The East Carolinian, November 15, 1979






Embezzlement trial begins for Best
By TERRY GRAY
Assistant News Editor
The trial of Dr. Andrew A. Best, an East Carolina
University board of trustees member charged with
conspiracy and embezzlement from a local credit union,
is scheduled to continue in Pitt County Superior Court
Thursday at 9:30 a.m.
Dr. Best, a local physician and an ECU Board of
trustees member for the past six and a half years, was
among three others who were indicted June 4, 1979 on
charges relating to the alleged theft of $13,400 from the
Eastern Tar River Credit Union.
Best was a member of the black-operated credit
union's board of directors during the time that the
alleged theft occurred.
Testimony during the trial proceeding Wednesday
centered on financial practices employed by Best and
Ruth Staton, a former secretary and treasure of the
credit union.
Staton, a Greenville high school teacher, pled guilty
to similar charges in connection with the case and is
testifying for the State against Best.
In testimony Tuesday, Staton said that she had
falsified records in an attempt to protect Best and the
credit union, which at the time was in danger of being
shut down due to delinquent accounts. According to her,
money was shifted from different accounts to cover the
delinquent loans.
She also said that she aided Best in carrying out
fraudulent transactions that benefitted him. One of these
involved the account of Georgia Corey of Washington,
N.C from whose savings $2,500 was withdrawn!
allegedly with her signature and consent.
Corey testified Tuesday that she did not know Best,
and when shown a check with her signature on it, said
that she was unable to write her own name.
Other transactions involved $7,000 in the account of
Delta Sigma Theta sorority and about $3,900 from the
account of Annie Taft Boyd. Staton said that some of
See BEST, page 2
Dr. Andrew Best
(Photo by Chap Gurley)
The East Carolinian
Vol. 54 No. 2?
12 pages today
Thursday, November 15, 1979
Greenville, N.C.
Circulation 10.000
Food airlifted
to Thailand for
Cambodians
. an Oxfam field worker in Phnom Penh
the extent of damage to the city caused
by Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge when they forcibly
evacuated 2 million people in April, 1975.
New director unhappy
WASHINGTON (AP)
� The new director of the
Civil Right- Office of the
D' partment of Health,
tcation and U elfare is
happ) with the L'n-
: North Carolina's
'� -egregation
piai
"I have looked at it
briefly, and my impression
is that I didn't like it
Roma J. Stewart said
Tuesdaj
1- Stewart, a Wash-
ton lawyer in private
prat tii e who was named to
'iv i rights post last
th b HEW Secretary
Patricia Harris, said the
revised I'N'C proposal
appeared to be a "per-
petuation of the separate-
hut-equal doctrine that
was ruled unconstitutional
decades ago
Her comment is the
first government reaction
to the university's pro-
posal since it was submit-
ted to HEW and the
Department of Justice last
month.
I NC is fighting a
cut-off of its federal funds
by HEW, which has
demanded that the 16-
campus university system
eliminate program duplic-
ation at neighboring pre-
dominantly white and
black colleges.
Ms. Stewart said she is
"discouraged from what
I've seen that there will be
any settlement in the near
futureIt doesn't look
good She appears to be
taking a line similar to
that of David Tatel, who
resigned as the office's
director last month to
return to private practice.
Ms. Stewart said she
would have no part of
what she called a compro-
mise.
Ms. Stewart set legal
precedent about two years
ago when a federal court
agreed with her that the
government should pay
the legal fees for federal
employees who prevail in
administrative hearings on
discrimination complaints.
The ruling eased the way
for federal employees who
feel discriminated against
to hire legal help.
She has never met any
of the UNC official's
involved in the dispute
and said she would be
interested in visiting the
campus, only if it would
not b e "an empty
gesture
Officials check on
N.C. student visas
By RONNIE LOVLER
Associated Press Writer
Immigration officials were trying to
work out the "logistics" yesterday of a
bi-state check on the visas of Iranian
students enrolled at universities in North
and South Carolina.
Under a nationwide order issued by
U.S. Attorney Gerneral Benjamin Civiletti
Tuesday, Iranian students must report to
immagration authorities within 30 days or
face possible deportation.
The order was issued in the wake of
the Nov. 4 takeover of the U.S. Embassy
n Tehran where some 100 persons,
including 60 Americans are being held
hostage by militant Iranians who want the
deposed shah returned. The shah is
undergoing cancer treatment in New York.
A spokesman for the Immigration and
Naturalization Service in Charlotte, N.C,
8&�d immigration officers will personally
visit universities with large Iranian
student populations, such as the
University of North Carolina in Charlotte
with 91 Iranian students.
"Where there are larger numbers, we
will go to the university or college. We're
trying to work out the logistics in 30 days.
If we don't do it that way, we'll have
them all in here at once said the
spokesman, Louis Richard.
At those schools where only a few
Iranians are enrolled, the students will be
asked to appear before an INS officer in
Atlanta, Charlotte or Charlston, S.C.
In all instances, the students "will be
interviewed by an immigration officer to
determine whether they are maintaining
their immigration status Richard said.
Richard stated that there are about
2,000 Iranian students enrolled in colleges
and universities in North and South
Carolina. According to Richard, the
Charlotte office, which handles im-
migration matters for the two Carolinas,
hoped to send officers to all schools with
See STUDENTS, page 5
Inside today
Durham sports writer
criticized
page 4
and the reason why
page 4
Wendel Adkins
interviewed
page 6
Mother98 Finest. �.
A close-up look at
Leander Green
page 9
WASHINGTON (AP)-The Carter administration is
preparing an immediate airlift of food to starving
refugees in Thailand while private relief agencies try to
raise $100 million in contributions to help ease the crisis
in Indochina.
"Two and a half million people face starvation in the
next few months unless food reaches them said
Matthew Nimitz, acting U.S. coordinator for refugees.
Rosalynn Carter, who visited Cmabodian refugee
camps in Thailand last week, announced Tuesday that
President Carter had ordered deliveries bv air of
vegetable oils, special food for infants and youngsters,
and other supplies.
The shipment is mainly to help young children, many
ot whom suffer from malnutrition. Their physical and
mental development will be impaired without adequate
food.
Ofticials said the airlift would begin as soon as the
supplies could be located and assembled for shipping,
but they gave no precise timetable.
Meanwhile, a spokesman for the State Department
said an air shipment of 45 metric tons of infant formula
arrived in Bangkok on MOnday.
Mrs. Carter announced the presidential actions at a
White House meeting of executives from about 30 relief
agencies who held a day-long conference to decide how-
to improve their efforts to help the refugees.
Afterward, the Rev. Theodore Hesburgh, president
ot Notre Dame, said he believed the groups should raise
$100 million in private contributions. About $30 million
has been donated so far.
"Somehow, using every means possible, we think we
can save this second holocaust from taking place he
told reporters later. "We are committed to every
possible, conceivable effort that will get to these people
before they die
Most of the aid to Thailand and Cambodia goes
through relief agencies, such as UNICEF, CARE and the
Red Cross.
Hesburgh said the voluntary groups were using
rivers, railroads, trucks and airlifts to get food to the
famine-struck Indochinese people.
Carter, acting at his wife's behest, also ordered an
immediate $2 million grant to UNICEF to buy rice for
the refugees, whose food supply was said to be for less
than 30 days.
Mrs. Carter said her husband also was increasing the
number of refugees from Thailland to be resettled in the
United States. So most of the U.S. monthly quota of
14,000 refugees will be filled by persons from Thai
camps rather than by boat people now in Malaysia and
Hong Kong.
Mrs. Carter said that, at her urging, the president
also was providing $4
million for the care and
maintenance of refugee
camps and had ordered a
review of the refugee re-
settlement process, which
was said to take too long.
"We cannot lose
time the first lady told
the representatives from
voluntary agencies. "The
situation is urgent
An agreement with
Phnom Penh has spurred
13 countries into pledging
a total of $186 million
dollars to aid an estimated
2.5 million Cambodians
who are starving.
On Thursday, and in-
ternational fast will be
held to aid the starving
populations. Money that
people save by fasting for
one day will be donated to
an international aid so-
ciety.
The government statd
on Monday that it was
"from now on ready to
receive whatever quantity
of humanitarian aid
without political consi-
derations
An ECU student stands a silent vigil until all U.S.
Postages in Iran are freed.
(Photo by Chap Gurley)
American
hostages
may go free
page 6
EDITOR'S OTE - At
3:25 a.m. �57, the
following bulletin was
transmitted by Associated
Press. Mo further details
were available at press
time.
NEW YORK (AP) -
Iran's foreign minister
said Thursday that all
hostages held in the
American Embassy in
Tehran except white
American males would be
freed "very soon CBS
News reported from the
Iranian capital.
The network said For-
eign Minister bolhassan
Bani Sadr told CBS cor-
respondent Randy Daniels
in an interview that "all
women and blacks would
be freed very soon
Bani Sadr did not say
exactly when this would
take place, Daniels re-
ported.
A total of 62 Americans
and 36 non-Americans
have been held hostage in
the embassy since Nov. 4,
but it is not known how
many of the Americans are
women. Most of the
non-americans are be-
lieved to be Pakistani or
Indian employees of the
embassy, but the South
Korean government re-
ported Thursday that a
South Korean busines-
sman was among them.
Less than 24 hours
before the announced re-
lease. President Carter put
a freeze on all Iranian
bank accounts in the
i nited States.)
WASHINGTON (AP)�
w hite House press
secretary Jody Powell
issued a statement at 8:10
a.m. EST saying: "The
purpose of this order is to
insure that claims on Iran
by the United States and
its citizens are provided
for in an orderly manner
The assets that Carter
ordered blocked include
deposits of the govern-
ment of Iran, Central Bank
of Iran and "other con-
trolled entities" in U.S.
banks and their foreign
branches and subsidiaries.
Powell's statement said
the exact amount of money
being blocked is not
known, "but there is no
reason for disturbance in
the foreign exchange or
other markets
Carter acted under
authority granted him
under the International
Emergency Economic Pow-
ers Act.
Powell said this law
gives the president au-
thority "to deal with any
unusual and extraordinary
threat to the national
security, foreign policy or
economy of the United
States
See IRAN, page 2
.
.





Page 2 THE EAST CAR0L1NAIN 15 November 1979
Jage 2 THE EAS AROUN, If
Health Careers Day to be held;
50 institutions to interview
Students who plan to
enter health-related fields
will have the chance to
meet prospective employ-
ers during Health Careers
Day on Friday, Nov. 16.
Approximately 50 in-
stitutions from the Caro-
linas, Georgia, Virginia
and Maryland will send
representatives to inter-
view ECU students who
are nearing the end of
their college work in the
health fields.
Nurses are apparently
in greatest demand this
vear, with over half of the
institutions seeking nursing
school graduates. Both
large and small institu-
tions are among this
group, including Duke,
John Hopkins, N.C. Mem-
orial, N.C. Baptist, Medi-
cal College of Virginia,
Rex Hospital, and Wake
Medical Center in Raleigh.
In addition to other
hospitals in Asheville,
Charlotte, Charleston and
Savannah, the U.S. Navy
and the U.S. Army Nurse
Corps will also be inter-
viewing prospective em-
ployees.
The purpose of the
interviews is to acquaint
interested students with
the prospects o f health
career and to give them a
better idea of the advan-
tages offered by individual
institutions. Salary scales
and benefits will als be
discussed.
Although nursing stu-
dents are in particular
demand, the various pub-
lic and private institutions
will also be seeking
graduates in almost every
other health specialization:
ATTIC
Medical Technology; Phy-
sical and Occupational
Therapy; Dietetics; Re-
habilitation Counseling;
Medical Records, and also
Psychology, Social Work
and Corrections, Child
Development and even
Music Therapy.
"This year's Health
Careers Day promises to
be one of the best ever art
ECU saysFurney James,
ECU director of Career
Placement and Planning.
James added that in-
terviews will be held with
students at the Nursing
Building between 9:45
a.m. and 1 p.m.
(DKT
AfflWNCCN DtHCHI
FEATURING BEVErages
3:00-
7:00
3:30-4:00
10' A CUP
3:30-7:00
50' A CAN
International
fast to be held
for starving
Thurs.
Black Oak
Arkansas
wOZ
FRI. Pegasus
SORT H.H.
AT.Pegaaua!
UN.
Warehouse
& Pegasus
campus division
SOCIETY FOR THE
ADVANCEMENT
OF MANAGEMENT
QUEST SPEAKER
ALL Interested persons
urged to attend
Thurs. Nov. is 4:00
244
Mendenhall
LIVE
BAND
ADMISSION -25
rei. ncw. it 411H
By KAREN WENDT
News Editor
An estimated 300 stu-
dents and faculty will be
participating in a fast for
world hunger here at ECU
Thursday, Nov. 15.
The fast, which will be
held nationwide, is being
sponsored locally by the
Greenville Hunger Coali-
tion.
According to Robert
Jones, who plans to
participate, the project is
held each year "to give
them (the participants) an
opportunity to see what its
like to go hungry for a day
and to show their support
Cor people who go hungry
a the time
Many participants in
the fast will be donating
the money that they save
to OXFAM, an inter-
national anti-hunger or-
ganization.
AAIT is essentially a
svmbolic gesture on the
honor system said Jones.
Jones stated that the
main purpose of the fast is
to build awareness in the
students.
The fasters can drink
water and fruit juices,
but cannot eat solid food.
Maggie McKivergin,
another member of the
group, said of the reason
thev are fasting, "That's
exactly what the people
are doing that are
starving
THE COMPLETE
STUDENT
ALL YOU CAN EAT
SPECIALS
The folks at Kroger Sav-on know the
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SALAD�50 EXTRA
IRAN
continued from page 1
While the Iranian gov-
ernment has put the
amount of money in
question at around $12
billion, U.S. reporters
were told that the sum
was closer to $5 billion.
A high White House
official said orders block-
ing Iranian assets had
been drawn up before
yesterday's action and that
Carter needed only to sign
the papers to block
withdrawal of the Iranian
money.
The official, who asked
not to be named, said the
president had anticpated
that the Iranian govern-
ment might attempt to pull
out its funds, but decided
not to act unless such a
situation actually devel-
oped.
Carter took his action
after meeting with top
Treasury officials to dis-
cuss the implications of
the Iranian action.
Treasury Secretary G.
William Miller called aides
to his office after the
announcment in Tehran.
The United States has the
power to retaliate by
freezing Iranian assets,
but there was no word on
what measures might be
taken.
Abolhassan Bani-Sadr,
the new Iranian foreign
minister, said at a new
conference in Tehran that
some $12 billion in U.S.
deposits would be trans-
ferred to branches of
banks that will not be able
to block the funds.
Bani-Sadr specifically
mentioned New York's
Chase Manhattan Bank in
his announcement, saying
that bank because it is
headed by David Rocke-
feller.
ASST. VAR 9 9
PIZZA � .ONLY TUE
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ITALIAN
SPAGH
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FRIED i 9 9
FBI.
BEST
continued from page 1
these monies were used by Best to pay on loans ana
income taxes. , ,
Best replied to the charges, saying that he had
borrowed the money to pay off unpaid loans and keep
the credit unicn financially afloat. Investigators testified
Tuesday that Best had paid back $5,600 of the amount.
Best also commented that a Tar River Credit Union
loan application entered as evidence by the prosecution
was "a forgery at best
The proceedings Wednesday were punctuated by
heated cross-examination from chief assistant District
Attorney Tom Haigwood, who at one point accused Best
of neglecting the interest of "hundreds of black folks in
the community
The credit union was established in 1943 for use
primarily by black citizens who reside within a 10-mile
radius of Greenville, according to the testimony of an
auditor from the credit union division of the state
Department of Commerce.
HaiRwood added that the assets of the credit union
decreased from about $450,000 in 1972 to about
1150,000 in 1977.
Asked what would happen to Dr. Best s status as an
ECU trustee if he were convicted in the case, Assistant
to the Chancellor Richard Blake said ' I really don t
have any information regarding such aj uation. 1
imagine that it would be a matter for the UNC Board of
Governors to decide . ,
The trial enters its third day Thursday following the
selection of the all-white jury Monday.
Donald D. Pollock of the Kinston law firm Beech
and Pollock is defending Dr. Best in the case.
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Despite an increase in costs
15 November 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 3
Jarvis residents pleased
Construction workers labored throughout new look, and residents there are
the summer to give Jarvis dormitory a generally pleased with the result.
(Photo by John H. Grogan)
SGA official silent
The investigation into
the alleged theft of a letter
to SGA President Brett
Melvin has come to a
standstill and mav have
been dropped, despite a
preliminary conference
held by the Attorney
General.
Three ECU students
were asked to the confer-
ence and were told that
charges were being placed
against them concerning
the theft and subsequent
attribution of copies of a
letter from former SGA
president Tim Sullivan to
Melvin.
However, a reliable
source close to the investi-
gation has told The East
Carolinian that the inves-
tigation has been dropped
and that the pending
charges have been dis-
missed.
When SGA Attorney
General Drake Mann was
asked to comment on the
case, he stated that he had
"been advised to make no
comment
Mann has been asked
repeatedly to comment on
the case and has consis-
tently refused.
According to former
Attorney General Randv
J
Ingram, the investigation
was ordered by Melvin to
determine who copied and
distributed the letter to
members of the board of
trustees, administration
officials and the editor of
The East Carolinian.
Ingram stated at the
time that the distribution
of the letter appeared to
be a serious violation of
the honor code.
In recent weeks, when
asked why the investiga-
tion was ordered, Mann
has replied that he could
not possibly try to deter-
mine a person's motives
(referring to Melvin).
It is unknown at this
time whether the investi-
gation will continue.
By MARY RIDER
Staff Writer
Last January part of
the ceiling in Jams Hall
collapsed, causing approx-
imately 168 girls to Hnd a
new place of residence.
Now, almost a year later,
after extensive repairs,
Jarvis is once again filled
to capacity.
The renovations in-
cluded a new roof, new
ceilings, complete rewir-
ing, an entire new paint
job and the installation of
such things as smoke
detectors, fire alarms,
overhead flourescent
lights, carpeting in the
halls and individual air
conditioning and heating
units in each room. Girls
living in Jarvis now pay an
extra $50.00 a semester.
During a recent inter-
view, some of the resi-
dents were asked what
they like best about the
renovations. Most replied
that they enjoyed being
able to regulate their own
ASU student is
charged in rapes
Bonds set for
Greensboro men
GREENSBORO. N.C.
(AP)�Bond in amounts
ranging from $4,000 to
$50,000 were set Tuesday
for 13 of 14 men charged
in the shooting deaths of
five leftist radicals during
a demonstration Nov. 3.
By late night, none of
the 13 had posted bond.
The 14th defendant did
not request it. Twelve
have been jailed without b
ond since their arrest after
the rally. The other two
have remained in custody
since their arrest several
days later.
In hearings that conti-
nued late Tuesday even-
ing, Guilford District Court
Judge Robert Cecil set the
bonds based on whether
the defendant had a
weapon during the inci-
dent in which five mem-
bers of the Communist
Workers Party were shot
to death during an anti-Ku
KIux Klan rally.
Cecil dismissed de-
fense arguments that de-
monstrators had provoked
the shootings. Attorneys
ai ed evidence of provo-
cation could be found in
the title of the march�
"Death to the Klan"�and
in threats in the handbill
the radicals distributed at
the shooting scene.
Twelve of the 14 are
charged with five counts- of
R
first-degree murder and
Twelve of the 14 are
charged with five counts of
first-degree murder and
five counts of conspiracy
to commit murder. The
other two face the con-
spiracy charge only.
The defendants claim
the demonstrators opened
fire first and attacked
them with sticks. They
said they came to the rally
to throw eggs, heckle and
disrupt activities, and fired
in self defense.
Defense lawyers
claimed their clients had
been subjected to "selec-
tive prosecution They
asked why none of the
demonstrators have been
charged with assault with
intent to kill for firing
weapons at the defend-
ants, beating the de-
fendants' vehicles with
sticks or why no one has
been charged with assault
with a deadly weapon with
intent to kill Flowers.
Police said the shootin
g of
Police said the shooting
of Flowers is under
investigation. Defense at-
torneys also urged the
demonstrators could be
charged with conspiracy
because of evidence they
held meetings prior to the
rally and made plans to
kill Klan members.
BOONE, (AP)-A 19-
year-old Appalachian State
University freshman from
Raleigh has been charged
in connection with a series
of alleged assaults and
rapes on two coeds.
Campus authorities
said Reginald Gerrord
Smith of Raleigh was
arrested about 12:05 a.m.
Wednesday by Appalac-
hian State University sec-
urity officers.
He is charged with one
count each of first-degree
rape, crime against nature
and assault on a female.
He remained in Watauga
County Jail without bond
Wednesday, pending an
initial court appearance.
A probable cause hear-
ing for Smith has been set
in Watauga County Dis-
trict Court Nov. 27.
The charges against
Smith stem from alleged
attacks on two university
coeds last Friday and
Sunday, and the alleged
assault Tuesday night of a
State Bureau of Investig-
ation agent who was
acting as a decoy.
A spokesman for the
ASU security office said
Smith allegedly attached
the female agent near a
campus mall, in the same
area where the other
incidents occurred. The
spokesman said Smith ran
and was apprehended near
the school library.
An investigation is
continuing, the spokesman
said, and additional
charges may be filed.
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heat.
As Clenda Blackwell, a
senior, put it, "You can
control the heat or the air
conditioning. Before, the
heat might come on and
you would burn up on a
warm day
Other residents were
also pleased with the
carpeting in the halls and
the air conditioning.
Students felt, however,
that certain things were
forgotten in the renovation
process. One major com-
plaint concerned the bath-
room facilities. The
plumbing is such that
whenever a tiolet is
flushed, all the cold water
is taken from the showers.
Residents are instructed to
yell "Shower when they
flush the toilet to keep
from scalding a fellow
student.
Another grievance in-
volved the placement of
study rooms. As one
resident stated, "As far as
studying goes, the study
room is next to the lobby;
that can be counter-pro-
ductive
Generally, though, the
residents feel that the
extra money is well worth
it. According to Angie
Mosley, a freshman, Jar-
vis is "the best dorm at
ECU
An East Carolinian
article earlier this year
discussed the possibility of
a violation in Title IX.
Title IX provides that both
sexes must have access to
"comparable facilities
this includes housing.
When asked their feel-
ings on this subject, most
residents of Jarvis replied
that they could sympathize
with the male viewpoint.
However, they felt that the
male residents had differ-
ent housing advantages
such as suites and that
this tends to equalize any
inequities.
This feeling was sum-
med up by Louise Massey,
a senior, who said, "None
of the housing is equal,
and I think that's as
important as the renova-
tions done here
Most residents were
vehemently opposed to the
possible solution of
making Jarvis a co-ed
dorm. The students felt
that they were entitled to
the better conditions that
now prevail as many of
them had lived in Jarvis
before the renovations,
when it was commonly
called a "ghetto dorm
On the other hand,
some residents agreed
with the opinion of Nancy
Morris, a freshman. "If
that (making Jarvis co-ed)
would remedy the discri-
mination controversy, I
expect that I could handle
it
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The East Carolinian
Editorials
(Opinions
Thursday, November 15, 1979
Greenville, N. C.
ECU was insulted
Reprinted below is an article by Art
Chansky that reeks of insult, bias and
poor taste, and � you guessed it � it
is all aimed at ECU.
This editorial is from the pages of
the Durham Morning Herald, the
Sunday edition after the football game
with the University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill. Since the controversy
surrounding this column has continued
for weeks following the game, we have
decided to run the column in its
entirelty for those who may have
missed it.
Our reasons for this action are
obvious.
We have been treated unfairly in the
Piedmont press once again. The
pro-UNC line has been consistently
taken by almost every newspaper in this
state since the battle began between
the newspaper editors fighting for their
beloved alma mater, UNC, and ECU
Chancellor Emeritus Leo Jenkins on the
subject of the ECU Medical School.
Long after the battle for the Medical
School was fought and won, editors of
Piedmont publications continue to
attack ECU.
Supporters of UNC did not see the
purpose of having a medical school in
Eastern North Carolina. Aided by thier
cohorts in the newspaper business, they
attacked the idea of that little
backwoods school in the East having a
medical school.
Fortunately for us � and the poor
and disadvantaged of East North
Carolina � the legislature saw the light
and decided that those poor children in
little hamlets near the coast could use a
little medical treatment. What can be
said for Art Chansky, the middle-aged
sports editor of teh Herald, the man
who wrote the swill you see below?
Granted, Mr. Chansky is usually a
professional writer and does a good job
of directing the flow of sports news for
the Herald. But this time he has
missted the mark by a mile.
Chansky referred to ECU fans as
drunkards, overflowing "from both end
zone sections having "imbibed so
much alcohol that whatever they drove
in from down east may not have needed
fillups on the way home But he
instists on describing UNC fans as rich
and privileged.
Attacking the football team, Chan-
sky called one "black and bow-legged
and yet another as a "third string
kickerwhose father owns a hot dog
stand in Wilson
Other examples follow. Read them.
If they make you as angry as they make
us, let the Durham Morning Herald
know about it. Write a letter to the
editor protesting this column. The
address is:
The Durham Morning Herald
P.O. ox 2092
Durham, North Carolina 27702
One thing Mr. Chansky failed to
mention when he was comparing ECU
fans to UNC fans was the "question of
admittance to an institution of higher
learning in this state.
No one ever had to know somebody
to gain admittance to East Carolina
University.
This is not the case in Chapel Hill,
unfortunately.
Letters to the Editor
Tuesday's editorials questioned
Chansky column
f ECU players, f(
EDITOR'S NOTE � The following is reprinted from the
Sunday, October 28 edition of the Durham Morning
Herald. It was written as an opinion column, and it
appeared under the byline of Sports Editor Art Chancy.
The headline over the column read "ECU Vs. UNC:
Sobriety, Socrate and Frustation
This column appears here by permission of the Sports
Desk of the Durham Morning HeraldJ
CHAPEL HILL � When UNC tied East Carolina in
football Saturday afternoon, it struck a note for sobriety
in America.
Jeff Hayes' 47-yard field goal with only a few
seconds to play sobered up a Kenan Stadium crowd that
was ready to either drunk-drive its way back to
Greenville or drown its sorrows in the bare of Chapel
Hill.
That's what a tie does in college football. No one
knows quite how to act. The team that does the tying is
generally happier that the team that gets tied. But, on
this day, two-touchdown favorite Carolina had little to
cheer about by snatching a deadlock from the jaws of
defeat.
After East Carolina watched what would have been a
season-saving victory slip away, the Pirates filed
glassy-eyed into the locker room. Their feelings
ricocheted in four-letter epithets as they loped off the
field.
Carolina, which sort of surrendered by kicking for a
tie, was just as stunned. Quarterback Matt Kupec, who
played another superb game, left before reporters could
get to him. "Matt always leaves right after a loss said
a teammate. "And this was a loss
The tie, ironically, was the only bad thing about an
otherwise exceptional day of college football. Two
high-powered offenses symbolized the contrasts of these
two teams.
Carolina was returning to its scenic, packed stadium
after a big win over arch-rival N.C. State. The Tar Heels
were many people's pick to win the ACC championship,
and they were again being watched by bowl scouj.
Their game plan was to run overand run downthe
smaller, independent Pirates.
East Carolina counters with finesse on the field and
in its program. The Pirates deceptive wishbone offense
is the brainchild of coach Pat Dye, who picks his words
carefully about opponents because he wants to keep
most of them on the Schedule.
Their quarterback, Leander Green, is 5-foot-7 and
black, compared to Kupck, Carolina 6-2, blond-haired
All-American type. Their fullback is a bow-legged
walk-on named Theodore Sutton, who is nicknamed
"Toad" because he runs like a very fast frog. His
counterpart is Greenville native Doug Paschal, who
shunned the home-town school for the glamour of the
ACC that has a 3-0-1 record against ECU this season.
Carolina's kickers are highly recruited specialists.
The closest East Carolina comes to that is a third-string
kicker named Socrates (Giarmis), whose father owns a
hot dog stand in wilson.
The stadium was filled largely with Carolina fans
who drove long cars and fancy campers to the game.
ECU fans overflowed from two end zone sections and
inbibed so much alcohol that whatever they drove in
from down east may not have needed fill-up on the way
home.
That merry band of Pirates provided the backdrop for
the game's greatest play. Green, scrambling to find a
receiver, rifled a pass to Vern Davenport at the
intersection of the sidelines and goal line for what
looked like ECU's winning touchdown.
It was the essence of athletics in one freeze frame,
why players play, coaches coach and fans follow teams.
Complete satisfaction. The ultimate high.
"Pure ecstasy, my biggest thrill ever sighed
Davenport later. 'I always wanted to go to Carolina, but
I was never recruited. I had to walk on at East Carolina
as a kicker. But now I wouldn't trade Greenville, Ptt
Dye or the Pirates for anything
Earlier, Dye had emerged from the locker room
teary-eyed and said his players didn't have enough new
football shoes to go around by they won 40,000 new
hearts nevertheless. He hedged when asked if he would
have kicked for a tie like Carolina did.
But Dye didn't want sudden death. "Naw he said.
"You prepare to play 60 minutes of football, and you
can't decide a winner in that time, let everyone go home
frustrated
Everyone did.
To the Editor:
It is my hope that
through this letter some
grumbling and cussing
might be silenced.
I'm referring to the
article and editorial in the
November 13th. issue
concerning the November
12th Legislative meeting.
There seems to be
some confusion about the
emergency fund from
which $5,000. was drawn.
The emergency fund
has previously been in a
local savings account,
separate from the SGA
General Fund, but LaciiMr
of new, state regulations
they now share a single
checking account in the
State Reserve Bank, the
$40,000. remaining from
that emergency fund is
still to be considered for
emergency use only.
Tuesday's front page
article quotes one Legisl-
ator: "The Appropriations
Committee was completely
bypassed President
Brett Melvin had in-
formed one Committee
chairperson of the reserve
fund on Sunday, Novem-
ber 14th. And according
to one member, the entire
committee had known of
the money prior to the
12th.
V ice-President Charlie
Sherrod had questioned
Mr. Melvin and Mr. Lowe
about the emergency
monies over two weeks
ago, and that was made
known to the Legislature
at last Monday's meeting.
I am well aware that
editorials are designed to
express personal opinion,
but the views stated
should be based on facts.
Tuesday's editorial, "Mel-
vin Rides Again sug-
gests that Mr. Melvin and
Treasurer, Ricky Lowe,
purposely kept information
from the Legislators. This
is not true; their know-
ledge had been put forth.
Quite simply, the Legis-

lators failed to act on it.
Maybe people left the
meeting grumbling and
cussing. I didn't hear it
because Iwas elated that a
good, workable, minimal
Transit budget has been
passed. But, if they
grumbled, it was because
they didn't know what
some of their fellow
Legislators knew.
Ellen N. Fishburne
The writer of this letter is
the SGA secretary of
communications and ex-
ecutive advisor to the SGA
president.
To the Editor:
I wish to take issue
with the editorial that
appeared in the Nov. 13
issue of this newspaper
entitled "Sound and
Fury
In a subtle way the
editorial condemned those
students who staged an
anti-Iranian demonstration
last Monday. The editorial
officially condemned the
demonstration.
It is a sad day when
any newspaper in this
country condemns the
citizenry for patriotism and
for standing up for the
liberty and freedoms of
their fellow Americans,
specifically those being
held hostage by crazed
and vicious foreigners.
This newspaper has
long complained about
apathy on this campus. On
its editorial page The Easi
Carolinian and its prede-
cessor, Fountainhead,
have repeatedU colded
the student bod) for not
taking stands on ;�-ues
and not taking action on
issues.
That editorial v.as cer-
tainly not the opinion of
this member of the
editorial board.
It appear- that the
students on thi campus
will continue to be
"damned if you do and
damned if you don't" by
the newspaper.
Robert 8 aim
The writer of this letter a
the director of advert
for The East Carolinian
Student's view of Iranian situation
To the Editor:
As the ECU Students
took to their feet to
demonstrate the recent
developments in Iran, a
number of questions ran
through my mind. First,
was this fired-up crowd
there only because UNC
and State held a rally or
was it a good chance for
T.V. time?
Or did most feel the
real need to show others
that they really cared what
happens to this country?
As I continued to
follow the mob it began to
appear that, yes, this
crowd did care and knew
somewhat the problems
between the USA and
Iran.
The only problem was
that few, if any during the
march, said anything con-
structive about what stand
they themselves take.
People would blast out
brilliant statements such
as let's deport all Iranians
in the USA or let's attach
Iran and take the whole
country over.
Such statements
seemed to me as having
no place coming from
college students. To begin
with, to deport Iranians
who are here in the USA
legally just for not believ-
ing what the majority
believes defeats the whole
idea the founding fathers
or the USA meant for us.
Since when do you
throw someone out for not
believing what you may
think is right.
The other statement
about "let's attach Iran"
is ludicrous. What we are
dealing with in Iran is a
terrorist group. It seems to
me that the Khomeini
government feels that if
they don't keep their
followers fired up they
might realize how far out
in left fiedl this Khomeini
chap has led them.
It seems that the way
Carter is handling the
situation now is about the
only alternative. The only
card violence holds is if
the 60 Americans are
harmed. Then the ISA
should deal with those
who are directlv respon?
ible.
The best thing the
concerned student can do
is show his or her support
peacefully and pray for a
safe end to this stalemate.
Now that Carter ha?
stopped imports of Iranian
oil the need is even
greater to stop driving so
much; this in itself would
probaby be the most
effective knife we hold
against Iran and others
who feel hatred against
us.
The USA can throw her
weight around if she is
totally self-dependent. But
not until we are free of the
oil string can the full
effect of our wrath be felt.
So nezt time we feel a
need to show our support
for the USA, let's do it
with pride and fore
thought.
Donald W. Warren
The East Carolinian
MANAGING EDITOR
Richard Green
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Anita Lancaster
NEWS EDITOR
A83T. NEWS EDITOR
FEATURES EDITOR
ASST. FEATURES EDITOR
THE
EDITOR
Marc Barnes
DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
Robert M. Swaim
ASST. DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
Terry Herndon
ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR
Cheryl Holder
BUSINESS MANAGER
Steve O'Geary
Karen Wendt
Tarry Gray
BWJones
Kr� rimi Miaiii
.Kj. PfBBunarn
SPORTS EDITOR
ASST. SPORTS EDITOR
COPV EDITOR
AD TECH. SUPER.
Charles Chandler
Jimmy Dupree
Diane Henderson
Paul Uncke
EAST CAROLINIAN
of East
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distributed
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Thursday during
weekly during the summer
Offices are located an the
la the student
University
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Tuesday and
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People, places, arid
15 November 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN P�Q� 5
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M1�
The Women's Resi-
dence Council is now
taking applications for the
two scholarships which it
awards annually. The schol
arships, each for $250.00,
are the Ruth A. White
Scholarship for an in-state
student and the Carolyn
Fulghum Scholarship for
an out-of-state student.
The awards are based on
need and contributions to
the residence hall and
university.
Any sophomore, junior
or senior who lives in a
W RC (excluding co-ed)
residence hall and has
paid this year's social fee
is eligible to apply. The
applications can be ob-
tained from and returned
to residence directors.
They should be completed
and turned in by Novem-
ber 21. The Scholarship
Committee will review the
applications until Decem-
ber 10 and the scholar-
ships will be presented on
Decmeber 11.
t il t u c
Students needed for
Task force committees
concerning student ser-
vices. Screenings will be
held Nov. 19, Mon. 4-7
p.m. oin SGA Cabinet
Room. Call 757-6611, Ext.
218 for an appointment.
Committees are:
StudentLife Administration
Student Counselling
Career Development and
Placement
Student Financial Aid
Student Health Services
Residence Life Programs
and Student Housing
Student Food Services
Student Union and the
Student Center
Public and Life Safety
Intramural Recreation Ser-
vice-
lecture
Mill I
100 percent Cotten, a
senior show of clay and
textiles works by Holly
Cotten, is in Joyner
Library from Friday thru
Nov. 22. She is receiving a
BFA in Ceremic Design.
Thomas F. Conlon,
Counselor in the Depart-
ment of State, will give a
lecture at 11 a.m Friday,
Nov. 16, in the Auditorium
of the Jenkins Fine Arts
Building. Mr. Conlon has
served in Indonesia, the
Philippines, Singapore,
Vietnam, and Thailand.
He will lecture on "Con-
temporary Problems in
Southeast Asia including
drug traffic and the
"boat people A question
and answer session will
follow the lecture. The
public is invited to attend.
reeJ
Students needed for
administrative committees.
Screenings will be held
Nov. 15, Thursday, 4-7 in
SGA Cabinet Room. Call
757-6611, ext. 218 for an
appointment. Committees
are: Canvassing, Selling &
Soliciting on campus, Re-
sidence Dfe, Status of
Women, Student Health
Affairs, and Univ. Traffic
Appeals.
cam feed
The Alpha Phi Frater-
nity will be sponsoring its
5th annual Can Food Drive
for the needy of Green-
ville, starting 12-20 Nov-
ember 1979. Donations of
non-perishable items and
canned foods will be
accepted. We will be
collecting from the dorm-
itories between the hours
of 7-9 p.m. on the above
dates. All donations will
be greatly appreciated.
eta mu
The brothers of the Eta
Nu Chapter of Alpha Phi
Alpha Fraternity, Inc will
be collecting canned goods
for their annual Thanks-
giving Canned Food Drive
the week of Nov. 12-19.
Members will be collecting
goods in the Dorms from
7-9 p.m. Weekdays. Please
give.
dance
The Gamma Sigma
Sigma service sorority will
hold a dance-a-thon Sat
Nov. 17, 8 p.m. until 8
a.m in Wright Aud-
itorium. All proceeds will
go to the American Lung
Assoc. Donations are by
solicited pledges, so pick
up your pledge sheets at
Mendenhall and the ECU
Student Store.
(ie
I ill i
Hillel is having a Bagel
and Lox Dinner Thursday,
Nov. 15th, at 6:30 p.m. in
the Mendenhall Multi-
purpose Room. This all
you can eat dinner will
cost $2 for members and
$3 for nonmembers. All
Jewish students are invited
to attend. For more
information, call Jeff Glei-
berman 752-9453 or Mike
Freelander 752-9473.
rcsse
There will be a meet-
ing of the ROSSE, return-
ing older students seeking
education, at 4 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 15, in
Wright Annex, Room 305.
Discussion will be center-
ed on problems encoun-
tered by the older stu-
dent's return to college
after being out for five
or more years, or older
students just beginning
college.
faculty
serate
Students needed for
faculty senate committees.
Screenings will beheld
Nov. 15, Thursday 4-7 in
SGA Cabinet Room. Call
757-6611, ext. 218 for an
appointment. Committees
are: Career Education,
Teaching Effectiveness,
Library, and Teacher Ed-
ucation.
STUDENTS
continued from page 1
more than 26 Iranian students to make it
easier on students, school officials and
immigration offcers.
"It's a three, party affair involving
immigration, the student and the school
he said. "We don't want to interrupt the
studies of students if they are maintaining
their status
In South Carolina, officials at six
colleges and universities said immigration
officials had already contacted them
informally by telephone before Civiletti
issued his formal order Tuesday.
Vice Chancellor for Student Life,
Elmer E. Meyer stated Wednesday that
he has not yet received official notification
of the move and will take no action
towards the "handful" of Iranians on the
ECU campus.
MIDNIGHT
EXPRESS
This Friday
And Saturday
7 And 9 p.m.
Hendrix Theatre
Sponsored by the
Student Union
Films Committee
The Graduate Record
Examination will be offered
at East Carolina University
on Saturday, January 12,
1980. Application blanks
are to be completed and
mailed to Educational
Testing Service,Box 966-R,
Princeton, N.J. 08540.
Registration deadline is
November 28, 1979. Ap-
pplications may be ob-
tained from the ECU
Testing Center, Speight
Building, Room 105.
plhctcs
The ECU Photo Lab
has an immediate opening
for the position of Staff
Photographer. Anyone
who is interested in
applying for the position
should fill out an applica-
tion at the office of the
East Carolinian in the Old
South Building across from
the Library.
njby
The ECU Women's
Rugby Team is playing a
practice game against
UNC-Greensboro on Sun-
day, Nov. 18 at 3 p.m. on
the Allied Health sports
field. Anyone interested in
seeing what women's rug-
by looks like or any
woman who is interested
in playing is encourages to
come and watch. For
further information call
758-8482.
amina
beta pM
Gamma Beta Phi will
meet Thursday, Nov. 15,
at 7 in room 244,
Mendenhall.
tuffeey
Thursday you can win
your Thanksgiving Turkey
at the Turkey Shoot in the
Mendenhall Bowling Cen-
ter. A SI.50 entry fee
allows you to bowl one (1)
ball at a full set of pins on
ten consecutive lanes. If
you knock down at least
eight (8) pins with just
nine (9) of the ball, you
WIN A TURKEY! (Limit
two turkeys per person).
Remember, Thursday,
Nov. 15, from 7 p.m. until
10 p.m. at Memdenhall.
You can try as many times
as you like so don't miss
it! '
4e�i(rci�
There will be a meet-
ing of the Young Home
Designers League on
Tues Nov. 20, at 5 p.m.
in the Van Landingham
Room in the Home Ec.
building. The speaker will
be the City Planner of
Tarboro. All housing
majors and minors are
urged to attend.
rcsl
The North Carolina
Student Legislative will
meet Thursday at 7 p.m.
at Mendenhall, Room 221.
Topics to be discussed will
be the Nov. IC and tickets
will be issued for the
upcoming fund raiser. All
members are urged to
attend this meeting.
clep
The ECU Racquetball
Club is scheduling dual
matches and tournament
competition with other
colleges and universities in
North Carolina, South
Carolina, and Virginia.
The club would like to
identify all male and
female students who are
interested in representing
the University on a Club
basis in competitive rac-
quetball.
Anyone interested in mem-
bership in the Racquetball
club and the opportunity
to compete for the Univer-
sity should contact Ms.
Mize, 757-6387, or come
by 204 Memorial Gym as
soon as possible. A
meeting has been sched-
uled for 5 p.m. on
Thursday, Nov. 15, in
Room 104 of Memorial
Gym to discuss the
Racuetball Club and inter-
collegiate competition.
Everyone interested should
attend this important
meeting.
Mr. John Childers,
Director, ECU Testing
Center, requests that all
persons who have taken
the College Level Examin-
ation Program (CL�P)
English Composition Test
from May, 1979, to
October 1979, contact teh
ECU Testing Center at
their earliest convenience.
tiawail
The Kappa Sigma
Pledges in conjunction
with the Alpha Delat Pi
pledges will hold their
"Greeks Go Hawaiian, Pig
Pickin Dinner will be
serve from 6-8, Friday,
Nov. 16, at the Kappa
Sigma House.
Get your advance tic-
kets from any Kappa
Sigma or Alpha Delta Pi
pledge for $4.00. Have all
the beer and pig you can
handle.
Be there, Aloha'
.WfiNLttB S
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CORSO, the club for
those interested ineither
Social Work or Correc-
tions, will meet TUes
Nov. 20. The meeting will
beheld in room A-101 Belk
at 5. Elections for the next
calendar year will take
place at this time. The
departmental Christmas
social will be discussed
also. Members are asked
to bring all money and
dinner giveaway tickets tot
this meeting.
The Law School Ad-
mission Test will be
offered at East Carolina
University on Saturday,
Decmeber 1, 1979. Appli-
cation blanks are to be
completed and mailed to
Educational Testing Ser-
vice, Box 966-R, Prince-
ton, N.J. 08540. Regis-
tration deadlin is Nov. 5,
1979. Applications may be
obtained from the ECU
Testing Center, Speight
Building, Room 105.
Electrolysis
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The Kat (Carolinian
features
Thursday, November 15, 1979 Page 6
Greenville, N.C.
Adkins could be Jennings'twin
a star in his own right
(Photo b Kip Sloan)
. . stry, idki i - so s. All
hart ail the
. � i
By BILL JONES
Features Editor
His voice comes from way down in the basement, a
gravelly, rumbling baritone carved out of so many days
and nights on the road.
Wendel Adkins has broken all attendence records at
the Carolina Opry House. Scheduled for a five-night
succession of performances, Nov. 6 through 10, Adkins
enjoyed playing the club so much and was so popular,
the engagement was extended another three days. On
Saturday, Nov. 10, a capacity crowd of over 1,000
attended and dozens had to be turned away.
Prior to his final performance. Tuesday, Adkins
spoke about his burgeoning career and the music
business.
"I've been playing for about 14 years. 1 played in
rock V roll bands for a while, doing a lot of Beatles'
tunes tnd such. Then 1 formed my own band and got
back into country music. We took off on tin- road, and
that's where we've been ever since
"The road" includes a four-year stint in Las Vegas.
Although successful there, Adkins was unhapp) with
the hype of Vegas' show business.
Jim Parker, a Las Vegas entertainment writer, called
him "the sex idol of the country & western set and
Adkins found himself being billed as such. But. two
beneficial things resulted from the promotional factor)
of club- like The Sahara and the Golden Nugget; Adkins
received wide exposure for his uncanny physical anc
vocal resemblance to Waylon Jennings, and among th
people his talent impressed was Willie Nelson.
Nelson advised Adkins to "go to Texas dkins did.
a week later.
Since then, he has become a regular at Vt ikey
River. Nelson's Dallas night club. For tin- past year,
Adkins has born touring with David Allen Coo. his
favorite musician.
When asked if he resented being compared to
Wavlon Jennings, Adkins replied, "No, I don't resent it.
It bothers me sometimes. 1 don't try to sound like
Waylon; I've always Ming like this. When I listen to
mvself on an album. don't think 1 sound like him. but
Willie think- I do, Waylon think- 1 do; every one rise
seems to think 1 do.
"One time Wavlon and Jessi (Colter) we're riding
down the road when a song 1 had recorded came on the
air. Wavlon said to Jessi, T don't remember recording
thai song She told him he hadn't, that it was Wendel
dkins. Wavlon told me that happened
On another occasion, Adkins was at a Jennings
concert when, having a -ore throat. Jennings ordered
him on stage saying, "Get your ass out here and -ing
like me
Questioned a- to whether those who come to see him
because he looks and sings "just like Wavlon Jennings"
will leave recognizing him as a legitimate performer, he
paused characteristically, a- it to satisfy himself with an
answer.
"I Hi. m tune. See, I've always done a lot of
Wavlon's material; I -till do. People like to hoar -tuff
that the van relate to. Then you ran always put in some
.mi. and thev'll enjo that to.
See TV IN. page 8
Adkins wailin'
Test-tube turkeys:
meat machines'
n NN C LLAS
1 Prt s s
Did Si haefer can
� wore omen
- lather in the -eat
liamond ring.
isl a bunch ol clone
run the BBB ranch
ireh meat machines
-mart- � and just
turkeys ovor the
� Schaefer family
le livelihood and a
"best-dressed" and
i torn- within a
� their southern
- v ith an occasional
ispended bod moving to
c regularity in the
- ranch home. He and his
ntracted polio within 12
26 years ago. He is
k down; she has no
: part of her left hand
house and yard in a
M. but not quite, like a
w ith her head cut oti.
the life of a modern-day
� ach other word- at
imt tho geneology ol their
omes through clearly
gh.
Coming
Attractions
PAPERM K1N(,
n art exhibition on Papermaking and
paperworks will be on display in the
Mendenhall Art Gallery from November
19 until De ember 16.
ESCAPK
Tonite! Escape to the South Seas, a
presentation and travel-adventure film by
Thaor Soule, will show in Hendnx
Theatre at 8:00 p.m.
MADRIGAL
The Madrigal Dinners will begin on
December 4, in Mendenhall's multi-
purpose room.
MOTHER'S
Mother's Finest and Nantucket will be
featured in concert on Sat December 1,
at 8:00 p.m. in Minges Coliseum.
ie poults says Betsy, "come to us
ild from San Joaquin Valley tor 85
apiei e They're produced by
-� mination there and -hipped
m special v an-
" o have to decide in January and
ruarv how many we can sell and we
-tart rai-ing them in May, June and July
for Thank-giving, Christmas and New
Year's Schaefer cut in. "They're
anvwhere from 16 t 26 weeks when
thev're killed and processed
Their turkeys cost more than $1 a
pound, compared to a supermarket price
55 cent But Schaefer sniffs: "They're
frozen. Our- are all fresh
- haefer returns to bewailing the
innocuous turkey. "They're all the same.
one take- over the flock. They don't
fight. If a buzzard should come over they
wouldn't even show any fear. It's scary
The flock has white features, the result
of meticulous breeding, Betsy says, of the
Belt-ville White with the Broad-breasted
Bronze.
"It all scientific now she says. "No
setting hens, no family flock
"And fun Schaefer repeats.
But they have to keep the hens
-oparated from the toms nonetheless.
"Tho toms just defeather them when
thev're together Betsy exclaims.
The BBB Broad-breasted Bird
Ranch isn't considered a large one.
They've cut their volume from 19,000 to
11,000 birds yearly since 1976. A large
rancher has a half-million and may
proces all year long.
Even so, the 45-acre ranch in the hills
of Chino has 30 seasonal employees.
Dick father, William, now 75, still
"rides herd" on the processing plant to
make -ure the end product is up to
standard. Willie, 22, Dick and Betsy
Schaefer's youngest, delivers to choice
independent markets and individual
buyers when he's not in class at nearby
Chaffee College.
Their two daughters, Laura, 29, and
Mindv, 27, are on their own and no longer
involved. Laura, however, has pursued the
poultry business in her own way. She's a
qualitv control inspector for the California
Department of Agriculture.
Housing developments have been
closing in on them, and smaller ranches
are becoming rare in the trend
agribusiness.
The Schaefers are ready to sell but
there are problems with sewer rights.
"We'll be doing this another year at
least says Dick.
The gobbling sounds of thousands of
turkeys comes faintly through the door as
the sun began to set. There was only one
more question.
"And what do you eat on Thanksgiv-
ing and Christmas?"
"Turkey they exclaimed in unison
for the first time that afternoon. "We love
it
Humor

little
(Photo by Fred Midgett)
Mothers Finest in concert
Welcoming students back to school from Th
finest rock V roll concert in ECl history
This high energy event is scheduled for
Minges Coliseum. Tickets go on sale Monday
Office: $4 for students, $6 at the door.
anksgiving will be perhaps the
Mothers Finest with antucket.
Saturday. Dec. 1, 8 p.m in
Nov. 19, at the Central Ticket
i n k s g
i s a s t h a 1
f re thinking. �
. � � .
Negative. Pre ksgn :
�� a hi rs start assigi
Wednesdav before Turkey d
afterw ards.
I personally happen I think
iu - v thing to do. I mi i
tuff my faci md resl
essorl'vegothasa is
me. I'm tellii ly
Granted, I worship at the
just like the rest I i gu) s, and
a . � � � this si
in the m1 to take a bum I
i Ine w ould assume th
this university for no short amoui I
braced myself for the inevitable
have thought I'd have taken a nott r I a
October and that I'd have I
research on those term papers 1
September.
NX rong again.
Ever heard ol the motl
can put off until next weel
ol mine. It ha- served me we
between a party or a trip to the
notecards.
At anv rate, whether I'm in the n
ests and papers aren't going to tiptoe avvav 1
that. I've accepted it, and so, yesterday when 1
out ot bed (suffering, but the wav. from
hangover), I derided to get on the stick and ; .
and schoolwork together.
Ah. the noble ideal- of a guilt) consciei
I rechecked assignments and dis
horror, that two term papers and four tests
agenda. After fighting down the visi
danced in my head. I decided to make a da
ibrary. I figured that would Ao it.
I rolled into Joyner that afternoon .
intentions in the world. 1 want you to know i
there is somethng about that place that tun
helpless, bumbling idiot. Suffice it to say that I b
out ol Library Science and haven't gotti
rev i-iting the course.
Truthfully though, admit it � nobody
what in that librarv. I aw quite a tew v
students wandering around in confusion, and I
one poor soul sobbing into the card catalog in
frustration because all the information he needed was
microfiche.
V
Th
1 w �
m
See HUMOR, page 8
V.
t1 Oavw Nois
H�1, I &0tf loo �eco0
)u KirJQ -n rr)ik up

mhat oo we aKx p





15 November 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 7
Spice of Life
sUCCliltntlv �
S�Charles speak
sII treat)
Li ign Rel-e, he had
r
is Republ-leagues i e for end) and ised all the
kv a slaughter.
k -id.
d Isav?" he
Percj joined the laughter Clegg, also accused Mrs.
whispered.
and corrected "succul-
ently" to "succinctly"
before going on with his
speech.
Encroachment
BRIGHTON, England
i P) � One post being
used by Laura Evans to
repair a boundary fence
was an inch thicker than
the others, so an 80-year-
old widow took her to
court, charging property
encroachment.
the widow. Phyllis
Evans' son-in-law of hit-
ting her over the head
with the post in the
ensuing row.
Both charges were
dismissed.
Big beans
CHESTER, England
(AP) � Head scratching
horticultura lists, noting
that runner-bean plants
"usually grow to about 13
feel at must are at a loss
to explain how young
Calvin Breckon managed
to coax his to 30 feet.
It's a nice, big
plant muses Breckon,
"but I don't like beans
Break pays off
NAPLES. Italy (AP) -
VI hen Ciancarlo Hazoni
had his left thigh broken
in a 1 c74 auto accident,
the bone healed but he
v as left with a limp.
K hen the same thigh
u.i- broken again recently,
surgeons found three coins
imbedded in the flesh of
his thigh.
The impact of the first
accident had forced the
coins through his trouser
pocket and pressed them
so deeply into the open
wound they were hidden
from sight when the bone
was set.
Stealers strip
DRACHTEN, Nether-
lands (AP) � Six young
women caught stealing
curtains took to their
heels, pursued by several
angry men. As the women
ran, they began stripping.
leaving their clothes be-
hind them.
The men were so em-
barrassed they gave up
the chase and let the
thieves escape � still
clutching the stolen cur-
tains.
Kenyan steam
NAIROBI, Kenya (AP)
� The East African
country of Kenya is in hot
water these days but is
very happy about it.
Surveys financed by
the United Nations' De-
velopment Program have
disclosed that a valley
near Nairobi contains e-
nough underground steam
for the generation of
steam on a commercial
s ale.
The government is now
negotiating with the World
Bank lor a loan w hie h
would permit the con-
struction ot two generating
units in the region, about
45 miles northwest ol the
Kenyan capital.
Thev would be the first
geothermal power stations
in Africa.
Visitors
COVENTRY. England
(P) � A -iirvev conduct-
ed at Walsgrave Hospital
shows that patients are
sick ot visitors.
W ell-wishers are dis-
turbing afternoon naps
and forcing patients to
rush through their meals,
the pull shows, but the
patients are too embai
sed to -peak up.
I
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917 West Morgan St
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VISA'
A
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I f that's the kind of job you're looking
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that Naw Officers have unequalled
opportunities in fields like Nuclear Power,
Aviation, and Engineering.
Or call toll free 800-841-8000. (In Georgia,
toll free 800-342-5855.) Early responsibility.
It's what being a Navy Officer is all about.
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P.O. Box 2000. Pelham Manor. NY 10803
D Send me information on Career Opportunities
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Page 8 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 15 November 1979
Coffeehouse delivers
comedy and good signs
Kids9 games are deadly
By RAYMOND L. FIKE
Features Writer
The ECU Student
Union Coffeehouse pre-
sented a double-bill of
entertainment on Friday,
Nov. 9. Both Jeff Blum-
berg, a comedian, and the
ECU Sign Language
Troupe performed. The
sell out crowd was well
pleased with the two half
hour shows.
The ECU Troupe did
sign language renditions
of some popular songs.
Troupe members were
very good individually and
in groups. The troupe had
an abundance of material
even enough to choose
TWIN
continued from page 6
But, if you get up there and play just stuff they've
never heard before, it's kind of hard for them to sit all
night and listen to something that's unfamilar.
In speaking of the recording industry, Adkins says,
"All the large record companies have bought up all the
small companies
RCA and Columbia control the majority of
distribution in this country, so if you can't get in with
them, you can't get a hit record.
"If you can stay alive long enough he continues,
"just hold out � you'll do it. There's more talent
undiscovered than people realize. I mean, there are
some great damned singers all over that nobody will
take time to listen to or help.
"And then you get some people (in positions of
control) who don't want nothing to change. Some guy
might have a song that would change the whole music
scene � they don't want that to happen, they're going
to lose too much money, so they do all they can to keep
him from getting recognized. It's politics in the music
industry
Wendel Adkins' performance, later Tuesday night,
was a combination of professionalicm and spontenaity.
Adkins prefers to do long sets, often up to 90 minutes in
length.
His choice of songs varies with each show. He never
uses a song schedule. This provides him with an
unusual intimacy with the audience that reflects and
caters to the audience's mood. Occasionally he even
changes songs in the middle of a tune.
On stage, under the spotlights, he does take on a
resemblance to Waylon Jennings. Although lacking the
same degree of rich, clean, operatic tremelo which
makes Jennings' voice so pleasant (perhaps due to the
number of performances in the last week) Adkins'
baratone voice all but indistinguishable from country-
music's premier 'outlaw
Adkins spotlighted his very talented band in the
second set. Billy Harold Lee, the drummer, has been
with Adkins since the rock V roll days twelve years
ago. The other members of the band include Rob Langy
on bass. Langy has been with Adkins for 9 years. Larry
Hill picks lead guitar. Randy Schaffer (who was
stationed at Cherry Point while in the Navy) also plays
lead guitar. And Slim "Wild Cat" George Hill, is armer
former Louisiana State harmonica champion.
Wendel Adkins might could pass for Waylon
Jennings' twin on stage, but he is no clone. He is very-
much a 'star' in his own right.
from when a call for more
came as time ran out on
their second show.
This group should have
been billed for the multi-
purpose room rather than
the small Coffeehouse.
People were lined up in
the hallway hoping to see
the performance. Most
said that they had been
drawn by the music and
had come to see what it
was about. They probably
would have paid admission
and stayed for the show if
they had had a place to
sit.
Comedian Jeff Blum-
berg was good, but he
needs work. He used old
adages, comedy about
childhood and other topics
where more original mat-
erial would have gone over
better.
Blumberg is funny, and
after he gets more exper-
ience, he may even
become a star. Yet, he
doesn't seem to know
whether he should pattern
his act after those of
famous comics or move
into his own style. We got
a little bit of Don Rickles,
Rich Little, Richard Pryor,
and a few others. We
should have gotten more
of Jeff Blumberg.
By JOHN BARBOUR
AP Newsfeatures Writer
NEW YORK (AP) � This city's streets are a
playground for a fifth of the city's million or so
school-age kids who don't go to school. The games they
play these days are deadly.
A 13-year-old boy with an older youth spot a
17-year-old with a radio. They want it. They take it at
gunpoint. The 17-year-old is left, shot dead in the street.
A 15-year-old and a 20-year-old plan to rob an
84-year -old woman's apartment. She is bludgeoned to
death, he body burned.
Another juvenile wants money from his grandmother.
He chokes her, cuts her, and leaves her in flames.
Passing firefighters save her life.
The ugly recital goes on. In nine months in the
boroughs of this city, 18 youngsters under 16 were
arrested for felony murder, and 36 for attempted
murder. The city is schocked at the scneselessness, the
easy way even 13-year-olds choke off life.
The state passes a law alloowing juveniles as young
as 13 to be prosecuted in adult courts for violent and
capital crimes.
The state passes a law allowing juveniles as young as
13 to be prosecuted in adult courts for violent and
capital crimes.
Among the people who have to deal weith this
sudden epidemic of violence by youngsters is District
Attorney Mario Merola of teh Bronx.
He points out it's not a New York problem alone.
"Kids are committing 50 percent of all the crimes not
only in New York City or the Bronx, but throughout the
nation
Merola admits the Bronx is worse than most places.
In the last year, the county has had 13 juveniles under
16 who committed 15 homicides. One of the worst
involved a 14 and 15-year-old who used fire to light up
an attempted burglary. The flames spread after they left
and killed seven people.
"When I left the Bronx DA's office in 1964 Merola
says, "we had 86 homicides a year. When I came back
in 1973, we had 430, a 500 percent increaseIf you look
at the statistics, you'll see that younger people are
committing adult crimes, much more violent crimes. But
so is the enitire society
Now that the actions of society are an excuse for
HUMOR
continued from page 6
I wandered around for awhile trying to look
competent, but since I have no earthly idea where to
locate things in that library, I didn't find anything even
remotely related to my term paper topics. I did,
however, happen to run across a book by Robert
Benchley, whom I consider to be an outstandingly funny
guy. I checked it out and went home to curl up in bed
with it.
This morning I remembered the four tests and the
term papers. I also remembered that I don't have
anything special to do next Tuesday except pack to go
home. I'll work on them then.
Yours,
775134
Go
Pirates,
GO
juvenille behavior.
Asst. District Attorney Robert Spadero of Brooklyn,
who handles juveniles in the borough quotes a police
officer who said "The child of today is not the same that
we had around here 15 years ago. They're more violent
today
Merola disagrees that youngsters are different.
"They're the same kids of 15 or 20 years ago. The
only difference is that then, if a guy brualized your girl
on Friday or Saturday night, maybe you had a fistfight
and maybe you had a black eye or a broken nose. But
now what happens is out come the knives and guns and
you've got death
There are other defferences, however. Merola
blames the highest divorce rate ever, more working
mothers than ever, violence on television and narcotics.
And more than any other facotr, besides the availability
of guns, is the high rate of truancy, he says.
"In New York City they tell me there are something
like 200,000 truants a day out of a school population of a
million
Merola recalls that New York used to have a facility
called the 600 school for those youngsters who fit
neither of teh other categories. It was a school for
disruptive students.
"You gave them a basketball and you had a physical
education teacher who made them play ball all day. If
you did all that, you'd reduce crime by half overnight
Merola also blames the ready availability of guns and
other weapons. "They tell me there are something like
two million guns in New York City out of eight million
people he says.
New York state's Division of Criminal Justice
Services is tabulating the number of youngsters under
16 brought to trial as adults. In a July report, the
division reported that "contrary to scare stories" violent
13 to 15-year-olds were just as unlikely to strike out at
younger kids as they were to pick on people over the
age of 60.
"In fact, they are most likely to pick on kids their
own size the report said, "with 380 of 932 or almost
41 percent of the victims between ages 13 and 19
The various district attorneys are in various stages of
discomfort with the new law. It's not easy to bring a
13-year-old to trial.
"Am I in favor of the juvenile law?" Merola repeats.
"I don't like the juvenile law. Nobody likes the juvenile
law. But what alternatives do you have. There's no
alternative. Obviously the way we handled them in the
past was totally unsatisfacotry.
"So, of course, I end up in favor of it because it is
the only thing we have available to us
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Carolinian
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The East Carolinian
lian m
sports
Thursday, November 15, 1979 Page J GreemHe, N.C
man9 Green fills big shoes ft
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
H
e s a
done some big things during his Pirate career, especially
in this, his senior season.
"I look at a quarterback in terms of what his team's
little man's hero says East Carolina offense gains from him said Dye. "And in our
football coach Pat Dye. Naturally, Dye's subject is a offense, Leander is spectacular. He's about four men
"little man" himself. combined into one
Actually, he is a little, big man. For 5-7 ECU One example of Green's value to the Pirates is the
quarterback Leander Green may be short but he has yards per carry average of the entire backfield.
(Photo by Chap Gurley)
Green barks out signals to Pirate offense
Halfbacks Anthony Collins and Sam Harrell are
averaging 7.4 and 7.3 yards per carry, respectively.
Fullback Theodore Sutton owns a sparkling 6.5 average
and his back-up, Mrvin Cobb, averages 7.3 yards per
rush.
"The fact that all our backs have such great
averages is just another tribute to Leander's play at
quarterback Dye proclaimed. "He always seems to
know where the soft spots of the defense are
Dye talked of Green's situation as compared to that
of Southern California's celebrated QB, Paul McDonald.
"Here it's not like it is with McDonald he said. "All
he has to do it pitch the ball to White (tailback Charles,
present Heisman Trophy favorite) and they're off. In our
offense, Leander must always make crucial decisions
because we run the option.
"The entire offense revolves around him Dye
added. "He must be able to read defenses, pitch, run
and pass. So he's actually a 'four-in-one quarterback
Green says that much of his success � he has
rushed for 490 yards and thrown for 851 in addition to
assisting the other backs this season � is due to being
surrounded by great personnel. "With the type of
offensive line we have, it's kind of easy to do my job
Green said. "Our backs have run great too, so our
offensive figures look real good
"Real good" is a major understatement. The Pirate
offense ranks third in the nation in running offense,
sixth in passing offense and eighth in scoring offense.
The Pirate offense is loaded with seniorsand Green
says this is the main reason for the success. "We have
all played together for a long time he said. "It all
comes from experience. The other backs know just as
well as I do about what I'll do in certain situations. This
proves that experience is the best teacher
Though things have gone well for Green this season,
it has not always been all roses for the Jacksonville
native. In fact, for much of the first part of last season,
when the ECU offense was struggling, Green received
large doses of criticism.
He suffered several injuries that slowed him down,
and also slowed down the Pirate team as a whole.
"Those were trying times said Green. "When I was
hurt, I figured someone would step in and everything
would be all right. But it didn't work out that way
Green said that there came a time last season that he
realized he must try to playi in pain. It all came together
for him in the late stages of a 21-14 win over Richmond.
"I felt I had to start doing something and figured
that was as good a time as any he said.
I that game, the Pirates struggled for much of the
afternoon against the underdog Spiders. Late in the
fourth quarter, the game seemed headed for a 14-14 tie.
But the Pirates, led by some fancy running by Green,
overtook Richmond with a last-minute touchdown.
"That was when it all came together for this
offensive team proclaimed Green. "We gained some
confidence then that we have had ever since
The rough going that Green experienced for part of
last season came as a surprise to many, including
himself, because of the success that he had enjoyed his
sophomore season. That year he split time at
quarterback with senior Jimmy Southerland. "My job
was to come in mainly to run the football Green said.
And run the ball he did, finishing his first full season as
a Pirate with 546 yards and seven touchdowns on the
ground. He threw the ball a mere 79 times that
sophomore season.
All of a sudden last season, there was no Jimmy
Southerland. It was all on the shoulders of Leander
Green. "At first it didn't seem like a big deal to me
claimed Green. "It really turned out to be tough,
though. The injuries sure didn't help any. I learned an
awful lot from the whole experience
The little ECU quarterback has, of course, rebounded
from the bad experiences of his junior year and become
a truly great quarterback. Some coaches have gone so
far as to call him the best wishbone quarterback in the
COuntry- See GREEN page 12
Wiggins' shoi
ives White
4-72 win
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
In 18-foot jumper by freshman guard Bryant
-gins gave the White team a 74-72 win over the Gold
in the first official intrasquad scrimmage of the season
for teh East Carolina basketball team Wednesday night.
�friggins, who finished the night with six points, put
the -hot through with five seconds remaining in the
ie. A last-second shot by the Gold's Kyle Powers
Ued from 25 feet. M
"I was not surprised to see Bryant take the shot,
Mid ECU coach Dave Odom. "He's got a lot of guts
Hkut him
The two teams played a very tight game all the way,
ith neither coming even close to building a substantial
Ud at anv time.
"This proves that we have a lot of kids who we will
ie able to play Odom said. "It really doesn't matter
ho we start because we will play nine or ten, maybe
?ven 11 people a great deal
The White team was led in scoring by senior
-Bwingman Herb Krusen, who finished the night with 18
points. He was followed closely by 6'8" sophomore
fDavid Underwood with 15 points, senior guard George
IMaynor with 14 and forward Frank Hobson with 10.
Herb Gray of the Gold team shared game-high with
Krusen as he too poured in 18 points. Clarence Miles
finished with 15 and Michael Gibson added 14 for the
3 Odom in his first year at the Pirate helm, said he
was pleased wth every aspect of the scrimmage.
"Considering this was the first time that we have played
before a crowd ,1 was very pleased " he said.
"I was surprised that we didn't run more though,
Odom added. "That could be good or bad. Maybe we
were a little cautious or maybe our defense was that
good. We've worked a lot on the zone defense itself, but
have not worked much against it
Odom said that he told his team before the
nmmage that winning and losing -as not somethmg
that he was worried about, "to it turned out, he said,
"nobodv really lost after all
The'rookihead coach said that the go he had set
prior to the game have been achieved We had two
prior to tne g find Qut where we
main goals, he said. We & from
are as a team and we wanieu tu b
the sneetators I feel like we achieved both.
the spectators. d h d f
us to be atthis point. And I feel that we showed we can
plavgooo baseball, which hopefully gamed na some
that the team had � m ffWS
during preseason practice, �"� �
hard to achieve. j nc �he team
He also said that �X�, �uch Irk
effort, he realizes that the Pirates su" � . id
to'do. "We've JJe we must
"First of all, we're very ���J�J�m&e of thm could
develop some advantages of our own.
be our 8uard height . odom i8
One feature of the game h' � f from the
the fact that both teams shot well ove�
field, the Gold team shooting 55.8 and tn
55 The point totals for this game wereabiUe.mng
game, going two 15-mmute naive
regulation 20-minute halves.
The Pirates will hold another 'fJ
lame next Wednesday, Not. :I , for p
High school gymnasium. Tip-oH time
Mean Gre
to invade
(Photo by Chap Gurley)
ECU halfback Sam Harrell 125) is one of many Pirate seniors
ECU vs. NTSU Saturday
Seniors' home finale
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
East Carolina's football team hopes to make the best
out of a bad situation Saturday when they take on North
Texas State in Ficklen Stadium.
The "bad situation" is created by the fact that a
large number of Pirate seniors will be playing their last
home game for ECU. Among those is quarterback
Leander Green.
"It's kinda sad said Green. "I just hope we can
play our best game of the year
Pirate head coach Pat Dye definitely hates to see this
group of seniors graduate from his squad. All season
long it has been evident that this recruited group is
probably his favorite ever.
"They're a class bunch of people said Dye at his
weekly press luncheon Wednesday. "They've been fine
leaders and citizens as well as fine players. Each one of
them has improved so much due to the amount of work
and determination that they have exerted for four
years t
Dye noted that many estabished "starsi among the
seniors were not highly recruited. "But he added,
"they all have the intangibles that you look for in a
great football player
The Pirate offensive unit, which ranks sixth in the
nation in total offense at this point, is senior-laden and
drew many raves from Dye. "This is by far the best
offensive team that we've had here he said. "They ve
played together a long time and know just how to
execute our attack
Dye said that he had recently talked with Barry
Switzer, head coach of the powerhouse Oklahoma
Sooners. "He wanted to know how our offense was
doing so well said Dye. "I told him that we were just
exciting. He commented on our lack of turnovers (the
Pirates have but 13, third best mark in the country). He
said that their offense had fumbled the ball 35 times
already .
On ECU's offensive unit, at least seven will be gone
next season. Those seven players include quarterback
Green, halfback Sam Harrell, Center Jeff Hagans, guard
Mitchell Johnston, tackles Matt Mulholland and Joe
h
Godette, and tight end Billy Ray Washington.
Fullback Theodore Sutton and split end Vern
Davenport are seniors but have a year of eligibility left.
Guard Wayne Inman and halfback Anthony Collins are
juniors. M
"It will really be tough replacing those guys, said
Dye. "They've meant so much to ECU football
Dye mentioned some of the players individually.
"When I think of this group I think of a kid like Billy
Ray. He has blossomed so much not only as a player but
personality-wise in his four years.
"The entire line is made up of self-made players.
They've worked so hard. Take Matt Mulholland for
example. Everything he has achieved has come through
nothing by hard, long hours of work.
Dye spoke especially high of Green. "He runs our
offense to perfection Dye said. "If there is an all-state
team and he is not named the quarterback, then there
ain't no justice
The sixth-year Pirate mentor did not forget his
seniors on defense either when passing out laurels
"Just look at Vance Tingler he said, "he's worked
himself into a player. The same can be said for Tim
Swords and Wayne Pocle. Noah Clark has meant an
awful lot to us, having always started on and off
Dye applauded the careers of senior secondary
members Charlie Carter and Ruffin McNeill, also.
"They've both started since they were sophomores he
said. "They're very tough and physical. Folks don't like
to run at either one of them
Then, of course, there is Ail-American candidate
Mike Brewington, a linebacker. "Mike's been a great-
player, Dye said. "He was highly recruited and has
lived up to all we expected of him. I just hope he gets
all the recognition that he deserves
Dye mentioned that there were so many seniors on
this year's team that he could hardly remember them
all. "I know I've probably left somebody out. But each
and every one of our seniors are super individuals and
will really be missed. , ' -
"If you check the record I think you 11 find that this
group of seniors will haTe won more football games than
any group of seniors in North Carolina.

By JIMMY DUPREE
Asst. Sports Editor
How does North Texas State plan to handle the
Pirates of East CArolina when the two teams meet
Saturday at 1:30 at Ficklen Stadium?
"With a great deal of difficulty muses North Texas
defensive coordinator Harold itichardson.
It seems the legacy of the powerful ECU wishbone
reaches all the way to the bad-lands of Texas, and it has
the Mean Green coaches disturbed.
"East CArolina's offense is close to being
awesome said Richardson. "I've seen the films and
they've moved the ball on every team they've played.
"The EAst CArolina wishbone is hard to defend
against. The defense has to be aware of teh entire
field
Fullback Marvin Cobb and running backs Sam
Harrell and Anthony Collins each average over seven
yards per carry, with fullback Theodore Sutton following
closely at 6.5; making the Pirate backfield on eof the
most potent in the nation.
"I think it is just indicative of how a veteran team
like East Carolina works together on offense. Those boys
have been together for three or fout years and they
execute to perfection. It's a situation with seniors where
you can't depend on them to make mistakes and cough
up the football. They just play too consistantly
Turnovers have come far too often for the Mean
Green offense, and according to Rchardson, the defense
has been unable to match the fumble interception total
which helped the 1978 squad to a 9-2 finish.
"One of the things we haven't done well this year is
get the turnovers he said. "A lot depends on being in
the right place at the right time and we just haven't
been there often enough
Offensively, the Mean Green works out of the basic
I-formation, with veteran signal caller Jordan Case
directing the attack.
Case has completed 96 out of 152 passes (63.2
percent) for 1056 yards on the season.
"They have good speed, good receivers and a good
quarterback said ECU assistant defensive coach Bobby
See MEAN GREEN page 10
NTSU tailback Bernard Jackoon
I
MB





Page 10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 15 November 1979
The Fearless Football Forecast
N. TEXAS STATE AT ECU
ARKANSAS AT TEXAS A&M
AUBURN AT GEORGIA
CLEMSON AT NOTRE DAME
N.C. STATE AT DUKE
NAVY AT GEORGIA TECH
PURDUE AT INDIANA
OHIO STATE AT MICHIGAN
OKLAHOMA AT MISSOURI
UNC AT VIRGINIA
WAKE FOREST AT SOUTH CAROLINA
TENNESSEE AT MISSISSIPPI
Charles ChandlerTerry Herndon
(81-37-2)(76-42-2)
ECU 38-20ECU 42-31
ArkansasArkansas
AuburnGeorgia
Notre DameNotre Dame
DukeN.C. State
NavyNavy
PurdueIndians
Ohio StateMichigan
OklahomaOklahoma
UNCVirginia
South CarolinaWake Forest
TennesseeTennessee
Jimmy DuPree
(73-45-2)
ECU 35-24
Arkansas
Auburn
Notre Dame
N.C.State
Georgia Tech
Purdue
Michigan
Oklahoma
Virginia
Wake Forest
Tennessee
Dave Odom ECU Basketball CoachThomas B. Brewer ECU Chancellor
ECU 28-14ECU 31-21
ArkansasArkansas
AuburnAuburn
Notre DameNotre Dame
N.C. StateN.C. State
Georgia TechGeorgia Tech
PurduePurdue
MichiganMichigan
OklahomaOklahoma
UNCVirginia
South CarolinaWake Forest
TennesseeTennessee
Lady Gold downs Purple
By JIMMY DUPREE
Asst. Sports Editor
Led by the hot outside
shooting of forward Kathy
Riley and the board
strength of center Marcia
Girven, the Gold eased by
the Purple 55-43 in the
Lady Pirates' intrasquad
game last evening in
Minges Colesium.
Riley scorched the nets
for 19 points, but it was
Girven who paved the way
to victory by adding 15
and grabbing a game-high
12 rebounds.
Top performers among
the Lady Bucs' rookies
were forward-center Mary
Denkler with 11 points and
guard-forward Donna
Brayboy with 11 rebounds.
All-American candidate
Rosie Thompson paced the
Purple with 16 points and
11 grabs, followed by
junior Lydia Rountree with
nine and transfer Heidi
Owen with eight.
The gold performed
without the services of
junior playmaker Laurie
Sikes, which limited them
to five players. Sikes
suffered a minor injury in
a recent scrimmage, and
coach Cathy Andruzzi
decided to rest the scrappy
court general.
After forging a seven
point lead by halftime, the
Gold showed signs of
fatigue in the second
building to the final
margin.
"The big thing right
noe is Laurie Sikes being
out said Andruzzi. "At
out other scrimmages,
that's where our enthu-
siasm has come from. She
makes things happen
In the absence of
Sikes, Andruzzi and as-
sistant coach Marcia
Richards decided agaisnt
reforming the units for the
adjustment and. instead
moved Brayboy and fresh-
man Fran Hooks to the
point. Neither player had
practiced at that position
until Tuesday.
The result of teh
experiment were favor-
able. While neither shoed
the awareness possessed
by Sikes, both turned in
solid performances at the
new slot.
"I think they both did
very well said Andruzzi.
"Donna Brayboy rushes
her shots, but that will
come with time. They
were all a little nervous
tonight
Hooks, a walk-on after
a shadowy career at
Goldsboro High School,
admits that the point
guard slot added pressure,
but stated that she en-
joyed the challenge.
"I have more trouble
working to get my shot
said Hooks. "I like
shooting from the wing
best. I like to be inside
rebounding, but I enjoyed
handling the ball
The inside performance
of Girven and freshman
Donna Moody showed a
marked improvement over
that of the 1978-79 squad,
with Denkler and Owen
adding to that power.
"Riley is really a
shooter explained An-
druzzi. "The previous two
scrimmages, she scored
second to Rosie. Kathy
complements Rosie on
offense.
"Denkler is a good
offensice ballplayer. She's
probably one of the best
shooters on the team.
Even though she's over six
feet, we like to use her at
forward. She's not afraid
to go up against anybody.
"Girven is getting
Mean Green
more aggressive with ev-
ery practice she said.
"She's gotten a lot more
confident in herself.
"Heidi Owen is a good
shooter. She only made
four tonight, but the shots
she took were percentage
shots. She really kept that
club (Purple) together on
defense
The Lady Pirates open
their 1979-80 scheduel
Saturday at 5:00 in Minges
Colesium against the In-
dians of William and
Mary.
The Division II Indians
return their entire starting
lineup from last season,
and with the unkown
status of Sikes for the
game, the Lady Bucs will
be put to the test in their
season premier.
"I thnk maybe every-
body was nervous said
Sikes. "We're definitely
better than we showed
tonight
Cont'd from page 9
Wallace. "They are capable of throwing the football. He
(Case) has only had one out of every 41 passes he's
thrown intercepted over the last three years. Across the
line they have a lot of experience
North Texas starts four seniors and two juniors in
their front wall, similar the the veteran lineup of ECU.
"They had the number six rusher in the nation last
year in Bernard Jackson (junior, 5-11, 187), but was hurt
early in the season explained Wallace.
"Overall they have a good offense and are very
dangerous
Defensively North Texas is led by sophomore Louis
Haynes and senior defensive end Bernard West.
Haynes and senior Mike Oliphant moved to
linebacker after serving at end last season.
"It's a hard position and I'm sure they had some
trouble adjusting said Richardson, "but no more than
the offense had gettin gused to a new system.
"We had a good year recruiting as far as talent goes
and we're starting some of our freshmen on defense
who played well for us early in the season
The Pirate staff will not only have to deal with the
powerful starters on the front line, but the unusually
deep reserve unit as well.
"They're going to play a lot of people up front
said ECU offensive coordinator Dick Kupec. "They've
got more quality linemen than anyone we've played.
"Charles Young (sophomore tackle) is a fine football
player, but apparently Chris Osborne has beaten him
out of his position.
"They lost two good linebackers last year and they
didn't have a lot of depth.
"They do not do a lot of stunting on defense. They
work very simple and very sound on defense
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i





J5MflMfimfefiI-13Z3JlE�AST CAROLINIAN Page 1
Odom calls for, and deserves, student aid
tball coach Dave Odom spoke lo a group
ruesda) night in Minges Coliseum and
ite ih- proper atmosphere" at home
- season.
ne SN an assistant at Atlantic Coast
i-e-member Wake Forest the last fev seasons,
ke with knowledge about the importance ol the
creating the "atmosphere" for games
M ges
I i- an atmosphere sport he said. "In
hve what is called the 'home court edge
ted b the noise and excitement treated b)
spe ialh the students
U he had hopes that Minges would
i "1 would especially like to
filled. We (the team) should be
rt hard we tr 1 amconfident that we will
i h game It will mean so much to see
the atmosphere" that creates a
- long b tore the game
in the gates five minutes
�int is missed " he
� begins long before that. It
ur players it the) could stand
he gym area) and be able to
tn � enthusiasm before the game
Iter than an pep talk I could
llso u the students
im. i '� � for our
rgel the other team is even
al you are
�76 W ake Forest team as an
I that that team. v hich wei
� ven CC road game except
N v . 'Everywhere we went we had
' stufl thrown down at us
- it� hen the fans did that out
ss and used it to an advantage

is a point, you know. I he h
rtant. He simph not
L
want the students at ECl to do anything to take awa
from it, but rather to come up with tilings to increase it.
Odom and his staff are doing their part He has
arranged tor a pep bam) to perform inMinges during
home games and has other dans to liven up the
i .iliseum.
It would make the job oi the coaching stalj, and the
team tor that matter, much easier if the students would
take serioush the idea ol building up the ECl
basketball program.
I he building of this program will rel) heavily on the
attitude of the students. In the past, man) students
attended home games fur laughs. Granted, at times
what the) saw on the court was funny. The head coach
oi the past two season certainly performed mam
amusing (and shocking) antics during the game- You
might even call his actions childish and clown-like.
Bui � is gone nun. Dave Odom is the new head
man. I nlike his predecessor, Odom is a professional, lb-
know- how to build a winner at East CAroIina. He also
knows that the students must take the program serioush
and support it. It not, he would not have taken time
Irom his hectic schedule to speak to the group Tuesda
night.
I he incompetent") ol the past two season is gone.
N �V hi.I is blessed with a knowledgeable, competent
Staff. It the students want to keep it this wa. the) will
answer to the needs of the new staff.
S WE.
CES
Friday And Saturday
7 And 9 p.m.
Hendrix Theatre
Sponsored by the Student Union Films Committee
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Page 12 THE EAST CAROLINAIN 15 November 1979
Bowls in state of chaos
By
HERSCHEL NISSENSON
AP Sports Writer
Every bowl want Ala-
bamaand every bowl
could be disappointed. In
all the guessing over
which bowl Alabama will
go to, no one seems to
realize it's po��Me for the
Crimson Tide to be shut ot
of a bowl.
A lot of things are
possible in the wild and
crazy bowl picture, much
of which should fall into
place Saturday if Georgia,
a four-time loser, beats
Auburn and becomes the
itheastem Conference's
representative in the Su
gar Bowl.
That would free the
Orange and Cotton Bowls
invite No. 1-ranked
Uabama. The Crimson
e prohablv would favor
Miami over Dallas since
Big Eight, whose
impion hosts the Ur-
ge Bowl, currently has a
her ranked team than
S ithwest Conference.
its champ to
Cotton Bowl.
More aboul that later.
What if Auburn beats
Georgia? The Sugar Bowl
uld then have to wait
for the Alabama-Auburn
game Dec. I. If Alabama
wins or ties that one, the
Tide goes to New Orleans.
But should Auburn �
which is on probation and
can't go to a bowl � win
that one to, Georgia would
back into the Sugar Bowl
and Alabama would back
into Tuscaloosa. All the
other bowls would be filled
by that late date and
Alabama would have to
stay at home.
Now, let's say that
Georgia beats Auburn.
Would you believe the
following conversation
come Saturday evening?
"Coach Bryant, how
about coming to the
Orange Bowl to face the
Nebraska-Oklahoma win-
9"
ner
Aww. hay-ull, we
ain't worth a damn jes'
'cause we edged Miami
35-0. That ol' Howard
Schnellenberger out-
coached me every way
known to man. But if ya'H
really want us, tell ya
what ah'll do. Ah'll poll
mv seniors Sunday
mornm' and see if the)
want to play in Miami
"Sorry, Coach, we've
got to know now or we 11
invite Florida State.
Decisions decisions.
"1 wouldn't mind ask-
ing them to wait a day, or
even a week Bear
Brvant said Tuesday, "but
1 don't think they'd do it
As usual, bowls,
schools and conferences
have been breaking the
no-contact-before-Nov. 17
rule left and right and
some teams are signed,
sealed and delivered. But
many of teh commitments
are contingent on vic-
tories, not only this
weekend but also down
the line.
The Rose Bowl is the
onlv game not holding its
breath. Southern Calif-
ornia will be the host team
for the 10th time in 14
years and either Ohio
State or Michgan will be
the Big Ten's representa-
tive for the 12th year in a
row. Ohio State will go if
it beats or ties Michigan
on Saturdayor if Purdue
beats Indiana. Don't ask
why; just believe it.
IfIfIf- That's what
it all comes down to.
If Alabama and Ohio
State and Nebraska and
Southern Cal and Texas
and Arkansasand Geor-
giakeep winning, the
four major bowls probably
will look like this:
Orange � Alabama vs.
Nebraska. Rose - Ohio
State vs. Southern Cal.
Cotton � Arkansas vs.
Oklahoma. Sugar � Geor-
gia vs. Texas.
But don't be surprised
to see some changes,
depending on the results
of the next few weeks. AH
bowls have alternatives.
The word is that the
Sugar and Cotton Bowls
have agreed to split Texas
and Arkansas. But if
Texas loses one of its last
three games � don't
forget the Longhorns must
face Baylor and texas
A&M � and the bwL
ends in a Houston-Ar-
kansas tie, the Cotton
Bowl could get Houston
and Arkansas could get
shut out of a major-major
bowl with a 10-1 record.
So could Ohio State if
the Buckeyes lose to
Michigan and Indiana
beats Purdue, although
that would make the
Buckeyes awfully attract-
ive to the Cotton Bowl.
And what does the
Cotton do if Texas makes
it to Dallas and Nebraska
beats Oklahoma? A Tex-
as-Oklahoma Cotton Bowl
is out of the question
because it would be a
rematch of their October
war.
Houston will wind up a
somewhere, but, says one
bowl source, "Nobody
want them; they've got the
old Arizona State syn-
drome
Sme other items:
� The Gator Bowl will grab
Florida State if the Sem-
inoles don't get the
Orange Bowl.
� The Fiesta Bowl would
like to match the Big Eight
and Big Ten runners-up �
a SWC team also is a
possibility � but Michigan
would prefer not to play
on Christmas Day. Ohio
State doesn't care.
i$& ��
� Clemson would like
another trip to the Gator
Bowl but the Gator people
might not want the Tigers
three years in a row. Notre
Dame is not out of the
question for Jacksonville,
although the Fighting Irish
might stay home this year.
� The Liberty Bowl is said
to be leaning toward Pitt
and vice versaand might
invite Clemson, if it beats
Notre Dame, although
there are other candidates.
The Hall of Fame Bowl
would like Clemson, which
has a huge following.
imrVE-THRTf BE�EnAGE STORE
BEER
SPECIALS "j?
Full line of Domestic &
Imported Beers.
-Wines- M
Munchies- Gasoline
Green
Cont'd from page 9
N C State must have realized his potential when he
. �9 - (. for a touchdown on his first varsitj
I tf .u. 1- �" J ' 9o i i Pirate
i-tl H finished that game, a li-i rirait
� fds rLX and -IDs. -That firs, m
tobVonhe big.hnUs ofm, �rm d
"That gave some confidence right oft the bat.
'f That confidence began Green on the road to success
Id end with all-star honors, says Uye.
pick an all-state team Dye said, and
Leander is'mS the number one quarterback, then there
; There are a lot of great college
. m him in setting the ball to his sKiuea
lose t turn in U1"s ,
H ' the uerlect East CArohna quarterback.
The acana g�?fL � -old - " "T
QB position this Saturday a sad day for both
and player. SAturday's game in Ficklen Stadium
TJ North Texas State marks the last home game of
pen's illustrious career.
"U kinda sad said Green. "I'm just gomg to go
out and try to do m best. I'd really like to have my best
"happens the Mean Green of North Texas
; ue will be in for a long afternoon. An aufully long
afternoon.
classified
MALE TO SHARE: apart-
ment or house close to
campus. Can move in after
exams and stay until the
end of spring semester.
Reasonable rates. Call
Terrv at 752-8461 or at
work M.T.W. 2:30-7 at
758-7767.
ROOMMATE WANTED:
to share two bedroom
apartment. Water and
heating included in rent.
Call 758-4253.
KENNEDY DISSIDENTS
UNITE Get your "I will
n ' run if nominated, I will
not serve if elected"
T-shirts bv mailing $6.50
check or money order to
Spencer Stephens, 1410
Dickinson Ave Green-
ville, N.C. 27834.
FOR SALE: 1975 Gibsen
L P Std. Pearl Grovers.
Sunburst. Excellent condi-
tion with case. 1400. Call
752-8354.
personal (J)
MALE GRAD STUDENT
NEEDS ROOMMATE: be-
ginning Dec. 1 to share
nice apartment. Apartment
has full kitchen, air
conditioning, heat, carpet,
two bedrooms, and cable
TV. Prefer reasonably
clean and quiet person.
Call 758-
4317.
ROOMMATE WANTED:
young professor or profes-
sional. Dynamite new
house in country. Must be
cook. Must be house
broken. $150 per month
and one half utilities. Call
758-5590 after 9 p.m.
ROOMMATE WANTED:
to share two bedroom apt.
$75 per month plus half
utilities. Located close to
campus. Call Pat 752-5182.
MALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED, to share one
bedroom apartment at
Kings Row. $195.00
monthly. Call 752-0564
after 10 p.m.
SKI TRIP: to Killington
Vermont Dec. 31-Jan. 7.
Lodging, lift tickets, tran-
sportation, meals, enter-
tainment, keg-disco part-
ies, movies. Ski main-
tenence clinic only $216.
Other options as low as
$160. For more info, call
Jav Eason 758-5892.
Sponsored by Intercolle-
giate Ski Association.
HORSE BACK RIDING:
Day or night, individual or
groups. Tri-County
Stables, Grimesland 752-
6893.
NEED X-TRA CASH: fair
prices paid for gold and
silver and silver coins.
Mixed Media. 120 E. 5th
St. Phone 758-2127.
TYPING DONE: Term
papers, thesis, resumes,
etc. Reasonable. Call:
Jane Pollock, 752-9719.
SPRING SEMESTER:
room for rent less than
one block from campus.
Male only 752-4814.
LOST: A black suede
sandal outside of Minges.
If found please call Laurie
at 758-0642.
RjQS
UNDER NEW
MANAGEMENT
TODAY AND EVERY
THURSDAY 2 FREE COKES
WITH
PIZZA
ELIVERYI
FAST
FREE
HOT
FRESH
HOURS
Mon. - Thurs.
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
4p.m. -1 a.m.
4 p.m2 a.m.
11 a.m2 a.m.
11 a.m12 Md
PIZZAS
"DOUGH MADE FRESH DAILY"
10" 14" 17"
EVERY THURS.
two FREE
IQKES WITH EVERY PIZZA
BEVERAGES
COKE
SM. .35
SPRITE
LG. .50
CHEESE
ONION
GREEN PEPPER
PEPPERONI
ITALIAN SAUSAGE
GROUND BEEF
OLIVE( Black or Green)
ANCHOVY
BACON
SHRIMP
MUSHROOM
HAM
JALAPENOS
ADDITIONAL ITEMS
$2.80 $4.40 $5.10
3.40 5.10 5.90
3.40 5.10 5.90
3.40 5.10 5.90
3.40 5.10 5.90
3.40 5.10 5.90
3.40 5.10 5.9U
3.40 5.10 5.90
3.40 5.10 5.90
3.40 5.10 5.90
3.40 5.10 5.90
3.40 5.10 5.90
3.40 5.10 5.90
.60 .70 .80
Phone
758-74��
507 EAST 14th St.
SANDWICHES
BREAD BAKED FRESH DAILY
Shot Loaf 2.05 GARLIC BREAD .79
Long Loaf 2.80 CHEFS SALAD 2.95
SUBMARINE
Ham, Salami, Sauce, Cheese-Baked
HAM AND CHEESE
Ham, Cheese, Mustard, Lettuce & Tomato
H0GIHam, Salami, Mustard, Mayonnaise, Olive Oil,
& Tomato Lettuce
ITALIAN SANDWICH
Ham, Salami, Sauce, Cheese, Onions,
Mushrooms-Baked Pepper
VEGETARIAN SANDWICH sauce
Onions, Green Pepper, Mushrooms, sauce,
Cheese-Baked
CHANELLaS SUPREME 5.60 7.50 8.75
Pepperoni, Italian Sausage, Mushrooms, Onion.far
Pepper, Green dive, Anchovy on request
Remember the top of the line is
CHANELLOS SUPREME PIZZA mmmm
ELUXE SICILIAN PIZZ.
" "THICK CRUST EXTRA CHEESE"
10" 14" 17"
puppec 3.40 5.10 5.90
ONION 400 5.80 6.70
GREN PEPPER 400 5.80 6.70
PEPPERONI 4.00 58� 670
ITALIAN SAUSAGE 400 5.80 6.70
GROUND BEEF 400 5.80 6.70
OLlVE(Black or Green) 4-00 5.80 6.70
ANCHOVY 400 5.80 6.70
BACON 400 5.80 6.70
SHRIMP 4.0C 5.80 6.70
MUSHROOM 4.00 5.80 6.70
iiam 4.00 5.80 6.70
JALAPENOS 4.00 5.80 6.70
ADDITIONALITEMS M � f
SICILIAN SUPREMF
'�$1.00 OFF ANY gkj �j
SIZE SUPREME "mm m
! PIZZA
4JNRijQ5
S1.00OFF ANY
! Not valid during
OFFER I Not valid during
EXPIRES I any other special
J any other special �� �
I ,07 E. 14th st. 1MS-79 j f7E. i4ta St.�
iFOR FAST"FREE DELIVERY
PHONE 758-7400
OFFER
EXPIRES
12-15-70 ,
��) ��) ��� ����Mi MB �� �� ����T





Title
The East Carolinian, November 15, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 15, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.23
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/57232
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