The East Carolinian, November 13, 1979






"Were it left to me
to decide whether
we should have a
government without
newspapers or
newspapers without
government, I
should not hesitate
a moment to prefer
the latter
�Thomas Jefferson
The East Carolinian
If you have a story
idea, a tip, or a
lead, please tele-
phone us:
757-6366
757-6367
757-6309
Vol. 54No.�2f
12 pages today
Tuesday, November 13,1979
Greenville, N.C.
Circulation 10,000
Protesters
burn figure
of Khomeini
From STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS
President Carter's speech on Iranian
oil is suspected to have been the cause of
a series of demonstrations on the ECU
campus yesterday.
The first demonstration apparently
began after students in Scott dorm hung a
banner out of their window stating "TO
HELL WITH IRAN FREE U.S. HOS-
TAGES
After hanging this banner, students
began massing between Scott and Aycock
Dorms shouting slogans such as "Deport
them referring to Iranians in this
country, and "Free them referring to
the U.S. hostages.
According to reports, a figure
representing the Ayatollah Khomeini was
burned at the bottom of College Hill, and
a group of students, at that time
estimated at 100 to 150, began marching
downtown.
The students marched through cam-
pus, gaining in numbers along the way,
until they reached the Pitt County
Courthouse. At that time there were
approximately 500 students participating
in the demonstration.
On the steps of the courthouse
students sang "God Bless America and
the "Star Sj�rt�Jed Banna
Riot police appeared on the scene, and
students began going back to campus,
chanting, "F Iran and "Deport
I
ran .
Police followed the marchers until they
entered campus, and apparently no
violence occured.
Students then again marched through
campus heading for the top of the hill.
When they reached the hill, another
effigy of the Ayatollah was hung and
burned, accompanied by chants and
slogans.
Chancelllor Thomas Brewer said that
he felt American diplomats were working
on the problem, and that the university
community should wait to see the results
of their efforts.
"The first thing we must think of is
the lives of the people in that embassy in
Tehran Brewer said. "We must not do
anything to endanger those lives
"We need to let diplomacy work or
these matters Brewer said. He added
that coller heads must prevail to help
insure safety of the American hostages.
One student, Gary Clayton, who
participated in the demonstration said that
he felt the U.S. had "given a lot to that
country
He accused the Iranian students of
"trying to blame all the Iranians' trouble
on America
He felt that the people at ECU were a
group of students speaking their minds.
He admitted that the demonstration
was a spur of the moment thing.
"The TV cameras brought a lot of
them out he said, referring to the
demonstrators.
When asked what he thought the U.S.
should do in this situation, Clayton
replied, "Blow the hell out of their
country. But that would not solve it
Another student who also was involved
in the demonstration said that fhey
participated because they would partici-
pate in "anything to raise hell about
A demonstration was also held in
Washington, D.C. on Friday.
Hurling obscenities and eggs, well-
dressed men and women joined young-
sters in jeans Friday to object to the
demonstration that wound through
downtown streets to the State Depart-
ment.
Hundreds of police protected the
demonstrators, members of the Moslem
Students Association. as they carried
banners and placards, declaring their love
for Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini and their
hatred for the deposed shah of Iran.
The students had planned demonstra-
tions again today and Sunday but, as the
last demonstrators were leaving the State
Department Friday, city Mayor Marion
Barry announced that no parade permits
would be issued to any group
demonstrating in connection with the
situation in Iran.
There were fears that demonstrations
could result in an outbreak of violence
that would complicate efforts to win the
release of the estimated 60 Americans
being held hostage at the U.S. Embassy
in Tehran.
Despite the explosivcness of Friday's
demonstration here, only three persons
were arrested on minor charges, two for
tossing eggs at the Iranian students.
The mood of the onlookers was felt
early. As the demonstrators began to form
in preparation for their march, there were
shouts from passerbys, "Why don't you
go home, camel jockeys
Students protest
Following President Carter's speech at 2 p.m. yesterday, students on the second floor of
Scott Dorm displayed this sign protesting the actions of Iranian students in Tehran.
(Photo by Chap Gurley)
Iranian students under fire
From WIRE REPORTS
Whatever their politics,
some Iranians sav thev
don't find life in the
United States easy today.
Angry Americans are
shouting at them, shun-
ning their businesses and
� in rare instances �
acting out U.S. frustra-
tions with violence.
The slogans in recent
days have been bitter �
"Rape All Iranian Wo-
men "Nuke Iran "Get
The Hell Out of America
And while some have
marched in support of
Moslems holding 62 Am-
ericans hostage in the U.S.
Embassy in Tehran, other
Iranians who do not
support the takeover are
feeling a hostile American
backlash.
"We get quite a bit of
calls and we don't know
who's calling us said an
Iranian businessman in
California, who asked not
to be identified. "They tell
us to get out of the United
States or go to hell or
something like that
Since the takeover:
�Some Iranian-American
businessmen in California
have changed the names
of their store to remove
the word "Iran
�Three Denver teen-agers
went out to "find some
Iranians to hassle police
said. Before the night was
over, one of the teen-agers
was dead and two were
wounded.
� Muhammed Mobarez,
who lives in Southern
California, has organized
the Association of Iranian
Communities Worldwide
"to help Iranian people in
America bring to the
public a different view of
Iranians than the street
fighting
The Iranian students
who seized the U.S.
Embassy in Tehran last
week are demanding the
return of the deposed
shah, now in New York for
cancer treatment. The
shah, who fled Iran in
January during a revolu-
tion led by the Ayatollah
Ruhollah Khomeini, is
under a death sentence in
that country.
"They should not hold
the Americans. It is
wrong said a student at
Connecticut's University of
Bridgeport, who identified
himself only as Davood.
"The shah is crazy but
what they are doing puts
the Iranian students in the
United States in the
middle.
"We are afraid of
being deported. We are
afraid for our families in
Iran. No one is studying
now. We sit by the radio
and television all days for
the news he said.
President Carter on
Saturday ordered the Jus-
tice Department to move
swiftly to deport Iranians
who are in this country
illegally.
President Carter has
decided to stop buying
Iranian oil in a response to
the seizure of about 60
American hostages at the
U.S. Embassy in Tehran.
ABC News reported yes-
terday.
The network's White
House correspondent, Sam
Donaldson, said the an-
nouncement was expected
Monday afternoon.
If all oil now supplied
by Iran is cut off, the loss
might amount to 7 percent
to 8 percent of U.S.
imports. That amounts to
about 3.5 percent to 4
percent of the total U.S.
oil consumption.
The Energy Depart-
ment estimates the total
imports of Iranian oil at
700,000 barrels a day and
another 200,000 to 300,000
barrels of heavy fuel oil
refined in the Bahamas,
Virgin Islands and else-
where.
Earlier today. Carter
met with key Cabinet
member? and other top
advisers, but his spokes-
man said the meeting was
not "prompted by any new
developments in Iran
White House press
secretary Jody Powell
disclosed the meeting, the
second in two days, as the
stand-off between the
United States and Iranian
authorities over some 60
American hostages moved
into its second week.
Powell told reporters
that Carter met with
members of his Cabinet
for about an hour, begin-
ning at 8:30 a.m. EST.
Then, members of the
Special Coordinating Com-
mittee on Iran moved to
the White House situation
room for another one-hour
meeting, without the pres-
ident.
Board changes
live-in bylines
for sophomores
By KAREN WENDT
News Editor
At their meeting on
Saturday, the ECU board
of trustees passed a reso-
lution which will enable
rising sophomores to live
off campus during the
1980 school year.
The resolution was
drawn up after a survey
conducted by residence
life staff revealed that
between 200 and 300
sophomores would have
lived off campus this year
if they had had the
chance.
This resolution tempo-
rarily overturns a 1970
decision which read, "A
motion to require fresh-
men and sophomore stu-
dents who do not commute
from home to live in
dormitories beginning with
the fall quarter 1970 was
made by W.W. Taylor.
Troy B. Dodson seconded
the motion. Following
lengthy discussion the
motion carried. The re-
quirement does not in-
clude married students
The resolution will only
be in effect until the end
of the 1980-81 school year,
at which time the trustees
will again meet and eval-
uate what progress, if any,
has been made.
According to the office
of admissions, between
100 and 150 potential
incoming freshmen are
unable to come to ECU
because they cannot be
guaranteed housing.
Conference affiliation
for the ECU athletic
department was also a
topic at the board meet-
ing.
According to Ashley
Futrell, the possible
change in conference affil-
iation is "holding position
right now
He added that plans
are "still in the formative
period
SGA president vetoes
controversial transit bill
The ECU Board of Trustees decided in favor of permitting sophomores to live off
campus beginning in 1980. This ruling reverses a 1970 decision requiring all
freshmen and sophomores to live in dormitories.
Dr. William Laupus of
the ECU Medical School
gave a report on the
progress of the new Brody
Medical Science Facility.
Laupus also listed
many of the reasons that
the new center will be a
boon to Eastern North
Carolina, including more
space and better training.
In other business, Dr.
Elmer Meyer, vice chan-
cellor of student life,
presented a progress re-
port on his division.
'The Media Board has
been smoothing out a bit I
think said Meyer.
"Many people have been
commenting on the quality
of the publications
The Student Life div-
ision has begun a mid-year
student orientation pro-
gram for transfers and
freshmen who come in at
mid-year.
According to Meyer,
distribution of Basic Edu-
cational Opportunity
Grants has gone up with a
one-third increase and a
57 percent monetary
(Photo by Chap Gurley)
crease.
An alcohol abuse train-
ing program for faculty
has also been started,
according to Meyer.
Donald Lemish of the
Department for Institu-
tional Advancement and
Planning presented a re-
port on the fund drives
that are going on within
the department.
It was formally an-
nounced that ECU has
been unanimously elected
in- See TRUSTEES, page 5
By TERRY GRAY
Assistant News Editor
The SGA Legislature trimmed over
$14,000 from the transit budget Monday
after SGA President Brett Melvin invoked
his power of veto to halt a previous
version of the bill.
The savings were achieved in part by
dropping the brown route from the transit
schedule.
In a related action, the legislators
suspended action on most other appro-
priations after learning that $45,500 had
been omitted from the reported available
funds through a "procedural error
Citing his reasons for the veto, Melvin
said that a "lack of leadership" in the
SGA Legislature and its Appropriations
Committee had helped produce a
controversial transit budget that lacked
concensus.
The legislature had approved the
$70,504.50 transit budget Nov. 5 by a 25
to 21 vote.
Asking for and receiving a suspension
of normal house rules, Melvin then
proposed an alternative $61,014.50 transit
budget. Approximately $5,000 of this
figure was drawn from the emergency
fund of $45,500. As a result, only about
$56,000 of the new budget would be
drawn from general funds.
The existence of the emergency fund
had not been reported to the Legislature
in previous sessions, and Treasurer Ricky
Lowe called this oversight "a mistake on
my part" and a "procedural error
The legislators also learned that all of
this money could theoretically be
appropriated, but Lowe advised that at
least $40,000 be put aside for
emergencies.
The transit bill, a collaborative effort
between Melvin and transit officers,
received a round of applause from
legislators, but not everyone was pleased
when the bill was later passed. Said
Speaker of the Legislature Mike Adkins
after the meeting, "The Appropriations
Committee was completely bypassed in
See SGA, page 5
Imide today
Melvin rides again
page 4
Happy hour
page 6
Victory over Spiders
page 9





Page 2 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 13 Nwember 1979
Greek News
day held by Si
By RICKI GLIARMIS
Greek Correspondent
The Sigma Phi Epsi-
lons had their annual
Parents' Day on Saturday,
Nov. 10. More than 125
people attended for dinner
and cocktails. They ended
up the day by attending
the game and a party.
In the upcoming week,
the Sig Eps will have a
social with the Delta Zetas
on Wednesday and will
hold their Sweetheart Ser-
enade for Jayne Hatcher
on Thursday. On Friday
night, there will be a keg
party for the brothers and
their dates sponsored by
the Happy Place.
The Sig Eps had their
Little Sister Rush last
week. All the Brothers
would like to congratulate
the new Little Sisters and
welcome them to their
organization.
The Pi Kappa Phis are
having their Third Annual
Thanksgiving Dinner with
their Little Sisters on
Sunday, Nov. 18.
The Pi Kaps defeated
the Sigma Nu's 4-0 in
bowling last week and are
also in the soccer playoffs
which began this week
Buccaneers
still here
By KAREN WENDT
News Editor
Though they were in-
itially received very well
by students, requests for
the 1979 Buccaneers have
fallen off, and staff
members are upset.
"I think it's a damn
shame that there are still
1,100 copies said Editor
Craig Sahli. "We have
given out 5,900
There are approx-
imately 12,500 students on
campus.
The 1979 Buccaneer
was the first edition of the
book to appear in three
Problems had
vears
plagued both the 1977 and
1978 staffs, and no books
appeared during those
years.
The 1979 staff did,
however, produce what
they feel is a fine looking
book, and results on its
judging should return
soon.
"We expect a very
favorable rating said
Sahli.
Anyone who would like
a book is requested to go
to the Buccaneer office or
The East Carolinian office
and pick up a copy. The
offices are on the second
floor of the Old South
Building, across from the
library.
The Pi Kaps would like
to invite all interested
young ladies to a Little
Sister Rush Kick-off party
at the Elbo Room Tuesday
from 7:30 until 9:30 p.m.
The Phi Tau's had
Little Sister induction Sun-
day night at the fraternity
house. Thirteen Little Sis-
ters were inducted into the
organization.
The Phi Taus will be
playing the Lambda Chi's
in the intramural Soccer
semi-finals this week and
will also be having a
Happy Hour at the Attic
on Friday from 3 p.m.
until 7 p.m.
On Saturday, the Phi
Taus will have a "Screw-
driver and Bloody Mary
Party" before the game
and will return to the
house after the game for
another party.
The Sigmas are holding
their Annual Sigma Pie
Throw on Nov. 20 at
Chapter X from 4 p.m.
until 7:30 p.m. Advance
tickets are being sold for
25 cents. Tickets at the
door will be 50 cents.
Meet your friends at
the Sigma Pie Throw, and
throw a pie at your
favorite Sigma, or several
pies at your favorite
Sigmas!
The Sigmas will be
working at the Tobacco
Festival this week and at
the Alumni Telethon on
Monday, Nov. 19.
The Tri Sigs won over
the Alpha Xi Deltas in a
soccer game last week.
The score in this close
game was 1-0.
The Alpha Delta Pi's
would like to congratulate
their sister, K.C. Need-
ham who has been ap-
pointed Assistant Feature
Editor to The East Caro-
linian.
On Halloween, the
ADPi's enjoyed trick-or-
treating for UNICEF with
their Little Brothers. The
ADPi's would also like to
announce that their pled-
ges will sponsor a "chick-
en picking" with the
Kappa Sigma pledges on
Nov. 16. They would like
to invite everybody to
"Poet's Day" at Chapter
X from 3 p.m. until 7 p.m.
Nov. 16 in honor of the
last home football game.
The AOPi's would like
to invite everyone down to
the Elbow Room tor a star
Wars' Party from 7 p.m.
until 9 p.m. Thursday,
Nov. 15. Points will be
given to the first three
places in each contest and
the organization with the
most points will be
awarded the grand prize.
The pledge class is
getting ready for their
upcoming Happy Hour on
Nov. 20 also at the Elbo
Room.
The Chi Omegas parti-
cipated in the Telethon on
Nov. 8 and will also take
part in this project on Nov.
14. The Chi Omegas are
busily planning several
philanthropic projects for
this semester. One of
these projects is "adopt-
ing" a child for Christmas
and making toys and other
items to give him.
Last week, the Chi O's
visited a nursing home
and talked with the people
there. This was a reward-
ing experience for all who
went.
The Kappa Delta's are
planning a happy hour for
Thursday, Nov. 8 from 7
p.m. until 9:30 p.m. at the
Elbo Room. You can buy
advance tickets from any
KD for 25 cents, and
tickets at the door will cost
50 cents.
CLIFF'S
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
�mm)
AIX YOU
�.9s CAN EAT!
MONDAY-THURSDAY
TROUT, FLOUNDER,
CRAB CARES
TEA is included with meal
CMFF'S SUPER
SPECIAL
WEDNESDAY
CRAB CAKE SPECIAL
2 Golden Fried Crab Cakes
French Fries, Slaw, and
Hushpuppies. QQC
Coors may open
a N.C. plant
on the street all the time
and ask if I've heard
(AP) � Coors Brewery anything from Coors
must decide soon whether Coors officials say they
ALL YOU CAN EAT
SPECIALS
4:00 8:00 PM HO CARRY0UT
SALAD�50 EXTRA
ASST. VAR.
mMmMmm � � �
WITH FRIES & COLESLAW
FRIED $
CHICKEN ?
GREENSBORO, N.C
it will locate on the East
Coast in the area it wants
or the area where it's
wanted.
The company holds
options, which expire Dec.
31, on sites in North
Carolina's Anson County
and Rockingham County in
Virginia.
Company officials say
they haven't decided
whether to locate in the
East, and if they do,
whether they'll locate in
Virginia or North Carolina.
"It became three or
four months ago that
Virginia was their first
choice over North Caro-
lina said Pat Taylor, a
Wadesboro attorney who
represents Coors in Anson
County.
The company comple-
ted tests last week on the
3,600 hundred acres it
holds options on in
Virginia. But residents of
the conservative faming
area in the Shanandoah
Valley have not rolled out
the welcome mat for the
plant. Opposition to zoning
for the site has landed the
issue in court.
In Anson County, on
the other hand, the only
opposition of any kind
came from the Baptist
Ministers Association,
which adopted a resolution
against the brewery and
forwarded it to Coors.
"Other than that there
has not been anything but
enthusiasm said Wades-
boro Chamber of Com-
merce Director Glenn
Webb. "People stop me
aren't anxious to locate
where they're not wanted.
Most Anson County resi-
dents say their area's
greatest attraction for the
brewery is their enthu-
siasm for the plant.
The county is domi-
nated by the textile and
apparel industry, and
does not need the brewery
for employment. But
Webb said the area does
need better paying jobs.
Underemployment is a
greater problem than un-
employment, he said.
Once a site is chosen,
it will take the company
three years to build a
brewery and up to 10
years for the brewery to
reach capacity. Competi-
tors are planning to
expand brewing capacity
and Coors will have to
make a decision soon if it
wants to maintain its
position on the national
beer market.
Over the last 20 years,
four national breweries �
Anheuser-Busch, Miller,
Pabst and Schlitz � have
dominated the American
beer market. Coors, which
only sold west of the
WITH GARLIC BREAD
ITALIAN
SPAGHETOonly
WITH FRIES & COLE SLAW
FRIED $
FISH
STUDENT
The folks at Kroger Sav-on know the
complete student has a party side.
too. So they have what East Carolina
University students need for any bash
. . from party platters to disco plat-
ters all in one convenient loca-
tion. Don't be incomplete this
year�shop Kroger Sav-on today.
COSMETICS
,
discounted

Betai
99
THUR.
UP TO
REG. OR DIP
COUNTRY OVEN
Potato
Chips
8-Oz Twin Pak
FRI.
OFF MANUFACTURER S
SUGGESTED RETAIL
LET THE DELI DO IT! Planning a party? Let the
Kroger Sav-on Deli supply the fixin's. Finest
quality meats, delicious cheese, & tasty
salads combine to make our party trays
perfect for entertaining. Just phone ahead to
place your order!
IS
Mississippi, and Stroh are
two regional breweries
that have survived in
competition with products
sold nationally.
Coors officials say only
29 percent of the U.S.
population now has the
opportunity to buy the
company's beer and to
reach the others, it may
have to move east.
Records and
Tapes
Stroh's
12
12-02.
. Cans
ANDRE WHITE OR
PINK CHAMPAGNE OR
Cold Duck
Copyright 1979
Kroger Sav-on
Quantity Rights Reserved
None SoW To Dealers
Correction
A mistake in a figure cost of repairing the SGA
resulted in an error in the bus damaged in �e Oct.
Nov 8 issue of The East 22 accident is $15,000. The
Carolinian. The figure $20 000 figure was the
given as the possible total total maintenance budget.
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertleed Iteme Is required to be readily �v���ble tor
sale In each Kroger Sav-on Stora eKcept as specifically noted In twa
ad r! we do run out of an advertised Item, we will offer you your choice
of a cobble Item, when available, 1�
ratneheck which will entitle you to purchase the advertised Item at the
advertised price within 30 daya.
NONE SOLD
TO
DEALERS
OPEN 7 AM TO MIDNIGHT
OPEN SUNDAY
9AM TO 9 M
FOOD, DRUG, GENERAL
MERCHANDISE STORES
PRICES EFFECTIVE TUES
NOV. 13 THRU SUN NOV. 18, 1979
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
Phone'756-7031





13 November 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Pape 3
Pecple, places, arid
(te
I ct Ic t tctc lat)
lectuie
Thomas F. Conlon,
Couselor in the Depart-
ment of State, will give a
lecture at 11 a.m Friday,
Nov. 16, in the Auditorium
of the Jenkins Fine Arts
Building. Mr. Conlon has
served in Indonesia, the
Philippines, Singapore,
Vietnam, and Thailand.
He will lecture on "Con-
temporary Problems in
Southeast Asia including
drug traffic and the "boat
people A question and
answer session will follow
the lecture. The public is
invited to attend.
ieeccrte�t
The Kappa Sigma
Fraternity will present
their 2nd annual Kappa
Sigma Raw Egg Eating
Contest, Tuesday, Nov.
13, at the Elbo Room.
Door Prizes will be given,
and the First Place prize
will be $35. Seconu place
will be $15 and third place
winner will get a case of
beer. Partying begins at
8:30 with reduced bever-
age prices. Advance tick-
ets can be bought from
any Kappa Sigma brother
for 25 cenis. 50 cents at
the door. Contest entries
should call 752-5543 or
758-1312.
The November meeting
of the Eastern North
Carolina section of the
American Chemical
Society will be on Wed
Nov. 14, at 7 p.m. in
Room 201, Flanagan
building on the East
Carolina University cam-
pus. The featured speaker
is Dr. Gerhard Popp of
Eastman Kodak who will
speak on "The Inside
Story of Color Photo-
graphy
He will demonstrate
how basic principles are
combined with silver
halide chemistry in a
variety of ways to produce
the transparencies, motion
pictures, conventional
prints and instant prints
which today comprise color
photography. The public is
invited.
smelha
tuifeey�ticct clep
The ECU Photo lab
is looking for
qualified
photographers.
Apply at
The East Carolinian
office
iu$t)y
There will be a meet-
ing of the Student National
Environmental Health As-
sociation (SNEHA) Wed
Nov. 14, at 7 in auditorium
101-A at the Belk building.
PLans for a Christmas
party as well as other
projects will be discussed.
All environmental health
majors are urged to
attend, other interested
persons are welcome.
commuiicr
An Episcopal service of
Holy Communion will be
celebrated Wednesday
evening, NOv. 14, in the
chapel of the Methodist
Student Center (5th St.
across from Garrett
Dorm). The service will be
at 5:30 p.m. with the
Episcopal Chaplain, the
Rev. Bill Haddenc celebra-
ting. Supper will be served
at 6 p.m. following the
service. A Bible Study at 7
p.m led by the chaplain,
will be held at the home of
Eleanor Coleman, 1003 E.
5th St. (across from main
gate).
study tiall
On the Hill in the
basement of Scott Hall, a
quiet, supervised STUDY
HALL is open to anyone
who would like to come in
and study. It is open
Monday, Tuesday and
Thursday from 8 to 11
p.m.
I ij 11 t in
The Kappa Sigma
Pledges in conjunction
with the Alpha Delta Pi
pledges will hold their
"Greeks Go Hawaiian, Pig
Pickin Dinner will be
served from 6-8, Friday,
Nov. 16, at the Kappa
Sigma House.
Get your advance tic-
kets from any Kappa
Sigma or Alpha Delta Pi
pledge for $4.00. Have all
the beer and pig you can
handle!
Be there, aloha!
Thursday you can win
your Thanksgiving turkey
at the Turkey Shoot in the
Mendenhall Bowling Cen-
ter. A $1.50 entry fee
allows you to bowl one (1)
ball at a full set of pins on
ten consecutive lanes. If
you knock down at least
eight (8) pins with just
nine (9) of the balls, you
WIN A TURKEY! (Limit
two turkeys per person).
Remember, Thursday,
NOv. 15, from 7 p.m. until
10 p.m. at Mendenhall.
You can try as many times
as you like so don't miss
it! '
ptil fceta
laimtxiai
There will be a meet-
ing for all Phi Beta
Lambda members and
prospective members Tues-
day at 4 p.m. Nov. 13, in
Rawl 103. This is an
important meeting. We
will discuss the raffel, the
bake sale, publicity, parti-
cipation and attendance. It
is important to the club
and to you as a member to
attend and participate. See
you there.
�ticn ccfitest
The Alpha Xi Delta
Fall Pledge Class is having
a Shag Contest at Chapter
X on Nov. 13th from 9
p.m. to 1 a.m. Advanced
tickets are 25 cents and
tickets at the door at 50
cents. Door prizes to be
jjiven away.
EVAN'S
SEAFOOD MARKET
Serving The Greenville
Area For 31 Years
A Variety of Fresh Fish, Including
Shrimp, Oysters-In-The-Shell, Soft-Shelled
Crabs, Hard-Shelled Crabs, Deviled Crab
Meat, Fresh Crab Meat, Scallops, and
Lobster Tails.
No Chart For Dressing
X03 W. 9th St.
MNMMMMNMMMMMMMMMMM
law
The Law School Ad-
mission Test will be
offered at East Carolina
University on Saturday,
December 1, 1979. Appli-
cation blanks are to be
completed and mailed to
Educational Testing Ser-
vice, Box 966-R, Prince-
ton, N.J. 08540. Regis-
tration deadline is Nov. 5,
1979. Applications may be
obtained from the ECU
Testing Center, Speight
Building, Room 105.
Mr. John Childers,
Director, ECU Testing
Center, requests that all
persons who have taken
the College Level Examin-
ation Program (CLEP)
English Composition test
from May, 1979, to
October, 1979, contact the
ECU Testing Center at
their earliest convenience.
�ctcliili
The James B. Mallory
Men's Residence Council
scholarship will be award-
ed this semester to a
young man who is a
memeber of the Men's
Residence Council. The
scholarship will be based
on need and residence hall
contributions. Applicants
must have at least a 2.5
grade point average. Ap-
lications may be picked up
in each dorm coun-
selor's office.
racquet-ball
The ECU Racquetball
Club is trying to identify
all interested faculty, staff
and students. Clinics and
tournaments are being
planned with competition
between schools being
scheduled. All interested
persons, please contact
Nanct Mize, 757-6387, 204
Memorial Gym.
jcresicim
meetly
There -will be meeting
in the basement ot Jones
Dorm Wed. night. You are
urged to come and join.
Please bring ideas for the
constitution. The time will
be 6:30 p.m.
clheml�tiy
Dr. William E. Hatfield
of the Department of
Chemistry at The Univer-
sity of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill will present a
seminar on "Designed
Synthesis and Structure of
Highly Conducting Mole-
cular Materials" Nov. 9
The ECU Women's
Rugby Team is playing a
practice game against
UNC-Greensboro on Sun-
day, Nov. 18 at 3 p.m. on
the Allied Health sports
field. Anyone interested in
seeing what women's rug-
by looks like or any
woman who is interested
in playing is encouraged to
come and watch. For
further information call
758-8482.
u fa
o
Each piece as unique as
herself. A distinctive
design in flowing script.
pfemsa aMow 3 weeks for delivery
30-day account
Extandad tarflta
anfcAmarcacd
Master Charge
American Eipraaa
Cards Honored
menetyd
OBEENVltlE, N.C,
Carolina East Mall
Qraanvilla N.C. 27834
The Graduate Record
Examinationwill be offered
at East Carolina University
on Saturday, January 12,
1980. Application blanks
are to be completed and
mailed to Educational
Testing Service, Box 966-R
Princeton, N.J. 08540.
Registration deadline is
November 28, 1979. Ap-
plications may be obtained
from the ECU Testing
Center, Speight Building,
Room 105.
Psi Chi � Psychology
National Honor Society
will have a meeting Tues.
Nov. 13, 7:30 p.m. in Sp
129. Harper Taylor, a local
dentist, will conduct a
program on his use of
acupuncture. Nonmembers
welcome. The Fall induc-
tion and dinner will be
held on Thurs. Nov. 15, at
the Methodist Student
Center, 501 E. 5th St.
Members are asked to
attend.
The ECU Photo Lab
has an immediate opening
for the position of Staff
Photographer. Anyone
who is interested in
applying for the position
should fill out an applica-
tion at the office of the
East Carolinian in the Old
South Building across from
the Library.
mi.
Hillel is having a Bagel
and Lox Dinner Thursday,
Nov. 15th, at 6:30 p.m. in
the Mendenhall Multi-
-urpose Room. This all you
can eat dinner will cost $2
for members and $3 for
nonmembers. All Jewish
students are invited to
attend. For more informa-
tion call Jeff Gleiberman
752-9453 or Mike Free-
lander 752-9473.
ecc
On Tuesday at 5 p.m.
the East Carolina Gay
Community will meet at
the Newman House of 608
East 9th St. Jay Ritxer, a
counselor at the Pitt
County Mental Health
Center, will speak on
psychology and the gay
communtiy.
l(r at II
delta
The next Sigma Tau
Delta meeting will be held
November 14. Terry Davis,
author of Vision Quest,
will speak.
BONANZA'S FAMOUS
&
m
t- ��
sf


:

I
I
EYEQINNEj
FOR
Imagine, this delicious steak plus a steaming hot baked potato or french
fries and a slice of grilled Texas toast. And salad you con pile a mile high
as often as you like . fresh greens and vegetables from our "Discov-
ery" Salad Bar. What a treat! And now you can get two complete meals
for just $5.99! Delicious!
Call 756-6508 to reserve banquet
room for groups
BONANZA'S FAMOUS
Offer valid with Coupon Only
thru December 15,1979
arn� ah - laalii at if a I mwm�mt
II DM HK tJVIIU I LSI J1JI
D.A.KELLY'S FEAST
It's here: D.A. Kelly's "Fruitful Day
Come see what our girls have to give away!
Oxford Sweaters with stripes are selling,
"Comeon down we're all yelling!
Lurex Shirts, plaid skirts, blazers too-
All are waiting -just for you!
Whoever comes can register for a "beast
A twenty-pound turkey-Oh! What a feast!
Ladies gathering clothes for the fall,
Think of D.A. Kelly's, with something for all-1
SPECIAL GROUP OF PULLOVER & WRAP SWEATERS
were $9.98 & $13.98
nowjust$7.00-$10.00
OXFORD SWEATERS
values at $15.98
Buy 1 and get 1 free
LUREX TRIM SHIRTS
values up to $13.98
now only $6.98
Buy a blazer of your choice
and find a matching skirt at 1 3 off-
Cowl necks in new fall colors
Buy 1 at $8.98 and get
another for just $2.99
i
SALE
Mon-Sat
Carolina East Mall Only
10-9 Dally
Carolina East
Mall
�;





The East Carolinian
Editorials
S?Op
mions
Tuesday, November 13, 1979 Page 4
Greenville, N.C,
Melvin rides again
The SGA meeting to approve
appropriations Friday night left a sour
taste in the mouths of everyone
concerned, from legislators to campus
organizations vying for funds. With a
little less than $10,000, the appropria-
tions committee tried to satisfy ten
organizations that desperately need
money, the three largest appropriations
going to the Visual Arts Forum, ECU
Playhouse and the Model United
Nations. The reason for the lack of
available funds was the mammoth
transit budget passed last Monday.
SGA President Brett Melvin said in
a prepared speech to the legislature last
night that the $70,504.50 transit bill
showed a lack of leadership and
understanding in the appropriations
committee and the legislature. And he
was right.
But Melvin failed to mention that
the committee was working from
sketchy information from SGA Treasur-
er Ricky Lowe and the statements of
Chubby Abshire and Leonard Flem-
ming, SGA Transit managers.
So Melvin comes riding up in front
of the legislature on his white horse
with the solution to everyone's
problems: He vetoed the transit bill and
proposed one of his own, one that
returned $14,504.50 to the appropria-
tions committee. He did this with a
reserve fund that no one knew about
until recently; therefore, he and Ricky
Lowe came out smelling like roses. But
roses have thorns.
Obvious questions arise. Why didn't
Lowe tell anyone of the reserve fund
until now? Why did he tell Brett Melvin
instead of the people working on the
transit bill? And these questions were
asked by many of the legislators at the
meeting, and they received less than
satisfactory answers. Many people left
the meeting grumbling and cussing.
The whole affair was a mess. It was
a planned show with Brett Melvin at
center stage making everyone else look
like horses' posteriors. And it worked.
The legislators were disgruntled, but
half of them didn't even know what
happened.
At least the final result will benefit
important student organizations, and it
is doubtful that anybody will complain
about that. But the complaining should
be: Stop keeping large sums of money
around without letting the legislature
know about it.
One legislator asked Brett Melvin
the most important question of the
evening: "If you know of any other
accounts that we don't, would you tell
us about them?" Good question.
Sound and fury
The demonstrations late Monday
afternoon indicated one important and
central point � many of the protesting
students knew little about the situation
at the American embassy in Tehran.
Those who knew even a little about
the situation seemed unsure of
themselves as they marched around
campus shouting anti-Khomeini slo-
gans.
The people who protested should
know that anti-Iran demonstrations
reinforce the general anti-American
feelings echoed by the radical students
who are holding more than 60
American hostages. These Iranians, like
it or not, may harm those Americans to
get back at the United States for all the
anti-Iran feelings that are floating
around at this time.
Those present at the demonstrations
could not help but notice that the
political expressions of a few were
secondary to a desire of the masses to
be seen on local television news. As
soon as reporters from the television
stations arrived and unloaded their
cameras outside Scott Dorm, hundreds
of students began shouting epithets and
waving American flags from their
windows. It seemed to us that they
wanted to be seen more than they
wanted to be heard.
The students who held the rallies
yesterday did nothing more than mill
around downtown Greenville last night.
If they really had something to say, it
seems that the event would have been
better organized, and that the group
sponsoring the demonstration would
have made speeches and carried signs.
Non-violence is also a trait of a
successful demonstration, for violence
signifies the ignorance of those who
destroy property or kidnap people.
Some students yelled and screamed
that they were out for blood � Iranian
blood. This is the opinion of a crazed
mob, one which we must condemn. It
makes no sense at all for us to assault a
group of people because of the
nationality or political beliefs. The
Iranians who attend ECU are here
because they want to learn, not because
they want to force any ideology on us.
They have nothing to do with the
Iranian students in their country who
are holding American hostages.
Chancellor Thomas Brewer said he
feels it is time for cooler heads to
prevail. The Carter administration is
using this strategy. ECU students
should do the same.
Letters to the Editor
Police state mentality prevalent
T� w,t Edt0r' decriminalized in twelve of
What happened to 157 ,he nationg gtateg dud-
nigh school students in . T iU n �� TL
xti i n .1 �ng North Carolina. The
Wake County recently was , � . . lr
such a low level bummer bast,ons of 8mu� 8e'
that for days I have been righteousness and totaht-
too ppressed even to find arian control appear to be
the words to express my gearing down for a
feelings on the subject, protracted war on dope.
This kind of police-state The fact that they cannot
tactic is indicative of an win that war and are not
alter their conviction that
it is a war worth fighting.
ugly repressive backlash of
anti-drug tactics in this
country. In spite of the
fact, or maybe because of
it, marijuana has been
even attempting to really
wipe out the dope traffic
in this country, does not
appear to soften their
resolve to fight it or to
juana industry is a lucra-
tive 145 billion-a-year in-
dustry. Business heads are
The best we can do already salivating at the
with the marijuana issue prospect of legalization,
in this country is to learn but that may take another
about it and accept it 15 years to bring about,
because it is obviously
here to stay. Every day Meanwhile, busting
the nation's drug enforce- kids' 8etting them thrown
ment agencies run up out of scho�l. and gener-
another million dollar bill "? 8crewi�g �P their lives
that the tax payers, many 18 no 8oiution to &
Pop's People
Football raises consciousness
By LARRY POPELKA
In the beginning
God created the pigskin.
Then He created the
Green Bay Packers. And
then Monday Night Foot-
ball.
That's what my football
fanatic uncle told me when
I was a kid.
Watching football with
him was always sort of a
religious experience. We'd
listen to Humble Howard
and Dandy Don speak the
gospel. Instead of taking
wine and bread com-
munion, we'd split some
beer and popcorn. And
throughout the game we'd
freqeuently pause to pray
for a win.
Honor thy Father and
thy Mother and thy
almighty Football Team, I
was taught, and someday
maybe you'll reach a state
of higher consciousness�
the playoffs.
I never fully believed
this, of course, since there
are many other things in
life besides football. Like
the Dallas Cowgirls. Or
the Irrestible Ewes. Or the
Chicago Honey Bears.
But football has always
seemed somewhat sacred
to me. After all, why did
they name a team the New
Orleans Saints?
Yet through all these
years football worshipers
have never had an organ-
ized method of expressing
their faith. Until this
season.
Say hallelujah to the
Church of Monday Night
Football!
Last August Ricky
Slade, 30, a Santa Bar-
bara, Calif marketing

consultant, was stewing
about the lack of respect
some of his friends
demonstrated toward the
holy sport.
"I'm a divorcee, and
very single Slade says.
"I'd get phone calls
during the game and lost a
lot of relationships be-
what they do.
There is also a com-
mandment after: Prepare
for the day when the
Super Bowl is played on
Monday Night Football
for on that day there will
be heaven on Earth.
So far about 1000
football fanatics around
"i the beginning God creat&d
the pigskin. Then He created
the Green Bay Packers. And
then Monday Night Football
cause of Monday Night
Football. I thought, if I
were in church nobody
would get upset
So Slade, with the help
of some football-worship-
ping pals, started his own
church, which is now
incorporated at P.O. Box
2127, Santa Barbara, Calif.
93102. It meets every
Monday night during foot-
ball season in a local bar
to observe the weekly
gridiron rites.
Slade, who has dubbed
himself reverend, has also
handed down six com-
mandments to the masses:
I. Thou shalt keep
Monday night holyand
tune in early.
II. Honor thy holy point
spreadfor it is right on.
III. Thou shalt not
covet thy neighbor's beer.
IV. Thou shalt not
commit adultery during
halftime highlights.
V. Thou shalt stay
tuned until, the final
gunfor the spread may
change.
VI. Forgive those who
bet against their home
teamfor they know not
the country have seen the
light and joined Slade's
following under either the
conversion plan (which
includes a no-cut member-
ship card, sacred scroll
with the six command-
ments, a schedule and a
decal for $5) or the deacon
plan (which includes a
T-shirt for $6 more).
"One guy who wrote
us says he worships on his
Colts run says Slade,
bubbling over like a
Moonie at an airport.
"Another guy said he had
been wandering aimlessly
for years. One guy said he
would have joined the
Hare Krishnas if we
hadn't come along
A few weeks ago Slade
and friends made a
Monday night pilgrimage
to the Miami-Oakland
game and converted Oak-
land quarterback Ken
Stabler�under the deacon
plan.
Slade' is also working
on setting" up temples
(bars) in each of the 26
NFL cities, where mem-
bers of his church can
worship the game every
Monday night.
"We try to keep a
tongue in cheek attitude
says Sla� e, "There should
be room to laugh. We're
not uoing anything reallv
sacrilegious. Especially for
California.
"Here you've got
drive-in church'
churches that worship the
devil. And in New Guinea
If people can do that, I
don't think we're that far
off the line.
"People have all day
Sunday to go to normal
church. Ours is just for
Monday nights. We've
only gotten two or three
letters from people who
thought we were in bad
faith
That hasn't stopped
Slade from sending Foot-
ball Church literature to
Billy Graham to try to
convert him to their way.
Rev. Graham hasn't re-
sponded yet.
Nor has ABC-TV,
which carries every Mon-
day night game.
Slade says that's be-
cause ABC stands for
Already Been Converted.
Or maybe it's because
many of the church
members are trying to
exorcise the Devil�Ho-
ward Cosell�from the
broadcasts.
The church is also
-rying to exorcise ABC's
Thursday and Sunday
night game.
And if that doesn't
work Rev. Ricky an
friends will pray to that
great football in the sky.
Amen.
of whom smoke marijuana,
must subsidize. The mari-
country's drug problems.
Jay Stone
The East Carolinian
MANAGING EDITOR
Richard Green
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Anita Lancaster
NEWS EDITOR
ASST. NEWS EDITOR
FEATURES EDITOR
ASST. FEATURES EDITOR
EDITOR
Marc Barnes
DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
Robert M. Swaim
ASST. DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
Terry Herndon
ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR
Cheryl Holder
BUSINESS MANAGER
Steve O Geary
Karen Wendt
Terry Gray
Bill Jones
K.C. Needham
SPORTS EDITOR
ASST. SPORTS EDITOR
COPY EDIT6R
AD TECH. SUPER.
Charles Chandler
Jimmy Dupree
Diane Henderson
Paul Lincke
THE EAST CAROUNIAN It the student
newspaper of East Carolina University
sponsored by the Media Board of ECU
and it distributed each Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic year
weekly during the summer.
Offices are located on the second floor of
the Publications Center Old South
Building. Our mailing address It- Old
South Building, ECU, Greenville NC
mT834.
The phone numbers are: 757-0366 6367





Drug charges
still pending
13 November 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 5
"Bv JOHNNY JOHNSON
Stuff Writer
During the Campus
Security's weekly press
briefing Director Joseph
Calder reviewed recent
Security activity.
There are still two
pending drug charges; one
in which 25 hits of alleged
LSD and six ounces of
marijuana were confis-
cated on Oct. 18 from
I instead Dorm. Only fight
davs before, on the 10th,
93" hits of alleged LSD
were confiscated in Slay
Dorm.
Calder cited that both
of these students are still
in school pending verifi-
cation from Raleigh of the
drugs. Calder added that
no effort was being made
to keep those students
from leaving ECU or
Greenville.
When asked about any
foreseeable problems with
anti-Iranian activities, Cal-
der indicated he did not
expect any uprisings.
When asked if his depart-
ment had any sort of
contingency plan in case
some sort of "violence or
other activity occurred
Calder answered with a
confident "No Calder
added that his opinion was
"we should just sit back
and do nothing
Black greeks, white greeks
explain: similar yet different
Winthrop soccer
players have no
clue in shooting
ROCK HILL, S.C. (AP)
� John Imholz says he
has no idea why he and a
teammate on the Winthrop
College soccer team were
shot at as they walked
near the campus.
"Somebodv inside veil-
ed out, 'Hey, look here
And then they shot at us.
Steve got most of it
Imholz said after the
shooting last Friday.
"All I can figure is that
somebody was looking for
something to shoot at.
And we happened to come
along at the right time
he said.
Two young Rock Hill
men were arrested Satur-
day and charged with
assault and battery with
intent to kill in connection
with the shooting.
City Recorder Charles
Chiles today denied bond
for the two men during a
hearing in Rock Hill.
Rock Hill police identi-
fied the two as Raymond
Boyd, 18, and David
Deville Robinson, 20.
According to police,
Imholz, 18, of Greenville,
and Steve Arnold, 21, of
Myrtle Beach, were walk-
ing along a road near the
Rock Hill camrus when
someone in a passing car
fired a shotgun.
Arnold, wounded in the
face and chest, was listed
in satisfactory condition
Sunday at York General
Hospital in Rock Hill.
Doctors say he may lose
his right eye, although it
is too soon to be sure.
Imholz was treated and
released from the hospital
early Saturday.
News of the shooting
came just as Winthrop was
preparing for the finals of
the NAIA District 6 soccer
tournament against Ers-
kine College.
At a prep ralle,
Winthrop Coach Jim
Casada said Arnold heard
that the team had con-
sidered canceling the
match. Casada said Arnold
telephoned and "told me
that he wanted us to play
and play to win Win-
throp defeated Erskine 2-0
for the title Saturday
afternoon.
By ARAH VENABLE
Staff Writer
Fraternities and sororities have
basically the same goals, brother or
sisterhood. There are differences, how-
ever, in how they go about achieving this
ideal, especially between predominantly
black or white Greek organizations.
Jeff Triplett, a member of Sigma Phi
Epsilon, said the major purpose of his
social fraternity is to promote ideals, good
academics, character and good conduct, at
the same time giving inspiration to
members.
Pratt Simmons of Alpha Phi Alpha
fraternity said that their purpose is
similar. The major differences are in
pledging procedures.
'We're more open with pledging
policies Simmons said. According to
Simmons, black fraternities pledge
anywhere from six to nine weeks.
Triplett said white fraternities pledge
between eight and ten weeks.
Both black and white fraternities have
smokers (a type of orientation for those
persons interested in pledging)'but Sigma
Phi Epsilon, like other white fraternities,
bids on pledges all year long. Triplett said
there is a formal rush, but if a young man
decides he wants to pledge into a
fraternity sometime during the year, he
can be accepted as a pledgee.
Black fraternities, on the other hand,
generally accept pledgees only twice a
year, once in the5 fall and once in the
spring.
Triplett added that blacks appear to
have a stricter pledge period, and their
requirements to get in look more
stringent.
"Black fraternities do a lot of things in
public Triplett noted. He said Sigma Phi
Epsilon's pledgees are not asked to do
things in the open. "They're for us he
added, "not for another fraternity
According to Simmons, the Alpha's
stress the importance of getting to know
potential brothers and the history to
pledgees so that they will be sure they are
doing the right thing.
"After you pledge, it's too late to turn
back he said.
Activities are performed on a week by
week basis, and the pledges are tested at
the end of each week. Pledgees have to
recognize big brothers by speaking to
them when they see them. Simmons said
speaking helps the pledgees to have
respect for the big brothers.
Alpha Phi Alpha has a smoker, but
Simmons said they don't recruit.
Triplett said, "Not every fraternity is
for everyone
He added that each is what the
individual makes of it.
"Anyone who's considering joining a
fraternity or sorority should go around to
all the groups and observe before you
join. When it boils down to everything,
it's the people in the house � not the
Greek letters
Simmons said the black fraternities on
campus are relatively new and therefore
behind. The white fraternities, he said,
are established.
"For example, the white fraternity
houses are already paid for he noted,
adding that black fraternities had to come
from nowhere to get what they have now.
According to Simmons, one of the
main concerns of Alpha Phi Alpha
Fraternity is the community.
"Blacks off campus are reluctant to
associate with students. We're willing to
do anything to get involved and let people
know we're here and we care
Marriane Edwards of Alpha Phi
sorority said, "Going Greek is an asset to
the individual
Edwards said her sorority has a fall
rush, an open rush and open bidding.
"The girls decide where they want to
go she stated.
According to Edwards, the sorority
pledge period for most predominately
white sororities is between three weeks to
sixteen or seventeen, depending on the
sorority.
Peggy Davidson, a newly inducted
member of Alpha Phi, said pledging
consists of getting to know the sisters,
visitation, getting a gift for the house, and
having a party or parties for the big
sisters. She feels that becoming Greek
helps one to become more well-rounded.
"You learn a lot about people and
individuals Davidson said.
Karen Dye, a member of Alpha Kappa
Alpha noted that the major difference in
black and white sororities is that "they
(white sororities) have houses which allow
them to take part in activities together.
That helps to promote sisterhood. We
pledge for life � they don't necessarily
Dye also mentioned that black
sororities and fraternities give block shows
in which they "step" and try to promote
the organization. Whites do not.
Alcohol use on the rise
in nation's universities
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
In response to the growing use of
alcohol on college campuses, officials at
some schools are waging campaigns to
promote "responsible drinking
"I don't think the problem is getting
out of hand, but we do want to stress the
idea of responsible drinking said Elmer
E. Meyer, vice chancellor for student life
at East Carolina University.
In North Carolina, studies indicate that
77 to 86 percent of the students
interviewed were drinkers, and the
percentages seem to be growing.
In a recent national survey by Time
magazine, as many as 95 percent of
students surveyed classified themselves as
drinkers.
"Students are waking up to alcohol
again said University of North Carolina
researcher Dennis McCarty.
M. Lee Salter, director of counseling at
North Carolina State University, said the
increase in student drinking probably
could be linked directly to a decrease in
the use of illegal drugs since the early
1970s.
Research shows that students drink for
most of the same reasons they used illegal
drugs: to relax, enjoy the taste or to get
high.
"Drinking is a social function and
social drinking is more popular now said
Chapel Hill tavern owner Harrison
"Mickey" Ewell.
At N.C. State, 77 percent of students
surveyed said they are drinkers, while 86
percent at UNC said they drink at least
occasionally.
At East Carolina,
than 1,000 students
have at least taken a
also showed 40 to 45 percent of students
drink as often as once a week and about
15 percent felt they had a drinking
problem, according to Marty Zusman,
director of the Alcohol Task Force, which
did the study.
According to one N.C. State University
health educator, booze was seldom heard
of on the campus scene two years ago.
a survey of more
shows 91 percent
drink. They survey
Now, she said,
�woodwork
'it's coming out of the
ECU students honored
Five ECU parks and
recreation majors were
honored recently for their
help in constructing a
recreational facility for the
Walter B. Jones Alcoholic
Rehabilitation Center.
The students helped to
design and lay out the half
mile trail. The area now
features a picnic area, two
small bridges, a gateway.
a boardwalk across a
marshy area and signs to
identify plants and trees
along the route.
The project was co-
ordinated by the Parks and
Recreation Department,
primarily by Dr. Raymond
Busbee of the department.
The students honored
were: Sam Bland of
Atlantic Beach, Cathie
Choate of Willsboro, New
York, David Diehl of
Greenville, Greg Grimes of
Siler City and Bernice
McWhorter of Waxhaw.
SGA
continued from page 1
this situation, and the bill was ramrodded
through the legislature
Pat Quinn, a day representative and
senior class vice-president, added that
"the legislature jumped at a proposal to
save money, but didn't take time to think
about the best interests of the students.
The brown route was eliminated because
of low ridership, which in my opinion was
due to lack of reliability of the buses
For others, the passage of the bill
legislature to increase the present $1,151
budget of that organization.
In other business, graduate student
representative Nicky Francis defended
members of the SGA Executive Council
from an Appropriations Committee
suggestion that would have cut their $25
monthly salaries. Francis said that it
would be "poor judgment to totally wipe
out the president's cabinet
After discussion which resulted in
minor amendments to the SGA Executive
Council budget, the legislators approved
the bill with salaries intact.
The legislature also received the
represented a chance "to divide part of the resignation of representative Hope
$14,500 savings among student organiza- McMillan, and heard appeals from
tions that have been inadequately funded. Cabinet member Dorothy Homer for
To Bill Barbe, a student who had earlier committee volunteers,
asked the legislators to take academic Kathy Vollmer, co-chairperson of the
student organizations more seriously when Appropriations Committee, moved to table
allocating funds, the development was "a a11 other funding bills until the next
step in the right direction session, saying that her committee needed
Jonathan Plott, speaking on behalf of time t0 consider how the extra $14,500
the Model UN Club, had also asked the should be used.
Shrimpers
Feast
LOTSA GOLDEN FRIED
SHRIMP � FRENCH
FRIES � HUSH PUPPIES
�COLESLAW
2.99
SHONEYS
TRUSTEES
continued from page 1
into the Institution of
Nutrition at UNC. This is a
high honor, according to
Dr. Maier.
At the end of the open
meeting, Chancellor
Thomas Brewer said a few
words about work still to
be done by the university.
Specifically, Brewer
spoke of severe salary
problems, equipment pro-
blems and physical facili-
ties. According to Brewer,
175 faculty members are
sharing offices.
He also cited a
$180,000 estimate to fix
the falling roof on the Old
South building, which the
university just does not
have.
Pizza inn
AMERICAS FAVORITE PIZZA

PIZZA BUFFET
ALL THE PIZZA AND
SALAD YOU CAN EAT
$2.39
Mon. - Fri. 11:30-2:00
Mon, fiP Tues. 6:00-8:00
Evening buffet 0t.B9
758-6366 Hwy 364 bypass Greenville , If. C,
f
s
S





The East Carolinian
nian 1 m
features
Tuesday, November 13, 1979 Page 6
Greenville, N.C,
Student life at East Carolina
Friday afternoon binge
By ICC. NEEDHAM
Assistant Features Eidtor
The Friday afternoon
binge is an intrinsic part
of student life at East
Carolina. Commonly refer-
red to as the Happy Hour
Syndrome, this tradition is
a favorite of all students
and is one few will regret
having carried out.
There are those who
fondly remember the good
old days of Happy Hour at
the Buc or at Blimpies,
but the majority of the
student body, when asked
what bar comes to mind
when Happy Hour is
mentioned, reply, "Elbo
Room
Perpetually jammed on
Friday afternoons with
students seeking oblivion,
the Elbo Room has been a
favorite Happy Hour ren-
dezvous for well over two
years. The music is disco,
the lights are low and the
atmosphere iscrowded.
"The thing about
happy hours a student
offered last Friday, "is
that you've gotta get
drunk whether you want to
or not just to be able to
stand all the people
"What?" another
yelled. "Oh, crowded?
Sure it's crowded, but you
get to see everyone
Regardless, the crowds
have never been a deter-
rent to those looking for
relief from the agonies of
classes. Loud music,
plenty of cold beer and
lots of people to socialize
with are the main draws,
though there are other
attractions.
"If you don't have a
date for the weekend
one junior confided, "you
just head to happy hour
and find someone
Chapter X inaugurated
a happy hour last winter
and dubbed it T.O.E.T.S.
Day' (P�On Everything;
Tomorrow's Saturday).
The pace is a little less
frenzied, but the motives
for coming remain the
same.
"Cheap beer a stu-
dent stated, leaning
against the bar, signaling
for another.
"I like Happy Hour music each bar has to
here another said, "be- offer.
cause it's not quite as
jammed as other places, The pace of happy
but if there was only one hour, which tends to grow
happy hour at one bar and steadily more insane as
I had to climb over people the hours pass, hits its
to get in the door, I'd be wildest after 6 p.m. and
there. All week long I look rarely lets up until the
forward to blowing it out bartenders wearily an-
at Happy Hour
Of course, there's also
Pantana's, which lacks a
dance floor, but not a
following.
"It's got my kind of
people, my kind of music most to sleep
and my kind of beer'l
one senior grinned, adding
as he took a long gulp of
beer, "I wouldn't miss
happy hour for the
world
On Friday afternoons,
students can be seen
heading in droves toward
the downtown area. Jay-
walking, in bunches and in
pairs, many head from one
bar to another meetings
friends and draining
beers. Few stay in one bar
for the duration, because
most students enjoy the
different atmospheres and
nounce, "Last call
When the music cuts off
and the lights cut on,
students shuffle off
through dropped beer
cans, some to eat, but
It's not surprising that
as one freshman whines,
"happy hour just kills
Friday nights. Everyone
passes out Yet, relat-
ively few students find
cause for complaint about
the happy hour tradition at
ECU.
"Happy hours senior
Margaret Nelson grinned,
"are the reason I've made
it through three and a half
years. Without them, I'd
have gone crazy a long
time ago
Cool it!
Four ECU girls cool off with "Pop's" ice cream in
Parque Central, Heredia, Costa Rica. From left)
Virginia Johnston, Christ Martin, Donna Wilke and
Cheryl Boehm spent spring semester 1979 in the tropics
on the ECU Costa Rica Program. Dr. R.E. Cramer,
Director of the Costa Rica Program, will speak tomorrow
night in BD-302. (Photo by Richard Green)
Experienced smoker wins
Spend spring break in Hawaii
The Bird-of-paradise
attractions.
one
Hawaii's
Deep blue waters and silvery white sands, golden
sunshine and balmy breezes, exotic tropical plants and
delicious Polynesian food � these are only a few of the
almost limitless enticements to spend a few enchanted
days in the fantasy world of Hawaii. The ECU Student
Union is sponsoring an enchanted week in Hawaii
during the University's Spring Break.
The trip convenienth departs from Raleigh-Durham
Airport on Saturday, M ch 8, 1980. None of the added
expenses or arrangements for getting to Atlanta or New
York interfere with the traveller's pleasure. Participants
return to Raleigh-Durham Airport on March 15. Travel
is on a United Airlines jet, and participants spend a full
week in Waikiki.
The price per person for the trip is as follows:
Single Occupancy 1850.00
Double Occupancy $725.00
Triple Occupancy $700.00
Quad Occupancy $675.00
The figures represent two price increases (because of
air fare increases), one in August and one in October.
We are assured that these prices are firm if we sell our
reserved fifty places by January 7, 1980; if not, each
participant's cost will increase by $50.00 The Student
Union Hawaii Trip is one of the best prices available. It
is certain that future trips will be even more expensive
due to energy costs, and therefore, air fare increases.
These prices include several "extras" in addition to
the standard air fare and in-flight meals. It includes
transfers, baggage handling for two bags per person
between the airport and hotel, hotel accomodations for
seven nights at Waikiki, fresh flower lei greeting upon
arrival, hotel porterage of two bags per person, a
briefingorientation the morning after arrival, a half-day
Honolulu CityPunchbown Crater Tour and the service
See HAWAII, page 8
Tempers and lethargy
By BILL JONES
Features Editor
"I once smoked one
bowl-full of tobacco from
Durham Hospital all the
way to the stop light up
here (the intersection of
highways 11 and 264).
That's a lot longer than
what I did today, and that
was with only one match
54-year-old Curtis Joy-
ner took fjrat prize at ti
Tindefbox rirst Annua
Pipe Smoking Contest
Saturday, Nov. 10.
"I could have easily
kept on for 30 or 40
minutes longer Joyner
continued. Joyner has
been smoking a pipe since
he was 18-years-old.
Last Saturday his ex-
perience paid off. Joyner
received a plaque from
Carolina East Mall, where
the contest was held
outside The Tinderbox, a
tobacco specialty shop. He
was also presented a blue
ribbon and a $150 "Eagle
Claw" meerschaum pipe.
Mr. Joyner was lucky
to make it to the contest at
all. His wrist still bore the
plastic hospital identifica-
tion bracelet which had
been issued to him the
evening before.
He had entered the
hospital for tests, but he
was released, only to
return next week.
Mr. Joyner's secret for
winning is a technique he
calls "vacuuming"
gently blowing air through
the pipe rather than
drawing sir into it. He
says this forces heat
upward evenly, burning
unused tobacco and mak-
ing the bowl last longer.
The Tinderbox contest
drew a variety of con-
testants, from the "ex-
perienced" smoker like
Mr. Joyner to the less
indoctrinated.
Twenty-four-year-old
Cliff Strickland lasted
more than half the length
of Mr. Joyner's winning
time of 60 minutes.
Strickland has been smok-
ing only 2 weeks.
Dina Jackmofsky, the
only female entered in the
gone well David Cobb,
another entry, replied,
"Bourbon and coke
wouldn't have gone bad
either
There was even a
"booby or in the case of
this contest, a "burn out"
prize awarded to the
smoker who lost "fire"
first. The prize was a
plaque from The Tinder-
rcm
coul
box which remtf. "i
tried, but he cou
it.
competition, didn't do
badly either. Ms. Jack-
mofsky's time was 24:01.
"I wasn't concentrating
she explained after the
contest.
Leon Gibson, with a
time of 52 minutes,
captured second place. His
reward was a ribbon and a
Caminetto pipe.
Third place was taken
by Larry Carnes, time 46
minutes, 40 �ec��d.
Carnes felt real good
about winning but was
surprised to have done so
well. He received a ribbon
and a handsome yellow-
stemmed Verona pipe.
No contestant coula
help but grin as one by
one, their pipes went out,
disqualifying them. Jim through direct involvement
Goes, whose time was 22 in the event again,
minutes, 4 seconds, chuck-
led, "I went to pieces in
the clutch. I think I was Walter McCauley,
worried about missing the manager of The Tinderbox
(ECU football) game and chief judge of the
Third placer Leon Gib- contest, grinned unmer-
son said, "Some good cifully. I could say nothing
strong ale would have but, "It's only right
It was won by none
other than this reporter,
with a smashing time of 10
minutes flat.
Never will I try to get
an angle on a story
Coming
might be cured by break Attractions
By K.C. NEEDHAM
Assistant Features Editor
As the Thanksgiving
holidays near, tempers are
running shorter while en-
thusiasm for classes has
dwindled sharply. Leth-
argy has swept through
East Carolina, and a lot of
students think they know
why.
"If we had a fall
break one senior
moaned. "When we were
on the quarter system it
was OK, but now we go
from September through
November without so
much as an extra day off.
"I really think four-day
break in October would
cool a lot of the tension I
start feeling around this
time of year junior
Margie Dolson stated. "I
hit November, and all I
can think of is getting
home for Thanksgiving
Many students put the
blame for all strain or
boredom on the lack of a
fall break, and there is
also a great deal of anger
surrounding the issue.
"If I have to wake up
one more morning and
face this room a
freshman living in Jones
threatened, "I think Til go
crazy.
"I'm sick of this school
right now. It really PO's
me that Carolina and
UNC-G and others get a
break and we don't
"S� one student
complained, "Other
schools get a break. Why
the hell can't we get one
too?"
gone

ESCAPE
break so I could've
home in October
Students also feel that
the lack of a break affects j �Escape t0 the South SeBB�f a travel-adventure filmby
their grades, and in many . Thayer Soule, will be presented in Hendrix Theater at
cases, their class atten- : 8:00 p.m. this coming Thursday.
dance.
"I just get to the point
where I don't care. I feel
like, if I flunk a test, so t PAPERMAKING
what?' I just want to go �
t An art exhibition on papermaking and paper works will
5 run from November 19 through December 15 in the
I Mendenhall Student Center Gallery.
home and forget about it
for a while. If I'd had a
chance to forget about it
for awhile earlier, wellI
might be doing better
now
"Come
November,1
I THANKSGIVING
There are also those
who feel they have a very
valid reason for wanting a
fall break. Many out-of-
state students cannot pos-
sibly go home for a
weekend. Because of this,
they feel the lack of a
break keenly.
"It's not just freshman
homesickness a Penn-
sylvania resident said, happens e ry year. That �)R0V)(r IBDUT COLL�b�.
"but it would be nice to fall break that other
one junior said, "I always I Thanksgiving holidays will begin November 22. Classes
start feeling really apath- � will resume November 26.
etic. I cut class and quit
taking notes when I do go;
Poote aims for record
By SUE FERNALD
Features Writer
When you last bought
a pack of gum, you threw
the wrappers away, right?
Well, there are thou-
sands of uses for these
seemingly innocent scraps
of paper. You could paper
a wall, use them to stuff
up holes, roll your favorite
blend, save them to put
your gum back in for the
next day (many people
don't know that gum lasts
for weeks) or make a
300-foot-long gum wrapper
chain.
hang things on or to go for
a world record.
Jenny Poote, a Special
Education major at ECU,
who doesn't even chew
gum, is one who hasn't
overlooked the latter pos-
sibility.
She has been working
3n a gum wrapper chain
for the past three years.
The chain now totals over
300 feet and has been
dubbed "Charlie
Charles, the magnif-
icent chain, was started
with no purpose in mind
other than being a room
Now, you may ask, ornament. But, as he grew
"What the hell can one do and grew, the possibility
with a 300-foot-gum wrap-
per chain?"
Answer: you can use it
to tie up your roommate,
walk your dog, as a jump
rope for 600 people, to
of a world record seemed
to be within reach.
Jenny intends to make
Charlie a total of one
kilometer. Her reasons for
making Charlie were not
just for the fame of a
possible world record, she
intends to use him as a
teaching aid in her special
education classes when
she graduates. Jenny
plans to use Charlie as a
representation of distances
and to show how a cocoon
is made. Charlie is kept
rolled in a ball about nine
inches in diameter.
Jenny's ingenuity in
using these seemingly
worthless scraps of paper
should be an inspiration to
us all. Just think of how
many things you throw
away that could be put to
useImagine being the
proud owner of the world's
largest beer can castle,
complete with drawbridge,
towers and moat!
thc f))ftp Klf
bi Pflvip AJowus
be able to get home before
Thanksgiving. I haven't
seen my folks or friends
since August
"It gets me down
sometimes one soph-
omore stated. "I don't
have a car, and I dont get
out of class on Friday until
2, and its just not worth it
to take a bus home (to
Maryland) for just a
weekend. It would've been
reallv nice to have had a
schools get would really
make a difference. I really
think it'd help my attitude
a lot
Since it has never been
tried here, it is difficult to
say whether a four-day
hacienda in October would
cure all the ills of
November at East Carolina
University, but as one
sophomore said,
"Lest we got the
weekend. If they tossed in
a couple of extra days one
timewho would it hurt?"
M0MICA, HOW 00 100 LCf
6�IN& A DULL A0VISOK.
thi� leflu?
SOffEOiOr UFT h f0OT� IH
f0�T Of r" DOOIL SMAI6,
"fUhX STTEf W THIS fT
ir ias attachcp
TO h LjtiQ fAlUti
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Battery, rape, abdu�inn and theft
Arrest record reads like War and Peace
MIAMI (AP) a
gunman on a two-hour
rampage abducted a
nurse, kidnapped a motor-
ist, raped a prostitute,
committed several rob-
beries, and, naked at the
wheel, rammed a stolen
car into another vehicle �
then knocked an officer
out cold, police say.
Police said Clarence
Mullins, 26, wrapped in a
blanket after his capture
early Sunday, told them it
mav have been someone
else who did the things he
is accused of doing.
Mullins was charged
with robbery, false im-
prisonment, aggravated
batttry, rape, abduction,
attempted abduction, auto
theft, battery, resisting
arrest and using a gun to
commit a crime.
According to police:
A man stopped Alberto
Prats at a downtown
Miami intersection and,
saying he had a gun,
forced the 19-year-old into
the trunk of his car.
Driving Prats' stick-shift
automobile with difficulty,
the man made his way to
the emergency room at
Jackson Memorial Hos-
pital, where nurse Mary
Lou Barredo, 26, was
returning with a breakfast
tray when the man grab-
bed her.
She said the man hit
her, marched her out of
the hospital and ordered
her into the car, but she
placed the tray of scram-
bled eggs and bagels atop
the car, climbed in the
driver's side and slid out
the passenger door,
screaming for help.
The man drove away,
abandoned the Dodge in
the middle of a street and
flagged down motorist
Jose Sefe, 58. Sefe was
pistol whipped and his
Chevrolet was stolen. He
was hospitalized in fair
condition.
From there, the man
drove to an all-night
restaurant, where he
choked Diane Lathrop and
took her purse. A few
blocks away, he picked up
a 26-year-old prostitute.
When the woman com-
plained that he was
driving "crazy the man
forced her into a sex act.
He then drove to a
park, forced the prostitute
to undress, shed his own
clothes and raped her.
When a passerby came
through the park, the
man, still naked, drove off
with the woman, but
rammed the Chevrolet into
the rear of another car.
The prostitute snatched
the car keys and ran naked
across an intersection. The
driver of the other car also
ran while the man pulled
on his shorts and chased
the prostitute.
Police say as they
closed in on Mullins at the
accident scene, he punch-
ed Officer G.A. Peagler.
Meanwhile, police
found the tray and bagels
� but no eggs � in the
Dodge and freed Prats
from the trunk
"It must have been the
dirtiest trunk in town
said police Detective
Louise Vasquez. "He was
grease from head to toe
Mullins' arrest record
reads "like War and
Peace one officer said.
T

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Pric Includes plan far,
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to avoid another price increase)
The Student Union Travel Committee
jU 9 fi.m.
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Guess Who's Back?
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IffMt 17 MfUtMS ttCMTMTIM
rm �I H MULT WAMUM
STARTS NOV 16th
AT A ZOO NEAR YOU!
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
(-
Each of these advertised items is re
quired to be readily available for sale at or
below the advertised price in each A&P
Store except as specificity noted in this
�y
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT, NOV. 17 AT A&P IN QfB 3nvlll6
I Greenville Square
Greenville
Ann Page 12 lowfat
MILK $1.59
Grade "A" Good only in
Gallon Jug Greenville
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN-FED BEEF
ROUND STEAK I ROUND ROAST
FULL CUT
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Beef Franks
12 oz. pkg
or meat
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GROUND CHUCK
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3 LBS
OR
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LB
$48
A&P QUALITY CORN-FED FRESH
US.DA. INSPECTED
PORK CHOPS FRESH FRYER
Va PORK LOIN
SLICED
BOX-O-CHICKEN
C
A&P COUPON
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A SUPERB BLEND, RICH IN BRAZILIAN COFFEES
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LIMfT ONE WITH
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SAVE
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LIMIT ONE COUPON
GOOD THRU SAT. NOV 17. AT A&P IN fjfAAnVlll8
$269
646
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ALL VARIETIES
PILLSBURY CAKE MIXES
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LIMIT ONE
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59
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WITH THIS
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APP
A&P NorthCAROLINA GRADE A
MEDIUM EGGS
; SAVE
25C DOZEN IOC
DOZEN
ONLY
LIMIT ONE COUPON W 643
GOOD THRU SAT. NOV. 17. AT A&P IN GrOAn Will A
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A&P COUPON
LIMIT ONE
WITH THIS
COUPON AND
ADDITIONAL
$7.50 ORDER
APP
LIMIT ONE COUPON
A&P BUTTER
SAVE 60 vlb QQC
IN
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1-LB.
PKG.
644
iVaJLMF GOOD THRU SAT. NOV. 17, AT A&P IN Gr8OnVlli0
GREEN GIANT WHOLE KERNEL
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3 . 89c
VERY YOUNG SMALL
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ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
U.S. 1 FINEST BAKING
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TENDER CRISP NUTRITIOUS
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THE FINEST
QUALITY-
K






Page 8 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 13 November 1979
Weekly Album ReviewLatest releases
By PAT MINGES
Features Writer
Bette Midler � Thighs And Whispers �
Bette Midler is on the verge of national acclaim with
the release of this album and the concurrent release of
her first movie, "Rose She is receiving faves from the
critics for her portrayal of a character loosely patterned
after Janis Joplin in the feature length motion picture
that opened last week nationally.
Ms. Midler's new album presents a few nice songs
surrounded by so much more disco dreck.
As rock was to the '60s, such was disco to the '70s,
but the disco decade is closing out, and we are on the
brink of a new form of musical prominence. A change is
in the air, and a new generation of relics will cling to its
music as some of us have clung to rock.
Midler has abandoned her faithful fans to pursue
that disco dollar, but fame is such a fleeting entity, and
we have got to jump on it while it is available. What
happened to that gorgeous vamp who rose from the gay
bathhouses of New York to show her butt at Harvard's
Hasty Pudding Awards and wooed me with "Do You
Wanna Dance" when I was just an impressionable teen?
Thighs and Whispers features an impressive lineup
of musicians, but the music is far from impressive, the
exceptions being "Big Noise from Winnetka" and
"Cradle Days "Millworker" lacks empathy, and the
rest of the album would set Denny Terrio to grinnin' and
spinnin I do not mind disco, and I am interested in a
"rock 'n' roll sucks" campaign, but when people I
respect turn to disco, they succumb to the lure of the
material over the sake of art, and I cannot tolerate
commercialism.
Pablo Cruise � Part of the Game �
These guys receive a lot of criticism Tor their
distinctly pop-music flavor, but neo-pop is beginning to
make a profound contribution to the field of music.
As disco wanes, pop flavored music is taking over,
and its main proponent is the album oriented rock
programming on radio that has become the most
prominent musical media force. It is a reciprocal
relationship. The recording industry is aiming for the
AOR audience, which boosts listenership by providing
them with exposure to new music, and in turn, album
sales are boosted.
Pablo Cruise is a group of competent musicians who
long ago adopted a pleasing blend of pop and rock
which is perfectly suited for the AOR format.
An interesting thing, rock dance music clubs have
become the rage in San Francisco, presenting this same
ble�d of pop-rock that Pablo Cruise presents, and Los
Angeies has become the haven for such neo-pop sensa-
tions as The Knack and the Pop.
Since it is commonly believed that California is the
Qom of the United States, it will be only a short time
until we all are bopping to pop music.
Part of the Game is an album of palatable ditties,
fresh on the heels of the current success of one of the
primary and premier pop groups in the United States.
You might like it.
Toto � Hydra �
This is Toto's second album, and frankly I have
always had a basic mistrust behind the concepts that
may have stimulated the formation of this group. It
seems to be, "Hey, you guys. We are all excellent
studio musicians. Let's get together, make albums, and
we can make a quick bundle
Hydra is faT superior to their last album, and Toto
should become a major rock sensation.
Truly, Toto is composed of perhaps the most talented
group of musicians recording, and Hydra is a superb
endeavor, but there seems to be a superficial aspect to
this album.
Hydra rocks, but I think this is a roll. This album is
not as blatantly commercial as Toto's first album, so
these fine artists have a chance to experiment a bit.
Toto features two keyboards, and that proves to be a
different, yet pleasing, contribution. Steve Lukather
allows his guitar to go on jazzy binges from time to time
which is another pleasant diversion.
The weakest points of this album are its dreadful
lyrics, expositions upon how cool it is to be rock stars
and childishly simple odes to lovers in rock 'n' roll lingo.
There is good music on this album, but there seems
to be little inspiration behind the release, except in the
pursuit of the commercial dollar.
Angela Bofill � Angel Of The Night �
Angela Bofill is a very talented lady, having a
remarkably strong voice and possessing a goodly amount
of compositional skill.
This, her second album, presents a wide range of
styles ranging from jazz to pop and disco and finally to
gospel inclination. The variety of songs allows Angela
Bofill many mediums with which to display her
expressive and forceful vocal range.
The best songs on the album are those written by
Bofill, for they are mostly slow, contemporary ballads
which are well-written and performed. There are a few
disco cuts on the album, but those reflect the singer's
urban background. The cities offer us an exposure to a
wide variety of influences, and this electicism is a major
theme proposed by Angel of the Night.
This album features a few impressive sidemen such
as Dave Crusin, Eric Gale, Ralph Mcdonald, Patti
Austin and Eddie Daniels whose sax gives the album its
subtle jazz inkling.
A good album.
John Klemmer � Mosaic � Best of: Volume One �
John Klemmer is one of the better saxophonists
recording and was once one of the most progressive
players in jazz music. He has played with such
luminaries as Muhal Richard Abrams, Eddie Harris and
musical genius Anthony Braxton and was the featured
sax player with the Don Ellis Orchestra.
His first ten albums were so progressive that his
likeness to Stan Getz was changed, and he was
compared to visionary John Coltrane.
Klemmer became dissatisfied with being a true jazz
stalwart and decided to produce more commercial
material. As his popularity with the public grew, his
favor among jazz critics declined, but Klemmer enjoyed
this appeal to the public. He forfeited the musical
integrity and sacrifice associated with jazz excellence
and compromised his progressive approach for the big
bucks found in the commercial recording industry.
Mosaic is completely composed of his post-progres-
sive material and would be an excellent selection for
those interested in slow paced, not too stimulating,
easy-listening music.
Mosaic is a double album that features material
ranging from his first commercial endeavor Touch to his
previous album Brazilia.
Mosaic is a nice, relaxing, easy to listen to album,
but does that sound like jazz. Moreover, is this really
the best he has produced? Hardly.
Symphony receives challenge grant
The North Carolina
Symphony became one of
only 120 art groups in the
U.S. Monday to receive a
challenge grant this year
from the National Endow-
ment for the Arts.
The grant which is a
matching grant requiring a
three-for-one match for
every dollar from the NEA
is in the amount of
$200,000
"This action on the
part of the National
Endowment for the Arts
offers the North Carolina
Symphony its best hope of
matching its financial de-
velopment to its artistic
achievement because it
comes as a challenge to us
and to our fellow North
Carolinians Charles B.
Wade, Jr of Winston-
Salem, said. Wade, Secre-
tary of the International
Advisory Board of R.J.
Reynolds Industries, is the
newly elected Chairman of
the Symphony's Board of
Trustees.
In other comments
made by Symphony offi-
cials at a news conference
Monday in the Symphony
offices, it was disclosed
that the NEA grant would
be part of a larger fund- year 1979-1981 period,
raising effort, called the In addition to the .EA
North Carolina Symphony grant, the Challenge Fund
Challenge Fund. This will include a $125,000,
larger effort has a goal of three-for-one matching En-
$2 million during the two- dowment Grant.
r
HAWAII
continued from page 6
of a tour travel desk.
The added amenities that mean so much more are
already paid for and available to each participant.
Accomodations are in de xe rooms in the Waikiki Malia
Hotel; trip participants may arrange for iheir own
roommates if they wish.
Although wanting to be as helpful as possible, the
Student Union Travel Committee wants to avoid being
over-protective. For this reason, travellers are given as
much freedom as possible in creating their own trip
experience. Participants explore restaurants and choose
their own meals, except for in-flight dining.
Optional tours are left to the preference of the
individual, as are special admissions to particular places
and attractions. Incidental expenses may be kept to a
minimum, or the participant may splurge for the trip of
a lifetime. Trip participants are also responsible for thei
transportation to and from Raleigh-Durham Airport.
Participants must make a $100 deposit when they
reserve places and submit applications. All places must
be reserved no later than January 7, 1980. The balance
must be paid by January 15. All payments should be by
cash, check or money order payable to the Central
Ticket Office.
Any trip cancellations must be made in writing; oral
ones will not be accepted. Cancellations dated prior to
60 days from departure will receive refunds of monies
less the $100 deposit, and those dated within 60 days
prior to departure will be accepted, and refunds less
twenty-five dollars registration fee will be made only if
seats are filled by standbys.
No refund? will be issued for unused portions of
transportation andor hotel accomodations.
While everyone else shivers away the last of winter,
fifty fortunate people will acquire their 1980 tans. Join
the beautiful people in the enchanted world of Hawaii.
This opportunity of a lifetime is open to ECU students,
faculty, staff, alumni and their immediate families.
Don't feel that you can't afford to go � you can't
afford not to. Prices will never be lower.
Support
East
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Rufus & Chaka � Masterjam �
Rufus with Chaka Khan has been producing albums
for some while, and this album continues the traditions
that have been set with their earlier efforts.
Masterjam is a clever blend of funk, soul, rock and
ballads that should become a noteworthy release and
ride high on the charts.
Chaka Khan is one of the most vibrant vocalists
recording today and, pardon my chauvinism, a damn
good-looking lady. Rufus is an excellent group of
musicians, having a jazz orientation. This group has
toured with such rock stars as Elton John and the
Rolling Stones.
Accompanying the five-piece group is a seven-piece
horn section featuring the Seawind horns, who excel in
the album's superb horn arrangements.
George and Louis Johnson and Richard Heath,
assisting in percussion, make a minimal guest
appearance on the album.
Quincy Jones produced the album, accordingly, it is
of splendid quality, and the sound is very articulate. The
various arrangements were handled by Rufus. "Do You
Love What You Feel" is already rocketing on the singles
chart, and Masterjam itself should become a soul
standard.
Albums courtesy of Record Bar, Carolina East Mall and
Pitt Plaza.
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The Kas; Carolinian

Sports
Tuesday, November 13, 1979 Page 9
Greenville, N.C.
Pirates stomp Spiders, 52-10
(Photo by Chap Gurley)
Leander Green scrambles
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
Quarterback Leander Green and running back Sam
Harrell combined for five touchdowns Saturday as the
Pirates of East Carolina frustrated the Richmond Spiders
52-10.
ECU scored on each of its first three possessions of
the game, with junior placekicker Bill Lamm booting a
14 yard field goal on the first drive of the evening.
The Spiders won the toss, but that was to be the only
advantage they would enjoy throughout the night. After
three plays, Richmond was forced to punt and Kevin
Wolfe shanked the ball for only 17 yards.
Green swept left for 11 and Anthony Collins added
four to set up the opening score.
The Spiders again lost possession after four plays,
but this time Wolfe laid his foot into a booming 50 yard
punt giving ECU the ball on their 37.
A third down gain of 36 by Green on a keeper right,
followed by a Harrell run of 11 set up the Bucs first
touchdown of the night. Green swept right on first and
goal from the two for the TD.
A Green pass to split end Vern Davenport for 18,
another to Collins for 16 and an 11 yard personal foul
penalty set up a nine yard blast by Harrell.
Again Richmond was unable to sustain a drive on the
rejeuvenated Pirate defense, but the picture changed
momentarily in favor of the visiting Spiders.
The Pirates drove to the Richmond 36, but the
Spiders defense showed its first sign of strength as they
held ECU to fourth and eight.
Head coach Pat Dye called timeout to confer with his
veteran signal caller, and although distance kicker
Davenport was willing, the decision was made to go for
the first down.
Green sprinted right and optioned to keep the ball,
but could only manage four of the needed five yards.
Richmond coach Jim Tait, under pressure because of
the winless record his troops have amassed, installed
reserve quarterback Tim Venable into the starting
lineup, but the speedy sophomore enjoyed no more
success than his predecessor.
After another Wolfe punt, Green directed the
wishbone attack to the left, pitching to Harrell who
exploded up the sideline for a 59 yard TD. He appeared
to have been stopped on at about the 20, but a bone
Odom to speak
PIRATE POOP:
New East Carolina basketball coach Dave Odom will
speak tonight at a Men's Residence Council-sponsored
event in Minges Coliseum.
The Pirates will hold a brief scrimmage after which
the players will be announced to the gathering before
Odom makes his talk. Afterwards, the ex-Wake Forest
assistant will be available during a question-and-answer
session.
Odom is expected to speak to tlie group on the
importance of attendance at home games. He has
stressed this in many of his talks already. The season's
outlook and other matters will also be discussed.
Following Odom's question-and-answer session,
there will be drawings held to give away a basketball to
one representative from each of the four men's dorms
on campus. To be eligible for the drawing, one must
register in the lobby of their respective dorm.
Odom asks that everyone be in Minges by 6:45, so
that he can finish as quickly as possible, so not to
interfere with the practice of the women's team.
THE PIRATES WILL be unveiled officially to the
public this Wednesday, when they will play in the
annual Purple-Gold contest. Both the men's and
women's teams will conduct such a scrimmage. The
women's game is scheduled to begin at 6:30 p.m. with
the men's game immediately following.
ANYONE WATCHING Pirate Game Plan, the ECU
assistant football coach's show seen on Channel 12, last
Thursday was given a real treat with ECU nose guard
John Hallow. The sophomore surely thrilled everyone
tuned in when he imitated former heavyweight boxing
champ Muhammed Ali.
Well, surprise, surprise, surprise. The word is that
the response was such that Hallow will be back on this
Thursday at 11:30 p.m. for an encore. Anyone who
chooses to tune in will probably go to bed with a smile.
Hallow does an excellent job of imitating one of the
most familiar voices in the world. The champ would
surely get a kick out of it himself.
UPDATING THE PIRATES STATISTICALLY:
�ECU ranks third in the nation in rushing offense,
sixth in total offense and eighth in scoring offense after
a 52-10 drubbing of Richmond last Saturday. Each
statistical category shows an improvement over last
week.
�The Pirates' total offense figure of 454.2 yards per
game is only 5.5 yards a game behind the fifth-rated
team, Southern California. The rushing offense mark of
352.8 yards is not far behind national leader Nebraska,
which is averaging 361.2 yards.
�Anthony Collins is 23rd in the nation in rushing
with 877 yards after nine games. His 7.4 yards per carry
average is the second best mark in the country while his
154.0 yard average ranks him sixth nationally in all-
purpose running. Charles White of Southern California
is tops in this category, averaging 190.6 yards.
crushing block from fullback Theodore Sutton paved the
way to the end zone.
One of three turnovers by the Pirates set up a 42
yard field goal by Richmond's Scott Schramme as time
expired in the second quarter. Collins coughed up the
ball near mid-field on a mishandled exchange.
The Spider defense held strong in their first
appearance of the second half, but the web collapsed
minutes later on a broken play.
Green rolled right and looked up field for tight end
Billy Ray Washington, but his high school teammate
was hawked by double coverage.
Green instinctively cut back against the grain and
bolted through thepermeable secondary for an 87 yard
touchdown sprint; his longest while wearing the purple
and gold.
The teams followed by exchanging fumbles, with
ECU finally maintaining possession.
On his final appearance of the evening, Green
galloped 16 yards untouched for yet another touchdown.
In an effort to give the ECU reserves valuable game
time, Dye made wholesale substitutions through the
remainder of the game.
On third and 10 from the ECU 20, freshman
quarterback Carlton Nelson tossed an interception to
Spider cornerbask Reggie Evans, giving Richmond the
ball on the ECU 24, their deepest field possession in the
� contest.
On first down, Brian Allard heaved a lame duck to
the end zone which ECU cornerback Willie Holley tipped
but was unable to intercept or knock away from flanker
Blenus Martin, who made the reception for the only
Richmond TD.
The speedy Nelson tallied 39 yards rushing on ECU's
final drive, which was culminated by a three yard burst
by sophomore Harold Blue.
"Five bowl teams might have played in North
Carolina today said Dye, "and not one of them can
move the football like our bunch. I wish there was some
way this team could get the credit it deserves
"We had to play a team which hadn't had a lot of
success and that's not the easiest thing in the world, but
we were ready. I credit the assistant coaches and the
players for that. We have gotten better every week.
"I feel for Coach Tait and Richmond he added.
"The season hasn't been much fun for them
(Photo by Kip Sloan)
Harrell on 59 yard TD run
Grapplers take tourney crown
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
The East Carolina coaching career of Ed Steers, the
new Pirate wrestling mentor, began with a booming
success Saturday when the Pirates claimed first place
honors in the Monarch-Civitan Open Tournament in
Norfolk, Va.
The Pirates edged out Clemson and host Old
Dominion for the crown.
"Really, I had no idea what to expect said Steers.
"We took 24 men and Clemson entered 35, so on the
surface there didn't appear to be any way that we could
win. We didn't even enter in two weight divisions, 158
or 190 pounds
Four Pirates reached the finals in their weight
divisions to lead the way in the surprising ECU showing,
three of them coming away winners.
Steve Goode, Butch Revils and D.T. Joyner each won
in their weight class and Frank Shaede finished second
in his.
Goode, wrestling in the 167-pound class, defeated
John Nowlan.d of Old Dominion 12-4 in the finals.
"Steve very well could have been named the
outstanding wrestler in the tournament claimed
Steers. "He just completely dominated his weight
class
Steers also spoke highly of Joyner, who defeated
James Brown of Appalachian State 3-1 in the finals of
the heavyweight division. "D.T. deserves special credit
for our win Steers said. "He has such a tough
academic schedule at this time and has had to practice
at odd hours. His performance was really remarkable
Revils won the 177-pound class by pinning Clemson's
Howard Lindstrom at 3:46 of their match. Shaede fell to
ODU's Roger Randall in the 150-pound finals 4-2.
Though the Pirates went out and won their first
match of the year, Steers is still wary of the season
ahead. "This win gets us started on the right track he
said. "It's a little deceiving, though. We have some
very experienced and excellent individuals but we are
hurting for overall team balance.
"In the larger meets, like the one Saturday Steers
continued, "these individuals will mean an awful lot if
we can get several of them in the finals. In the dual
meets, though, they won't mean quite as much. We
must have a super effort from everyone in the duals
The win at ODU marks the fourth consecutive year
that Steers has coached the winning team in the
tournament. The past three years lie led William and
Mary to victory.
The first-year ECU coach cited mental readiness as a
key for the Pirates. "We've tried to get the guys feeling
positive about themselves he said. "It showed through
in this tournament. The guys also did a lot of things
technically right. In the past, East Carolina has lost on
mental errors. This year we did a better job mentally
than any team entered
The Pirates finished the tournament with 112 points,
followed by Clemson with 11034, Old Dominion 108V&,
Appalachian State 95, Westchester State 843i, and
William and Mary with 794.
ECU will compete in the North Carolina Invitational
in Chapel Hill this Friday and Saturday and will open its
dual season at Richmond on Nov. 21.
Healthy after injuries
Warren known for hitting
Jeffrey Warren
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
In past years the Pirate defense has been called the
"Wild Dog" defense, the "Swarm" defense and
numerous other unprintable titles.
The units have been anchored by standout players
such as Danny Kepley, Jim Bolding, Zack Valentine and
Mike Brewington.
All too often a spectacular performer is
overshadowed by one of these names, but one who is
certain not to be lost in the crowd is junior linebacker
Jeffrey Warren.
At 5-10, 207, the Snow Hill native is not as awesome
appearing as the towering giants that patrol the
secondary for other teams, but his philosophy on
defense is simple and to the point.
"I like to hit people hard but I don't like to get hit
hard mused Warren. "You have to take some hard
shots, but in the end I like to think that the ones I gave
out were harder than the ones I got
Warren was juggled from defensive end to his
natural linebacker slot throughout the season, and
according to defensive head coach Frank Orgel he had
trouble getting accustomed to the two positions.
"He was confused last year said Orgel. "Jeffrey
had a problem in dropping into the right spot on our
pass coverage. That sort of thing has to come to a player
by doing it over and over.
"He's got good, solid technique on tackling and is
one of the hardest hitters we've got. It gives Jeffrey a
boost and that is kind of contagious
One of Sport Information Director Walt Atkins'
favorite stories is how Warren hit one of his teammates
fPh t b K' SI 80 kar( m 1� pre-season drills that both breast plates
on the victim's shoulder pads broke and he was out of
practice for several days with a sore chest.
"In the (Independence Bowl) game last year I had a
hit like that Warren said. "That really felt good to
me.
That hit, too, was'a monumental impact.
The unfortunately Louisiana Tech quarterback who
was on the receiving end was knocked cold, never to
return to the contest.
Lately it has been Jeffrey Warren on the receiving
end of the pain. In the first half of the N.C. State game
in early September, Warren suffered a laceration to his
hand which appeared to be routine at the time.
Infection set in, though, and Warren was confined to
the infirmary for observation and treatment, forcing him
to miss the Pirates' 28-14 loss to Duke the following
week.
"That made me feel real bad; like I had let the team
down said Warren. "I haven't had a chance to get
many big hits this year because I've been hurt so
much
Orgen has nothing but praise for Warren when it
comes to his injury-plagued past.
"I don't know if we've got many kids who would
play with the pain he's played with he said. "Up until
the last couple of weeks, he's been pieced together to
play. Now up to about 80 or 90 percent strength.
"He helps Mike (Brewington) with the enthusiasm
he has on the field, and I'm sure Mike helps him. When
you have two linebackers that compliment each other,
then it makes things go that much smoother
Warren explained that the defense realized before
the season started that the loss of former standouts Zack
Valentine and Fred Chavis would hurt the team, but
added that they knew they had the personnel to replace
them.
"If we win the next three games big, we still have a
chance for a bowl Warren states. "I'm going to
rack-up in the last two games.
"I'll get some good licks in before the season is
over, I'm sure
f





Title
The East Carolinian, November 13, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 13, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.22
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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