrologist
103 Oakmont Dr. Greenville
756-3780
Tues. Wed. Fri. 10:00-5:00
Thurs. 2:00-7:00
Discount to college Students
people, 111�s. Hto �nei
�l(i
The People, Places, andcolumn is a public service
provided by The East Carolinian. It is available to all
city and campus organizations who wish to have
announcements published. The announcements are
written by the groups themselves, and are subject to
editing for brevity due to space limitations. The East
Carolinian is not responsible for the content of the
announcements in the column.
If you would like something published in the column,
bring it by The East Carolinian offices typed
doublespace before 2 p.m. on Tuesdays for the Thursday
paper, and before 2 p.m. on Friday for the Tuesday
paper. No announcements will be accepted that are
handwritten or that are turned in after the deadline.
There will be a SNEA
meeting on Wednesday,
November 28, at 4:00 p.m.
in Mendenhall. A presen-
tation will be given by a
guest speaker.
ECU Sign Language
Club meets Thursday,
Nov. 29, at 7:30 in Wright
Auditorium 202C 202D.
All members are asked
to be present.
t lH
Godspell will be pre-
sented at the Methodist
Student Center, 501 E. 5th
St on Nov. 28, 29, 30,
and Dec. 1 at 8 p.m.
There will be a matinee on
Sunday, Dec. 2 at 2 p.m.
TickeU are $2 in djv
and $2.50 at the �:
Tickets on sale now at
Mendenhall Ticket Office
and the Methodist Student
Center.
Support
STUDENT UNION
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
CABLE & CRAFT YARNS
Now Has White Silk
Scarves for Batikers
Unusual Gift Items
for Christmas
812 Dickinson Ave.
ABORTIONS UP TO 12TH
WEEK OF PREGNANCY
$175.00 "all inclusive
pregnancy test birth control and
problem pregnancy counseling For
further information call 832-0535 (toll-
free number 800-221-2568) between
9AM-5PM weekdays
Raleigh Women's Health
Organization
917 West Morgan St.
Raleigh, N.C. 27603
GROWLING ABOUT
GRADES?
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Cliffs Notes help you save time and earn bettet
by isolating key facts in literature assignments They r
a fast and easy way to review for exams too
Over 200 Cliffs Notes titles available to he; .
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528 S. Cotanche
Greenville, N.C.
THE COMPLETE
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Phone 756-7031
r





27 November 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 3
Law of the Sea seminar set for Nov. 30
B DIANE HENDERSON
Copy Editor
Our purpose is mak-
the people of North
Carolina very much aware
he Law of the Sea and
it affects them and
people aware that
fast Carolina University
lS an interest in this
Peter Fricke, senior
. , ntisl in the ECU
te tor Coastal and
Marine Resources, com-
ted on the Law of the
Seminar to be held at
n Nov. 30 and Dec.
The seminar will ad-
dress economic, environ-
mental and legal aspects
of the United Nations
Conference on Law of the
Sea (UNCLOS). The final
signature by participating
nations in the U.N. treaty
is scheduled for Decem-
ber, 1980.
'The treaty is impor-
tant to North Carolina
because it will bring
changes in U.S. fishery,
navigational and environ-
mental laws. Ocean min-
ing legislation must be
passed before the treaty
can be implemented in the
United States said Dr.
Fricke, who has been the
technical advisor to the
Liberian Delegation to
UNCLOS since 1975.
The seminar at ECU is
the fifth in a series
co-sponsored by the Unit-
ed Methodist Law of the
Sea Project (UMLOSP).
Others have been given at
Scripps Oceanographic In-
stitute at the University of
California and Woods Hole
Oceanographic Institute in
Massachusetts.
"We (ECU) were chos-
en because of our interest
in marine affairs Fricke
stated.
ECU Attorney David
Stevens indicated that the
seminar is very important.
"We have a nation that is
surrounded by the sea or
bodies of water. Resources
of the sea are not
unlimited, whether you're
talking about energy re-
sources from the bottom of
the sea or resources that
find their existence within
the sea. Orderly con-
sumption and harvesting
of these resources is
tremendously important to
our country as well as all
mankind
"Certainly in a con-
ference such as this, you
encourage people to think
and be conscious and
aware of the importance of
the resources of the sea to
all of us Stevens added.
As Dr. Fricke explain-
ed, a conference on Law of
the Sea would not have
been necessary before
1946. That year, the
Truman Proclamation ex-
tended the U.S. boundary
for mineral resources out
to the edge of the con-
tinental shelf. This meant
that U.S. companies had
the right to exploit mineral
resources within waters
less than 200 meters deep.
The proclamation came
largely as a protection to
U.S. oil companies.
Because of the U.S.
stand, other countries
began to make changes.
Chile, Ecuador and Peru,
for example, extended
their fishing zone to 200
miles.
Before 1946, every
nation had the right to fish
and mine ocean resources
outside the territorial wa-
ters. The majority of these
territorial seas extended
for 3 miles (a "cannon
shot") offshore, but some
nations claimed 12-mile
territorial waters.
"In the last decade,
mineral resources began
running short, and the
question of possible ex-
ploitation of minerals of
the deep ocean bed arose.
Producer countries (of
mineral resources) such as
Canada, Chile and Zambia
disputed this because it
would destroy their eco-
nomy Fricke explained.
As a result of these
developments, the formal
conference on exploitation
was proposed by Malta in
1967, a Sea Bed Commit-
tee of the General Assem-
bly was formed in 1969
and finally, in 1972, the
diplomatic conference of
nation-states began.
The conference has
resolved issues of a
12-mile territorial sea and
a 200-mile zone for
fishing, but the question
of deep sea resources,
agreements for freedom of
merchant shipping, en-
vironmental controls,
boundary disputes be-
tween neighboring coun-
tries, national sovereignty
over the continental shelf
and the problem of
countries without sea ac-
cess have yet to be
answered.
See SEA page 5
-4 . (continued from page 1)
rnment extradite Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi,
s being treated for cancer at a New York hospital.
The U.N. Security Council was expected to begin
� today on the crisis. Acring Foreign Minister
tssan Bani Sadr planned to address the Council,
stponed his trip for a week because of a religious
la and a constitutional referendum, a government
kesman said.
Hansen said when he entered the embassy and "I
se gates clank behind me 1 thought this must
last free-walking American official in Tehran
tken out of circulation
H- said the student captors "blindfolded me and
me around the compound a couple of times in a
- before reaching the hostages.
"Some things will be with me for a long time � the
I, the look on the hostages' faces when I walked in,
the horror the students told me they and their
- had suffered under the shah
bin minutes the chants switched to "People Yes,
ter No apparently in response to a signal. Hansen
- tid.
He said he had a moment's apprehension when he
first saw the crowd, "then I saw smiles and arms
reached out to shake hands, and I decided this is a
Friendly crowd
"I'm here because I am concerned about your cause,
j ur people, your suffering and about the threat of
;ar Hansen told the embassy captors in a question
and answer session shown on Iranian television Sunday-
night.
�W VSHINGTON (AP) � White House press secretary
Jod Powell said today the Carter administration
- Rep. George Hansen personal mission to Iran
ami believes it may prolong the holding of 49 American
- iges there.
1 don't think that sort of thing is helpful Powell
said of Hansen's negotiating independently with Iranian
officials.
Hansen has proposed congressional hearings into
charges against the deposed Shah of Iran as leverage to
win the release of American hostages held for 23 days in
the U.S. Embassy in Tehran.
President Carter has not endorsed any such proposal.
When a reporter asked if there was a danger that
Iranians might misinterpret Hansen's statements as an
official signal from the administration, Powell said,
"Yes. If he gives a conflicting view to the students
he could prolong their (the hostages') stay
Police release report
GREENSBORO, NX. (AP)-Police
made "adequate and proper" prepar-
ations for a Nov. 3 anti-Ku Klux Klan
rally in which five leftist activists were
shot to death, Police Chief Edward Swing
reported Monday.
A report presented by Swing to city
officials said there was some confusion
of the city where the rally was forming.
Fifteen men, several claiming membership
in Klan or Nazi organizations, have been
charged in the shootings.
The 92-page report, prepared last
week by police officials, said the
"planning and preparation for the
anti-Klan march and rally were adequate
CLIFF'S -
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
among officers at the scene of the rally and proper.
because there were groups of people at
two locations�one where the Communist
Workers Party had announced it would
form an anti-Klan march and the other at
a spot where the rally actually began.
Five CWP members were fatally shot
Response time to the scene was not
unreasonable after officers were notified
of the confrontation it said. "Even
though the confrontation began approx-
imately eight minutes before the officers
were to be on their assignments, the
when several cars containing a group of responding officers made successful and
white men drove into a mostly black area quick apprehensions of suspects
SCwA. (continued from page 1)
on-campus organizations who do not request money for
overhead expenses.
Most of the other student organizations whose
budgets were considered received their money without
debate, but the funding of two groups was debated and
modified before getting final approval. The ECU
Playhouse budget was cut from $9,000 to $7,000, and
the North Carolina Student Legislature budget was
granted an additional $200 to raise its original
appropriation to $1,275.
Other organizations who received money are the
Visual Arts Forum, $5,750; the Marching Pirates,
$2,500; AFROTC, $395; the Sign Language Club, $400;
the ECU Law Society, $150; the Graduate Business
A-sociation, $162; and the Model UN Club, $1,650.
In other business in its Nov. 26 meeting, the SGA
approved the request of SGA Vice-president Charles
Sherrod for $12.48 to pay for his notary public seal.
Sherrod told the legisoators that he could save students
the expense of going to an outside notary by having
legal documents notarized free of charge in his office.
Sherrod said that he would be offering this service until
his graduation, tentatively slated for Spring, 1981.
The legislators also approved a resolution
commending the 1979 Pirate football team for its
record-breaking offensive efforts this season.
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a cool, green bottle of MOLSON GOLDEN.�
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�WflPww�
MHCSr





The East Caroli
nian 1 am 0 �
Hiditonals
�? Opinions
Tuesday, November 27, 1979 Page 4
Greenville, N.c.
SGA strikes again
Everyone was very satisfied with
SGA President Brett Melvin's veto of
the old transit bill and his proposal for
a new one. It was undoubtedly the most
intelligent move he has made this year.
With $14,000 additional funds made
available by the new bill, all of the
organizations asking for money signed
with relief �� they had a chance for a
slightly greater fraction of what they
needed.
Unfortunately, three of those
organizations lost money. The East
Carolina Gay Community (ECGC) and
the REAL Crisis Center lost funding
completely, and the ECU Playhouse was
cut by $2,000.
Last year the ECGC was approved
as an official organization and is
entitled to SGA funding, but when
considered for appropriations, the moral
issues of homosexuality were brought
up again. The gay community asked for
only $140, and that amount was
approved in the previous budget �
that is, before Melvin vetoed the old
transit bill. Mark Zumbach, president of
ECGC and SGA legislator, reminded
the legislature that the gay community
sponsors the Peer Counseling Center,
which is for all students. That did not
seem to matter to the legislators in the
very close vote.
The REAL Crisis Center was created
by the university in the sixties as a
service to ECU and the community, and
REAL has not received funds recently
as it has in the past. About 70 percent
of the people counseled at the
all-volunteer center are students, but
Melvin insisted that students use the
on-campus counseling services because
they do not ask for money. He also does
not believe the SGA should subsidize
the rent, utilities and telephone costs of
an off-campus center, but if Melvin had
bothered to ask, he would have found
that those are the only expenses at
REAL. He did not ask, and he vetoed
one of the most valuable services to
ECU students.
When Brett Melvin was running for
office in March 1979, his platform was
to make the student seat on the ECU
Board of Trustees more effective and to
support the fine arts. In the March 22
edition of Fountain head, Melvin stated:
"SGA's funding of Music, Art and
Drama must be better organized and
more reliable � and it can be" Like
most politicians, Melvin forgot his
commitment to the people who voted
for him and the importance of the ECU
Playhouse to the campus community.
Thanks to the SGA and the
president, three of the most important
organizations on carfipus lost some or
all funding. Of the remaining organiza-
tions, special interests got the money
they requested � the Marching Pirates
(which could be funded by the Athletic
Department), the ECU Law Society, the
Graduate Business Association, and the
Model UN Club.
The SGA President and the
legislature are clearly not functioning
with students' interests in mind. Money
is in short supply everywhere, but that
is no reason to neglect important
student services. The transit system can
be blamed for part of the shortage. It
would be interesting to know if students
value the transit system as highly as
the SGA.
If students think the system needs
trimming, then it must be done. If the
transit system IS that important, then
let's start calling the SGA the STA
(Student Transit Association).
Iranian stalemate
There is no turning back in the
current stalemate with Iran. Something
of massive proportions will happen soon
unless the Carter administration can
find a way to defuse the crisis.
Both sides are firm in their beliefs
that they are right, and that the other
side must bend under the pressure. The
Iranians believe the deposed shah must
be returned to Iran for atrocities which
were allegedly committed while he was
in power. The Americans, on the other
hand, feel that embassies should be
free from foreign interference, and that
the hostages must be released
immediately.
Americans argue that it is wrong to
send a sick man back to a hostile
foreign nation where he will certainly
be executed. Also, many of us feel it is
wrong to succumb to terrorism, because
of the likelihood of encouraging other
fanatics who may consider the same
actions.
Columnist David Armstrong reminds
us that America has been involved in
internal affairs of Iran since 1953, when
the CIA allegedly overthrew the
government, returning the shah to
power.
According to Armstrong, the shah
became a billionaire by stealing from
the Iranian people. SAVAK (Iran's
secret police) has been accused of
involvement in beatings and other
violence during the shah's reign.
During this time, it must be
remembered that the U.S. government
was in full support of the now-deposed
Iranian leader.
This is the Iranian logic � the U.S.
government, through actions of the
CIA, damaged their country and their
economy.
There are several alternatives:
�Khomeini could order the release of
the hostages, but he himself admitted
that he doubts the students would listen
to him now.
�The students could try the hostages on
charges of espionage, as they have
promised in the past. It is doubtful that
a fair trial would result, and the
hostages, according to Islamic law (as
interpreted by the students) could
possibly be executed.
�President Carter could authorize an
Entebbe-style rescue, but the hostages
might be harmed in the process.
Perhaps the best move would be to
appoint an international tribunal which
would investigate charges against the
shah and bring these incidents before
the public. It could be that the Iranian
students would accept an investigation
of the matter rather than a kangaroo
court trial for their deposed leader.
This action might resolve this
explosive situation. At the same time,
the United States would be reaffirmed
as a country that searches for justice in
all things, rather than being known as a
country that uses military force.
In a war � even a war with a
smaller and weaker adversary such as
Iran � there are no winners. We need
only remember the lesson learned in
Vietnam.
Letters to the Editor
Student roasts Chansky
Editors note � The
following letter was writ-
ten to Art Chansky, sports
editor of the Durham
Morning Herald.
Dear Mr. Chansky,
I am responding to
your pathetically critical
article, "ECU vs. UNC:
Sobriety, Socrates and
Frustration in the Sun-
day, October 28 edition of
the Durham Morning Her-
ald.
To be a professional
sports writer, which I
assume you are, your
editorial was most indic-
ative of the attitude of a
lot of sports writers in
North Carolina. In refer-
ence to your most critical
editorial, I would like to
point out several impert-
inent and degrading state-
ments you made per-
taining to the game and to
some of the Pirate players.
The first nonprofes-
sional remark was directed
toward Coach Dye, and I
quote, picks his words
carefully about opponents
because he wants to keep
them on the schedule
Personally, and I speak for
the majority of ECU
students, Coach Dye has
the priority to say what he
wants. However, if you
would take to time to
inquire about people be-
fore you write about them,
you may find them to be
contrasting to own ideas
and views.
Secondly, I have heard
no mention of Matt
Kupec being an 'All-
American If you would,
again, take time to read
professional writer's crit-
iques, you will find that
Leander Green is consid-
ered to be one of the best
quarterbacks in the coun-
try. After all, he does lead
an offense that is seeded
third in the nation in
running, sixth in passing,
and eighth in total scoring.
Why don't you compare
those statistics to your
"All-American" boy!
Third, the most imper-
tinent statement in the
whole disgusting article
was mentioning the third-
string kicker. Your state-
ment read as follows:
, "The closest East Carolina
comes to that (referring to
a kicking specialist) is a
third-string kicker named
Socrates (Giarmis), whose
father owns a hot dog
stand in Wilson Mr.
Chansky, what in the hell
does that statement have
to do with the game of
football?
And last, but not least,
was that sarcastic and
ignorant remark you made
about the ECU fans,
saying, and I quote, "ECU
fans overflowed from two
end zone sections and
inbibed so much alcohol
that whatever they drove
in from down east may not
have needed fill-up on the
way home In rebutting
this statement, I would
just like to say that it does
not matter how one arrives
at a particular game, the
main purpose in going is
to support one's team.
And ECU fans clearly
display their support of
ECU athletics.
I am speaking on
behalf of many ECU
students. To you Mr.
Chansky, I submit this
request: I ask you to
reconsider the article you
wrote, swallow some of
your pride, and write an
apologetic letter to the
East Carolinian, regarding
your insulting, degrading
and unprofessional re-
marks toward ECU stu-
dents, football players and
administration.
Laury Young
Sleepless
To the Editor:
I am writing this letter
in appreciation to those
wonderful people who
have helped me sleep this
morning. I really must
thank you for standing
behind Unstead at 1:15
Monday morning. Your
screaming was like a
sweet lullaby to me. I
must say however that 10
minutes is a bit long for a
lullaby.
The continuation of
your concert inside proved
to me that it is possible for
someone to sleep through
a wild party (my roommate
slept peacefully). But the
thing I liked best was the
encore you provided as
you left. The beauty of
your voices screaming
obscentities was almost
too much to bear. Then
when you added the car
horns I nearly died of
ecstasy I pray that one
day you too may be blest
w'th such a serenade.
Next time though, could
you please stage this
lovely interlude to sleep at
a different time and place?
I'm ure my fellow stu-
dents would enjoy it als
And maybe you'll listen
one of them when they
kindly ask you to turn it
down.
Mary Rider
Melvin praised
To the Edit
This is written
comment the action?
Brett Melvin. president ol
the Student Government
Association. Contrary
statements in a recent
editorial, Mr. Melvin acted
on information that had
already been made �
to other legislator- He
showed admirable initia-
tive in forming a ne
Transit Appropriations
which was presented
legislator Nicky Fran -
The new bill, which
replaced an earlier vetoed
bill, is undisputably one oi
the best pieces of legisla-
tion in many years. Such
actions on Brett Mehin"
part show the kind of
leadership that should
characterize his office. The
legislature also should be
recognized for its prompt
response and its coopera-
tion in seeing that such
excellent legislation va
passed.
CORRECTION
E. Marena Wright
In the November 15
edition of The East
Carolinian, Ellen Fish-
burne, SGA secretary of
communications and pres-
idential advisor, wrote a
letter to the editor con-
cerning the editorial and
front page story of Nov-
ember 13.
The letter said that
President Brett Melvin
told one appropriation
committee chairperson of
the reserve fund on
Sunday, November 14
The correct date is Sun-
day, Nov. 4.
We sincerely regret the
typographical error and
that it was missed during
proofreading.
The East Carolinian
MANAQINQ EDITOR
Richard Green
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Anita Lancaster
NEWS EDITOR
ASST. NEWS EDITOR
FEATURES EDITOR
ASST. FEATURES EDITOR
EDITOR
Marc Barnes
DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
Robert M. Swaim
ASST. DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
Terry Herndon
ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR
Cheryl Holder
BUSINESS MANAGER
Steve O" Geary
Karen Wendt
Terry Gray
BillJones
K.C. Needham
SPORTS EDITOR
ASST. SPORTS EDITOR
COPY EDITOR
AD TECH. SUPER
Charles Chandler
Jimmy Dupree
Diane Henderson
Paul Lincke
THE EAST CAROLINIAN Is the student
newspaper ef East Carotins University
sponsored by the Media Board of ECU
and la distributed each Tuesday and
Thursday during the
(weekly during the summorl.
Publication
Building. Our mailing
South Building, ECU,
27834.
The
Old South
Is: Old
NC
757-636, SS67,
S10
Offices are located on the
floor of
�p mm �nmmsj





27 November 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page i
Greek news
sigma
seniors honored
(Photo by Kip Sloan)
ECU raises funds
w a s
war
n estimated $33,000
raised during this
tion.
This year the tele-
Alumni Telethon, phones were manned by
according to Mike Smith, members of both the pan-
hellenic council and the
intrafraternity council.
Up to twenty phones
were used at one time for
the fundraising drive.
The organization is
active in providing ser-
vices to ECU alumni.
The Alumni Associa-
tion has purchased an
Alumni Center for ECU,
according to an announce-
the Intra-
fraternity Council.
The telethon, which
been going on for
several weeks now, con-
led Monday.
During the telethon,
volunteer students made
telephone calls to alumni
CU no longer living in
area to take pledges
the Alumni Asso.cia-
ment last week by Donald
L. Lemish, vice chancellor
for institutional advance-
ment and planning.
"This is one of the
most outstanding things
that has ever happened for
ECU alumni programs
said Lemish.
The association has
been working on the
project for the past two
months.
The new center will be
located at 901 E. Fifth
Street.
Sea
(CO
ntinued from page 3)
ECU Law Society Pre-
ni Lynn Calder, who
will give a welcome at the
seminar, said of the
anization's involve-
"H's a world legal
problem. Even though the
seminar is of broader
than anything the
Law Society has under-
n before, it is perti-
nent to �ur interests
, ording to Calder,
� -hould be an atten-
dance of between 100 and
150 people from all parts
oi North Carolina and,
hopefully, Virginia and
- nth Carolina.
Calder feels that a Law
th Sea workshop is
n the East Coast
probabh benefit
The seminar, for which
a registration fee of $2.00
for students and $10.00 for
non-students will be
charged, officially starts
the same day at 7:30 p.m.
with registration at 7 p.m.
Students who help in
some way will not be
charged.
For further informa-
tion about the seminar,
contact Peter Fricke at
757-6779 or Lynn Calder,
phone 757-6611 (the SGA
office). The SGA office will
take messages for return
calls.
By Ricki Gliarmis
Greek Correspondent
Sigma Sigma Sigma is
proud to welcome their
National Field Secretary
Laura Carroll to Greenville
and ECU. She will be
visiting the sorority during
the week, while meeting
with the sisters and
conducting workshops.
Virginia Minges, Tri
Sigma Chapter advisor, is
honoring the seniors with
a supper in her home on
Dec. 6. Senior sisters and
alumni will attend the
dinner and anticipate a
very enjoyable evening.
Delta Zeta is happy to
announce the addition of
30 new Big Brothers.
Induction for the new
brothers will be held
Thursday at 7:30 p.m.
Jayne Hatcher, the
Sigma Phi Epsilon Sweet-
heart, was serenaded last
Thursday. The Delta Zetas
collected canned goods for
the Salvation Army at
Thanksgiving. They will
also be at the Mall Nov.
26, 27 and 28 ringing bells
for the Salvation Army for
Christmas. Congratula-
tions to three new initiated
pledges.
Alpha Phi would like to
announce the initiation of
the Beta Alpha Pledge
class and welcome them
into the sisterhood.
The Beta Beta pledge
class has been working
hard this semester and the
sisters would like to say
thanks!
The Chi Omegas are
proud of their eight new
pledges. The winter
pledge class is looking
forward to the Big Sis
Hunt on Wednesday, Nov.
28. These pledges will
have to go through several
tasks before finding out
who their Big Sister is.
The spring pledge class
is having a lockout Nov. 30
through Dec. 2. The
pledges get to lock the
sisters out of the house for
the entire weekend.
The Sigma Nus defeat-
ed the Kappa Sigs in
soccer on Wednesday. The
night was not a total loss
for the Kappa Sigmas,
who beat the Sigma Nus
earlier in a team handball
game.
The Kappa Sigs would
like to thank the Alpha Xi
Deltas for a great New
Year's Eve Social which
was held later that night.
The Kappa Sigs would
also like to acknowledge
their little sisters for their
support throughout the
soccer season.
The Pi Kaps boosted
their bowling record to
12-0 by defeating the Phi
Taus, 4-0. The Pi Kaps
also finished second in
fraternity soccer and
fourth on campus.
Little Sister Rush is
being planned by Pi
Kappa Phi for Tuesday,
Dec. 4 and Wednesday,
Dec. 5. They would like to
congratulate their seven
new brothers who were
initiated before the
Thanksgiving holidays.
The Lambda Chi Al-
phas have announced their
winter formal will be held
Nov. 30. Their regular
formal, Crescent Girl, will
take place on Feb. 23 at
the Greenville Country
Club.
The Lambda Chis are
installing wood stoves in
their home in order to
combat the cost of oil.
Other Lambda Chi activi-
ties have included a
successful chicken party
which was held Saturday
before the game with the
Sigma Tau Gammas.
The Lambda Chis plan
to send their new Iota
Newsletter to all active
members and alumni dur-
ing December. They would
like to urge everyone to
support the Nantucket
Concert to be held at ECU
on Dec. 1.
r
THIS COrPON GOOD FOR
A SLGU, FRIES AKD
MEDHXM BRINK FOR � 1.59
CHEESE AND TOMATO EXTRA.
. Good nly at parn. ipatina Wendy
May not be used in c nmbmation
with any other offer
t xpires: Sat May 2b, 1979
S WENW THAflK-YOU ('OtllW
ALCOHOL (continued from page 1)
BLS I (continued from page 1)
ded i
and will
ECU.
"The
-
notability of the
will be an
-tif added.
There will be 12
tk( rs at the seminar.
� rempie Swing, vice-
Tit of the Council on
n Relations and
- - to the U.S. Dele-
m to IJNCLOS since
1972, i- the key guest.
Swing, who usually charg-
- about $1,200 for a
-peaking engagement, has
agreed to appear without
ment. (His travel ex-
penses will be provided.)
Another prominent fig-
ure scheduled to speak is
Dr. Hans Indorf, legis-
lative director for Sen.
Robert Morgan. Indorf,
who has been involved in
maritime affairs in the
U.S. Congress and in
North Carolina, will dis-
cuss Senate considerations
concerning the Law of the
Sea.
Director of the Uni-
versity of North Carolina
Sea Grant College Pro-
g-am Dr. B.J. Copeland
will talk about environ-
ment' consequences of
marine resource allocation.
Major donors for the
new center were Luther
M Taylor, class of 1957,
and E. Marvin Slaughter,
a 1950 graduate.
Best had also testified that he and other credit union
directors took "heroic" measures to protect the credit
union, which had a history of problems with past-due
accounts, from folding. He said he used $10,000 of his
wn money to help balance the books.
Defense Attorney Donald Pollock of Kinston
characterized Ms. Staton in his final arguments as a
"liar" who was testifying for the State in order to
escape a harsh sentence for her admission of
wrongdoing.
"This case is built on someone who lied said
Pollock. He also contended that the State had no
evidence that there was a conspiracy between Best and
Staton, and said that if anything, Best was only guilty of
being a poor businessman.
fter the trial, one of the jurors said that "there just
wasn't enough evidencenot without reasonable
doubt
ing that he thought
consumption had remained
relatively static over the
last several years.
All the nightclub man-
agers agreed that students
visit the bars less fre-
quently and spend less
time there once inside.
"Students used to come
down earlier and more
often Haines said.
The nightclub mana-
gers have taken several
steps to try to improve
business, and although all
the clubs are members of
the Greenville Nightclub
Association, the cometition
is fierce.
The Rathskeller, which
originally initiated a Happy
Hour, now must compete
with Pantana Bob's, The
Elbo Room and Chapter X.
Other steps to entice
students to drink down-
town include high quality
entertainment, diversity of
atmosphere, specials and,
as Heiser says, "Clubs are
doing a lot more promo-
bug.
Stressing the Attic's
'lowest prices in town'
slogan, owner Tom Haines
added that "nightclub
owners are trying to eat
the cost increases" rather
than pass them on.
"WC5
J
$
tf
NOV. 28, 29, 30, DEC. 1
8:00 P.M.
sun. matinee
DEC. 2, 2:00 P.M.
in advance
SZ.50 at the door
METHODIST STUDENT CENTER
501 E. FIFTH
758-2030
i?
XP
Etf

iff
O
&
V
&
e


TICKETS ON SALEMENDENHA1 I
SAVE UP TO $3.00
Top Artists! Major Labels!
Many, Many More! Classics Included!
Come Early tor Best Selection.
Sals Now Underway
Con Untieing thru December 7f If7�
Student Supply Stors , Wright Building
Go1 Your Favorites at Big Discounts!
o
A
. � � ft �WVSrl- -� �
M, �,i � O1
�n�wrgKaiaiMfctiiir' it





The Fast Carolinian
features
Tuesday, November 27, 1979 Page 6
Greenville, N.C.
Wesleyans stage Godspell
The Wesley Foundation
will present the musical
comedy "Godspell" Nov-
ember 28 through Decem-
ber at 8 p.m. and a
will direct music. Cos-
tumes are by Mark Zum-
bach, and lighting, by
Donald Titus.
The cast includes Steve
special matinee perform- Cooper as Jesus Christ,
ance at 2 p.m. on Decem-
ber 2 at the Methodist
Student Center, 501 East
5th Street, across from
Garrett Dorm.
The music for the show-
was composed by Stephen
Schwartz and includes the
popular song "Dav by
Day
The production is di-
rected by Lisa Anderson,
with choreography by
Debbie Phipps. Bob Miller
Doug Hamilton playing
John the Baptist and
Judas Iscariot, and Greg
Brown, Carolyn German,
Truett McGee, Lillian Nor-
ris, Mickey Skidmore,
Cameron Stanforth, Diane
Starks, Stephanie Tyson
and Eric Van Baars
playing apostles and var-
ious other Biblical charac-
ters.
Band members are:
Woody Cowan on electric
bass, Mark Ford on drums
and percussion, Dan
Hamilton on electric guitar
and Sandy Hamilton on
keyboard.
"Godspell" concerns
the teachings of Jesus
Christ and includes the
parables of the Gospel
according to St. Matthew.
The scriptures are told and
sung in a stylized manner,
making a show that will
appeal to all faiths.
Tickets are $2.00 in
advance and $2.50 at the
door and can be purchased
at the Methodist Student
Center or Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center.
Godspell performers in rehearsal.
(Photo by David Hunt)
An East Carolina Playhouse production
Children's Hour
com
pellin
ECU professors
receive grant for
'talking' computer
Close vour eyes and walk around a thorouf
familiar room. Imagine having to do this every -daj
your life � never being able to read a label, a bi
name, a book, a street sign � being a student
cannot take a test or study a textbook � a student
is carefully programmed to enter professions where his
blindness will not be much of a handicap.
Drs. David Lunney and Robert Morrison of the Fa-
Carolina University Department of Chemistry arc the
administrator and director of a program to break some
of the barriers that have held back blind pe
long. They have been awarded a grant of $110.7"
develop a "talking" computer ?nd software l��r us
chemistry laboratories.
When the Lunney-Morrison project i completed
computer will be small enough to be carried around
a briefcase and, hopefully, inexpensive enough for
blind person to have his own "talking" computer.
Components for the "talking" computer are air
in existence; the job of Lunney and Morrison and theii
team of graduate and undergraduate assistants
miniaturize them.
One of the assistants is a blind student who is
a consultant on the projects. Richard Hartnes
as
GREENVILLE - "The Children's
Hour Lillian Hellman's dramatic story of
two teachers accused of lesbianism, will
open Wednesday, Nov. 28, at the East
Carolina Plavhouse.
The compelling drama vividly depicts encouraged to pursue a full-time career in
. r . �.� ii r � �j rv-l:U U
the shattering effect of a lie, told by a
frightened and vindictive girl, on the lives
of the people around her. As the tragically
moving story unfolds, the two women are
unable to overcome the whispers and
innuendos which rapidly compound on the
tale and lead to their ruin.
uncovered, it is too late to salvage their and Speech at ECU, comes to Greenville
lives and careers. from the University of Texas, where he is
This gripping work launched Lillian completing his PhD.
Hellman's career as a playwright. His credits include acting, directing
Working as a book reviewer, she had been and stage managing at several universities
and professional theaters, including the
Tyrone Guthrie Theater and the Actors
Repertory Company. Lockhart is enthu-
siastic about this directing assignment.
The Children's Hour' has long been
a play I've wanted to direct, and I'm
really excited about this production. We
have some fine acting talent at East
Carolina he said.
The cast for the production includes a
dozen students and three faculty members
at ECU. Dr. Helen Steer of the
Department of Drama and Speech will
play Amelia Tilford. Dr. Steer returns to
the stage in Greenville after several years'
! bv her friend Dashiell Hammett.
The result of that encouragement, The
Children's Hour" appeared in 1934,
became an immediate critical and popular
success, and stamped her as a literary
artist of the highest calibre.
Director Travis Lockhart, a newcomer
anu Kau ij un ii���. �' �� �
When the girl's maliciousness is finally to the faculty of the Department of Drama
absence. Summer Theater audiences will
remember her performances in "Mv Fair
Lady "Mame" and "Never Too Late
Anita Brehm of the School of
Education will appear as Agatha, Mrs.
Tilford's maid. Playhouse audiences will
remember Mrs. Brehm's roles in "Fiddler
on the Roof "Bve Bve Birdie" and
"The Skin of Our Teeth
In the role of Lily Mortar, one of the
teachers at the boarding school, will be
Hazel Stapleton of the Department of
Psychology. Mrs. Stapleton has graced the
Plavhouse stage in "Pippin "Emily"
and "The Skin of Our Teeth to name
but a few.
Student cast members will be Cindy
Carol Williams, a junior from Newton
See CHILDREN'S HOUR, page
Rocky Mount, N.C, is luckier than some of the I
students who have come before him in a coup
He arrived at ECU just as the world is beginning
op n up for the visually handicapped by mean-
talking computers and he is serving as the consultant
the exciting innovation that is being developed in
Chemistry Department.
Lunney and Morrison say that even though the
system is designed primarily for the chemitr
laboratorv, the system will be open ended, a unie-
laboratory training and research aid and will
adaptable to any instrument with an electrical signal. In
chemistry laboratories, it will work with a vanet
instruments that will measure air pressure, elect-
properties, temperature and other experimental res
and will also function as a "talking" computer termi:
Lunney and Morrison agree that there are things that
a blind scientist could not be expected to do
laboratories. On the othe hand, there are labs, su h is
industrial quality control labs where most of the
measurements are done by instruments on which a
person using one of the computers could do quite we
See BLIND, page 7

The Vegetarian Epicure j
is a gourmet's guide
And people said turkeys can't fly. Fred Midgett displays (Photo by Richard Green)
his aerial abilities in the Carolina-blue skies over
Maysville.
Print auction tonight
By SUE FERNALD
Features Writer
Tonight, November 27,
at 7 p.m. in the Leo
Jenkins Fine Arts Center
auditorium, East Carolina
students and Greenville
residents will be given the
chance to view and buy
original prints done by
ECU art students and
faculty.
The various types of
work that will be repre-
sented in the auction will
include relief prints, which
are usually done by
engraving or cutting the
desired design into wood
or linoleum and then
printing what is left of the
original surface on paper.
Intaglio prints will also
be offered. These are also
printed from engravings
bu� what is printed is the
cut our part or what is
below the surface of the
plate, giving a relief type
raised surface.
Other types of prints
such as collographs, dry-
point, aquatint, litho-
graphs and serigraphs or
silkscreen prints will also
be available.
The purpose behind
the auction is not only to
help educate people in the
different aspects of art but
to give the students and
faculty members a chance
to -show and sell their
works. The auction is also
being held to raise badly
needed money to help
update and raise the
quality of equipment in
the art studios used by the
students.
At last years auction
prices for the prints
ranged from $5 to 145.
However, this year a
starting bid of $5 will be
set as the artists need this
much to pay for their
materials. These rates are
extremely low, and going
to the auction would
enable one to get a nice
piece of original art at a
good price as well as help
out ECU's School of Art.
Chairman of the De-
partment Donald Sexauer
is donating all of his prints
to the auction, as he has
been doing ever since the
auction was started four
years ago. Sexauer will
also be the auctioneer.
Possible buyers are
urged to come to a
preview of the prints
which will be held from 5
p.m. to 7 p.m. preceeding
the auction.
A ceramics auction will
also be offered to the
public December 4 and 5
at Wright Auditorium from
10 a.m. to 7 p.m.
This will be to raise
money for their studio, to
exhibit other works not
associated with the practic
cal side of ceramics as
well as to hopefully get
people to accept ceramics
as an important art form,
not just as a craft.
By JAY STONE
In the introduction to
The Vegetarian Epicure,
author Anna Thomas
writes: "Good food is a
celebration of life, and it
seems absurd to me that
in celebrating life we
should take life. That is
why I don't eat flesh. I see
no need for killing
People have varied and
often esoteric reasons for
becoming vegetarians. It
can be generally assumed,
however, that the recent
natural food and vege-
tarian movement in this
country is a result of a
kind of neo-fundamental-
ism and an enlightened
self-interest. People are
struggling to re-establish
contact with an essential
part of themselves and to
become more thoroughly
integrated with the vanish-
ing natural world around
them. Processed foods,
prefabricated meals, and
animals that are raised
solely for slaughter have
become symbols of a
general malaise of the
spirit that alienates us
from the community of
nature.
The Vegetarian Epicure
is primarily a cookbook for
vegetarians. Yet, what
separates this book from
most other manuals of the
genre is its title. An
"Epicure" is defined as
"one who has a discri-
minating taste for foods
and liquers, one who is
71 is a rich and
varied cuisine ,u
of many marvelous
dishes a with
definate
characteristics not
in imitation of
anything
else-certainly not
meat.9
fond of luxury and sen-
suous pleasures With a
title so heavily laden with
pretension and noble as-
piration, it only follows
that this cookbook would
make no concessions to
the popular stereotype of
diet. This is a gourmet's
guide to vegetarianism.
Naturally, when the culi-
nary arts achieve this kind
of a fine high plateau, it
seems inconsequential that
a staple item like meat is
being omitted.
Ms. Thomas asserts
that the first thing to do in
considering the vegetarian
cuisine is to get free of the
idea that meals must be
served in a rigid pattern
(soup, main course, salad,
dessert) and especially the
notion that one must find
substitutes for meat.
"Vegetarian cookery is
not a substitute for
anything. It is a rich and
varied cuisine, full of
many marvelous dishes
with definite character-
istics not in imitation of
anything else � certainly
not meat
The Vegetarian Epicure
is filled with wonderful
and compelling variations
upon everything from
crepes to souffles and
curries. Recently, I had
the opportunity to sample
spanakopita, which is a
spinach dish included in
Coming
Attractions
CLOGGERS DAY
The Roxy Music Arts and Crafts Center
will sponsor the 4th Annual Green Grass
Cloggers Day Celebration this coming
Saturday, Dec. 1. Workshops and
performances will be held in Wright
Auditorium. Workshops begin at 12 noon
and end at 5:00 p.m. The concert will last
from 8:00 p.m. til 12 midnight.
SWEEDISH
Sweedish Summer, a travel-adventure film
by Dick Reddy, will be shown in Hendrix
Theater on Thursday, Dec. 6, at 8:00 p.m.
MADRIGAL
The Madrigal Dinners will be held
December 4th through the 8th in the
Multi-purpose room at Mendenhall at 7:00
p.m.
BORGE
Victor Borge will appear in Wright
Auditorium on December 10, at 8:00 p.m.
The Borge performance is sponsored by
the Artists Series Committee.
the austere vegetarian See VEGETARIAN, page 8
LeflftAMioo 6our Coccc6� -me tfAftp Ay
y Pivip A)oi3
Ml 00rf �f THC VILC5T
Y0O C IMJGWC
as





Spice of Life
Lopez
DAVID MILLER
v . � 11 ntvr
mer l nited States
htweighl kick
ham pion Ton
i ti Greenville "ii
November 23rd
� ! Los Angeles,
to ir.iin tor a
i rematch vsith
world-titleholder
i inks
theii lirsl meeting
a contro-
spl mom over
decision tor
ised pri-
his showing in
irl 'iiii Lopez
the fighl in
unl nearly
Franks in the
I Ainc the bout
ranks was hospitalized
for treatment of" three
broken ribs.
The rematch will he
held December 21st in
Bloomington, Minnesota.
Negotiations are under
wa) to have the light
televised live nationally on
Home Box Office.
Mr. Teen N.C.
Bv CHERYL FISHER
features U riter
An ECU student is Mr.
Icon age North Carolina.
Michael Lange, 6 feet,
15 pounds, has brown
hair and green eyes and is
the title holder for men in
the state.
Lange entered the Mr.
I menage N.C. contest at
High Point in September.
The physique contest is
sponsored by the Ameteur
Athletes Union.
It took Michael five
years to train and build up
for this contest.
"It's run sort of like
the Mr. World Contest
Lange stated. "First, an
individual routine is done,
then group routines. The
individual and group rou-
tines are then repeated
No scholarships or
prizes are given out. As
Lange pointed out, "It's
not a pageant
The only advantage of
the contest is its inspir-
ation to continue working
out.
Eighteen people tried
out tor the teen division
and 32 for the men's
division. Lange said con-
tests are held all over
N.C, S.C. and Va.
ECU may be rape capitol
CHERYL FISHER
. . ' n Writ
uld become
USA.
- one ol the most
rimes as v. el! as
the most
experience a
'inter. The
� meeting a rapist
I is one
- typically
men who are
mprise 27
t oi all rape v. ictims.
new point ol
I it an
She i- young,
�I usually
ible route.
ts, here
young women
"ut after 1 a.m. announce
themseh es.
At 1 a.m the doors of
the women's dorms are
locked. It a resident is out
past this hour, she must
signal, by turning on a
switch that flashes a blue
light. tor a campus
policeman to let her in.
fhis light automatically
inform- all who see it that
a coed is out alone.
Many girl- saj they
have waited tor as long as
1-5 minute- to be let in to
their dorms.
A determined rapist
only needs a few minute
It has been proven in
colleges all over the
United States that be
improving security mea-
sure- on campus, many-
rapes can be stopped.
K hen asked their opinion
ol this frightening campus
situation, ECU coeds had
the following to say:
"Campus security has got
to be improved�we're not
safe out there at night
"I'm afraid to go out
because 1 know I'll be
locked out at 1 and won't
be able to come in. How
much fun can 1 have
then?"
V e don't want to
make ourselves vulnerable
to these unstable criminals.
Vie pay our fees why
shouldn't we be allowed to
move vsith freedom
( HII.DRE1VSHOUR
nued from page f
gj Rogers; Tarboro
Cay Gaskill as Catherine;
Senior, as Lois
M I Wrightsville Beach,
- Evelyn Munn; Rocky
nne Daughtridge as Helen
dfelter, a junior from
Wells;
Fayetteville senior,
n junior Paige Weaver
'a Debra Zumbach, a junior
- Karen Wright; Shauna
Greenville senior, as Martha
Salem senior Donald
Dr. Joseph Cardin; and
William C. Sumner from New Bern, a
sophomore, as the grocery hov.
Scenery tor the production is designed
bv Gregory Buch. costumes bv Peggy
' Anton, and lighting by David F. Downing.
� All three are on the ECU drama and
speech faculty.
rhe Children's Hour" will open on
Wednesday, Nov. 28. and run nightlv,
except Sunday, through Saturday. Dec. 8,
at 8:15 p.m. in the Studio Theatre of the
drama building at ECU.
rickets are $2.50 for the public, or
fl 50 for ECl students with a current
student activity card. Tickets may be
i lered 1 tailing the Playhouse Box
Office, 757-0590. between 10 a.m. and 4
p.m. Monday through Friday. (The box
office will be closed tor the Thanksgiving
holiday Nov. 22 and 23.)
Goldle Hauun
Chevy Chase
C@rJS-r
Distributed By
Taylor Beverage Co
Goldsboro
IMPORTED

Heineken
HOLLAND BEER
THE 1 IMPORTED BEER IN AMERICA
Taco Cld�
64 Bjr-Pi
TACO CID
ISA
SHOPPERS
DELIGHT!
A place where convenient
hours are found
(especially for the
late night
shoppers) and where low
prices encourage more
buying power to aid you
in the Holiday Season.
(next to Tarheel Toyoto)
At the moment, Lange
is trying to gain weight
and build his body more in
order to enter a contest
this spring. Lange's room-
mate is his workout
partner.
Baby Snakes
By RICHARD GREEN
It's "a movie about
people who do stuff that is
not normal
Frank Zappa's long-
awaited movie, Baby
Snakes, will open Fri
Dec. 21, at Guild's Victoria
theater in New York City,
and no one really knows
what to expect.
BLIND
During a telephone
interview on WRQR in
September, Zappa said he
hoped to finish the movie,
distributed by Intercon-
tinental Absurdities, by
December. One caller
aked Zappa what the
movie was like and what
music would make up the
soundtrack.
Zappa said there would
be some music from his
album, Sheik Yerbooti,
and "other things and
animation that I can't
describe to you
If Zappa can't describe
it, who can? Check out
Baby Snakes if you happen
to be "up north" during
the holidays -let us know if
YOU can describe it.
continued from page 6
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Morrison says that even though the researchers
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Morrison says that the machine has a potential
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2i:





Page 8 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 27 November 1979
Weekly Album Review: Latest releases
By PVT MINGES
Features Writer
�Jefferson Starship � Freedom At Point Zero
The group has lost none of the fire that has made it
a rock sensation and have even made some advances in
incendiary techniques of musical exposition. Even
without Grace Slick and Marty Balin, the Starship
cruises into some pretty melodic material, yet the
dramatic imagery and political fervor may have suffered
in the loss. Especially missed are the powerful prosaic
presentations of Slick, but Mickey Thomas does a good
job of emulating the former lead in vocal performance.
The music on this album is superb, as could be
expected by this competent group of professionals.
Freedom At Point Zero possesses a stronger rock drive
than has been offered on earlier endeavors.
The album was recorded by the respected Ron
Nevison, production was coordinated by Pat Ieraci and
the release is a nice package of excellent photography
and informative media.
The single, "Jane already receiving significant FM
airplay, is a quick tempoed rocker with an underlying
reggae sound. "People get ready there's a ship
comin (Freedom At Point Zero).
�Talking Heads � Fear of Music
When this album first came out, it was distressing to
see it greeted with such a laughable reaction. Friends
joked about the group's appearance, and a local record
merchandiser referred to the album jovially as "robot
music
Those same folks are not laughing now, for Fear of
Music is about thirtieth best-selling album in the nation.
Extensive feature articles on the Talking Heads
appeared in "Rolling Stone" and "Musician"
magazines last week. In every article, there are
numerous references made in psychological lingo, so let
us just get this behind us disco psychosis, sublime
neurosis, paranoid panacea, pedestrian psychodramas.
David Byrne, leader of the Heads, states that Fear of
Music refers to a disease called musicogenic epilepsy,
which throws its victims into fits whenever they hear
music. Perhaps it is also symbolic of the Talking Heads
music that upon exposure it throws its patrons into
uncontrollable dancing fits, bordering on disco fever.
Yet, this is hardly disco, being some of the most
progressive rock produced.
Whereas rock music of the '70s was made to sit
back, get stoned and effervesce, the '80s will be the
dance decade.
The Talking Heads music, like all New Wave, is
driven by the rhythm section, in this case, the husband
and wife team of drummer Chris Frantz and elfish Tina
Weymouth, on bass guitar. These two play an integral
role in the album's intense dancability.
Frantz, Weymouth and Byrne met studying art at the
Rhode Island School of Design and the keyboard player,
Jerrv Harrison, was picked up from Jonathan Richman
and The Modern Lovers.
The aura of this album is the same genre as The
Man Who Sold The World by David Bowie or The Doors
Strange Days, that of a spooky surreal world. The
Talking Heads' Fear of Music tells of an all too real
world where one can get frustrated by a piece of paper,
changed by his own mind, and where even the air can
hurt you.
It is so refreshing to have a theme in rock other than
satisfaction of the libidinal urges!
The album was coproduced by Brian Eno and the
Talking Heads and features guest artists Gene Wilder
and Robert Fripp.
This release is one of the top albums of the year
from one of the most promising groups of the eighties.

�Prince � Prince
Move over Stevie Wonder. Here comes a kid with his
heart set on your territory. I believe that this is a debut
album and, if so, it is the most outstanding premier
album of the year.
Released only last week, this album shot up to no.
140 on the overall charts and to twenty-second in the
Soul charts, a remarkable effort for an unknown
individual. -
This guy has got everything you could ask from a
performer. He is an excellent songwriter, has a sweet
voice and is an absolutely astounding musician.
On Prince, Prince composes and arranges all of the
songs and performs (through multi-tracking) the "
material on all sorts of instruments (including lead and
backing vocals). You wanna talk about a one man band!
Oh, yes! The album was also produced by Prince.
The styles of music performed range from funk through
pop and disco, to slow melodic beauties. Prince excels
on guitar and is superb on keyboards, but his most
fascinating asset is his high piquant voice.
The man's songwriting skills are endearing, and to
listen to "Still Waiting" is to catch a glimpse at the
man behind the words: it grabs at my heart.
"I Wanna Be Your Lover" is already fiftieth on the
disco charts and a big no. 3 on Soul charts.
The heart in the Prince logo sums it up, there is a lot
of heart and a lotta love in this album.
�Yusef Lateef � In A Temple Garden
This is one of the best jazz albums released this
year, having the melodic power to appeal to a popular
audience yet strong enough to be appreciated by jazz
buffs.
Lately, newer jazz stars like Pat Metheny and Joni
Mitchell have achieved this status, but Yusef Lateef has
been around a good while.
Born Bill Evans in 1921, he is a multi-instrumentalist
who plays tenor sax, oboe and is an excellent flautist
who has performed with Cannonball Adderly. A Detroit
musician, he was one of the first jazzmen to incorporate
middle eastern and Asian influences into his music,
predating a general jazz interest by a decade or more.
In A Temple Garden blends jazz, pop and blues into
what could be one of the top-selling jazz albums of the
year. This album transcends commercialism by
presenting material palatable to a general public but
maintaining its integrity as a jazz medium.
The songs on the album were written and arranged
by Jeremy Wall, and the production was handled by
Creed Taylor for CTI (who once employed George
Benson and Freddie Hubbard).
In A Temple Garden is performed by a
knowledgeable group of jazz sessionmen such as the
Brecker Brothers, Tom Schuman, Eric Gale, Will Lee,
Steve Gadd and Sammy Figueroa. Lateef is splendid on
sax and flute, and Gale and Lee turn in some of their
better performances.
Others have said that this is a nice album, but
forgetable. I beg to differ, thinking it one of the finer
commercial endeavors this year. It will all be decided
soon enough.
�Z.Z. Top � Deguello
This group was formed toward the end of 1970,
gaining their claim to fame by being a support group
that headliners were reluctant to follow. Jimi Hendrix,
in a Carson interview, said that Top's Billy Gibbons was
one of America's best young guitarists.
Their music is derived from southwestern blues and
R.&B. melted into high powered contemporary rock.
Their first hit was the outrageous Larange and
their most popular album was in 1973, Tres Hombres
ThTs is their first album in a long time, and it will be
Greeted with much interest.
g The gruff vocals of Gibbons and Dusty H.ll .till are a
dominant facet, and the driving guitars propel jh.s h.gh
energy album. The major change .s the pseudonym of
the Lone Wolf Horns and the addition of a saxophone,
creating a rock V roll atmosphere.
have never had an affection for three-p.ece, three-
chord rock, and this album is not really a dynamic one
bit it will be nice for Z.Z. Top fans to get a few last
elimpses of their idols.
If you like hard driving southern rock sounds, you
will like this one.
VEGETARIAN
continued from page 6
George and Murdoch to perform
the book baked with filo (a
Greek kind of strudel
dough) and feta cheese. I
found it to be a light yet
engaging dish with a
refreshing textured flavor.
Served with a fresh salad
and white wine, spanako-
pita makes for a very
elegant spread that will
please the palate as much
as it will nourish the body.
The book contains 262
recipes in all, guaranteed
to make every meal a
"delight and a celebration
of life It seems plausible
that as exhaustive and
diverse as this book is that
every novice gourmet chef
will find something to
stimulate his imagination.
Most of the dishes in The
Vegetarian Epicure are
relatively simple to pre-
pare and require few
ingredients. This brings
up another good reason for
being a vegetarian; it is
economical. Whether or
not one is vegetarian, this
book can save you money
and still allow you to
prepare vegetarian dishes
in such a creatie and
appetizing manner that
meat will scarcely be
missed.
GSSEBgES
anjiuimxjaj
1111 ii 11 hi i ii i � � ii ii i r"
Kathy George of Col-
lege Park, Md percus-
sion, and Jean Murdock of
Glen Ridge, N.J French
horn, will perform in
recital Friday, Nov. 30, at
7:30 p.m. in the Fletcher
Recital Hall.
Both are senior stu-
dents in the ECU School of
Music.
Kathy George, a stu-
dent of Harold Jones, will
perform four movements
of William Kraft's
"Images the Kabalev-
shy-Jolliff "Comedian's
Gallop Toshimitsu Tan-
aka's "Two Movements
for Marimba" and the
Moszumanaska - Nazar
"Three Concert Studies
Weigand book cited
A study skills book by
an East Carolina Univer-
sity faculty member is
recommended in the Oct-
ober issue bf Better
Homes and Gardens
magazine.
How To Succeed in
High School by Dr. George
R.J. Weigand, director of
ECU's Counseling Center,
is one of five books
mentioned as helpful aids
to better study habits by
author Margaret Daly at
the end of her article,
"Does Your Child Know
How To Study?"
The Weigand book is
one of two cited as
especially useful for junior
and senior high school
students.
A member of the ECU
faculty since 1963, Dr.
Weigand was previously
director of the University
of Maryland's Office of
Intermediate Registration.
He is the author of three
other books on study and
testing skills and college
orientation, as well as
articles in several profes-
sional journals.
for Percussion Solo
She will be assisted by
a three-member marimba
ensemble: Susan Jette,
Edward Asten and Bruce
Smith.
A candidate for the
Bachelor of Music Educa-
tion degree, Ms. George is
the daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. George P. George of
College Park, Md.
Jean Murdoch, a stu-
dent of James Parnell, will
perform the third and
fourth movements of the
Handel Sonata in G Minor,
Cohen's Fantasy in F
Major, Franz Strauss's
"Thema und Variationen"
and "Frippery 2" by
Shaw.
She will be accom-
panied by Cynthia John-
son, pianist, and assisted
by three other French horn
performers: Judy Fordyce,
William Pearce and Sherry
Jones.
The daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. John T. Mur-
doch of 412 Ridgewood
Ave Glen Ridge, N.J
Ms. Murdoch is a candi-
date for Bachelor of Music
degrees in music educa-
tion and music therapy.
The George-Murdoch
recital is free and open to
the public.
November Specials
Lunch 11:00-3:00
Moil. Slices of Beef , Toast &
Potato �2.49
XllCS. Soup & Salad �1.49
Wed. Sirloin Tips, Toast &
Potato �2.49
Xhur. Old Fashion �1.49
Cheeseburger & Soup
Fri. File of Chicken Sandwich
& Potato �1.39
Sat. Chowder & Salad �1.79
Sun 6oz Sirloin , Toast &
Potato �2.49
3005 E. 10th St. Greenville 7B8-8550
ff
13
Airlines' discount f
like monty from
Far saves you a super 25 (Fri. thru Sun.)
35 (Mon. thru Thurs.) roundtrip if you make your resec-
tions and ticket purchase 30 days before departure, and
ay at least 7 days.
Weekend Excursion Fare means a 30 roundtrip dis-
unt if you leave Saturday and return any day except Sun-
ay (1201 pmuntil midnight)orFriday.
For complete information, including time and reservation
jquirements and fare availability, see your travel agent or
all piedmont Airlines. Discount fares subject to change
ithout notice
Stanch Investment Services
Announces the
GRAND OPENING
off FAMOUS PIZZA
wed. Nov. 28
formerly Eggs-N-24
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Featuring World Famous Pizza
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AN EXHIBITION OF 44 WORKS
BY 15 SOUTHEASTERN ARTISTS
"Various the papers, various wants produce
The wants of fashion, elegance, and use.
Men are as various: and If right I scan,
Each sort of paper represents some man
11
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ORGANIZED BY
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ATLANTA, GEORGIA �f)
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He i lc 11 ill Callerv
Nofllfl i1,l II 14 I Ll J II . I 1. I �N
���





The East Carolinian
tian am
sports
Tuesday, November 27, 1979 Page 9
Greenville, N. C,

Pirates down
Marathon
Oil 103-92
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
East Carolina outscored Marathon Oil 19-3 in the
first 1:30 of the second half in rolling to a 103-92 victory
last night in an exhibition game in Minges Coliseum.
Guard George Maynor spearheaded the explosion,
-coring 10 points in a space of only four minutes. The
senior from Raeford finished the night as the Pirates'
leading scorer with 18 points.
The first half of the contest was very even, with both
teams taking the lead on several different occasions.
ECU led at intermission by a single point 48-47.
Marathon Oil, made up of former college stars,
stayed with the Pirates in the first half thanks mainly to
the sharp-shooting of ex-Virginia Tech stalwart Phil
Thieniman. who tallied 21 points in the first 20 minutes
of play.
The Oilers fell behind fast in the second period and
never could regain their first-half form, due mainly to
the fact that they had only seven players present.
Several of Marathon's players, including ex-Kentucky
star Larry Stamper and 6-11 Bob Foggin, did not make
the trip to Greenville because of weather and travel
complications.
Pirate coach Dave Odom was pleased with the
performance of his team, especially the display of
enthusiasm shown by his players. "I set two goals for
this team coming into the game Odom said. "We
wanted to play hard and we wanted to show them that
we were involved in the game. I feel we accomplished
both.
"I wanted to fans that were here to go back on the
streets of Greenville and say 'hey, these guys know
what they're doing I think that might just happen,
too
Indeed, the Pirate fans did see a much different
team than they have seen in recent years. A patient
offense and a scrappy defense were big factors in the
Pirate victory.
Another factor, said Marathon coach Scotty Baesler,
was the play of Maynor. "You don't find many guards
like him said Baesler. "He's so strong and is very
talented. He was the best player on the floor by far, but
had sense enough not to try and dominate everything.
He has a good head on his shoulders
Baesler. whose team lost recently to nationally
ranked Louisville, said Maynor ranked with the
Cardinals' All-America guard, Darrell Griffith.
"Maynor's the best guard we've seen except Griffith
he said. "He's probably every bit as good a pro
prospect though as Griffith because of his heady play
Baesler went on to say that he did not feel the
absence of several of his players made any difference in
the game. "I don't think they would have changed the
outcome Baesler said. "They might have made it
closer, though
Odom felt that the Marathon absentees played a vital
role in the Pirate victory because of the Oilers' inability
to substitute. "The whole story Odom said, "comes
. down to the conditioning of our 13 players compared to
that of their eight players
The Pirates begin their regular season Friday as they
begin play in the Spider Classic in Richmond, Va. The
two-day tourney also features host Richmond, West
Virginia Tech and Virginia Commonwealth.
EAST CAROLINA (103)
Grav 5 5-10 15, Krusen 5 0-0 10, Hobson 5 0-0 10,
Miles 0 2-2 2, Mavnor 9 0-0 18, Byles 7 0-1 14,
Underwood 6 1-1 13, Powers 2 0-0 4, Gibson 3 1-4 7,
McLaurin 2 2-3 6, Wiggins 2 0-0 4, Tyson 0 0-1 0,
Batson 0 0-0 0. Totals 46 11-22 103.
- MARATHON OIL (92)
Glenn 7 2-2 16, Dunagen 2 1-1 5, Bunting 2 0-1 4,
Thieniman 7 10-12 24, Smith 13 7-10 33, Davis 4 2-2 10,
; Gibbs 0 0-0 0, Totals 35 22-28 92.
Halftime � ECU 48, Marathon Oil 47. Fouled out �
; none. Total fouls � ECU 22, Marathon Oil 15. Technical
- K. Davis, Marathon Oil. A � 2,500.
Collins passes 1,000
ECU clubs Indians
(Photo by John Grogan)
Collins surpassed lOOO yard
mark Saturday
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
WILLIAMSBURG, VA. � Running back Anthony
Collins ran for two touchdowns as the Pirates closed the
1979 season with a 38-14 trouncing of the Indians of
William and Mary, in the process becoming only the
fifth player in ECU history to rush for over 1000 yards in
a season.
Collins broke the barrier, on the Bucs opening drive
of the afternoon with a five yard blast up the right side
of the Indians permeable defense. He netted 162 yards
on 19 carries for the day.
It was a day to rewrite the record books at ECU, as
quarterback Leander Green surpassed the single season
total offense mark set by Carl Summerell in 1972.
Running back Sam Harrell became the fourth
member of starting backfield to pass the 1000 career
rushing mark; a feat unusual even among the most
successful running teams.
Kicker Bill Lamm put the Pirates on the board four
plays later with a 21 yard field.
Safety Willie Holley put an end to the Indians' hopes
of sustaining their second drive attempt with an
interception at ECU's 22.
Harrell shook off three would-be tacklers on a quick
pitch to the right and raced 40 yards for the Bucs first
touchdown. A run of 32 by Collins set up the TD sprint
by Collins.
The Tribe appeared to have their offense moving on
their next possession as fullback Alvis Lang rushed 11
yards off right tackle for a first down, but Garrity fell
victim to the inspired ECU defense on the next play as
he dropped back to pass and was sacked by John
Robertson for a 10 yard loss.
Again the Pirates took over and again the offense
marched down the field for a touchdown.
This time it was the explosive Collins darting
through the heart of the William and Mary defense for a
nine yard TD.
The Indians most successful drive of the first half
ended on the ECU 42 when Garrity fumbled the
exchange from center Peter Pfeffer and linebacker
Chuck Jackson recovered for the Bucs.
Reserve QB Henry Trevathan's third down pass
attempt was batted down by a W&M lineman, and
punter Rodney Allen was forced to take the field for the
first time of the day.
After turning the ball over on downs in the first
possession of the second half, Holley again came
through for the ECU defense, this time with a fumble
grab at the 49.
Collins rushed for a first down and then it appeared
tljat the Pirate offense was to be in one of the situations
of the year.
On first and 10 at the W&M 38, Collins swept right
for what would have been a gain for a first down, but a
holding penalty pushed the Bucs to the 50 where it was
now first and 22.
Illegal motion was then assessed to ECU, setting up
first and 27. One second down and 23, Green dropped
into the pocket, but the Indian defense had receivers
Billy Ray Washington and Vern Davenport hawked and
it appeared the speedy quarterback would be dropped
for another loss.
The alert action of Green and fullback Theodore
Sutton moved the visitors 18 yards on an unscheduled
screen pass.
With 3:20 remaining in the third frame, Collins dove
over from the one for his second scoring jaunt.
A two-yard dive by Sutton culminated ECU's next
drive, giving each starting running back a TD.
The Indians capitalized on the inexperience of
the reserve defensive unit, with wide receiver Mike
Burgess taking a reverse of 15 yards for W&M's first
score.
Trevathan redeemed himself with a four-yard sprint
on an option play right for the final ECU points of the
contest.
William and Mary took a "never say die" attitude
and again surprised the mediocre crowd of 9,100 with a
14 yard Garrity to Al Tafro touchdown strike.
bad, there will be no NCAA champ
"The bowl situation is about to get out of hand
says East Carolina football coach Pat Dye. He definitely
has a point.
The Pirates, 7-3-1 and the nation's number one
rushing team, are left out in the cold and will go to no
post-season bowl.
Teams far inferior to the Pirates, both record-wise
and talent-wise, will go bowling at the end of December,
though. California, Missouri and Louisiana State, to
mention just a few, have mediocre 6-5 records, yet,
because of financial and traditional reasons, will all play
in post-season bowls.
N.C. State, the regular season ACC champ, is
another team with reason to gripe, as they too are
without a bowl bid. There are surely many other teams
in the country more worthy of a bowl bid than mediocre
teams like California, but because they may not have the
proper fan support, must say home over the holidays.
"I really don't blame the bowl people at all said
Dye. "They have to make money. They need to get
teams that will have a lot of fan support
Just because he sees the point of view of the bowls
doesn't mean Dye is not unhappy. "It's the system
that's messed up he said. "Maybe the NCAA should
come up with a playoff system or something
The playoff system that Dye spoke of has been
discussed much in the past few vears but seems unlikely
I

to become a reality. The tradition involved with the bowl
system of post-season play definitely presents a problem
for those trying to promote the idea of post-season
playoffs in college football.
But how else can a true national champion be
decided? Take this season, for example. Alabama,
Southern California, Ohio State, Florida State and
Brigham Young are all undefeated.
The Buckeyes and Trojans appear headed for a
matchup in the Rose Bowl, but the other unbeatens do
not play each other. It is possible, then, that there could
be four major unbeaten college teams at the end of the
season. Should something as important as the national
championship of college football be left up to the
opinions of pollsters?
The answer is definitely no. The championship
should be decided where it counts, on the playing field
This is the only true way to know exactly who is THE
best.
Another gripe with the bowl system, aside from its
usual inability to narrow down who the national
champion should be, is that many unworthy teams are
invited to play in the post-season classics. Naturally
then, many deserving teams are left out.
After the nation's top 15 or 20 teams are taken by
the various bowls, the picking becomes a financial
matter. A perfect example of this is the Hall of Fame
Bowl this season.
The Alabama-based bowl wanted Kentucky to face
South Carolina if the Wildcats could defeat Tennessee
last week. If Kentucky lost (they did) and UCLA had
beaten Southern Cal (they did not), then the Bruins
would have been in despite a horrendous season before
that game.
Why? Because UCLA is UCLA and that means fans
and that means money. That's what bowl games are all
about these days � the almighty dollar.
Do not be surprised if, after this year's bowls, you
ask yourself, "Who really is the national champion?" It
is too bad no one will be able to answer you.
i �.
Offense shows true identity
Linemen pi
Maynor sets for foul shot
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
WILLIAMSBURG, VA
� Sam Harrell sprints left
and goes 40 yards for a
touchdown.
Leander Green com-
pletes a pass to Theodore
Sutton for 18 yards and a
first down.
Anthony Collins blasts
off right tackle for a
touchdown.
Wait a minute.
Who the H� plays
right tackle?
For that matter, who
plays left tackle?
For 11 games this
season, a group of linemen
have served faithfully in
opening the holes which
have enabled: Harrell tor
suh for the 1000th yard of
his career, Collins to
become only the fifth
player in Pirate football
history to rush 1000 yards
in a season, Green to
establish a new single
season total offense re-
cord, and Sutton to score
four times as many
touchdowns as in his
previous two seasons.
For the record:
tackle Joe Godette (Sr
6-2, 215), left guard
Mitchell Johnstone (Sr
6-4, 242), center Jeff
Hagans (Sr 6-0, 242),
right guard Wayne Inman
(Jr 6-3, 242), right tackle
Matt Mulholland (Sr 6-0,
242)1.
These five work horses
fired off the line week in
and week out, every
offensive play of the game
(with the exception of
Godette who missed four
games with a knee injury
suffered in the State
game).
"The hardest thing
was missing Homecoming
in my last year said
Godette. "It really makes
you feel helpless watching
from the sidelines
The fact that they
received little credit
throughout the season
didn't hinder their perfor-
mance.
"The backs ran great
left Green (10) follows strong offensive line
(Photo by Kip Sloan)
say Mulholland. "The
offensive line takes great
pride in that. Wayne, Jeff,
Mitchell, Joe, Oscar (Ty-
son), John (Maness), Gary
(Gambrell); I thought we
all played well. There's
not really a weak link
The Pirates learned
late Saturday that there
would be no bowl game
for the team from Green-
ville, North Carolina which
led the nation in rushing
offense, was second in
total offense and third in
scoring. Pretty impressive
stats, but just not enough.
The linemen had a few
words prior to the bowl
announcement.
"We're a BAD team
said Mulholland empha-
tically. "We started late
but we came out smoking
in the second half of the
season. I hope we do go,
'cause we got a team that
can play against any-
body.
"People go to a bowl
to see an offensive show,
reasoned Inman, "not a
defensive battle.
The team members had
confidence in themselves,
but the coaches were
satisfied that they could
achieve as well.
"Every one of those
people who was on our
line was not highly
recruited said assistant
line coach Wayne Bolt.
"Wayne makes up for
his lack of strength with
great technique. Our
guards have to be our best
athletes, and ours are
quick enough, fast enough
and smart enough to play.
"Jeff is the guy who
gets the least recognition
of any of them. We've
never really had a big
center. He's improved the
play at center since he's
been h�re
The only starting line-
man returning next season
will be Inman (a red-
shirted senior this season),
but Bolt has confidence in
the ability of backup guard
Fee Griffin and experi-
enced tackles Tyson and
Gambrell.
Tm sure they'll play
some good football for
East Carolina he prais-
ed, "but we're going to
miss this fane
So will Anthony Col-
lins, Theodore Sutton,
Marvin Cobb
v5N
Lggai m1$fcfc
l
MMMMgaMMMWHMft"





Page 10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 27 November 1979
Lady Pirates take
two in Big Apple
A new comedy thriller
from Ihe creators of "Silver Streak?
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
A Thanksgiving weekend trip to the Big Apple
proved to be fruitful to the Lady Pirate Basketball
squad, as the team swept a pair of games from M.
Johns 83-71 and Manhattan 98-32.
ECU went into the St. Johns matchup Fnday as the
decided underdogs, but according to head coach Cathy
Andruzzi, the spirit and preparation of the Lady Hues
enabled them to outscore the taller hosts.
Jr
(Photo by Kip Sloan)
kathv Rilev concentrates
"It was truly an upset for us to go to New York and
beat St. Johns said the second-year coach. "We were
supposed to lose by as many points as we won by
Senior all-American candidate Rosie Thompson paced
the Pirates with 19 points and eleven rebounds, followed
by Laurie Sikes with 17, Kathy Riley 16 and Lydia
Rountree 12. Center Marcia Girven added eight points
and eight grabs.
ECU led 41-27 at the end of the first hall, but St.
Johns' relenteless offense outscored the Lady Bucs by-
two in the final half.
"We came out in the first half tight said Andruzzi.
"I think the girls were a little excited about playing in
"Lydia hit only five out of 16 shots, but they were all
good percentage shots. She has been playing the
perimeter very well for us.
"I don't think we hit the boards as well as we should
have she added. "We were a little too cautious
rebounding; worrying about fouls.
"Our freethrow shooting kept us in the game.
"We knew it would be a tough game
The Manhattan bout Saturday was a different story,
though. .
The Ladv Pirates quickly jumped ahead of Manhattan
and by halttime owned a comfortable 50-17 edge. The
reserves handled most of the second half duty, but
maintained the intensity established early in the contest
Thompson and Rilev again led the scoring blitz with
18 cadi, though seeing limited action. Rountree added
16, followed by Sikes and Girven with 10. Freshman
Mar Denkler paced the backups with eight.
Anne Flannery netted half of Manhattan's points and
grabbed 12 rebounds.
Andruzzi praised the freshmen for their efforts in the
record-setting 66 point victory.
"They came in and kept up the shooting percentage
'55.6 percent) she said. "They were just so hyper.
"When you have a whole team play and only have 1
turnovers, then you're getting good fundamental play.
w .� don't put them in just because we're ahead; we put
them in to plav.
'�When you plav a fast game like we play, you have
a lot of turnovers. We've got to try to keep them down.
"The trip to New York was very important to our
program said Andruzzi. "East Carolina wants to be
recognized as a good basketball team. That's why a win
over St. Johns was so important. It's very important not
because we won. but how we won; with solid, team
'Tin pleased with all of them, but 1 know we can
still plav better
The Ladv Pirates host UNC-Wilmington tomorrow at
7:30 p.m. in Minges Coliseum.
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Lady Pirate action
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November 28
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27 November 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 11
Fan displays unusual support
By ED WILLIAMS
Staff Writer
do
How many people
you know that have
regularly attended ECU
football games for the last
ten years, as well as
driving a 1964 purple-and-
gold Pontiac that reflects
their unwavering support
of ECU athletics?
Bv the wav, there
really is an answer to this
question.
The answer is repre-
sented in the form of Leo
Hunt, manager of a Perco
gas station on 14th Street.
Hunt has been in
business "now going of
ten years at the station.
H s also been devot-
ing his Saturdays to
watching East Carolina
football games for "as
long as I've been here (in
Greenville)
Although he admits to
missing one or two games
at year, he still tries "to
every game if I
he stated. This
attending away-
well as home
to
gel
can
means
games
ones.
as
Hunt first got inter-
ested in ECU when his
son, Robert, was attending
school here. The school
was a teacher's college
then and Hunt came down
for a visit. He "liked the
school and "felt that the
school would be a good
one to support" if he ever
got the chance.
His chance material-
ized after he retired from
mechanical work in the Air
Force in 1965 and came to
Greenville. He opened a
Zip Mart of 5th Street but
found that he didn't
particularly care for that
type of work. He returned
to mechanical work at an
Exxon Station on 264
by-pass. After that he
recieved the opportunity to
manage the Perco station.
Hunt said he has
"always been interested in
football and when he
"got here (Greenville), got
interested in East Carolina,
and that was it
Hunt's regular attend-
ance of football games has
become a "family affair
He said when he started
going to football games
"my son John went with
me, My wife just started
going to all the games just
this year
One game that stands
out in Hunt's mind is the
38-17 victory over UNC-
Chapel Hill in 1975.
"I'd like to see that
one again he Said.
Hunt recalled that after
the UNC game he was
walking around wearing a
purple-and-gold outfit. A
few "UNC alumni came
out and said, 'There goes
a Pirate
Damn proud of it I
said
"After beating them
38-17, damn right I was
proud. Wouldn't you be?"
Hunt has no real
predictions for this year's
squad. Rather, he would
just like to see them win
the rest of their games.
"I think the team has
done outstanding since the
Duke game he said.
"They lost so miserably, it
kind of woke them up
"I think Pat Dye had
done a good job he
continued. "He's working
on next vear's team this
year by letting every-
body play in the games to
gain experience, Hunt
believes.
He cited ECU's 49-7
thrashing of the Citadel as
an example.
"We could've blown
them out he said. "But
he (Dye) put in other
players
Hunt is obviously
proud of ECU's football
team and his support of
the game. He is also
proud of his purple-and-
gold Pontiac Catalina that
"I had a basketball on
there (the roof), but it
blew off
The hood of the car
carries a purple-and-gold
football on each fender,
plus an authentic football
helmet as a hood orna-
ment.
"I went over to the
football office and asked,
'Do you have a football
helmet I can have? Hunt
recalled.
"He turned to a player
ind said, 'Go get him a
helmet
Carlen satisfied by-
South Carolina
Support
East
Carolinian
A dvertizers
Outland Trophy awarded
to N.C. State's Ritcher
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP)-
North Carolina State cen-
ter Jim Ritcher will be
presented with the 1979
Outland Award early next
year at a banquet in
Seattle, honoring him as
the top interior lineman in
college football.
The 6-foot-3, 245-
pound senior has made
blocks believed impossible
for a center.
Ritcher's ability to do
such things as get outside
a defensive tackle and
block him in has amazed
both teammates and ex-
ponents.
The Outland Award,
announced Saturday, is
presented annually by the
Football Writers Associa-
tion of America to the
outstanding guard tackle
or center in college
football.
In becoming the 34th
recipient of the award,
Ritcher beat out eight
others who were finalists
because they made the
Football Writers' All-
America team.
The others were of-
fensive lineman Jim Bunch
of Alabama, Ken Fritz of
Ohio State, Brad Budde of
Southern California and
Greg Kolenda of Arkan-
sas, and defensive linemen
Jim Stuckey of Clemson,
Bruce Clark or Penn State,
Curt Greer of Michigan
and Steve McMichael of
Texas.
The 1978 winner was
Greg Roberts, an offensive
guard from Oklahoma who
is now a starter for the
Tampa Bay Bucaneers.
Wolfpack center Jim Ritcher
COLUMBIA S.C. (AP)-
Coach Jim Carlen says he
considers the Gamecocks
13-9 victory over intrastate
rival Clemson one of his
most satisfying moments
in his five years at South
Carolina.
"Unquestionably it is
for a couple of reasons. It
was our eighth win-the
first time South Carolina
has won eight games in a
season since 1903 he
said.
"And it was a win over
Clemson after we had lost
three straight to them.
When you live in South
Carolina it's double treat
to beat Clemson. We've
got a lot of orange around
us he said.
The game finished
season play for the
Gamecocks and Tigers,
leaving them both with 8-3
records. But each has a
post-season bowl game
upcomingClemson at the
Peach Bowl and South
Carolina at the Hall of
Fame Bowl.
The low-scoring game
kept the crowd of nearly
57,000 that packed
Williams-Brice stadium
edge until the final
seconds.
The score was 10-6 at
the start of the second half
when South Carolina
placekicker Eddie Leopard,
who kicked a 34-yard field
goal late in the first
quarter, added a 37-yarder.
But it was an 80-yard
punt by Jay Feltz with
only minutes remaining in
the fourth quarter that
apparently put the Tigers
out of scoring range.
Clemson had bottled
up South Carolina's attack
at the Gamecock 16-yard
line, but Feltz boomed the
ball over the head of
Clemson's Hollis Hall and
the ball was downed at the
Tiger 4-yard line.
Clemson made it to the
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7SS-4080
East Carolina Playhouse
presents
THE CHILDREN'S HOUR
by
Lillian Hellman
From one of America's
foremost playwrights
a powerfully moving
drama about the evil
that a lie can do
Directed by
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November 28 through December 1
December 3 through 8
8:15 p.m.
Studio Theatre
Tickets are $2.50
ECU Students $1.50
For reservations and information
call 757-6390
between 10 and 4
Monday through Friday
South Carolina 5 before a
pass on a fourth down fell
incomplete, killing a 91-
yard drive with 18 seconds
left in the game.
Clemson Coach Danny
Ford credited the Game-
cocks defense for the
victory.
"After that last long
punt by South Carolina,
our guys did a good job
driving almost the length
of the field. We had a
chance to get it and we
didn't. And that's goocj
defensive play by South
Carolina he said.
Field goals dominated
the scoring with only
one touchdown tallied �
South Carolina tight end
Ben Cornett's 2-yard
touchdown pass in the first
half.
It was cornett's first
touchdown of his college
career. The score was set
up by a 60-yard pass play
from South Carolina quar-
terback Garry Harper to
tight end Willie Scott.
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Page 12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 27 November 1979
Scott Rogues capture title
Intramural soccer season ends
classified
Soccer Playoffs
By Freddie Frazier
The Intramural soccer
season came to a thrilling
climax last Tuesday night
a two all campus champ-
ions were crowned. The
Scott Rogues captured the
men's title for the second
car in a row while Sports
n Shorts won the wo-
men's title.
In the men's indepen-
dent division playoffs,
I RKZ met the Indepen-
dents in the firt round.
The Independents won 6-1
v ith John Kim scoring
three goals. In the inde-
pendent finals, the Inde-
pendents gained revenge
on the Slash with a 3-2
victory with John Kim
getting all three goals.
In the men's residence
hall division, the Belk Gola
defeated the Aycock Deso-
lation Angels 3-2 to reach
the finals. In the finals,
the) met the top-ranked
S it! Rogues. The Gola
51 to the powerful
Rogues 4-0.
Is a general rule,
ternit) games are more
emotional than others.
Thi- was definitely the
soccer. In the
semi-finals of the frater-
playoffs, Sigma Nu
defeated Phi Kappa Tau,
3-1, and Pi Kappa Phi
;ed Tau Kappa Epsilon,
2-1. In the fraternity
s, .tima Nu edged Pi
Kappa Phi 1-0 on a goal
Peter Moss
In all campus semi-
ils, both games were
won b penalty kiek as
Independents beat Pi
Kappa Phi and the Scott
Rogues edged out Sigma
Nu. Thi- set up a show-
n between the two
tms most people picked
in the finals. Scott
be a little
-�- nger as thev won the
2
women's soccer
�roved to be
ting The playoff
jeneralh played
i er. In the resi-
hall championship,
'n Shorts edged
2-1 in a close
ha i Delta de-
- gma Sigma Sigma
2-1 ' set up the all
finals. Sports 'n
Iged Alpha Xi
Ita 1-0 despite a tre-
ndous and courageous
rt b Alpha Xi Deltas
were led by Gail
O'Brien.
Basketball Tournament
The Men's Pre-season
sketball draw has been
expanded to include 64
ims because of the large
number ol teams who wish
to enter the tournament.
The weekend tourna-
ment will be held D�r
8 and 9. The deadline for
entering the tournament is
today, Nov. 27, at 5 p.m
and the Team Captain's
meeting will be held
Thursday, Dec. 6 at 6:30
p.m.
Recreational Free Play
Memorial Gymnasium
and Minges Coliseum
recreational free play
hours will be supervised
effective Nov. 26. Valid
ECU student identification
cards or Faculty Staff
Independent cards will be
required to gain admit-
tance to the gyms during
free play hours.
Guest passes issued by
the Intramural Office are
available from 8 a.m.
through 5 p.m Monday
through Friday, for week-
end use. Guest passes
allow admittance to all
recreational facilities when
accompanied by the stu-
dent, faculty, or staff
sponsor.
Meetings, Announcements
and Deadlines
An important meeting
of the women's and men's
team handball clubs will
be held on Wednesday,
Nov. 28 at 3:30 p.m. in
104 Memorial Gym. All
interested students are
encouraged to attend.
Dave Underhill, advisor
for the ECU Ski Club,
invites all interested stu-
dents to attend an organi-
zational meeting on Thurs-
day, Nov. 29 at 4 p.m. in
104 Memorial Gym.
Recreational Free Swim
Recreational free swim
is offered by the Intra-
mural Office at ECU. Pool
hours are as follows:
Monday � Thursday, at
Memorial Gym, 4 p.m.
until 6 p.m and at
Minges. 7:30 p.m. until
9:30 p.m. Monday, Wed-
nesday and Friday both
pools are open from noon
until 1 p.m. Saturday.
Memorial is opened from 2
p.m. until 6 p.m. while
Minges is closed. Sunday,
Memorial pool is closed
with Minges pool -tamg
open from 2 p.m. until 6
p.m.
Valid student identi-
fication cards or Faculty
Staff Independent cards
are required. Sponsors of
invited guests must obtain
guest passes through the
Intramural Office, Monday
through Friday, from 8
a.m. until 5 p.m.
Co-Rec Tennis
The 1979 Intramural
Tennis Mixed Doubles
Tournament came to a
close Thursday, Nov. 8
with a new set of cham-
pions being acclaimed.
OPTICIANS j.
A f.t
opticians i ' v
df amenca t j
OVER 1000 FRAMES-
TO CHOOSE FROM
Single Vision-White Glass Lenses$19.50
Bifocal Lenses-White Glass$ 30.50
Single Vision Photo Gray Lenses$26.50
Single Vision Photo Gray Extra$30.50
Bifocal Lenses Photo Gray$38.50
Trifocal White Glass Lenses$37.50
Trifocal Photo Gray Lenses$47.50
(1st DIVISION LENSES)
CONTACT LENSES
by
Bausch & Lomb Sof lens Or Milton Roy Nature Vue
Soft Lens�$!29.95
Semi Soft Lens$' 10.00
Hard Lens$105.00
15 Student Discount On Glasses
752-1446
GREENVILLE. NX
PHYSICIANS QUADRANGLE
Of FICt HOURS
MOM TMS TNURS �M
IAN-1PM IWt
WEOMCSOAT
1 ADJACENT TO CAST CAROLINA CYE CLINIC
BUILDING A
17MW.STHST
E.
�J
Terry Casome and Elaine
Kutteh soundly defeated
Terry Skipper and Kelly
Haynes in the finals
match.
The College Hills ten-
nis courts were quite busy
for a while as teams
battled for the title of best
Co-Rec Tennis Team on
the ECU campus. The
Co-Rec Tennis Tourna-
ment was a success and
the Intramural staff wishes
to thank all those whe
participated.
1 he ECU Karate team
won the regional meet
which was held in Shelby,
N.C this past weekend.
The ECU team won over
highly ranked USC, NC
State, Appalachian, and
Gardner-Webb.
Coach Bill McDonald
praised the club saying
that the tournament win
was a complete team
effort. He also congratu-
lated his white belt girls
and green belt men, as
these two gruops domi-
nated their divisions.
Jerry Little, white belt
female, fought her way-
through tough competition
to win first place honors
while also placing in
forms-marsha. Another
team member, Livingston,
demonstrated superb form
winning style in the forms
competition.
In green belt men
competition, Orlando
Dowdy's high kicks won
him first place honors,
while James White won
second place form and
fourth place fighting.
Congratulations to the
ECU Karate Club for their
victory in their regional
match.
Team Handball
By Freddie Frazier
The Intramural Team
Handball season is off to a
very exciting start. The
games are getting more
enjoyable as all teams
Lnow the rules of the
game now. Most of the
ranked teams enjoyed
good weeks except for one
upset.
In the Hercules divi-
sion of the Fraternity
League, Tau Kappa Epsi-
lon and Lambda Chi Alpha
continue to remain unde-
feated and stay at the top
of their standings. Kappa
Sigma defeated Sigma Nu,
16-10 for iheir first win.
Sigma Tau Gamma seems
to be the class of the Zeus
Division. They are 3-0 and
crushed Delta Sigma Phi
23-0 with Mark Hoffman
leading the way with 11
goals.
In the residence hall
division, the Belk Gola and
Scott Withdrawals have
dominated play so far.
Both are 3-0, and their
season-ending game will
probably decide the divi-
sion. The Gola defeated
the Jones One Hits 14-8
while the Withdrawals
beat the Scott Scrubs 18-6
with Mike Davis getting
nine goals.
In women's play, the
top-ranked Tyler Heart-
breakers remained unde-
feated as thev beat Alpha
Xi Delta I, 16-9, behind
Ginger RothermeH's nine
goals.
In other games, Flem-
ings' Goalie Trotters
edged Carries Unmen-
tionables, 14-11, and P.E.
and Co. crushed Alpha Xi
Delta II, 23-3.
KENNEDY DISSIDENTS
UNITE Get your "I will
not run if nominated, I will
not serve if elected"
T-shirts by mailing $6.50
checkm.o. Spencer Ste-
phens, 1410 Dickinson
Ave. Greenville, N.C.
27834. Specify size (S-M-
L) Allow 3 weeks for
mailing.
FOR SALE: Kenwood
KR-4400 30 watt receiver,
$125; Marantz 2285 85
watt receiver, $275. One
must go before Christmas!
Call Rick at 758-7894.
FOR SALE: Used furni-
ture, used small appli-
ances and other miscel-
laneous household items.
Call 756-5413.
FOR SALE: Wetsuits. One
Body Glove Spader, Full
Suit; One Surfer House,
Nvlon-2 Shorty. Reason-
able price. Call Dave at
758-2843night.
ROOMMATE NEEDED.
Male grad student needs
roommate beginning Dec.
1 to share nice apt. Full
kitchen, AC, heat, carpet,
two bdrms, cable TV.
Prefer reasonable clean
and quiet person. Call
758-4317.
HOUSING NEEDED: Male
student looking for house
or apartment to share with
present occupant for
spring semester. Prefer-
able near campus. Call
Terry at 752-8461 after 7
p.m.
MALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: To share one
bedroom apt. at Kings
Row. $195 monthly. Call
752-0564 after 10 p.m.
ROOMMATE WANTED:
To share two bedroom apt.
$75.00mo. plus lA utili-
ties. Close to campus. Call
Pat at 752-5182.
HOUSING NEEDED. Cou-
ple seeks three to four
room house or apt. near
campus. Call 752-0800.
terwfjjy IpcTjondQ
ROOMMATE WANTED:
To share two bedroom apt.
ater and heating includ-
ed in rent. Call 758-4253.
TYPING: Term papers,
theses, resume etc. Rea-
sonable. Call Jane Pollock
at 752-9719.
BEACH LOVERS Part-
time student sales repre-
sentative position available
for Spring Semester. Job
involves promoting high
quality sun trips on
campus for commission
and free travel. Call or
write for an application.
Summit Travel, Inc
Parkade Plaza, Suite 11,
Columbia, Missouri 65201.
(800) 325-0439.
SKI TRIP: To Kill.ngton.
Vermont Dec. 31-Jan. 7.
Lodging, lift ticket trans-
portation, meals. enter-
tainment keg and di-( a
parties, movie- Ski
maintenance clinic only
$216.00. Other option- low
a $160. Sponsored by
Intercollegiate Ski sso i-
ation. For more info, call
Jay Eason at 758-5892.
BABYSITTER WANTED:
January through Man �
lull day a week I
Friday-) or equivalent
time. Transportation nec-
essary, good pay. referen-
es. Call 756-7772
NEED X-TR. CASH
price- paid tor gold
silver and -ilver i oins.
Mixed Media. 120 E. 5th
St. Phone 758-2127.
UNDER NEW
MANAGEMENT
WED: TODAY'S SPECIAL
All the Pizza You Can Eat!
For Only $2.38
From 5 - �Dine In Only )
PIZZA
ELIVERY
FAST
FREE
HOT
FRESH
In les� than 3� minutes
Phone
758-7400
507 EAST 14th St.
HOURS
Mon. - Thurs. 4p.m1 a.m.
Friday 4 p.m2 a.m.
Saturday 11 a.m2 a.m.
Sunday 11 a.m12 Md
EVERY THURS.
two FREE
JOKES WITH EVERY PIZZA
SANDWICHES
BREAD BAKED FRESH DAILY
Short Loaf 2.05 GARLIC BREAD .79
Long Loaf 2.80 CHEFS SALAD 2.96
SUBMARINE
Ham, Salami, Sauce, Cheese-Baked
HAM AND CHEESE
Ham, Cheese, Mustard, Lettuce & Tomato
HOGIE
Ham, Salami, Mustard, Mayonnaise, dive Oil,
& Tomato Lettuce
ITALIAN SANDWICH
Ham, Salami, Sauce, Cheese, Onions,
Mushrooms-Baked Peppe�-
VEGETARIAN SANDWICH
Onions, Green Pepper, Mushrooms, Sauce,
L. Cheese-Baked
PIZZAS
'DOUGH MADE FRESH DAILY"
10" 14" 17"
CHEESE
ONION
GREEN PEPPER
PEPPERONI
ITALIAN SAUSAGE
GROUND BEEF
CLIVE(Blackor Green)
ANCHOVY
BACON
SHRIMP
MUSHROOM
HAM
JALAPENOS
ADDITIONAL ITEMS
$2.80 $4.40 $5.10
3.40 5.10 5.90
3.40 5.10 5.90
3.40 5.10 5.90
3.40 5.10 5.90
3.40 5.10 5.90
3.40 5.10 5.9t
3.40 5.10 5.90
3.40 5.10 5.90
3.40 5.10 5.90
3.40 5.10 5.90
3.40 5.10 5.90
3.40 5.10 5.90
.60 .70 .80
CHANELLOS SUPREME 5.60 7.50 8.75 12.00
Pepperoni, Italian Sausage, Mushrooms, Onion.Green
Pepper, Green Olive, Anchovy on request
Remember the top of the line is
CHANELLOS SUPREME PIZZA
DELUXE SICILIAN PIZZA
1ST EXTRA CHEESE"
10" 14" 17" 20"
3.40 5.10 5.90 8.50
CHEESE
ONION
GREEN PEPPER
PEPPERONI
ITALIAN SAUSAGE
GROUND BEEF
OLIVE(Black or Green)
ANCHOVY
BACON
SHRIMP
MUSHROOM
HAM
JALAPENOS
ADDITIONAL ITEMS
SICILIAN SUPREME
$2.00 OFF
i any Any 20 " Pizza
� Dine In or Free Delivery
! Not valid during
any other special
I f�7 E. 14th St.
1 WJ�B 5 WTLW1N tot) S
P P
Sl.OO OFF
Any 14,17,
or 20" Pizza
OFFER i Not valid during
EXPIRES j any other special
Dec. 10
I S07 E. 14th St.
OFFER
EXPIRES
Dec. 10
FOR FAST FREE DELIVERY
PHONE 758-7400





Title
The East Carolinian, November 27, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 27, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.24
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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