The East Carolinian, November 8, 1979






"Were it left tome
to decide whether
we should have a
government without
newspapers or
newspapers without
government, I
should not hesitate
a moment to prefer
the latter
�Thomas Jefferson
The East Carolinian
If you have a story
idea, a tip, or a
lead, please tele-
phone us:
757-6366
757-6367
757-6309
Vol. 54 No. 2ff

10 pages today
Thursday, November 8, 1979
Greenville, N.C.
Circulation 10,OCX)
Greensboro deaths topic of discussion;controversy
From STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS
"l could not believe that anyone would have the gall
to stand there in front of television, newspapers and the
whole world and gun down four people. I reallv have
never seen anything like it and hope I don't ever again.
'The absence of the police was all the more shock.
The police had cars with the Klan in them under watch
on 220 and I-85 and supposedly followed them in.
"But then you see the television picture and the
Klan gol out ot the cars and stood there and shot people
which had to take at least three minutes, and then went
and put the guns away in the trunks of the cars.
"In one car where they went to the trunk and were
reloading and still the police were not there
These were the word's of one Greensboro resident
after viewing what has been called the massacre of five
people during an Anti-Ku Klux Klan rally held in
Greensboro on Saturday on a local television station.
Pledges come
to aid starving
Cambodians
Many people have expressed opinions on what
happened in Greensboro, and it is not yet certain just
what did happen.
Members of the Communist Workers Party, who
sponsored the rally, are emphatic in their opinions on
the killings.
Sally Bermanzohn, a member of the Party, whose
husband was shot during the rally, has accused the
Greensboro police department of "orchestrating the
assassination of our five comrades and planning the
escape" of the attackers.
Bermanzohn has also accused the FBI and other
investigative agencies with "continuing to threaten us,
harass us, follow us and tap our phones
Bermanzohn has filed suit , will seek permanent
injunctions against the investigators from party
members, and will seek to impound all television and
newspaper film of the shootings.
Local police and FBI agents have denied involvement
in the shootings and claim that members of the
Communist Workers Party are refusing to cooperate
with the investigation.
'That is because the investigators are part of the
people we accuse of being part of the assassination
Bermanzohn said.
Worth Henderson, a Greensboro lawyer, gave his
opinion on the case, "If they don't go to the gas
chamber, they'll at least get life imprisonment � every
one of them
"It's the worst premeditated deliberate murder
that's ever happened in the history of Guilford County
commented Henderson.
Other Greensboro natives seemed shocked that
something of this kind could happen in their communitv.
Linda Link, who is also an ECU student, said that
she couldn't believe that it could happen in Greensboro.
She also said that she felt more mad than anvthing.
Andy Roman, another Greensboro resident, said that
he was shocked, and that he had not r
was a KKK membership. "I didn't ihii
happen like that said Roman.
Many people who knew
commented on their friend-
Michael Nathan, one of the
massacre, moved South from 5
undergraduate and medical school
He is remembered as calm and g
deeply about children "He m
always with a concern about medieii
Paul Bermanzohn. from the- New
seriously wounded in the attack,
sometimes cocky and impatient with I
agree with his views. A d
medical work was largely a si
politics.
See GREENSBORO
An agreement by the
Cambodian government to
open tlw Mekong river is
g problems encount-
ered by outside groups
who are attempting to aid
- an ing population of
iuntry.
The agreement from
lorn Penh has also
spur 13 countries
g( $186 million in
the 2.5 million
diaris who are
starving in (me of the
severest famines in mod-
ern times.
The pledges came in a
special United Nations
conlerence Monday after
Cambodian Premier Heng
Samrin's government a-
greed to allow relief
supplies to be shipped
through the Mekong Riv-
er. The government stated
that it was "from now on
receive whatever
quantity of humanitarian
aid without political
- ierations
Former attempts to
liver relief supplies on
the Mekong had been
1 because of appre-
hension in Phnom Penh
that such supplies would
fall into the hands of
157 arrests
opposing guerilla forces in
the country.
The guerillas are led
b) former Premier Pol Pot,
who wa ousted by the
Vietnamese last Januarv.
United Nations Secre-
tary-General Kurt Wald-
heim said in the con-
ference that the arrange-
ments of the agreement
should "assure us and the
donors that supplies arrive
in the hands of the
suffering civilians for
whom they are destined
Relief efforts by private
organizations are also
being facilitated by the
government's go-ahead to
use the river.
One such organization
is Oxfam of America,
which has formed a group
of 37 international volun-
tary agencies to coordinate
and channel assistance
into the country.
According to Susan
Abrams, an Oxfam spokes-
man, most of the supplies
until now have been
entering Cambodia at
Kompong Som, a port in
the south of the be-
leagered nation. Abrams
noted that the facilities at
the port are limited and
Minority
publication
may survive
This photo, which was taken in Phnom Pehn recently, shows the extent of
malnutrition evident among children in the country. The child lying on the mat
died soon after this photo was taken.
that future supplies may
now be sent directly into
the heart of the countrv at
Phnom Penh.
According to Abrams,
Oxfam has sent 3,600 tons
of food plus medical
supplies and agricultural
equipment into the country
since its first deliveries in
August.
Although access to the
river has been granted,
Cambodian officials re-
main steadfast in their
opposition to other forms
of distribution, such as
trucking and airlifting.
American representatives
at the UN conference
argued that truck routes
were the only way to
deliver the quantity of aid
needed.
The Red Cross has
estimated that 1,000 tons
are needed daily.
The United States, one
of the 13 nations that
made pledges, offered $69
million in aid. If other
private agencies are suc-
cessful, the $186 million in
planned aid could rise to
well over $200 million.
Oxfam of America has
set as its goal $50 million
in aid, to be raised from
private sources around the
world. Part of the Oxfam
goal is to restore the
capacity in Cambodia to
become self-sufficient in
food population.
"A nation is literally
dying said Jim Howard,
an international disaster
expert with Oxfam. One of
the few westerners with
See PLEDGES, page 2
By KAREN WENDT
Aeus Editor
The Ebony Herald was again the major
topic of discussion at the Media Board
meeting on Tuesday.
Discourse centered around an ad-
vertisement, to be placed in The hast
Carolinian, for applicants to the position
of editor.
Some board members objected to the
use of the word "editorship" in the ad.
They felt this usage guaranteed that The
Ebony Herald would be published if the
ad was put in.
"I do not want us to be bound said
Charles Sune, president of the Student
Union, "I want to see some plans first
The board decided the application
statement should include a clause in
which the prospective editor would be
required to submit a list of goals of the
publication.
Board members also agreed that if this
year's publication does not work out,
there will probably not be another one.
"Even I'm agreeable to that said
SGA president Brett Melvin.
In other business, Buccaneer Editor
Craig Sahli presented the board with
itemized lists oi
1980 printing and -
Josten's earbook
"Of the two I've w
Josten's said .thli.
Though Josten' - bid
the other two,
others were tentati
Rudolph Alexander, ass
student affairs, said that lie felt th
should approve SahJi's choice and r.
the motion that they accept the bid.
the understanding that the total pi
includes taxes, and all expensi
exceed the amount in the budget.
He also stated that it would al
editor and the staff the rig
money as the se fit.
B o a r d members q u i
Podeszwa, head of the PI
line item transfer whicl
through the proper chanm -
Podeszwa stated
oversight on his part.
The board m
standard policy that all requis
have to be signed by Mi
Chairpers Tri M :
authorized representative m the
Drug bust in Wake
RALEIGH, N.C. (Ap)
Wake County law-
enforcement officials work-
ed an unprecedented un-
dercover operation in the
county schools for two
months using college stu-
dents as drug agents, an
investigation that resulted
in 157 arrests Tuesday.
Most of those arrested
Inside
today
Gun control
page 4
Students
interviewed
on Iran
page 5
Appalachian
this
weekend
page 8
were students from the
county's 12 senior high
schools who were caught
with drugs or selling drugs
by young criminal justice
students from a Piedmont
technical school who posed
as fellow high school
students.
The charges involved
the selling of drugs or
conspiring to sell drugs
and most involved mari-
juana.
Police said the under-
cover agents made drug
buys on and off school
campuses. The investi-
gation involved Wake
County school officials,
Raleigh police, the Wake
County Sheriffs office and
the Wake County District
Attorney's Office. It was
initiated by school super-
intendent John Murphy.
Raleigh Police Chief
Frederick K. Heineman
said Tuesday placement of
the undercover agents in
the schools was an un-
precedented move in a
drug investigation.
"As far as I know, it's
the first time it's been
done any place Heine-
man said.
Heineman said the
undercover agents were
"absolutely not" advised
to solicit students for
drugs. But that was
disputed by a number of
students at one of the high
schools involved. Those
students claim a student
they suspected of being an
undercover agent flashed
large sums of money and
asked students where he
could find large quantities
of marijuana.
A Wake County grand
jury handed down 206
indictments against 157
people in a late-night
session Monday.
Of the 157, 117 were
high school students, an-
other 33 were non-stu-
dents charged with selling
drugs to students. Fifteen
ABC violations were filed
for alleged sale of alco-
holic beverages to minors.
STuWtmatn
4
This bus, severely damaged in an accident on Oct. 22, may cost $20,000 to repair.
(Photo by John H. Grogan)
Bus repairs
may exceed
$20,000
By KAREN WENDT
News Editor
The bus which was wrecked in the October
accident may never be fixed, and if it is, it could cosl
the transit system upwards of $20,000. according to
Leonard Fleming, SGA transit manager.
Costs of fixing the bus have been based on a simple
initial price estimate of body adjustments. It is
unknown, however, how much damage has been done to
the engine block and the transmission. There is a
possibility that the entire engine framework was
damaged in the accident.
"We have no idea what kind of internal damage was
done said Fleming.
The absence of a bus and the disability of another
have caused the Brown route to be out of operation for
some time now. The route is expected to begin running
on Monday, according to Fleming, since personnel at
Hastings Ford, the company which works on the buses,
say the transmission repairs should be finished by then.
Kim "Chubby" Abshire and Fleming say that parts
from the damaged bus may be used to replace some of
the defective parts in the other bus that is presently out
of operation.
Fleming feels that the possibility of not repairing the
bus will have no effect on the transit budget passed
Monday.
See TRANSIT, page 2





�Jaqe 2 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 8 November 1979
Two UNCWstudents stabbed
An early morning
breakfast party ended
tragically Saturday when a
University of North Caro-
lina at Wilmington student
was murdered and another
seriously wounded.
George Davis Curtis,
24, of Burlington has been
arrested and charged with
murder in the stabbing
death of 19-year-old Ricky
Knight Gunter of Fuquay-
Varina. Additional charges
of assault with a deadly
weapon are pending a-
gainst Curtis in the attack
on Jeffrey Nelligan of
Bridgewater, New Jersey,
also a student at UNCW.
Details of the incident
are sketchy, but Police
Chief George Antley said
that the party was held by
several fraternity brothers
and their girlfriends, and
that Curtis was unknown
to any of them. Curtis
apparently crashed the
party at 19 East Hender-
son Street at around 2
a.m Antley said.
"Words went between
them for him to leave the
house, and somehow an
altercation lollowed in the
street" outside 17 E.
Henderson Street, he
added.
It was unknown why
Gunter and Nelligan went
into the street where the
murder occurred, said
Antley. The weapon used
in the murder is believed
to have been a sheathed
hunting knife.
Other guests at the
party ran after Curtis after
the knifing and appre-
hended him several blocks
away, said Antley.
A nursing student at
the party tried in vain to
keep Gunter alive with
cariopulmonary resuscita-
tion, Detective Gary
Smithson said, but Gunter
was pronounced dead on
arrival at New Hanover
Memorial Hospital.
Twenty-one-year-old
Nelligan is listed in
serious condition in the
intensive care unit of New
Hanover Memorial Hospi-
tal. Curtis, also injured in
the scuffle, remained hos-
pitalized in fair condition.
Greensboro
continued from page 1
Bermanzohn and Nathan became active in Durham
politics. They began with fashionable liberal causes. But
anti-war liberalism gave way to health-care politics; and
the various involvements gave way to increased
radicalism that left them estranged from many of their
old friends.
But many acquaintances recognized a spark ot
themselves in the two nice middle-class people who
looked at the society around them, didn't like all they
saw and decided to do something about it. But most of
these people, after brief flings at radicalism, had moved
"within the system �
"I can't help but feeling they had a death wish,
said one woman who knew them both. "But I worked
with them in earlier years and I keep thinking it could
have been me out there
"You had to wonder what spaceship they stepped ott
of " said another, himself a left-wing political activist, of
the Marxist-Leninist-Mao Tse-Tung line the radicals
believed.
Nathan, 33, graduated from Duke Medical School m
1973, did a residency in pediatrics at Duke and
post-graduate studies in child development at the
University of Virginia. It wasn't known whether he knew
Bill Sampson, 31, another of the dead, who attended
Virginia's medical school in the mid-1970s.
Sampson was an honor graduate in philosophy from
Augustana College in Rock Island, 111. He received a
master's degree in theology from Harvard Divinity
School in 1973 and attended the University of Virginia
Medical School, withdrawing in 1977.
In North Carolina, he worked to try to organize a
radical union at textile mills.
Bermanzohn, 30, a graduate of New York University,
graduated from the medical school in 1974 and did a
residency in family practice at North Carolina Memorial
Hospital in Chapel Hill.
His wife, Sally, once was married to Nathan. She
said Bermanzohn was an intellectual. "But people can
come from different classes and change, she said.
"Many communist movements start with working
intellectuals
He wasn't always a communist, she said, but he
found other movements lacking. "He wanted an answer,
so he studied Marx looking for answers she said.
Both men were involved in the Medical Committee
for Human Rights, union organizing and in a group
called New American Movement.
Dr. Evelyn Schmidt, director of Lincoln Community
Health Center in Durham, where Nathan was head of
the pediatrics section, said Nathan always conducted
himself professionally at work. She said Nathan's
political views were his own business.
"Mike was a very concerned, caring and professional
pediatrician she said. "I think that this tragedy is a
loss to the community of children for which he had
compassion and rendered great care
Sandy Smith, 29, another of the dead, had gone to
Bennett College in Greensboro. It was there that she
met Nelson Johnson, the activist who was one of the
leaders who organized the Greensboro rally. Ms. Smith
had been a union organizer at a Cone Mills plant before
moving to Piedmont, S.C.
Johnson and Bermanzohn had both been active in
the African Liberation Support Committee, the Durham
Coalition for Quality Education and its statewide group
and the Durham Coalition Against Police Brutality.
James Waller Jr 37, of Pittsboro, was a 1970
graduate of the University of Chicago Medical School
and also a pediatrician.
He was a union worker for Cone Mills in Haw River
and president of the union local.
Transit
continued from page I
Col. Dick Blake, assistant to the Chancellor has
contracted a member of the N.C. department o
Transportation about evaluating the current SGA transit
system. Jim Ritchey, a transportation specialist for the
Department, will speak with Fleming and Abshire
concerning the evaluation, the present routes, he
ridership and suggestions on how to improve the
ALrding to Blake, Ritchey gave invaluable
assistance to the Greenville municipal bus system. It is
hoped he can offer some equally helpful adv.ce
concerning the SGA system.
Problems with the buses have been attributed to lack
of preventive maintenance on the part of past systems
and the fact that the vehicles were not made for the
stop-and-go driving they are subjected to on the SGA
routes.
Pledges
continued from page 1
first-hand experience
there, Howard called the
situation "horrific �
worse than anything I've
seen in 20 years of
experience with disasters
in countries like Biafra,
Bangladesh and India.
What we face now is the
extinction of a nation
Although shipments on
the Mekong should ease
distribution problems, it is
presently unknown whe-
ther the Cambodian gov-
ernment will place limi-
tations on the amount of
food and supplies to be
shipped.
Distributed By
Taylor Beverage Co.
Qoldsboro
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Lunch 11:30-2:30
SunThurs. 4:30-9:00
Frl. and Sat. 4:30-10:00
Mon. Ladle's Day-Free trip
to salad bar with
each full meal
Tues. Ladle's Day
Free cup �f clam
chowder with each
full meal
Wed.
Thurs.
Fri.
Soup n' Sandwich
$2.25
Soup n' Salad
$1.75
all the trout you can
eat for $1.99 with
fries and slaw
(The folks at Kroger Sav-on know the
complete student has a party side,
too. So they have what East Carolina
University students need for any bash
from party platters to disco plat-
ters all in one convenient loca-
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AMP
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Records and
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Shrimp $491
Oysters $4-75
Flounder $3.50
Trout $2.95
SunThurs. 430-9:00
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FOOD, DRUG, GENERAL
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PRICES EFFECTIVE TUES
NOV. 6 THRU SUN NOV. 11, 1979
NONE SOLD
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Phone 756-7031
i





Pecple, places, and ���
8 November 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Pape 3
ft slit
tuifeey
f)ll�t�
l i i il
�td(
Lambda Alpha Epsilon,
the American Criminal
Justice Association, will
hold a mandatory meeting
on Nov. 8 at 5 p.m. in
Auditorium 101A of the
Allied Health building. All
applications for new mem-
bers are due before or at
this meeting. Applications
may be obtained and
returned to the following
people: Richard Belthoff
(758-4623), Toni Dye (758-
4309) or Mr. Campbell in
AH. 312. Please put fee
($26) in a sealed envelope
and attach to application.
Dues ($20) for old mem-
bers are also due at this
meeting. Topics for meet-
ing: fund raising for
planned social with COR-
SO and Christmas basket
for needy family. All
interested persons please
attend.
ill
oil II I
The Sierra Club will
meet on Monday, Nov. 12,
at 9 p.m. in the First
Presbyterian Church,
Greenville.
"Alaska, a land in
balance a non-political
and straight-foreward film
about Alaska will be
featured.
Visitors are welcome to
attend both meetings and
outings of the Sierra Club.
Upcoming outings in-
clude two canoe trips and
two Sunday afternoon
hikes.
M�tci
On Thursday, Nov. 8,
there will be a meeting of
Phi Alpha Theta History
Honor Fraternity at 7:30
p.m. in the Todd Room
located in D wing of
Brewster. AU members are
requested to attend.
On the Hill in the
basement meeting room of
Scott Hall, a quiet,
supervised STUDY HALL
is open to anyone who
would like to come in and
study. It is open Monday,
Tuesday, and Thursday
from 8 to 11 p.m.
The American College
Testing (ACT) will be
offered at East Carolina
University on Sat. Dec. 8.
Application blanks are to
be completed and mailed
to ACT Registration, P.O.
box 414, Iowa City, Iowa
52240. Registration dead-
line is Nov. 9. Applications
may be obtained from the
ECU testing Center,
Speight Building, Room
105.
ARMY-NAVY STORE �
? Backpacks, B-15, Bomber
?Field, Deck, Flighi.Snorkei;
? Jackets, Peacoats, Parkas,
J Shoes, Combat Boots,Plus
1501 S. Evans Street
SAAD'S SHOE
REPAIR
116 Grande Aye.
758-1228
'Jualitr Shoe Repair
Win your Thanksgiving
turkey at the Mendenhall
Bowling Center. A $1.50
entry fee allows you to
bowl one (1) ball at a full
set of pins on ten
consecutive lanes. If you
know down at least eight
)�) pins with just nine of
the balls, you WIN A
TURKEY!
The date is Thursdaym
Nov. 15 from 7 p.m. until
10 p.m. and you can try as
many times as you like.
Don't miss it.
law
The Law School Ad-
mission Test will be
offered at East Carolina
University on Saturday,
Decmeber 1, 1979. Appli-
cation blanks are to
completed and mailed to
Educational Testing Ser-
vice, Box 966-R, Prince-
ton, N.J. 08540. Regis-
tration deadline is Nov. 5,
1979. Applications may be
obtained from the ECU
Testing Center, Speight
Building, Room 105.
�lmcitanj
Jelta
The next Sigma Tau
Delta meeting will be held
Nov. 14. Terry Davis,
author of Vision Quest,
will speak.
I II l lit ill
The ECU Racquetball
Club is trying to identify
all interested faculty, staff
and students. Clinics and
tournaments are being
planned with competition
between schools being
scheduled. All interested
persons, please contact
Nancy Mize, 757-6387, 204
Memorial Gym.
The ECU Photo Lab
has an immediate opening
for the position of Staff
Photographer. Anyone
who is interested in
applying for the position
should fill out an applica-
tion at the office of The
East Carolinian in the Old
South Building across from
the Library.
Mr. John Childers,
Director of the ECU
Testing Center, requests
that all persons who have
taken the College Level
Examination Program
(CLEP) English Compo-
sition test from May 1979
to October 1979 contact
the ECU Testing Center at
their earliest convenience.
science
Chi Beta Phi Scientific
Fraternity meeting Thurs-
day, Nov. 8th 7:30 p.m. at
Biology BN-102. Dr.
Moore of the Psychology
Dept. will be talking about
Sex. Initiation meeting: All
people wishing to join
please attend. All students
invited. More info call
President Tom Leech 758-
7493.
Ml I I 111 i
All students interested
in National Fellowships
Scholarships are invited to
attend a presentation by
Dr. John Ebbs on Thurs
Nov. 8 at 5:30 in 244
Mendenhall.
Phi Eta Sigma mem-
bers will have a business
meeting at 5 in 244, prior
to the presentation. Those
members who ordered
T-shirts are asked to bring
money at this time. See
you there!
The November meeting
of the Eastern North
Carolina section of the
American Chemical Soci-
ety will be on Wed. Nov.
14th at 7 p.m. in Room
201, Flanagan Building on
the East Carolina Univer-
sity campus. The featured
speaker is Dr. Gerhard
Popp of Eastman Kodak
who will speak on "The
Inside Story of Color
Photography He will
demonstrate how basic
principles are combined
with silver Hajide chemis-
try in a variety of ways to
produce the transparen-
cies, motion pictures, con-
ventional prints and in-
stant prints which today
comprise color photo
graphy. The public is
invited.
The Alpha Xi Delta
Fall Pledge Class is having
a Shag Contest at Chapter
X on Nov. 13th from 9-1
a.m. Advanced tickets are
25 cents and tickets at the
door will be 50 cents. Door
prizes will be given away.
I �M ill
scj
The Society for Col-
legiate Journalists will
meet Monday at 6 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter, Room 248. All mem-
bers are urged to attend.
bcwl
Take advantage of thes
bowling specials at
Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter: "Red Pin Bowling7
p.m. to 10 p.m. every
Sunday bowlers get a
chance to win one FREE
GAME with every game
bowled. "Rent-A-Lane"�
Every Saturday from noon
to 6 p.m. you can rent a
lane for $3 for one hour.
"Discount Day"�onethird
off the price of bowling
every Monday from 2 p.m.
until 6 p.m.
ECU Sign Language
Club will meet Nov. 8 at
7:30 p.m. in Brewster
B-236.
The Greeks go Hawai-
ian. Coming Nov. 16, PIG
PICKIN' and beverage at
the Kappa Sigma house.
Be thereALOHA!
�nappy ticui
Kappa Delta Happy Hour
Thursday, Nov. 8th from
7-9 p.m. at the Elbo
Room. Advance Tickets
are 25 cents and tickets at
the door are 50 cents.
Take a break from studies
and join the fun
Il II II I I ll
The Intramural Council
meeting will be held
Thurs Nov. 8, at 4 p.m.
in Memorial Gym, room
104.
�a -ac
Screenings will be held
Thurs Nov. 8, in the SGA
Cabinet Room, Menden-
hall for SGA adminis-
trative committees. Call
for an appointment (757-
6611, ext. 218). The
following committees need
to be filled:
Alcohol Drug Educa-
tion
Soliciting on Campus
Residence Life
Status of Women
Student Health Ser-
vices
International Student
Affairs
University Traffic Ap-
peals
Admissions
University Cirriculum
Library
Student Recruitment
Career Education
Instructional Survey
General College
ART&CAMERA PLAZA CAMERA
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The North Carolina
Student Legislature will
have a meeting tonight at
7 p.m. at Mendenhall Rm.
221. Topics to be dis-
cussed will be Compend-
ium review and about the
upcoming fund raiser for
the delegation. Also the
November IC will be
talked about. All members
are expected to attend.
The Graduate Record
Examination will be offer-
ed at East Carolina
University on Saturday,
January 12, 1980. Appli-
cation blanks are to be
completed and mailed to
Educational Testing Ser-
vice, Box 966-R, Princeton
N.J. 08540. Registration
deadline is Nov. 28, 1979.
Applications may be ob-
tained from the ECU
Testing Center, Speight
Building, Room 105.
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917 West Morgan St.
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The Student Union
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presents
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Fri. & Sat, Nov. 9 & 10
Half hour shows from 9-11 pm
room 15 Mendenhall
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last
ii





The East Carolinian
Editorials
�Opinions
Thursday, November 8, 1979 Page 4
Greenville, N.C.
A .38 in the drawer
The shot rings out, and the man
dies in a poo! of his own blood in the
middle of a dirty street, in the middle
of the afternoon, in the year of our Lord
1979.
Who the man is, or was, does not
matter as much as the fact that he died
while fighting for the right to speak his
views against an organization which has
traditionally held a reputation for
violent actions.
Others have died in similar violent
actions across the country, in many
places, and in many different ways. In
the few days since the bloody massacre
in Greensboro, a girl was stabbed as
she stood in the hallway in her school in
Nashville, and three were killed in a
family dispute in Indianapolis.
At the hour of this writing, Iranian
students are still holding Americans
hostage in the American embassy in
Tehran, and thousands more Americans
are afraid to go outside of their houses
at night at home.
We have become a nation of double
bolt locks and .38 pistols tucked away in
drawers near our beds. Community
Watch programs help, but they are no
match for professional thieves.
Convenience store employees and
those of us who work late at night sleep
a little less soundly these days, because
of the spread of violence all around us.
spontaneous in our lives. We look with
suspicion at the strangers around us,
and it is making us a paranoid nation.
Who, then, is to blame? The blame
is as hard to place as the problem is to
pinpoint. We are all in a sense to
blame, from the desperate criminal who
inflicts the damage, to the gun lobbyist
who tries to stop gun control.
The gas chamber is not the answer,
either. It's not the answer because it's
a solution that is too easy. We should
be concerned with finding ways to make
all lives better, rather than resorting to
the quick punishment of cyanide.
What can we do, then? It's hard to
say. We could make a start by caring a
little more for what goes on around us,
and trying to make our corner of the
world a little better one to live in.
Secondly, we could help to elect
good and just leaders that we feel will
lead us out of the mess we are in now.
We could not support a candidate for
national public office who is not
interested in seeing that the sale and
distribution of handguns is curtailed.
Finally, we could help to rid
ourselves of our personal fears by
getting involved in the rehabilitation of
prisoners. We cannot solve any
problems as long as our prisons
continue to be schools of crime.
In a real sense, then, we have If we do, we will continue to be
become scared of our own shadows. We victimized by the graduates of these
have become less caring, and less schools.
JACK ANDERSON-JOE SPEAR
SPECIAL
Brennan JVlay Resign Supreme Court;
Carter Appointee Should Be Liberal
By JACK ANDERSON
and JOE SPEAR
WASHINGTON Presi-
dent Carter may have the
opportunity next year to
appoint a Supreme Court
justice. Unfortunately, it
won't do much to defrost the
Ice Age mentality of the
Warren Burger Supreme
Court or modify the chilling
effect of four of Richard
Nixon's men on the high
tribunal.
Associate Justice William
Brennan Jr. has signaled to
intimates that he probably
will bow off the bench after
this term, creating a vacan-
cy for Carter to fill. Carter's
choice is expected to be far
less rigid-minded than the
Nixon nominees who now
dominate the court.
Almost without exception,
the Burger court has hacked
away at the rights of the
news media to be immune
from the restrictive hand of
government. An array of
restrictive rulings has
reflected the chief justice's
own personal animosity
toward the press. Burger
shares the bitterness of Nix-
on who appointed him. He
has referred to the reporters
who cover the doings of his
court as "a bunch of
Pipsqueaks When New
ork Times reporter Myron
Farber was jailed for con-
tempt for refusing to turn
over his confidential notes to
a judge, Burger was elated.
Brennan, recognized as a
brilliant and articulate
jurist, has stood against the
repressive Burger tenden-
cies of the highest court in
the land. Appointed by the
late President Dwight D.
Eisenhower, Brennan was
an active opinion-moulder
during the landmark era of
the Warren court.
But with the coming of
Burger, Brennan found him-
self an odd man out. Court
sources tell us that the icy-
mannered chief justice rare-
ly allows Brennan to write
opinions even when he's on
the majority side and
assigns him only the dullest
of cases.
This they say is a major
factor in Brennan s decision
to withdraw from Burger's
judicial deep freeze.
Another Horror? The
world was horrified last
year with the ghoulish trage-
dy in the South American
country of Guyana when cult
leader Jim Jones ordered his
disciples to gun down five
visiting Americans, includ-
ing U.S. Rep. Leo Ryan, and
then led 900 of his followers
into mass suicide.
Now we've learned that
an equally rabid American
cult leader is flourishing in
the jungle undergrowths of
Guyana. He has assumed the
name of Edward Emmanuel
Washington. His real name
is David Hill, a bail jumper
from Cleveland, Ohio, where
he was convicted of corpo-
rate blackmail eight years
ago.
The 50-year-old fugitive
from justice has set up a
black supremacist group
called the House of Israel.
Hill goes by the title of rabbi
but claims to be an incarna-
tion of God.
He has gathered about
him a band of fanatical
followers, most of them
unmarried. They have been
persuaded to die on his
command.
Disturbingly, the cult sup-
ports the Guyanan govern-
ment of Prime Minister
Forbes Burnham, who has a
dictatorial bent. Some who
have spoken out against
Burnham's corrupt regime
have been assaulted by Hill's
bullyboy followers. There
have been fearful reports of
government opponents being
beaten with iron bars, sticks,
and stabbed by knife-wield-
ers.
The State Department is
"very concerned about Mr.
Hill's activities but a
spokesman explained: "The
Guyanese government is
really responsible for taking
any legal action against
him
Dry Economy: Labor Sec-
retary Ray Marshall sur-
vived Jimmy Carter's Cabi-
net shakeup but the
president's new tight-money
policy may prove too much
for the affable, well-liked
Marshall to stomach.
He is complaining pri-
vately that Federal Reserve
Board Chairman Paul
Volcker and Carter's finan-
cial advisers are launched
on an anti-inflation course
that will cast American
workers to the sharks.
Volcker and Treasury Secre-
tary William Miller espouse
a tight-credit policy that
most economists predict will
dry up the inflated economy
and create widespread
i
unemployment.
The only recourse labor
unions have is to demand
inflationary wage settle-
ments to keep pace with
double-digit inflation. Volck-
er and Miller, weekly break-
fast companions, are striv-
ing to keep the president on
their side of the fence.
If Carter loses the popular
Marshall as a result, ne may
wind up with organized
labor going all out for Teddy
Kennedy in the battle for the
upcoming Democratic presi-
dential nomination.
Under the Dome: Carter
and the other two partici-
pants in the Camp David
Mideast peace summit are
facing uneasy futures. While
Carter is confronted with an
uphill fight to win re-elec-
tion, Israeli Prime Minister
Menachem Begin has sus-
tained a rebuff from his
Supreme Court on settle-
ments in the lands seized
from the Arabs and the
desertion of his best-known
Cabinet member, Moishe
Dayan.
Egypt's Anwar Sadat is
also enmeshed in domestic
troubles. Secret Cabinet
minutes from the White
House disclose that Carter's
emissary Robert Strauss
brought back a message
from Begin urging the Unit-
ed States to rush more eco-
nomic help to Sadat.
Strauss told the Cabinet
meeting that the economic
problems facing Egypt were
very complex and that
American involvement in
the economic support of
Egypt would be critical to
its long-term future
United FaMar Syndicate, lac.
'BANZAf!
PC7
Letters to the Editor
Reader defends 'discomania9
To the Editor:
In reading a letter to
the Editor of The East
Carolinian, I have decided
to respond to the criticism
of disco music. As a senior
here at ECU, I have also
been downtown and ex-
perienced that "disco-
mania" which Mr. Nilsson
so harshly described as
emanating from the down-
town establishments.
I only with to indicate
to him, and others, that
there are others among us
who appreciate the unique
sounds of Glenn Miller,
the jazz of Chic Corea, the
softness of Brahms, and
the easy listening of
Manilow.
Where the current
trend in music is obviously
the disco beat of the likes
of the Bee Gees and
Donna Summer, their mu-
sical popularity is not
necessarily contingent up-
on the popularity of the
disco sound. For example,
Dionne Warwick and Bar-
bra Streisand have rolled
with the musical punches
throughout the years and
will probably continue to
be popular in the future,
regardless of the ups and
downs of the musical
community.
Music is not unlike an
electronic component,
made up of many fila-
ments of different natures.
It is our natural and God
given right to have and
express opinions of our
likes and dislikes on
subjects ranging from
Gregorian chants to John
Travolta.
I for one do not
particularly object to disco
music, however I agree
with Mr. Nilsson that we
should not close our minds
to the "music of different
drummers
Marianne Harbison
Poole dealt blow
To the Editor:
I would like to recog-
nize the quality of sports-
manship and character
that one particular Caro-
lina football player dis-
played in Saturday's
game.
The player was number
32 (listed as Greg Poole in
the game program), and
the sportsmanship and
character of this mindless
dimwit was comparable to
that of a spineless coward.
Those who watched the
game highlights and the
Pat Dye Show know
exactly what I'm referring
to.
In the first half,
Leander Green was
pushed out of bounds into
a mass of Carolina players
on the sidelines. To keep
him from running into the
bench and possibly getting
hurt, 32, Greg Poole,
alertly offerred a jolting
elbow-forearm "shot" into
Leander's throat, nearly
decapitating him.
Leander, being a first
class, first rate person and
athlete, just recovered and
quietly ran back onto the
field and resumed play as
if nothing happened.
In my opinion it took a
much bigger man to do
what Leander did than it
took Poole to deliver such
a malicious and deliberate
blow.
I tip my hat to you
Leander for giving Caro-
lina a lesson in class and
sportsmanship that was
obviously sorely needed.
As for Poole, I doubt
he would have offerred the
same gesture to Mike
Brewington or Jeff Warren
since he doesn't have the
backbone to pick on
someone unless they un-
derweigh him by 40
pounds as Leander did.
It's a disgrace to
"mighty" Carolina that
they have someone of
Poole's caliber represent-
ing them on an otherwise
decent football team.
Ben Toler
Auditor
criticized
To the Editor:
The purpose of this
letter is to speak out
against the attitude of
self-importance that is
prevalent in the adminis-
tration of ECU. The
administration seems to
think that their job would
be much simpler if the
students would take their
clutter of problems and go
awav.
In trying to straighten
out a payroll problem, I
had the opportunity to
speak with the Internal
Auditor over the phone
He implied that if I wasn't
polite and respectful, he
could make it very difficult
for me to get an
emergency loan. Students
are the reason his job
exists, but this gentleman
insists on treating them
like adolescent nuisances
instead of responsible
adults.
Students do not exist to
be preyed upon by the
administration; the oppo-
site is true, the adminis-
tration exists to serve the
students of this University.
Let's keep that in mind.
Susan Ries
The East Carolinian
MANAGING EDITOR
Richard Green
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Anita Lancaster
NEWS EDITOR
ASST. NEWS EDITOR
FEATURES EDITOR
ASST. FEATURES EDITOR
EDITOR
Marc Barnes
DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
Robert M. Swaim
ASST. DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
Terry Herndon
ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR
Cheryl Holder
BUSINESS MANAGER
Steve O'Geary
Karen Wendt
Terry Gray
Bill Jones
K.C.
SPORTS EDITOR
ASST. SPORTS EDITOR
COPY EDITOR
AD TECH. SUPER.
Charles Chandler
Jimmy Dupree
Diane Henderson
Paul Lincke
THE EAST CAROLINIAN Is the student
newspaper of East Carolina University
sponsored by the Media Board of ECU
and Is distributed each Tuesday and
Thursday during the
weekly during the summer).
the Publications Center Old South
Building. Our mailing address is: Old
South Building, ECU, Greenville, NC
27834.
The phone numbers are: 757-8366, 6367,
$10
Offices are located on the
fleer of





The Kast Carolinian
inian. 1 m
features
Thursday, November 8, 1979 Page 5
Greenville, N.C
m jpm
American hostages in Iran
ECU students voice opinions
David Friedman, Ratzo Harris, Michael DiPasqua, and Dave Samuels of the
Double Image Jazz Ensemble.
The Double Image brings
innovative jazz Tuesday
Hn BILL JONES
Features Editor
'The group is com-
pletely innovative. There
cedent for it in
At their best, they
and project a
of intensity that
the room in a
silence
Double Image, the jazz
emble which John S.
�A The New York
thus describes, will
�i in a free concert
esday, Nov. 13. The
will be held
the A.J. Fletcher
Hall in the ECU
� Music.
Double Imago is made
?i
Coming
Attractions
IjlBILEE!
up of four gifted and
innovative musicians.
Thirty-one year old David
Samuels is a former
instructor of mallet per-
cussion and jazz improvis-
ation at the Berklee
College of Music
Besides playing vibes
and marimba for Double
Image, Samuels is a
Ladwig clinitian and lec-
tures at colleges through-
out the United States. He
has performed and re-
corded with Gerry Mull-
igan, Frank Zappa, Carla
Blev and Herman Szobel,
among others.
Besides having been
featured in a cover story in
Downbeat magazine and
receiving recognition in
their Critics Poll, Samuels
has contributed to the
development of a new
pick-up system for vibra-
; phone and marimba.
Di Pasqua,
By K.C. NEEDHAM
Assistant Features Editor
"What do you think of
the present situation in
Iran concerning the 60
Americans being held
hostage in lieu of the
return of the Shah?'1
On November 7, mem-
bers of The East Caro-
linian staff conducted an
informal survey of student
and faculty opinion on the
recent developments in
Iran. The
people of his country
desire the United States to
turn him over to Iranian
authorities and to these
ends have taken 60
Americans hostage.
The following is a
sample of the opinions of
to his individuality and the ECU community.
versatility. A native son of
New York, he is one of
that city's most sought
after mallet specialists.
Friedman also teaches
mallet percussion and jazz
ensemble classes at the
Manhattan School of
Music and the Institute for
Advanced Musical Studies
in Montreux, Switzerland.
He has performed and
recorded with some of
today's most influential
contemporary musicians,
such as George Benson,
Hubert Laws, Horace Sil-
ver and others.
Born in Indiana in
1954, Ratzo Harris em-
barked on his musical
career at the ripe old age
of 13. He lived in Chicago
and Detroit before joining
Joe Henderson's band.
Harris has been based in
New York since 1977.
Having experienced
�I think it's inadvisable;
inappropriate for us to use
force. We'll just simply
have to work it out diplo-
matically. (Dr. Wm. Still,
Professor, History Dept.)
�Iran? I really don't keep
up much, but I don't think
we have anything to get
involved in um, really I
guess there's not much we
can do, unless the Shah
wants to give himself up
freely. We can't force him
to go. I really don't see
the point in trying to get
us to hand over the Shah.
I think we should try in
some way to save the
hostages without any
force.
�I think they're crazy
really.
�I think it's very disgust-
ing that they did that. It
shows how totally un-
civilized they are.
�I think they're serious. I
think they're real serious.
He's gonna die anyway.
He's gonna die when they
send him back over there
cause they've already
planned to kill him, right?
I think we should get his
medical records straight
and send him back over
there.
�I haven't really thought
abut the situation.
�Personally, I think it's
best, nationally, to send
him back.
�The situation currently in
Iran, given the state of
affairs, looks very difficult
for the American govern-
ment to deal with. We
have no bargaining power.
Returning the Shah is
against the principles of
this country. Therefore, I
suppose "concern" is the
only feeling I really have
at this point. There's
nothing that can be done
logically or effectively
unless the Iranians change
their position. (Dr. John
Bort, Assistant Professor
of Sociology and Anthro-
pology Dept.)
�I'm not following it
wouldn't be able to help
you.
�Uh, I wouldn't go back,
man. You know, we've
been good to the Shah,
man, and I wouldn't go
back if I were him. You
know, it's like "pull up
the ladder, I'm aboard
�Well, being a political
scientist There's no
alternative but what we're
doing. It's one of those
situations that you're go-
ing to have to play by ear.
We're between a rock and
a hard place. We'll just
have to go through
diplomacy and hopefully
reason will prevail. As my
minister would say, "We
should probably pray a
lot
�I myself don't know what
to think. They made
suggestions about holding
Iranians in this country
hostage, and I don't think
that's a good idea. But I
don't know what we could
do unless we just storm
the place.
�I think since the Shah's
only one and they got 60
of them, we ought to send
him back.
�Could you run that by me
again?
Editor's note: Most
students interviewed de-
clined giving name
classification.
or
I
Humor
Wonder's Journey is
a phenomenal effort
; I a celebration in �
�song, featuring selections;
Jfr The Wiz, Porgy and I
li. ss ther musicals, �

Sweater TONIGHT at 8:001
�p.m
I ESCAPE
Michael
drummer-percussionist for such a large variety of
the group, is a versatile different musical styles,
and sensitive musician. He Harris has developed a
has performed and re- unique bass-playing style,
corded with such artists as The individual origin-
Zoot Sims, Marian Mc- ality that characterizes
appear in Hendnx J partlanc Ralph Towner each of the members of
and many others. Di the Double Image Jazz
Pasqua began his career Ensemble has contributed
strictly as a drummer but to the group's unique
expanded into other ve- instrumentation and fresh
nues of percussion to be individual and group im-
able to work with a wider provisation.
scope of textures, sounds Downbeat summarized
and artists. Double Image's perfor-
For two consecutive mance at the Newport Jazz
years, Downbeat maga- Festival as, technically
zine's "Talent Deserving complex music vibrating
Wider Recognition" has with rich coloristic, timbral
voted David Friedman No.
1 vibraphone player, due See JAZZ, page 7
t"Em ape to the South!
� - is a travel-adventure;
tfilm by Thayer Soule, will �
I'bv shown on Nov. 15, at
�800 p.m. in Hendrix.
5 Auditorium. �
Stevie Wonder
By PAT MINGES
Features Writer
When Paul Simon re-
ceived a Grammy for his
album Still Crazy After All
These Years and it came
time to give acknowledg-
ments, he simply stated "I
would like to thank Stevie
Wonder for not putting
anything out this year,
enabling me to win this
award
Well, it has been three
years since the release of
Songs In The Key Of
Life, and Stevie Wonder
has released his latest
endeavor, Stevie Wonder's
Journey Through The Se-
cret Life of Plants.
This is truly an asto-
nishing album, perhaps
the most phenomenal ef-
fort in the history of
modern pop music.
The new release is
based on the book The
Secret Life of Plants, by
Peter Tompkins and
Christopher Bird, and
substantial portions of this
recording are contained in
the soundtrack of the
motion picture, 'The Se-
cret Life of Plants
released through Para-
mount Pictures.
Journey Through The
Secret Life Of Plants is a
most remarkable album.
Stevie Wonder composed
all of the music, performs
it mostly by himself and
handles the arrangement
and production chores for
this double album. Only a
true musical genius could
attempt such an endeavor
and pull it off with the
success that this album
will surely receive.
Stevie Wonder is the
single most highly paid
performing artist in con-
temporary music, and with
the release of this album,
there is little wonder as to
See WONDER, page 7
Fall edition of Tar River Poetry reviewed
Three ECU students
poems
By RICHARD GREEN
It feels like autumn outside, as well as
inside the pages of the fall edition of Tar
Rner Poetry.
This is mv favorite season of the year,
but I fear it will be springtime before
knowing whether this slender collection of
poems will rank as highly. Some of the
poems will take time to enjoy fully, to
savor. For now, it impresses me with the
variety of language and depth of the
poems, and they read in an unpretentious
order. .
Ironically, yet perhaps fittingly, the
first four poems are by A. Poulin Jr who
will edit Peter Makuck's forthcoming
book, Where We Live. As the editor of
Tar River Poetry, Makuck chose to lead
with poems that embrace the overall tone
of the book.
Though many of the selections move in
and around the season, the majority do
not Few poetic cliches appear as the
fresh language weaves through autumn
and relationships, and the final pattern is
quite pleasing. Everyone should be able to
find a number of personally relevant
poems and to acknowledge that all of the
poems are fine-tuned and professional.
Three ECU students are featured in
this edition, which is a compliment to
their poetic abilities and an asset to the
book as a whole.
Colleen Flynn, 1979-80 editor of the
award winning Rebel, gives us a poem
entitled "Counterpane" that is full of
meaning from the title to the last line. In
a very human voice, she uses a simple
language in an original metaphor of
not-so-simple feelings:
poem forthcoming in the New Earth
Review, and both students are in the
writing program at ECU and members of
the Poetry Forum.
Joseph's "Hooked" and Andrew's
"By Lamplight" are about separation
from or the absence of a loved one. So all
three students express similar feelings in
beautiful verse, feelings with which most
students can empathize.
The production of Tar River Poetry is
excellent, from a pleasing and very
readable body type to the peach-tinted
stock. The cover photo is an interesting
duotone of a photo by Pete Podezswa, and
small, low-key, ink sketches by Joseph
Dudasik are appropriate and well-placed
throughout as pleasant visual breaks from
the type.
Tar River Poetry can be purchased for
$2 at the ECU Student Supply Store and
other bookstores in Greenville.
Greetings fellow residents of ECU: Suit case college
extraordinaire,
On the theory that all of you have taken road trips on
one occasion or another, I thought I would address
myself today to the various do's and don'ts of successful
road tripping. I feel I am a authority on the subject,
having taken quite a few such jaunts during my college
days, and I would like to share my findings with you.
For those of you who are confused as to what a road
trip actually is, I will be more than happy to give a
simple definition. It is any excursion one decides to
take on the spur of the moment. For example, if a friend
accosts you at Happy Hour on Friday afternoon and
drags you off to the beach, you are embarking on a road
trip.
Road trips usually succeed best when one has gas in
the car and money in the bank. If you're lacking either,
vou're in trouble.
If you don't have much gas, you may find yourself
running out in the booming metropolis of Stumpy Point,
North Carolina. Stumpy Point unfortunately leaves
something to be desired in the way of social hfe and
places to sleep. If you don't have much money, the
consequences may be the same.
It's also a good idea to make sure that the car you
are driving is trustworthy. I once took off on a road trip
to Nag's Head at 2:00 in the morning and found myself
in a dead car at Columbia, N.C. at 4:00 a.m. I remained
in this small town until late the next afternoon while the
car was being fixed. Taking angry pulls at a fifth of
Early Times, I wondered how in the hell I was going to
cover the expense of a new transmission.
When a friend cons you into a visit to his mountain
cabin for the weekend, by all means, grab a sweater and
go, but please, ask him to make sure he has the keys to
his cabin. I spent a rather uncomfortable evening in a
VW bug during one road trip to the mountains. It was
nice to have a driveway to sleep in, but a bed would
have been infinitely preferable.
While we're on the subject of places to sleep, I
wo id like to remind everyone to make sure they have
one before leaving Greenville on a wild and crazy road
trip. It's also a good idea to give everyone in the car
their own directions on how to find the place.
On yet another journey, I found myself cruising
around an unfamiliar Chapel Hill after an evening of
partying. All other occupants of the car were solidly
passed out, including the Chapel Hill native who was
supposed to let us sleep in her house. After emptying
several beer cans over her head in an effort to awaken
her, I gave up and steared into a parking lot hoping to
get'some rest myself. I was quite embarrassed when I
woke up to find a policeman peering in the windows
with the aid of a high-beam flashlight.
I must say though, that no matter what the
destination, the actual ride in the car is the most fun. I
love to drink and drive. It's one of my favorite bad
habits.
Always be sure to lay in plenty of beer for the drive,
a well stocked cooler makes for a happy crew. Be
3.S
prepared for mumerous pit stops, and never deny
fellow passenger the luxury of a quick stop. The car
seats you save may be your own.
And listen guys, whatever happens, don't let those
nasty highway patrolmen ruin a good time. They have a
rotten habit of putting a crimp in some real great road
trips. Aloha! Yours
775134
Cranberry-colored pigeons
On my bedroom wallpaper are eating stems
Of cherries.
We lie close on the counterpane
As close as the frilled, feather-like leaves that
Just touch tips around the birds.
I want to be covered
By you
Not shielded
Of touch
Like the stiff Geisha doll in glass
On the dresser.
The other student poets are Jeffrey
Joseph and Denise Andrews. Joseph has a
Louwjog Aeour Cou-ftf re H�p Way
bl Pwip Noris
f 00. T��TH
AHiJCTECN TlYfcS TOQfM
I
4





Page 6 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 8 November 1979
Hunter Thompson
is running loose
B) JAY STONE
To discover thai Hunter S. Thompson is running
loose and strange and riding high on the momentum of
a hue nevs book entitled The Great Shark Hunt was
amusing to me. I have read all three of Dr. Thompson's
previous hooks: The Hell's Angels: A Strange and
Terrible Saga, Fear and Lathing In Las legas and Fear
and Loathing On the Campaign Trail '72, as well as
several ol his pieces in Rolling Stone magazine, for
which he was the national affairs editor throughout the
1.2 presidential election. Subsequently, the concept of
venturing into the hinterlands of "gonzo journalism"
and had craziness" filled my spirit vith great joy.
Hunter Thompson is one of those rare eeeentrics who
somehow manages to acquire the ability to practice
responsible journalism and then runs amuck, to
everyone's dismay and horror In 1970. Thompson took
it upon himself to run for sheriff of Aspen, Colorado.
His campaign promise- included ripping up the city
streets with jackhammers and installing a set of wooden
stocks on the courthouse lawn with which to punish
dishonest druti dealers
He narrowly lost the election. However, the Aspen
Freak Power Uprising" has snue become a legend,
and i! is covered in detail in The Great Shark Hunt.
Tin new $15 hard-cover anthology contains what is
certainly some of Thompson's most powerful and
accessible work. It spans the career of a writer who has
been called 'America's foremost Outlaw Journalist
and it is from his decidedly unconventional perspective
that we see our own society with a heightened
sensitivity. Simultaneously, we are filled with the
conviction that none oi it can be taken too seriously,
regardless ol how ominous or cumbersome events
become.
The Great Shark Hunt is divided into
four separate parts, each composed of
various essays and narratives that may
bear a loose affinity with theme
- - ilitical material in The Great
iguely enlightening to read. To
sample, that Hunter Thompson almost
Muskie's political career by
his press pass an aggressive drunk is just
�ther con rmation that keeps the
g out enough on "gonzo journalism" to read
thr n insightfi . intelligent analysis of the 1972
esidential m.
The Great Shark Hunt is divided into four separate
parts, each composed of various essays and narratives
that may bear a loose affinity with a common topic or
theme. For the nn rt, however, the work is simply
arranged in chronological order.
The title oi this new book owes its inspiration to an
essay n pa this piece, Thompson and a
mpanion, Yail Bloor, set out to cover a
ing Mazatlan, Mexico on the expense
m igazine and the Striker
. eventually, the reader
mpson is merely using the
sy ej use to get locked into a
full-blow n dm .
Eventually, a series ol serious yet somehow
inevitable miscalculations lead- to a confrontation with
the people in authority, and the reader follows
Th. mpson and Bloor through some mind-bending
escapades that cause a distinctive numbing quality in
the brain.
1' is indeed unfortunate that none of Ralph
Steadman's illustration- were included in The Great
Shark Hunt as they have been in past Hunter Thompson
publications. Steadman's illustrations give the writer's
word- a -urreal quality that tends to pail anv other
attempt at journalism by comparison.
The Great Shark Hunter, however, is a desperate
attempt at respectability by a dope-addled manic
depressive writer who is nearing male menopause. It
must be taken in that context, for there is no choice but
to get caught up in this thing and follow Hunter
Thompson's antics and see the world from his vantage
point.
In a world completely devoid of rational
interpretations the only logical response is bad craziness
and perhaps, on occasion, sex and drugs and
Rock-n-Roll.
Exiled Dalai Lama may return to Tibet
By HUGH A. MULLIGAN
AP Special Correspondent
LHASA, Tibet (AP) �
When construction work-
ers in coolie hats were
building a tea house for
tourists at the edge of the
lotus pond where the Dalai
Lama used to look for
meaningful reflections, the
water had been drained,
,but the handwriting was
on the wall for his
lollowers to see.
The Potala, his thou-
sand-room winter palace
taller than the dome of
Christopher Wren's St.
Paul's Cathedral, has been
turned into a museum.
The Jokka Kang Temple,
the Vatican of the lamaist
religion where his devoted
acolytes used to burn a ton
of yak butter a day to keep
the votice lamps flickering,
is open only a few hours a
week to the most elderly
faithful.
The Drepung monas-
tery, once the world's
largest with 10,300 lamas,
echoes hollowly now to the
footsteps of only a few
hundred lamas, all of them
getting on in years, too.
The Dalai Lama, if he
comes back to Tibet, will
find lots of other changes
have taken place under the
Chinese communists since
1959.
That's when he made
his dramatic escape 20
years ago on foot and by
yak-skin canoe to India
across three-mile high
mountain passes and down
wild, roaring rivers, wear
ing cheap spectacles and
disguised as a begging
monk.
The Chinese govern-
ment says it would wel
come the Dalai Lama back,
like any other exile, either
to visit or to stay, and five
of his senior emissaries
now art- on an extended
tour of the (ountry to
assess under what condi-
tions he could make his
return.
If - plain the
Himalayan peaks
this short-time tour I
Tibet that the
the 1 1-th and m
reincarnation of the B
dhisl god of iii-
be coming I
kind leader.
spiritual or temp
All the lama
living Buddh
working in th rnrni
RICHARD
PRYOR
Filmed y
LIVE IN
CONCERT
East Carolina's
minority
news-

paper s

WARNING: This Picture Contains
Harsh And Very Vulgar Language
And May Be Considered Shocking
And Offensive.

position
is now
available
to any full-time
ECU student.
Fri. @ Sat. night
7 � 9 p.m.
Hendrix Theatre
Sponsored by the Student Union Films Committee
Seethe Media Board secretary
at the East Carolinian office
Nov. 7 - 14.
Ad provided by the East Carolinian
for the Media Board
Equal opportunity employers
MRC
GAMEROOM
LOCATED IN
BASEMENT OF
AYCOCK DORM
� Pinball Contest
with Prizes
� Serves as checkout
area for recreation
equipment.
� One-half of Game
room receipts goes
back to students
through MRC projects.
SUPPORT
THE MRC GAMEROOM
This weekend Eat, Eat,Eat!
STUDENT UNION
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
ALPHA PHI
Presents a
� a
Your
Student
Union
Committees
Computer Dating
Happy Hour'
Sun. Nov. 11, at
Jolly Roger
Tickets will be sold at the Book store
Thurs. & Fri. between the hours 10-1
Music: Disco Beach Rock
November 11th � a hearty brunch bonanza!
All the hotcakes, syrup, butter and sizzling
patties of pure pork sausage you can eat. All the
fresh, hot coffee you can drink. No limit. No
kidding!
You'll get a cold glass of juice, too. Orange cr
grapefruit. A juicy decision.
Nobody can do it
like McDonalds can
All for $2.29. And all you have to do is just sit,
relax, and enjoy while the special All-You-Can-
Munch Brunch hostess keeps the hotcakes.
sausage and coffee coming till you cry -Uncle
The $2.29 All-You-Can-Munch Brunch Sun-
day, November 11th, 6:30-10:30 a.m. Much
munching at the 10th Street McDonald's !
TM





8 November 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
ECU
faculty
concert
GREENVILLE - The
Brahms Serenade No. 2,
Opus 16, will be perform-
ed at an East Carolina
University Faculty Cham-
ber Concert Sunday, Nov.
11, at 4:15 p.m. in the
Fletcher Recital Hall.
The program is the
second in a series of
chamber concerts featur-
ing members of the ECU
School of Music faculty.
Coordinating the series
this year are faculty
members Joseph Distefano
and David Hawkins.
The chamber ensemble
will include two flutes, a
piccolo, two oboes, two
clarinets, two bassoons,
two horns, three violas,
three cellos and a bass
viol. Conducting the en-
semble is Robert Hause,
professor of music at ECU,
who also conducts the
ECU Symphony Orchestra.
All concerts in the
chamber series are free
and open to the public.
Other programs will fea-
ture chamber works by
such composers as Beet-
hoven, Schumann, Web-
ern, Albeniz and Turpin.
GREENVILLE - An-
tonia Dalapas, soprano, a
member of the voice
faculty in the East Caro-
lina University School of
Music, will perform in
recital Sunday, Nov. 11 at
8:15 p.m. in the Fletcher
Recital Hall.
Accompanied by pian-
ist Everett Pittman, dean
of the School of Music,
Ms. Dalapas will perform
arias from Handel's Julius
Caesar, six Brahms songs,
an aria from Puccini's
Manon Lescaut, four songs
by Faure, two songs by
Ginastera, two Greek folk
songs and Ravel's "Five
Popular Greek Melodies
The program is open to
the public without charge.
An assistant professor
at ECU, Ms. Dalapas has
degrees from the New
England Conservatory of
Music. She has performed
in the Pacific Northwest as
well as in several Eastern
cities and was featured
with the ECU Symphony
in performances of
Strauss's "Four Las
Songs" and the Beethoven
Ninth Symphony.
Spell may be broken
WONDER
continued from page 5
the justification of this
tact.
Born Stephen Judkins
in Saginaw. Michigan on
May 13. 1950, Wonder has
been blind since birth. His
family moved to Detroit
when he was 12. and there
he met Berry Gordy, head
of Tamla Records. Gordy
immediately signed the
youngster up, for besides
his urgent, piping vocal
style, the boy was also an
adept harmonica and
bongo player. His first
album was Recorded Live
-The Twelve Year
Genius, and the rest is
history. Stevie Wonder is
ably the most re-
� performer in all of
if not ot all
music.
new album is
mtly different from
last effort; it is
stantially more relaxed
v rigs In The Key of
There is less of an
towards AM
: il is more bent
ai Is the prominent FM
music. Accord-
fiere are only a
uple of tunes with a
flavor. which is
TPhing and indicative
-wing away from
that has been
Id in the press.
It is absolutely amazing
that one individual could
form a large majority of
the music that is contained
on Journey Through The
- ret Life of Plants.
Wonder has always been
known to work in isolation.
quite independent of the
Motown organization. The
range and expertise of
instruments played on this
album by the artist is
psychologically debilitat-
ing, for he does everything
from accompaniment on
strings to the vocal tracks
and almost all in between.
Always, there are a lot
of surprises thrown into
the production of a Stevie
Wonder album. The entire
effort for this one was
recorded and edited on a
Sony PCM 1600 digital
sound reproduction unit,
which is reproduction
completely without tape
recorders. This method
� liminates any of the
noises usually associated
with tapes and produces a
cleaner, crisper sound. Ry
Cooder and Fleetwood
Mac have used this
method on their last
albums, both of which
have been great commer-
cial successes, and this
digital method seems to be
the wave of the future.
Perhaps the theme of
The Secret Life of Plants is
for man to develop a more
profound appreciation of
the ecological relationship
between plants and him-
self. In turn, this enlight-i
ened acknowledgment can
perhaps foster a deeper
understanding of the im-
portance of replenishing
our all too fragile environ
ment.
When man's techno-
logy has gotten too big foH
even our greatest minds to
direct, it may prove to be
his Armageddon, yet alas,
from a tiny seed can a
yvhole new world begin.
Such is the strength of a
mere plant, that it dwarfs
man's greatest technolog-
ical advances.
In the las. words of the
liner notes, Stevie Wonder
thanks all who have so
patiently yvaited for this
accomplishment and hopes
that his effort is worthy of
the wait. All good things
take time to develop
properly.
Stevie Wonder's Jour-
ney Through The Secret
Life of Plants is perhaps
the greatest accomplish-
ment of the most respect-
ed performer in popular
music and is destined to
take it's proper place in
the history of modern
music.
Photo Lab
Photographer needed
apply in the East Carolinian Office
By RICHARD GREEN
Managing Editor
Halloween 1979 passed
with almost every night-
time establishment in
downtown Greenville
closed Wednesday night,
but 1980 may break the
four-year spell.
The riot on Halloween
night, 1975, in Greenville
resulted in numerous ar-
rests, property destruction
and ultimately the ghost-
town appearance of the
downtown area on Hallo-
ween night.
Alleged causes of the
riot vary, but nightclub
owners generally agree
that the reasons were a
combination of non-com-
munication and poor or-
ganization of the Green-
ville Police Department
and the willful destruction
of private property by the
public.
Nightclub owners met
with the police to discuss a
plan of action prior to the
1975 riot, but when it
actually happened, nothing
went as planned. One
example was the sug-
gestion that owners keep
people inside the clubs if
trouble started. The Attic
abided by that request
only to have a tear gas
canister thrown inside the
club.
The Halloween mora-
torium began by orders of
the police. The Greenville
Nightclub Association has
voluntarily continued the
practice but not without
pressure from the police.
Halloween 1980 will
fall on a Friday night, and
many club owners say they
will be open. Among them
are the Attic, Sun Set,
and the Rathskeller.
The owners expect
pressure from the city, but
they agree that Halloween
1975 should be tucked
away in the history books
where it belongs. Con-
tinually canceling the fes-
tive night only serves as a
reminder of the freak riot.
Patronize
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"he East Carolinian
lianj m
sports
Thursday, November 8, 1979 Page 8
Greenville, N.C
From winless Richmond
Dy
e expects
'war'
Theodore Sutton takes off against ASU
(Photo by John Grogan)
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
One has to wonder if East Carolina football coach Pat
Dye is really concerned about the Pirates' game this
Saturday with winless Richmond.
"You better believe I am said Dye. "I expect an
all-out war
Dye evidently based his statement on tradition rather
than the present. The Spiders, 0-9 this season, have
scored a measley 59 points all season. That translates to
an average offensive output of 6.6 points per game.
"They've had some rough breaks said Dye.
"Actually, Richmond is a very capable football team
with some very capable personnel
Dye pointed to the Spiders 17-14 loss to Cincinnati
several weeks ago when the Spiders had the ball on the
Bearcats one-yard line late in the game but failed in two
chances to get the ball across the goal line. "I'm not
sure they didn't beat Cincinnati Dye noted. "I've seen
the films and it looks like their guy scored both times
The loss to Cincinnati was only one of many close
defeats this season for the Spiders. They fell to
Wyoming 9-7, West Virginia 20-18, and fumbled on the
goal line with 1:20 left in the game in last week's 9-3
loss to Villanova.
So Dye is wary, and rightfully so, that this may just
be the week that things fall into place for the Spiders.
"One tremendous advantage they have Dye said,
"is that they played awisJj.bone team in Villanova last
week (the Pirates also run the wishbone attack). So
they've had two weeks to prepare for us plus they got to
get in a game scrimmage last week
Some observers sav that a decision by the Richmond
Board of Trustees later this week could have an effect
on Saturday's matchup. The board will vote on whether
to continue the football program.
Dye said that either way the decision goes the
Pirates will come out on the short end. "I certainly hope
they keep football at Richmond he said. "If they do do
away with it, their team will probably fight that last
effort to prove that there should be a football program.
If they keep it, they'll play hard in hopes of a continued
program
Pye pointed to the fact that in the past the Spiders
had given the Pirates a tough time in the past. 'They
gave us all we could handle last year (a 21-14 ECU
win) he said. The coach is right. It took a late
fourth-quarter drive by the Pirates to prevent a 14-14
tie.
The Spiders defeated the Pirates in 1974 and 1975,
Dye's first two seasons at ECU, by scores of 28-20 and
17-14.
The sixth-year ECU mentor is also wary of the speed
of the Spiders. In the backfield is sprinter Jesse
Williams, who runs the 100-yard dash in 9.1 seconds.
"Williams caused a lot of problems for us last year as
did Short said Dye.
"Short" is James Short, the Richmond split end who
quarterbacked the club last season. "He gives them a
great deal of speed at the end position Dye said.
As for his own team, Dye said he was impressed by
the performance of the defense over the last four games.
"The first four games, when we went 1-3, we forced
only four turnovers. The last four games (in which the
Pirates went 3-0-1) we forced 16. Some led to scores.
That definitely has been a big factor in some of the Dig
scores that we have posted lately.
dL-J2�
Lady Bucs take a pair;
end season even at 20-20
By JIMMY DuPREE William and Mary 15-13,
Assistant Sports Editor 15-17, 15-4.
Odom working on basics
PIRATE ROUNBALL NOTES:
Things are going along in a normal sort of way for
the East Carolina basketball team, especially since the
team is adjusting to a new coaching staff.
"I'd say that right now we are a little behind the
other college teams said new ECU head man Dave
Odom. "This is because we have worked a great deal on
fundamentals. This may hurt us some early but should
really pay off as the season goes on
Odom will unveil the Pirates to the public officially
for the first time next Wednesday night when the team
will hold a Purple-Gold intrasquad scrimmage game.
The game will be preceded by a similar contest
featuring the women's team.
THE NEW COACH also invites all interested persons
to show up at a Men's Residence Council-sponsored
event next Tuesday night. Beginning at 7:00 p.m. the
team will hold a brief scrimmage. Following the
scrimmage, Odom will introduce the Pirate players to
the assembled group before making a brief talk. The
talk will be followed by a question-and-answer session,
at which time Odom will entertain any questions that the
audience may have.
A WELL-KNOWN pre-season basketball publication
has rated the ECU schedule "above average evidently
citing tough road tests at Old Dominion, Duke,
Maryland, Detroit, N.C. State, Oral Roberts and South
Carolina.
THE RAVES ARE coming in from Pirate players
about their new coach already. Odom must definitely be
a welcome change considering Larry Gillman was the
coach at ECU for two long seasons.
One player who should know what kind of coach
Odom is, senior Herb Krusen, is impressed. "Coach
Odom is really energetic said Krusen. "He's very
emotional and gets involved in what you do. If you do
something good, he jumps for joy. I'm really impressed
and quite surprised at how well he knows the game of
basketball. It's impressive to me that he knows so well
what a big man should do in all situations
Krusen said this pointing evidently to Odom's short
frame. It would be interesting to place the coach and
ex-N.C. State mighty-mite Monte Towe (who is 5-7)
side-by-side and compare heights.
PIRATE FANS WILL probably find one of the team's
new recruits to be quite enjoyable to watch on the court.
Tony Byles, a 6-4 transfer, has been quite impressive in
practice and Must rate, at this point at least, to be the
favorite to start at point guard when the Pirates begin
their season on Nov. 30 in the Spider Classic.
FOOTBALL NOTES:
Carlton Nelson, the freshman quarterback who has
been so impressive to ECU coach Pat Dye, continues to
thrill his coach. In a scrimmage featuring freshmen that
was held last week, Nelson was superb in running the
ECU option attack. He also connected with split end
Reggie Harden on two long touchdown passes.
"Carlton did some things last week that were
incredible said Dye. "Right now, I'd have to say he's
better than any quarterback that we've ever had at that
stage
IT WAS EVIDENT at Dye's Wednesday press
conference that the Pirate coach is certainly not giving
up hopes that his team may get a poet-season bowl bid.
When the NCAIAW
Volleyball Tournament o-
pens Friday at North
Carolina State University,
coach Alita Dillon and her
Lady Pirates will be
starting a new season.
Well, almost.
The Lady Bucs closed
out their regular season
Tuesday evening in Min-
ges Coliseum with a pair
of wins to even their
record at 20-20 in 1979.
"We're pleased about
that Dillon said. "It
helps to have two wins
going into the state
tournament
ECU easily defeated
Pembroke State 15-9, 15-6
in the final match of the
evening, but narrowly
defeated the Indians of
"The main thing that
has been inconsistent for
us has been our serving
said Dillon. "We had
some mental errors on
positioning, but the serv-
ing worries me the most.
"I think they knew that
it (William and Mary)
would probably be a good
match. That certainly was
our better match of the
night
The Pirates trailed
William and Mary 6-2 in
the opening game of the
match but struggled back
to a 6-6 knot before again
lapsing to a margin of
10-6.
The hard hitting of
spikers Sharon Perry,
Stacey Weitzel and Judith
Ausherman enabled the
Lady Bucs to retaliate and
claim victory.
"We showed confi-
dence in our offense
Dillon offered. "We don't
panic anymore in close
games.
"I think Yvette (Lewis)
has been faily consistent
serving for us. Our
passing and hitting was
decent, but nothing spec-
tacular. I guess you could
say we played well enough
to win
Team spirit and atti-
tude has taken a turn for
the better in recent
matches, and senior de-
fensive standout Joy
Forbes credits the team's
play in the recent Univer-
sity of Maryland Invi-
tational Tournament
that boost.
for
"We really played well
at Maryland said
Forbes, who is also a 800
meter runner for the
women's track team. "We
got off to a real slow start
at the first of the season. I
wasn't really surprised
though, because I knew
that we would be re-
building.
"I knew we'd come
around, so I wasn't really
worried. We feel a lot
more confident now after
finishing with a few wins
and playing so well in
Maryland.
"Our record is not real
great, but we know we can
beat teams like State and
Carolina when we play
well
(Photo by Kip Sloan)
(L-R) Duncan hits; Perry, Lewis set
Coach Praises consistency
Inman still the kid after three years
By JIMMY DuPREE
Asst. Sports Editor
He can be considered the kid on the block.
In his fourth year with the East Carolina Pirates,
guard Wayne Inman ranks as the only member of the
offensive line who will return to battle when the 1980
season rolls around.
Inman joined ECU head coach Pat Dye and his
troops after a successful career at South View High
School in Hope Mills, but the 6-3, 242-pound blocker is
yet another example of the talent which other colleges
passed up by not recruiting.
Wayne Inman
The veteran-dominated line has enabled the Bucs to
earn a ranking, of fourth in the nation in rushing offense
and seventh in total offense.
"I love it he emphatically states. "Everytime they
(running backs) get recognition, I know everybody's got
to look at the offensive line and think- how well were
opening the holes.
"The backs we have running the ball are something
special. Blocking for them is exciting. I want to have a
good block every play because you never know which
one can go all the way and win a game for us. They can
break any play for a touchdown
Indeed they can. So far the Pirate backfield has
accounted for 32 touchdowns.
"It makes us (linemen) feel real good to see Anthony
Collins rated second nationally in yards per carry said
Inman. "The ball carriers really appreaate what we do
up front, and that makes if fun to really take care of
them as best we can
The backfield through eight games has averaged 443
yards per game behind the blocking of Inman and
company. Offensive back caoch Ken Hutcherson
appreciates the value of a Rood block.
"The offensive line deserves the credit for any
success we've had on offense this year said
Hutcherson. 'They've really done a fine job. I think the
backs ought to bow down and thank them everyday in
practice
Three members of the ECU backfield (quarterback
Leander Green, fullback Theodore Sutton and running
back Anthony Collins) already boast career rushing
totals over 1000 yards and senior running back Sam
Harrell needs only 173 yards to reach that plateau.
"Early in the year, Theodore wasn't getting to carry
up the middle as much as he did last year explained
Inman. "The wishbone is a type of offense where you
have to take what the defense is giving. They were
playing strong up the middle, so we went outside and
Anthony rolled up a lot of yardage.
"It makes me happy that he (Collins) has done so
well because he runs to the right behind me and Matt
(Mulholland) a me ana mat
Inman expressed displeasure with the performance of
the Pirates against the 'Big Four but added that the
team was still not out of the bowl picture.
"State has had a lot of problems on defense since we
played there he said. ' James Butler hurt us worse
than anyone else on their team. He can up with the big
play at the start of the second half that turned the game
around. He went out with a knee injury in the fourth
quarter and he's out for the season; that's the way it's
been for them.
"Wake Forest is when we really ime together as a
team. They just beat us.
"The Duke game is a nightmare he lamented. "It
sort of makes me sick to think aoout it. We gave them
21 points turning the ball over deep in their territory
Praise from a coach comes seldom in the duration of
a college football player, so when the praise comes from
the person that held the position for three years before
the flayer-entered ECU, it just adds more satisfaction.
He's been our most consistant lineman all season
lauded Wayne Bolt, former All-Southern Conference
lineman and now assistant offensive line coach. "He
does it all; he blocks well on running plays and passing
plays. You can single him out every week in the game
films for efforts. He just gets the job done week in and
week out.
"He was an All-South Independent lineman last year
and I m sure he will be again this year
Is it difficult for Wayne Inman being the onl
married player on the ECU football team?
'It doesn't pose any problem for me he said. "Ii
takes a lot of discipline, though. My wife is a big help tc
me; she takes care of me when Pm hurting anc
encourages me, too.
"I'm a family person. We both really ehjoy having
the family around for the games and going home witE
them afterwards.
Inman remains optomistic about the Pirates' chanced
of being selected for a bowl even though the season
record of 4-3-1 dims the outlook.
"We need to win the next three games and we neec
to win them big he savs. "Bowl scouts look for team,
who can put points on the board and that's what we've
got to do. Our record is not that had
t
)





8 November 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 9
The Fearless Football Forecast
RICHMOND AT ECU
ALABAMA AT LSU
ARIZONA STATE AT UCLA
CLEMSON AT NORTH CAROLINA
DUKE AT WAKE FOREST
GEORGIA AT FLORIDA
SOUTH CAROLINA AT FLORIDA STATE
TEXAS AT HOUSTON
MICHIGAN AT PURDUE
PENN STATE AT N.C. STATE
NOTRE DAME AT TENNESSEE
SOUTHERN CAL AT WASHINGTON
Rejects racial barbs
CHARLES CHANDLER
(73-33-2)
ECU 56-7
Alabama
UCLA
North Carolina
Wake Forest
Georgia
South Carolina
Texas
Purdue
N.C. State
Notre Dame
Southern Cal
Dr. J in new movie
By WILL GRIMSLEY
IP Special Correspondent
Julius "Dr. J" Erving
more amused than
chagrined at some of the
iemaning barbs, largely
lal, aimed at the
staining aspects of
essional basketball.
One of the most widely
ulated goes like this:
Pro basketball is 10 black
n leaping for a ball
ry 24 seconds. Another
- that if you tune in on a
:ne in the last 10
minutes, you don't miss a
thing.
NEw York newspapers
have publicly explored the
suggestion that declining
attendance at Madison
Square Garden may be
attributable to the fact that
the Knicks are all black,
with no Bill Bradley or
Dave DeBusschere woven
into the ranks.
"Ridiculous retorts
Dr. J, one of the sport's
premier talents, now with
the Philadelphia 76ers.
'The game transcends
color. When the ball drops
into the net from 20 feet
out, nobody thinks of the
color of the man who
tossed it.
Articulate, poised, sans
hangjups and crusading
tendencies, Erving came
to New York earlier this
week not to indulge in or
espouse the merits of his
profession but to kick off a
new movie in which he has
a starring role, "The Fish
THat Saved Pittsburgh .
It opened Tuesday
night at a chain of
theaters.
"It's a delightful mus-
ical comedy�colorful, wit-
ty, youth oriented with a
basketball theme the
76ers' star said. "The
music is catchy. Others in
the cast are Jonathan
Winters, Flip Wilson,
James Bond III and
Meadlowlark Lemon. I
have a serious role with a
love interest. It's all built
around a team on which
every member was born
under the astrological sign
of pisces fish
It is easy to understand
why Lorimar Productions
chose Dr. J. He radiates
the kind of charisma out
of which stars are born.
A product of Roosevelt,
Long Island, he attended
the University of Mas-
sachusetts and in 1971 at
age 21 joined the Virginia
Squires of the old Amer-
ican Basketball Associ-
ation. For the next six
years he became the
center of franchise battles
and multimillion dollar
suits involving the
Squires, Atlanta Hawks
and Milwaukee Bucks.
Finally he landed with
the New York Nets, who
subsequently traded him
to the 76ers in a $2.5
million deal.
Dr. J, no longer
wearing braces on his
fragile knees, has fixed a
timetable for his retire-
ment�in 1982 at the
conclusion of his present
:ontract. He will be 32.
"I have been preparing
a business portfolio he
said. "I don't care about
going into the movies or
becoming a TV commen-
tator
TERRY HERNDON
(67-39-2)
ECU 49-3
Alabama
UCLA
Clemson
Wake Forest
Georgia
Florida State
Houston
Michigan
Penn State
Tennessee
Washington
JIMMY DuPREE
(66-40-2)
ECU 45-7
Alabama
UCLA
Clemson
Wake Forest
Florida
Florida State
Houston
Michigan
N.C. State
Notre Dame
Southern Cal
classified
toric
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FOR SALE: Sanyo Refri-
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Prices Negotiable. Call
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DAVE ODOM
ECU Basketball Coach
ECU 42-7
LSU
Arizona State
North Carolina
Wake Forest
Florida
Florida State
Houston
Purdue
N.C. State
Notre Dame
Southern Cal
RICH BRENNER
Sports Director - WRAL-TV
ECU 49-7
Alabama
UCLA
North Carolina
Wake Forest
Georgia
Florida State
Houston
Purdue
N.C. State
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The Student Union Travel Committee





10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 8 November 1979
ECU stomps Spiders, 2-1
By DAVE SEVERIN
Staff Writer
Second half goals by
Mike Lawrence and Jeff
Karpovich overcame an
early 1-0 deficit as the
ECU Soccer team bea the
University of Richmond
2-1 at the Spiders' home
turf.
The Pirates took con-
trol of the game early but
a violation in the penalty
area resulted in an penalty
kick with less that five
minutes elapsed. Steve
Poole drilled it through for
the Spiders and they led
1-0.
"We were in control of
the game all the way but
with the poor condition of
the field, we couldn't put
the ball through said
Coach Brad Smith.
"The rain definitely
was a factor. There was a
lot of sloppy play at the
beginning of the game
because we weren't used
to such poor playing
conditions. It had rained
all day and all during the
game and it made the field
extremely muddy
Even with the Pirates
in control of the game,
they still found themselves
trailing by one goal at the
end of the half.
The Pirates came out
in the second half and
dominated the Spiders. On
a corner-kick by Brad
Winchell, Lawrence put
the ball in the net on an
assist from Karpovich,
who later added the
winning goal when he
stole the ball from a
Richmond defender and
beat the goalie one-on-
one.
"I was pleased with
ouq play today. We played
under a constant down-
pour, and adapted well to
the muddy field
But the most impres-
sive thing was that the
firates were playing with-
out two of their starters.
"Chip (Baker) and Phil
(Martin) didn't even make
the trtp to Richmond. Chip
broke his foot last week
and will be out for the rest
of the season. Phil severe-
ly sprained his ankle and
will be out indefinitely
But Coach Smith found
some surprises when he
turned to his younger
players for help.
"I was extremely
pleased with our younger
players. Calvin Mangum,
who is a freshman, came
off the bench and played
an exceptional game.
Sophomore Howard Bei-
mus and junior Mike
Hitcock played well, also.
"Then there's Mike
Lawrence. He was really
our reserve goalie but he
went out there on the
front line and played very
well
The win brought the
Pirates' record to 5-10-2; a
definite improvement from
last year.
Sports Writers
Needed
Call: 757-6309
Mike Hitchcock in ECU soccer action
Premier Saturday on WNCT-TV
Lady Pirates get coach's show
DRm-raWf BEVEnAGE STORE
ON THE CORNER OF CHARLES & 14th ST.
GREENVILLE, N.C.
By JIMMY DUPREE
Asst. Sports Editor
It's been a while since
women's basketball at
East Carolina University
featured six players, with
two remaining on each end
throughout a game.
In those days, players
were short and were
expected to play with
grace and dignity instead
of fire and determination.
Up until the arrival of
second year head coach
Cathy Andruzzi, ECU had
never had a full-time
coach; certainly not a
full-time assistant.
But times change; sit-
uations change; and the
game of women's basket-
ball has certainly under-
gone a multitude of
changes.
The 1979 season adds a
new outlook to the Lady
Pirate scene. There are
new players, but perhaps
the most unusual addition
will be "The Cathy
Andruzzi Show the first
women's basketball co-
aches show in North
Carolina.
The show premiers this
Saturday at 3:30 p.m. on
WNCT-TV (channel 9),
with sports director Jim
Woods as commentator.
"It's an important
innovation said Woods.
"I think certainly it will
help the program with
regards to publicity and
exposure. It will give the
general public the idea
that women's basketball is
here
The show will feature
highlights of past games
and the outlook of up-
coming games. Player
interviews along with
'hidden' aspects of the
ATiTIC
N.C. No. r
see East Carolina.
"Anytime we're on TV,
East Carolina University is
on TV and gets ex-
posure Andruzzi added.
"That helps every pro-
gram we have here at
ECU.
"We want people to
see that the game is no
longer plaved with six on
the floor for each team;
that the game has pro-
gressed. We want them to
see that women's basket-
ball players today are
strong, skilled athletes
Featured guests on the
first show will be ECU
all-time scoring leader
Rosie Thompson and
junior college transfer
Laurie Sikes.
"We plan to have'
everyone on the team on
at some time or another
explained Andruzzi, a
native of Staten Island,
N.Y. "People will see the
girls at home in the dorm
and around campus as
well as on the court. This
helps their enthusiasm on
the court, also
Andruzzi
will
basketball program
add depth to the format.
Andruzzi is excited and
proud that ECU has the
first show, but that pride
is not selfish.
"We're not excited
about it because we beat
out Carolina and State.
We know it will help all
the programs in the area.
We are competitive, but
we are competitive with
class
"It will possibly be one
of the few women's
coaches' shows on a major
television station in the
nation said Andruzzi.
"Hopefully we'll be set-
ting a trend
"We won't just be
helping the growth of
women's basketball at
East Carolina, but
women's basketball every-
where. It's going to help
high school girls' basket-
ball program and let them
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1





Title
The East Carolinian, November 8, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 08, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.21
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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