The East Carolinian, November 6, 1979






"Were it left to me
to decide whether
we should have a
government without
newspapers or
newspapers without
government, I
should not hesitate
a moment to prefer
the latter
�Thomas Jefferson
The East Carolinian
If you have a story
idea, a tip, or a
lead, please tele-
phone us:
757-6366
757-6367
757-6309
o?l
Vol. 54 No.
12 pages today
Tuesday, November 6,1979
Greenville, N.C.
Circulation 10,000
Legislature
narrowly
OK's funds
By KAREN WENDT
News Editor
The SGA transit budget passed by a narrow margin
at the legislature meeting held yesterday.
With a vote of 25 for and 21 against with one
abstention, the legislature passed the $70,504.50 transit
budget.
Controversy arose as to whether some members of
the legislature completely understood the budget and
whether the understood the procedures of Robert's
Rules of Order
"That was pitiful said Nicky Francis, President of
the SGA Executive Council. "That was an appropriate
example of confusion, misinterpretations and an overall
fiasco
Also according to Francis, "Robert's Rules of Order
were ignored and abused
Supporting the bill, Cheryl Felbinger said she felt
that the transit managers were more qualified to decide
how much they need.
Another member of the legislature, Jeff Triplett, said
"I think it sucks. We gave them too much
The budget had been changed twice since its original
conception, and Transit Manager Leonard Fleming was
not happy with one of the changes.
When congratulated after the meeting, Fleming
expressed strong disappointment that the escrow
account had been cut from the budget.
The escrow account would have allowed the eventual
buying of another bus and now "allows no provisions for
a new bus according to Fleming.
See BUDGET, page 2
Judge bars
families from
first hearing
By WILLIAM M. WELCH
Associated Press Writer
Families of men charged in Saturday's Greensboro shootings pictured here
under guard) have been barred from preliminary court proceedings.
Greenville civic groups lay down
battle lines in their War on Winter
Battle lines have been
drawn. The first major
attack in the War on
Winter will take place
Saturday, November 10,
when volunteers from
churches, clubs and the
general community begin
home weatherization and
woodcutting for the elderly
and disabled who need
help.
The Old Fire Station on
West Chestnut will be
battle headquarters for the
weatherization teams. Vol-
unteers are urged to meet
at 9:00 a.m. for work
assignments and to bring
tools such as hammers,
screwdrivers, scrapers,
ladders, caulking guns,
and staplers. Workers will
caulk and weatherstrip
windows and doors, install
plastic over windows, and
make other improvements
to weatherproof homes.
Woodcutters will meet
at 8:30 a.m. at the Pitt-
Greenville Airport Ground
Station. Everyone having
woodcutting equipment
and pickup trucks is
requested to bring them.
Materials for the
weatherization project are
being furnished by local
businesses and through
contributions from the
community and various
organizations. Snacks and
lunches for workers will
also be provided by local
restaurants.
War on Winter is being
waged as a joint effort by
The Greenville Energy
Program and The Junior
Woman's Club of Green-
ville as part of November
Energy Conservation
Month activities. The War
is aimed at informing the
community about ways to
save energy by making
home improvements that
will give more protection
from the cold months
ahead. The volunteer pro-
ject will assist in making
the improvements for
those older people who
physically and financially
cannot make the improve-
ments for themselves.
Volunteers from ECU
include several organiza-
tions: Lambda Chi Alpha,
Phi Beta Lambda, Social
Work and Corrections
Club and other indivi-
duals. Student groups
from Pitt Community Col-
lege and Agnes Fullilove
Community School, and
church and community
organizations have offered
to help.
According to Mrs. Pri-
vette, the major needs at
this time include sufficient
workers and tools to
perform the weatherization
and woodcutting and ad-
ditional donations of ma-
terials and money for
supply purchases. Contri-
butions can be sent to
P.O. Box 8083, Greenville,
N.C. 27834, and should be
made payable to the
Junior Woman's Club
Energy Conservation De-
partment. Arrangements
for materials or volunteers
can be made with Mrs.
Privette at 756-9086 oi
752-5725.
Everyone in the com-
munity is invited to help
fight this battle against
the coming cold weather.
With the cost of heating
fuels rising, many older
people on limited incomes
will face a serious problem
of heating their homes this
winter. For some it may
be a choice of having fuel
or food and medicines.
Everyone's help is needed;
every contribution will be
appreciated.
GREENSBORO, N.C. (AP) � Family
members of some of the men charged in a
multiple slaying at an anti-Ku Klux Klan
rally during the weekend waited outside
the courtroom Monday, blocked from
watching as the suspects made a first
court appearance.
District Court Judge Robert Cecil
allowed lawyers, court personnel and
news reporters into a courtroom for the
morning-long hearing in which attorneys
were appointed and bond was denied for
the 14 men.
"It makes me mad. They've got all
kinds of rights and laws, but we ain't got
no right to see our son said William
Clinton of Lincolnton. His son, Michael
Eugene Clinton, faces murder and
conspiracy charges.
With the elder Clinton were the
defendant's wife, Karen, 20, and his aunt,
Ann Propst. Clinton said he was unable to
get word to his son that a private lawyer
had been hired before Michael Clinton
asked the judge to name a court-appointed
attorney.
Members of the families of at least two
other defendants, Terry Wayne Hartsoe,
19, of Hickory and David Wayne
Matthews, 24, of Newton, also were at the
courthouse.
The defendants have not been allowed
visitors since their arrests. Court officials
said none would be able to see their
families until regular jail visiting hours on
Tuesday.
The defendants, handcuffed in pairs,
were kept away from persons inside the
courthouse by dozens of sheriffs deputies
and Greensboro police.
unusual, especially in Guilford County
he said.
Cecil, in an interview after the
hearings, said the size of the courtroom
and the need for security prompted him to
exclude the general public.
"Secondly, I don't know how many
family members are here. And thirdly, !
don't know who is a family member
Cecil said.
Will make efforts
"Because a family can't get in doesn't
mean it's not an open hearing. We let all
the reporters with press cards in he
added. "It's not completely open, but we
don't have the facilities to have everybody
with some isolated interest in the case to
come in. If we did, we'd have to rent the
Greensboro Coliseum
Cecil said he would "make efforts" to
allow family members in for the
defendants' probable-cause hearing Nov.
20. But he said he may limit the number
of family members allowed in.
Surprise
Unusual
District Attorney Michael Schlosser
said it was unusual for families to be
denied access to the courtroom for a
hearing.
"In a crime of this magnitude, it is
The families expressed surprise at
their relatives' involvement, and none
acknowledged knowing of any KKK
involvement.
"This is the first time he's ever done
anything like this said Karen Clinton,
who has two children, 4 and 16 months.
Her husband is an electrical worker in
Lincolnton.
"He just got in with some bad guys
and got into this she said.
Clinton's aunt, Mrs. Propst, said "He
didn't even own a gun. He hasn't ever
been in any trouble
Maynard Witherspoon of Hickory, who
said he was the father of Hartsoe, said,
"He couldn't have done it. He's just a
kid
Craig Matthews, whose son is David
Wayne Matthews, would not comment on
whether his son had any KKK connection.
"That's something I can't reveal he
said.
Morgan worried over Helms'
endorsement of John East
Dr. John East
WASHINGTON (AP) -
John East, who has
decided to run for the U.S.
Senate next year, is
virtually unknown to North
Carolina voters. But the
fact that he has the
endorsement of Repub-
lican Sen. Jesse Helms
has incumbent Sen. Robert
Morgan worried.
East, a Republican
science professor at East
Carolina University since
1964, plans to challenge
Democrat Morgan next
year. So far no other
Republicans are opposing
him for the nomination.
Morgan's taking him
seriously because of Re-
publican Helms' endorse-
ment, which means finan-
cial backing. During his
1978 campaign, Helms
raised $7 million, nearly
10 times as much as
Morgan raised during his
1974 election.
Morgan said the money
he expects East to get
from the Helms organiza-
tion could be a factor in
the race.
"They'll pour a lot of
dollars in there said
Sally Swift, a campaign
worker for Morgan.
"When you've got the
money, you can be put
before the public
East, 48, who ap-
parently shares Helms'
conservative convictions,
says he will take issue
with such Morgan stands
as the Panama Canal
treaty and Soul City.
Observers say he may
also try to identify Morgan
with the Carter adminis-
tration on such issues as
its anti-smoking program
and efforts to further de-
segregate the state 16-
campus university system.
Morgan says he dis-
approves of both pro-
grams, but East said he
shares the blame because
he has "embraced Car-
ter
East is a native of
Springfield, 111. He has
been confined to a wheel-
chair since he contracted
polio while serving at
Camp Lejeune with the
Marines in 1955.
In 1966 he ran un-
successfully for Congress
against Walter Jones and
in 1968 he drew 48 percent
of the vote in his un-
successful bid to unseat
Secretary of State Thad
Eure.
Joyner library-
studying longer
hours request
An extension of library
benefit tight-scheduled
hours would et
working students.
By MARY RIDER
Staff Writer
An informal investiga-
tion to determine the
possibility of extending
library hours at Joyner is
currently being under-
taken, according to Dr.
Eugene A. Brunelle, Di-
rector of the Library.
The question of ex-
tending library hours arose
during a recent SGA
meeting, when Nicky
Francis, president of the
graduate class, asked
Chancellor Thomas Brewer
about the possibility of
longer library hours on
weekends.
Francis stated that
many graduate students
work and have families,
and must use Joyner
Library primarily during
the weekends.
Dr. Brewer replied that
if a problem did exist, he
would want to see utili-
sation studies done before
he could consider extend-
ing the hours.
Francis later met with
Dr. Eugene A. Brunelle,
director of the library, and
discussed the extension of
hours. Brunelle and Dr.
Wilson Luquire, bis asso-
ciate, explained that the
library wiH do everything
possible to cooperate.
In separate interviews
both Brunelle and Francis
stressed the library staffs
willingness to serve the
students, noting that re-
search on the problem is
currently being under-
taken.
When the memo was
sent from the chancellor's
office to the library con-
cerning the possible ex-
tension of hours, the
library staff conducted a
survey of five other
educational institutions to
compare their library
hours to Joyner's. ECU's
library is open 94 hours a
week, which is five and a
half hours longer than the
library at North Carolina
State University and three
hours longer than the one
at the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill.
However, the libraries at
Duke, Pincetou, and the
University of South Caro-
lina are open longer than
ECU's.
The staff is trying to
maintain or expand their
services in the face of
inflation which has hit the
libraries extremely hard,
said Brunelle. According
to a survey last year the
inflation rate for library
purposes was almost dou-
See LIBRARY, page 2
U





Page 2 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 6 November 1979
Greek News
Phi Taus congratulate new Little Sisters
By RICK GLIARMIS
Greek Correspondent
The Phi Kappa Taus
held a Halloween Social
with the Chi Omegas on
Tuesday, Oct. 30. The
costumes ranged from Salt
and Pepper and Crayola
Crayons to Couni Dracula.
The Phi Taus would
like to congratulate and
welcome 15 new Little
Sisters to their organi-
zation.
Upcoming events for
the Phi Taus include a
soccer game Thursday
with the Kappa Alphas
and working at the Alumni
Association's Telefund
with the Alpha Phis this
week.
Last Thursday, the Phi
Taus received the Fall
Blood Drive Trophy for the
fraternity with the most
donors during the drive. A
total of 35 Phi Taus gave
blood.
The Pi Kappa Phis
upped their soccer record
to 3-0 last week after
shutting out the Lambda
Chis, 3-0. In the second
game of the week, things
didn't look too promising
at half 'me as the Pi Kaps
found themselves down
2-0. With a gallant effort,
three goals by Bruce
Mullis and another by
Michael Wise, the Pi Kaps
fought back to win a 4-2
victory.
The Sigma Sigma Sig-
ma sorority is now selling
tickets to its annual Pie
Throw which will be held
at Chapter X on Nov. 20.
Everyone is invited to
come out and throw pies
at your favorite Sigma.
The Sigmas will also be
working for the third year
at the Tobacco Festival
which is being held Nov.
14, 15 and 16.
Last week the Kappa
Deltas celebrated their
82nd anniversary. The
sorority was founded on
Oct. 23, 1897 at Longwood
College in Farmville, Vir-
ginia.
The Kappa Deltas ser-
enaded and presented a
door plaque to the men of
Beta Theta Pi fraternity
commemorating the move
to their new house on
campus.
The members of Kappa
Delta are busy planning
their beach weekend to be
held this weekend at
Myrtle Beach. A happy
hour is also being planned
for next week. Details will
be in next week's column.
Hunnrs
1890
Seafood
Tuesday Night
Specials
TROUT $2.95
PERCH $2.95
all you can eat
No take-outs please.
Meal includes:
French Fries, Cole slaw,
HnihpnppUt.
We are proud to
announce that we
have added
one of the
AREAS FINEST
SALAD BARS
lor your
dining pleasure.
OPEN FOR LUNCH
Dally 11X30
Sun. - Thur.
4:30-9:00
Fri. and Sat.
4:30-10:00
The Chi Omegas are
looking forward to their
Alumni Weekend on Nov.
10 and 11. A pig pickin'
will be held at the
American Legion and Five
Degrees South will be
playing. After the ball-
game, the band will return
to entertain sisters, dates
and guests.
On Sunday, Nov. 11, a
breakfast will be held at
Ramada Inn to honor the
Alumni.
The Alpha Xi Delta
Fall Pledge Class is having
a Shag Contest at Chapter
X on Nov. 13 from &:00
p.m. until 1:00 a.m.
Advance tickets are 25
cents. Tickets at the door
will be 50 cents. Door ,
prizes will be given away
during the night.
BUDGET
continued from page 1
Also, in a friendly amendment to the bill, a change
was made so that all monies not used by the transit
system this year would revert back to the SGA general
fund.
A question was also raised concerning the wages of
the bus drivers. Drivers have been paid ten cents per
hour more than minimum wage requirements. Bus
drivers will continue to be paid this amount until
January when they will go to a normal minimum wage
scale.
In other business, the legislature was presented with
a request from the ECU Law Society for funding.
ABORTIONS UP TO 12TH
WEEK OF PREGNANCY
$175.00 "all inclusive
pregnancy test, birth control ana
problem pregnancy counseling For!
further information call 832-0535 (toll-l
free number 800-221-2568) between!
9AM-5PM weekdays
Raleigh Women's Health
Organization
917 West Morgan St.
Raleigh, N.C. 27603
LIBRARY
continued from page 1
ble that of the national
inflation rate.
Dr. Brunelle asked
Francis to tajk with other
students and to arrive at a
general consensus on li-
brary hours. If there is
clear evidence that a
change in hours is neces-
sary, said Brunelle, a
proposition may be made
Support
East
Carolinian
Advertisers
to the SGA.
At one time, Joyner
Library was open 24 hours
a day during exams. It
was found, however, that
very few people used the
library between the hours
of 3:00 a.m. and 6 a.m. As
a result, the library is now
open from 8:00 a.m. to
3:00 a.m. on weekdays
during exams. The exam
schedule begins on De-
cember 12 and continues
throughout the rest of the
semester.
At present, Joyner
Library is open from 8:00
a.m. to 12:00 midnight
Monday through Thurs-
day, 8:00 a.m. to 9:00
p.m. on Friday, 9:00 a.m.
to 5:00 p.m. on Saturday
and 2:00 p.m. to midnight
on Sunday.
November Specials
Lunch 11:00-3:00
Moil. Slices of Beef , Toast &
Potato �2.49
Tues. Soap & Salad �1.49
Wed. Sirloin Tips, Toast &
Potato �2.49
Thill. Old Fashion �1.49
Cheeseburger & Soup
Fri. Filet of Chicken Sandwich
& Potato �1.39
Sat. Chowder & Salad �1.79
Sun. 6oz. Sirloin , Toast &
Potato �2.49
8005 E. 10th St. Greenville 7S8-8550
ALL YOU CAN EAT
SPECIALS
4:00 8:00 PM
SALAD�50 EXTRA
NO CARRYOUT
ASST. VAR. � g g
PIZZA. .q"ly
WITH FRIES & COLESLAW
FRIED
CHICKEN a:
WITH GARLIC BREAD
ITALIAN t -i q q
OrHuHL I I ONLY I HUR
WITH FRIES & COLE SLAW
FRIED $�. 9 9
The folks at Kroger Sav-on know the
complete student has a party side.
too. So they have what East Carolina
University students need for any bash
. . from party platters to disco plat-
ters all in one convenient loca-
tion. Don't be incomplete this
year�shop Kroger Sav-on today
COSMETICS
m
WUMWCiS
discounted
TIMEX
WATCHES
-j
UP TO
REG. OR DIP
COUNTRY OVEN
Potato
Chips
8-Oz. Twin Pak
OFF MANUFACTURER S
SUGGESTED RETAIL
LET THE DELI DO IT! Planning a party? Let the
Kroger Sav-on Deli supply the fixin's. Finest
quality meats, delicious cheese, & tasty
salads combine to make our party trays
perfect for entertaining. Just phone ahead to
place your order!
a
Records and
Tapes
MscouirfHil xuop
FIRE BREWED
Stroh's
Light
Rossetto A fx
Lambrusco. .1B5yyq
Off
MFR
SUG
RETAIL
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised item Is required to be readily available for
�ale In each Kroger Sav-on Store except as specifically noted in this
ad. W we do run out of an advertised Item, we will offer you your choice
of a comparable Item, when available, reflecting the same savings or a
ralncheck which will entitle you to purchase the advertised item st the
advertised price within 30 days.
NONE SOLD
TO
DEALERS
OPEN 7 AM TO MIDNIGHT
MON
THRU
SAT
OPEN SUNDAY
9AM TO 9 PM
FOOD, DRUG, GENERAL
MERCHANDISE STORES
PRICES EFFECTIVE TUES
NOV. 6 THRU SUN NOV. 11, 1979
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
Phone 756-7031





llPecpl
e1 Iuh. arid ���
IV
The ECU Law Society
will be having a meeting
tonight, Nov. 6, at 8:00
p.m. in Mendenhall room
248 (the auditorium up-
stair?). We will also be
meeting for dinner at 6:30
at Western Sizzlin' for
those who would like to
come. Mr. Alan Pittman, a
Campbell Law School
graduate now practicing
law in Greenville, will be
one of the speakers; he
will cover such topics as
Campbell Law School, the
bar exam, and beginning a
practice. A faculty repre-
sentative from the Ad-
missions Office of the
Campbell School of Law
will also be speaking at
the meeting.
6 November 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 3
Mjcl
Lambda Alpha Epsilon,
the American Criminal
Justice Association, will
hold a mandatory meeting
on Nov. 8 at 5 p.m. in
Auditorium 101A of the
Allied Health building. All
applications for new
members are due before
or at this meeting. Appli-
cations may be obtained
and returned to the
following people: Richard
Belthoff (758-4623), Toni
Dye (758-4309) or Mr.
Campbell in A.H. 312.
Please put fee ($26) in a
sealed envelope and attach
to application. Dues ($20)
for old members are also
due at this meeting.
Topics for meeting: fund
raising for planned social
with CORSO and Christ-
mas basket for needy
family. All interested per-
sons please attend.
eci-ccc
The ECU Collegiate
Civitan Club will have an
organizational meeting at
7 p.m. on Nov. 6 in
Flanagan 201.
The ECU Club is
sponsored by the Green-
ville Civitan Club.
Collegiate Civitan
Clubs are dedicated to
service to others with
special emphasis on men-
tal health and mental
retardation. Any student
carrying 12 semester hours
or more is eligible to
become a member. For
further information, see
Dr. R.A. Klein, Flanagan
235 or phone 757-6274.
On the Hill in the
basement meeting room of
Scott Hall, a quiet,
supervised STUDY HALL
is open to anyone who
would like to come in and
study. It is open Monday,
Tuesday and Thursday
from 8 to 11 p.m.
delta
The next Sig4 Tau
Delta meeting will be held
November 14. Terry Davis,
author of Vision Quest,
will speak.
if llil I I )l
The Inuamural Council
Meeting will be held
Thursday, Nov. 8 at 4
p.m. in Memorial Gym,
room 104.
snea
There will be an SNEA
Cluster meeting for all
area chapters on Nov. 6 at
J.H. Rose High School in
Greenville. Exhibits will
be displayed from 8 a.m.
to 1 p.m. All members are
encouraged to attend.
Ml I ni i
All students interested
in National Fellowships-
Scholarships are invited to
attend a presentation by
Dr. John Ebbs on Thurs
Nov. 8 at 5:30 in 244
Mendenhall.
Phi Eta Sigma mem-
bers will have a business
meeting at 5 in 244, prior
to the presentation. Those
members who ordered
T-shirts are asked to bring
money at this time. See
you there!
I l� l f It ill
The ECU Racquetball
Club is trying to identify
all interested faculty, staff
and students. Clinics and
tournaments are being
planned with competition
between schools being
scheduled. All interested
persons, please contact
Nancy Mize, 757-6387, 204
Memorial Gym.
If you like pinball, pool
or foosball, the place to be
is the MRC GAMEROOM.
Located in the basement of
Aycock Dorm, it is open
from 10 a.m12 p.m.
every day. The gameroom
also serves as the checkout
area for tenls, canoes, car
racks and life preservers.
Remember, the Men's
Residence Council pro-
vides these services.
�c he! n�r i it etc lafc ff e
The James B. Mallory
Men's Residence Council
scholarship will be award-
ed this semester to a
young man who is a
member of the Men's
Residence Council. The
scholarship will be based
on need and residence hall
contributions. Applicants
must have at least a 2.5
grade point average. Ap-
plications may be picked
up in each dorm coun-
selor's office.
The ECU Photo lab has
an immediate opening for
the position of Staff
Photographer. Anyone
who is interested in
applying for the position
should fill out an applica-
tion at the office of The
East Carolinian in the Old
South Building across from
the Library.
�ufc
H i
Screenings will be held
Thurs Nov. 8, in the
SGA Cabinet Room, Men-
denhall for SGA ad-
ministrative committees.
Call for an appointment
(757-6611, ext. 218). The
following committees need
to be filled:
Alcohol Drug Educa-
tion
Soliciting on Campus
Residence Life
Status of Women
Student Health Ser-
vices
International Student
Affairs
University Traffic Ap-
peals
Admissions
University Curriculum
Library
Student Recruitment
Career Education
Instructional Survey
General College
The Student Union
Films Committee will meet
Tuesday, Nov. 6, at 3:30
p.m. in room 242 of
Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter. All members
urged to attend.
are
law
The Law School Ad-
mission Test will be
offered at East Carolina
University on Saturday,
December 1, 1979. Appli-
cation blanks are to be
completed and mailed to
Educational Testing Ser-
vice, Box 966-R, Prince-
ton, N.J. 08540. Regis-
tration deadline is Nov. 5,
1979. Applications may be
obtained from the ECU
Testing Center, Speight
Building, Room 105.
M�tciy
RMY-NAVY blORE
Backpacks. B 15 Bombei
Fi�ld, Dck. Flight, Snorkel
Jackets. Peacoats Parkas
Shoes, Combat Boots Plus
Over 400 Different Gi item
1501 S. Evans Street
On Thursday, Nov. 8,
there will be a meeting of
Phi Alpha Theta History
Honor Fraternity at 7:30
p.m. in the Todd Room
located in D wing of
Brewster. All members are
requested to attend.
At Barre,
LTD.
act
The American College
Testing (ACT) will be
offered at East Carolina
University on sat Dec. 8.
Application blanks are to
be completed and mailed
to ACT Registration, P.O.
Box 414, Iowa City, Iowa
52240. Registration dead-
line is Nov. 9. Applications
may be obtained from the
ECU Testing Center,
Speignt Building, Room
105.
bcwllfii
Take advantage of
these bowling specials at
Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter: "Red Pin Bowling"�
7 p.m. to 10 p.m. every
Sunday bowlers get a
chance to win one FREE
GAME with every game
bowled. "Rent-A-Lane"�
Every Saturday from noon
to 6 p.m. you can rent a
lane for $3 for one hour.
"Discount Day"�onethird
off the price of bowling
every Monday from 2 p.m.
until 6 p.m.
!$ i lanuae
cltt
ECU Sign Language
Club will meet Nov. 8 at
7:30 p.m. in Brewster
B-236.
ecc
The East Carolina Gay
Community will meet
Tuesday at 5 in the
Newman House at 608
East 9th St.
Greenville
805 Dickinson Ave.
752-5186
DANCERS
New Shipment Just
Arrived
�Terry Tights
�Ribbed Orion Tights
�Straight Leg Jazz Pants
�Suspender Stirrup Tight!
Distributed By
Taylor Beverage Co.
Goldaboro
I
PORTED
Heineken
HOLLAND BEER
THE 1 IMPORTED BEER IN AMERICA.
Huronrs
1890
Seafood
Friday's Seafood
X311S. Evans St.
LUNCH ONLY
Lunch 11:30-230
SunThurt. 4:309:00
Fri. and Sat. 430-10:00
Mon. Ladle's Day-Free trip
to salad bar with
each full meal
Ifies, Ladle's Day
Free cup of clam
chowder with each
full meal
Wen.
Soup n' Sandwich
02.25
Soup n' Salad
01.7S
FrL all the trout you can
eat for 01.99 with
fries and slaw
fiftB. Family Day
� Lunch and Dinner
All you can eat
Shrimp $495
Oysters S4-7S
Flounder $3.50
Trout $2.95
SunThurs. 4:309:00
Fri. if 8at.4:30-10:00
- - � i-
Thurs.
The Graduate Record
'Examination will be offer-
ed at East Carolina
University on Saturday,
January 12, 1980. Appli-
cation blanks are to be
completed and mailed to
Educational Testing Ser-
vice, Box 966-R, Prince-
ton, N.J. 08540. Registra-
tion deadline is November
28, 1979. Applications may
be obtained from the ECU
Testing Center, Speight
Building, Room 105.
and
L 1 ' rt
supb
are
The Student Union
Program Board will meet
Tuesday Nov. 6, at 7
p.m. in room 212 of
Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter. All members
urged to attend.
scec
The Student Council
for Exceptional Children
will meet Wed Nov. 7, in
room 129 Speight at 5
p.m. All members and all
prospective members are
asked to attend. Dr.
Shiggley from TEACH will
be the guest speaker.
PART
TINE
JOB
Looking for a part-time
job with flexible hours
and real business
experience? Northwest
Mutual Life Ins. Co.
has openings for college
agents. Call before noon
for appointments!
7SS-4080
I
The Look Today is casual, and comfortable
whether it be a beautifully styled classic Jacket
or a great looking, pair of poplin Trousers. At
The Clothes Horse you'll find that we pay
particular attention to correct fashion and
quality. We like to show you our shop
Th
BY
21� East Fifth
S undoy � Novmbf 4
f :00 P.M.
GotfMM Concert � Hoorix Tnootro
7:00 P.M.
Mowdoy � Novmbf 5
0:00 PM.
Uctwra: "Who Kilted Merita lwth�r King. Jr.
Tu�doy � Novombor 6
4:00 PM.
. Wft�tf viltfVfW tflfC
Ttwirodoy � Novmbf 8
� �00 PM.
Mtro Arte: Jwbite � rtendrix Th�el
Frtdoy � Novmbf 9
740 a 0:00 PM.
Mevte: TBchfd Pryor hi CaitcTt
Sotwdoiy � Novmbf 10
7:00 0 9:00 PM.
Movte: ftfdwrd Pryoc In Concert
I Oy ttw ttodwrt IMom
�:00 PM.
MOTvry Afrl rPml! VVwCK oXOOV OMO
Wihjhl Cultuiat Culu
All Activities sponsored by Student Union





The East Caroli
Editorials
& Opinions
JL Tut
Tuesday, November 6, 1979 Page 4
Greenville, N.C.
Energy: life or death
People are sick and tired of hearing
about the energy crisis. They want
some answers � now. What have they
gotten so far?
Experts say that world oil production
is up 5.8 percent for the first half of
1979 compared to the same period in
1978, but the industry was keeping
production low to attempt to relieve
downward pressure on oil prices. Oil
companies continue to sell oil on the
open market at prices greatly exceeding
OPEC prices and to turn "old oil" into
"new oil" for even greater profits. In
other words, high prices are due to big
oil gluttony rather than the real
shortage.
The oil giants are reporting record
profits at the expense of the U.S.
economy with no end in sight. They
have even admitted to reducing the
production of heating oil in favor of
highly profitable jet fuel. Locally, the
Greenville Energy Program is looking
out for the elderly and disabled by
providing free firewood and weather-
ization services. Meanwhile, Congress
is sitting back and watching as many
poor people will freeze to death this
winter. Cutting the bottom out of
President Carter's windfall profits bag
is insignificant compared to the inability
of legislators to ensure warm homes for
the less fortunate, who do not receive
financial contributions from oil com-
panies.
If the impending death of shivering
senior citizens fails to move cold-
hearted congressmen to action, then the
impending death of millions in the
event of a major nuclear accident stands
a snowball's-chance-in-helI of convincing
legislators to do something about
nuclear energy.
The nuclear industry has been under
fire by experts and concerned citizens
for some time now and rightfully so. In
the Three Mile Island incident last
March, Metropolitan Edison and the
Nuclear Regulatory Commission per-
formed questionably in the nation's first
potential nuclear disaster. The NRC
faces total extinction if the president's
special committee has its way.
Nearly 10 percent of the population
of the United States lives within 60
miles of two nuclear reactors at Indian
Point, near Buchanan, New York.
That's 36 miles north of New York City.
Chicago is only 25 miles south of two
reactors. According to the Rasmussen
Report to Congress, the worst nuclear
accident at a power plant would result
in only 3,300 deaths and 45,000 cases of
radiation poisoning, but these estimates
are widely disputed.
The present problem with the
disposal of spent fuel is acknowledged
as the greatest risk in nuclear power,
yet nuke plants continue to produce
wastes with only one commercial
disposal site open in the United States,
Chem-Nuclear Systems, Inc. in Barn-
well, South Carolina. Gov. Richard
Riley recently announced that the dump
is cutting in half the amount of waste it
will accept. The national government is
not only ignoring the needs for effective
disposal at home, but they are
providing such facilities for foreign
countries at American taxpayers'
expense. The United States unsuccess-
fully attempted to purchase Palmyra, a
privately-owned, 1,400-acre island lo-
cated 1,100 miles southwest of Hawaii,
to dispose of nuclear wastes from Asian
atomic reactors.
The president and Congress must
take action to stop the manipulation of
energy for private gains and to ensure
the welfare of the American people.
Without an effective windfall profits
tax, legislation must be passed to halt
profiteering on the open market and at
home with tough and fully enforced
regulations. If oil companies are forced
to be responsible to our basic needs,
nuclear power, a potential benefactor
but even greater enemy, can develop
safely and effectively at a slower rate,
with little adverse affect on total
available energy.
These alternatives are not new.
They are simply stifled by mammoth
corporations and sluggish bureaucracy.
But try to explain that to the person
who will freeze to death this winter, or
the parent whose child will die of
leukemia.
VJKewGKras
mi 3c aneap
MP Kb
YJHfl?
v
Pop's People
Quoth the Raven, 'Nevermore'
For whom the bells toll
Chancellor Brewer got mad.
And when Chancellor Brewer gets
mad, things get done.
That's because he's the Boss.
And that's what caused the
problem.
The campus administration, in its
infinite wisdom and foresight, cut off all
the bells on campus last week in an
executive decision that took almost a
year to finalize. In the end, 10
administrative departments were in-
volved in the decision making process.
The decision itself was sent down
from The Big House about seven
months ago. The Chancellor decided
that bells in the halls of an academic
institution such as this made the place
sound like a high school breaking for
recess.
The memo went something like this:
"In times like these, with institutions
vying for academic excellence, the
'ministration feels that East Caro-
l's image will be uplifted by the
removal of the bell system, a time-
honored convention which signals the
change of classes
Immediately the idea ran into
trouble.
One vice chancellor wanted to know
how the professors were supposed to
f
know when to stop lecturing.
Another vice chancellor said stu-
dents would have a lot of trouble
waking up at the end of classes without
the bells.
Another vice chancellor ordered a
survey to be taken, and he remarked
that he could probably get federal
funding for the project.
A university attorney said that the
bell problem needed further study, and
he knew of no law prohibiting it.
A director of athletics said that
without the bell a lot of the athletes
would have problems knowing what
time of day it was.
A dean of medicine said he was
worried about the change in metabolism
certain freshmen would suffer if they
had to do without the bells.
Several administrative officials sup-
ported the move.
An assistant to the chancellor said
he thought it was a great idea.
Another assistant to the chancellor
(who still likes the job, he likes the job,
he likes) said he thought it was a
prime example of Brewer's creative and
provocative thinking in a time of great
social upheaval.
It's a good thing the chancellor
doesn't mind bells on telephones.
By LARRY POPELKA
What's so spooky
about Halloween?
I never get scared.
Everybody knows there's
no such thing as ghosts,
goblins, spooks, voodoos,
vampires, zombies, wit-
ches and the Incredible
Melting Man. So why do
we have a holiday to get
scared about it all?
I suppose 300 years
ago when the puritans
were still staking out old
hags they thought were
witches a person could get
a little freaked out on
Halloween. But today
what's the point?
I was complaining a-
bout this very fact last
week when someone told
me about a Halloween
seance they were having
and invited me to come.
I had never been to a
seance, but anyone with a
head between his shoul-
ders will tell you seances
are phony.
They were invented in
1848 by three women
known as the Fox sisters
who convinced everyone
�including President Lin-
coln's wife�that they
could talk to dead people,
who responded by making
strange cracking sounds.
After padding their
pocketbooks for several
years the Foxes confessed
that the cracking sounds
were nothing more than
one of the sisters cracking
her toe joints.
Since then every seer
in the country has been
cracking toes and uttering
strange words to try to
make money off poor fools
who believe in dead
spirits.
I wasn't too interested
in watching some clown
crack his joints, but seeing
how I had nothing planned
at midnight that night, I
figured I might as well go
for a good laugh.
The seance was held in
a round classroom at
Kendall College, a small
liberal arts college in
Evanston, 111. About 20 of
us sat in a semi-circular
arc of chairs surrounding a
wooden table with a
candle, a chest and a red
velvet backdrop.
In a few moments our
deck of cards, which had
letters of the alphabet
instead of numbers, and
put them in a glass holder
inside the doll house while
chanting, "Spirits are you
there? Spirits are you
there? Spirits, ARE YOU
THERE?"
Finally the "Y" card
jumped out of the deck.
Then the "E And then
the "S And then all the
"1 can't imagine what Poe's spirit
would be doing in Evanston, III.
He was buried in Baltimore,
which is hardly a hop, slip and
a howl away
spirit leader, Eugene Bur-
ger, appeared in front of
the table. Burger, a large,
balding man with a long
gray beard that scrunched
awkwardly against his
chest, looked like some
sort of European warlock
who belonged in a stone
castle on a mountain top.
He said he used to be
a college professor before
he entered the spirit world
profession, but I can't
imagine what kind of
classes he taught. Maybe
Intro to Toe Crackine
A01.
Burger started the
seance by showing us a
doll house he said was
haunted. That sounded
pretty dumb to me. Why
would a spirit be in a doll
house? Did Barbie kill Ken
there?
But Burger said he
could prove it was
haunted. He took out a
deck of cards, which had
letters of the alphabet
instead of numbers, and
put them in a glass holder
But Burger said he
could prove it was
haunted. He took out a
others flew up into the
house.
The spirits were there
�or so said Burger. But I
think he had magnets or
something.
Next he brought out a
wooden hand, which he
said was given to him by a
friend named Sylvia, who
is now dead, to help
communicate with the
spirit world.
After someone from
the audience cho?e a word
and wrote it down
secretly, Burger put Syl-
via's hand on a board and
had her spell out the word
by tapping the wooden
arm against the board.
The arm looked like it
was moving on its own.
Somehow, it tapped out
the right word, too, as
Burger recited the alpha-
bet.
But I was skeptical.
Burger let us examine this
wooden hand, and on the
surface it did look quite
plain. But he must have
had strings or magnets or
something to make it tap.
If Sylvia was dead, why
the heck would she care
about guessing a silly
word?
After saying goodbe
to Sylvia, Burger took out
two chalkboards, which he
said would help him
communicate even better
with the spirits.
I had heard of this trick
before. The boards start
out blank, and when
everyone's not looking, the
spirit leader switches
boards with one that has a
pre-written message on it
and tnen says some spirit
wrote it.
I watched closely a
Burger numbered each
side of the boards, then
asked a volunteer from the
audience, named Kathy,
who she wanted to com-
municate with. Kathv aid
Edgar Allen Poe.
Burger held the boards
in front of him while
chanting some insane
phrases, and in a few
moments he produced four
messages from Poe.
The messages were
something weird like "Be-
ware of the evil in the
darkness of the night
but they were all ad-
dressed to Kathy by name.
And Burger hadn't even
changed boards.
I figured he had to
have switches on the sides
or something to flip the
writing surfaces. But I was
a little confused as to how
Kathy's name got on
there. Maybe it was set up
with her in advance. I
can't imagine what Poe's
spirit would be doing in
Evanston, 111. He was
buried in Baltimore, which
is hardly a hop, slip and a
howl away.
I stumbled out into the
dark empty street, trying
to figure out how Burger
had done it. Was this a
high-class fraud or were
those really spirits in
there?
r
The East Carolinian
MANAGING EDITOR
Richard Green
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Anita Lancaster
NEWS EDITOR
ASST. NEWS EDITOR
FEATURES EDITOR
ASST. FEATURES EDITOR
EDITOR
Marc Barnes
DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
Robert M. Swaim
ASST. DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
Terry Herndon
ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR
Cheryl Holder
BUSINESS MANAGER
Steve O'Geary
Karen Wendt
Terry Gray
Bill Jones
K.C. Needham
SPORTS EDITOR
ASST. SPORTS EDITOR
COPY EDITOR
AD TECH. SUPER.
Charles Chandler
Jimmy Dupree
Diane Henderson
Paul Lincke
THE EAST CAROLINIAN is the student
newspaper of East Carolina University
sponsored by the Media Board of ECU
and Is distributed each Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic year
weekly during the summer.
Offices are located on the second floor of
Old South
address Is: Old
NC
tw
Building. Our mailing
South Building, ECU,
27534.
The phone numbers are: 757-6366, 6367,
630f. Subscriptions are $10 annually,
alumni $� annually.
I





The East Carolinian
man i
features
Tuesday, November 6, 1979 Page 5
Greenville, N.C.
Tin der box
sponsors
'Pipe Craze'
By BILL JONES
Features Editor
'This will definitely be
a 'world qualifying' e-
vent insists Walter Mc-
Cauley, Manager of The
Tinderbox Greenville's on-
ly tobacco specialty shop.
Mr. McCauley explain-
ed further that the First
Annual Tinderbox Pipe
Smoking Contest, to be
held this Saturday at the
Carolina East Mall at 3:30
p.m would be conducted
"strictly by the rules
The "rules" are those
accorded by the British
Pipe Smoking Counsel.
The Counsel hosts an
annual international con-
test at St. Claude, France.
St. Claude is the home of
the "briar" pipe. The
briar pipe's unexcelled
porosity gives it the much
looked for quality of
drawing moisture from the
tobacco to the outside of
the pipe where it can
evaporate. This makes for
a much smoother drawing,
evenly burning bowl of
tobacco.
Each contestant in the
Pipe Smoking Contest will
be given 3.3 grams
(approximately one bowl
full) of the same type of
tobacco. The type to be
used will not be made
public until the time of the
contest. It is the same
type used in the world
championship.
Then, after one minute
for the "char light" or
initial lighting of the
surface tobacco and the
first "tamping" or recom-
pression of the tobacco
which expands when fired,
timing will begin.
The winner is the
smoker who, using only
the two matches can keep
his pipe going longest.
The current world record
is two hours, 10 minutes
and 40 seconds.
Mr. McCauley en-
courages women to parti-
cipate in the contest,
which is billed as the
second largest event of the
Greenville J.Cs Tobacco
Days Festival.
The 1975 World Pipe
Smoking Championship
was won by a woman.
Mr. McCauley believes
that society's views about
women smoking pipes,
what has been previously
regarded as a "nasty,
dirty habit is rapidly
changing. He says about
20 percent of his clientele
are women. They prefer
the more petite pipes,
especially a sleek line
which appear designed for
women called Bent Bobs.
Registration for Satur-
day's contest bears out
McCauley's statements.
Two of the 15 participants
which had signed up by
last Friday were female.
Prizes for the First
Annual Tinderbox Pipe
Smoking Contest are im-
pressive. The first place
winner will receive a
carved $150 meershchaum
"eagle claw" pipe, a
ribbon and a plaque.
Second place will receive a
Caminetto pipe and rib-
bon. Third place earns a
Verona pipe and ribbon.
There will also be a prize
for first pipe out and gifts
for all entries.
Pipe smoking contests
are not all without un-
gentlemanly conduct.
In last year's world
competition, the Italian
team was disqualified for
using wooden tampers
which, on contact with
glowing tobacco, would
ignite, enabling a dying
bowl to be rekindled.
In the Greenville com-
petition, tampers will be
provided to contestants by
the Tinderbox.
Edwards' comedy
'10 'only scores '6'
By JOHN WALDEN
Features Writer
The new comedy film,
"10 has a talented cast
and a fine comedy director
in Blake Edwards (known
for his "Pink Panther"
films). Yet, one comes out
of the movie thinking that
"10" was more of a six
than anything else because
of a departure to serious-
ness near the end.
The main character in
"10" is a man who has
everything � a successful
career writing music, a
luxurious home in the
Hollywood Hills and even
a beautiful live-in girl-
friend to go along with it.
Still, George Webber is
not happy. He has just
reached the age of 42, an
age when many men start
looking back more than
forward. Like most men,
George Webber wants to
find the perfect woman.
Before he plunges into
middle-aged muckery, he
wants to experience the
love of the woman of his
dreams.
Although Webber is
always disappointed, he
continues to comb the
town searching for his
ideal woman. He finally
meets his fantasy woman
one day at a stop light on
his way home.
It is love at first sight.
Unfortunately for him,
she is going to her
wedding. Undeterred,
Webber goes after her,
and the chase is on.
George Webber (Dudley
Moore) trails this un-
reachable beauty (Bo Der-
ek) everywhere. His mis-
adventures while trying to
find her make for good
comedy. Meanwhile, his
jilted girlfriend (Julie An-
drews) waits patiently for
him to come back to his
senses.
The comedy film "10"
is the stuff that Blake
Edwards is known for.
"The Pink Panther" di-
rector is a master of this
type of comedy situation.
Dudley Moore should
also be given due credit.
He makes a good showing
as he did in "Foul Play
in which he portrayed a
swinging symphony con-
ductor who kept rubber
dolls in his room. This
British comedian knows
how to add a certain wit
and charm to Webber that
lets us understand him
better. He will most likely
be seen on the screen
again.
Both leading actresses
deserve recognition as
well. Julie Andrews's act-
ing is always very good,
and as for the lovely Bo
Derek, she looks more like
a "15" than a "10 Her
acting is on par with the
others too.
What then went
wrong? With a good cast
like this one, Edwards
should have been able to
bring us a great comedy
flick.
The problem may be
that Edwards is not
sticking to what he knows
best. Near the end of the
movie, he tries too hard to
bring a serious tone to this
otherwise soft comedy.
The values that he puts
into the movie are not
necessarily bad. Yet, they
seem to subtract rather
than add to this film. The
audience would probably
have wanted a little more
comedy and a lot less
seriousness.
Another fault with the
movie is its anti-climatic
ending.
Although "10" does
not measure up to Ed-
ward's earlier "Pink Pan-
ther" movies, it is still a
pretty good comedy and is
well worth your money to
go and see it.
Students addicted to 'Soap Opera
By K.C. NEEDHAM
Assistant Features Editor
"It's always fun to try
and figure out who got the
poor bitch pregnant The
old adage that only house
wives and the bedridden
watch soap operas is no
longer true. A quick check
across the college cam-
puses of America reveals
that a large percentage of
students spend quite a few
daytime hours glued to the
tube.
ECU is no exception.
"Sure I watch soap
operas one student said.
"I've been watching a
couple of them in the
summer since I was 13.
Now I can watch year
round
For some, the viewing
of daytime television is no
more than a break in the
round of classes. It's a
chance to sit back, grab a
smoke and a drink and put
those tired feet up.
For others, watching a
certain soap opera at a
certain time is a compul-
sion.
"Every year I schedule
my classes so they won't
interfere with the soap
operas I like. I know it's
stupid said one ECU
coed.
"Hell another laugh-
ed, "a couple of times I've
gone through the pain of
drop-add when I really
didn't have to, just so I
could get out in time for
my soaps
"Oh God another
student said, "my room-
mate and I fight all the
time about which soap
opera we'll watch because
our two favorites come on
at the same time on
different channels. Last
year, when everyone knew
Liza was going to find out
Travis wasn't really dead,
a bunch of my friends cut
class just so they could see
the big moment. We all
sat there and sighed. It
was a really touching
scene
A new twist to the saga
of soap opera watching is
the surprising number of
male students who tend to
keep up with the girls as
far as devotion to soaps is
concerned.
As one coed put it,
"When I met my boy-
friend last year, he really
amazed me. He was the
one telling me what was
going on on all the soaps.
I didn't think guys
watched
"Watch soap operas?"
said a male student,
"Sure, a bunch of the
guys get together and
laugh at them mostly.
Sometimes it's interesting
to find out what's doing
though. You know �
who's been raped, who's
been messing with who's
wife. It's alwasy fun to try
and figure who got the
poor bitch pregnant
"I watched one be-
cause I saw a preview
about a girl who was
getting attacked by a
shark. So, I watched. I cut
class for a damn week,
and it really pissed me off.
He "didn't even touch her.
I thought that shark was
gonna tear her freakin'
legs off, but she got
rescued
Even the fact that the
plots of each soap opera
vary little from one to the
other doesn't seem to
phase students.
"You just kind of get
involved in it, like you
know those people or
something a student
states. "I mean, sure, the
same stuff is happening on
all the soaps, but it's
different people. You
really want to know if
Lance is going to find out
that Leslie's baby is really
his
"They drag things out
so much another student
sighed. "You almost know
for sure what's going to
happen, but you want to
see it for yourself. By the
time one thing finally
happens you're hooked
into wanting to find out
what's going to happen to
someone else on the
show
"It's all the same
damn story, you know?
Watch, you've seen them
all, so 1 quit watching.
Then one time I just
happened to see one I
used to watch, and
Wham-Ban, here I am
again
Of course, there are
always those who wouldn't
be caught dead watching a
soap opera. Many find
them childish and boring.
Yet the fact remains that a
large portion of the ECU
student body watches and
enjoys daytime television.
"It's like this said a
resident of Belk dorm,
"What the hell else do I
have to do in the
afternoons?"
Fifth Annual Ball
provides Halloween fun
Ninety year old ghost haunts Opera
By LEIGH COAKLEY
Staff Writer
wi
11
Twin Rinks
NEVER be the same!
If you happened to
miss the Fifth Annual
Halloween Masquerade
Ball sponsored by the
Roxy Music Arts and
Crafts Center, Inc it was
an evening to behold. It
reminded me of a costume
party held in my high
school gym.
There was a vast
variety of costumes from
Groucho Marx to God. It
was useless to try to
identify a familiar face,
with the exception of those
individuals who came as
is. It was quite amusing to
see Miss Piggy dancing
with Darth Vadar, and
there were tales of a
headless horseman riding
up on a white stallion.
Local entertainment at
the ball included Real
Gone Cats, a '60s pro-
gressive, original rock
band; the Jerry Thomas
Band, spicing up the party
with a bit of rhythm and
blues; some jaaxy rock
from Buford T. Band and
the heavy-metal thunder
from Two Dollar Pistol.
These energetic musicians
held the crowd together
until the wee hours of the
morning.
The costume contest
was a disappointment for
many.
The judging was post-
poned until the tail end of
the ball, and by that time
the judges had grown
weary and gone home.
Faculty members from the
the ball included
Real Gone Cats, a
progressive,
original rock band;
the Jerry Thomas
Band, spicing up
the party with a bit
of rhythm and
bluesand some
jazzy rock -
dance and art departments
were asked to judge the
contest, but as we all
know, 8:00 a.m. classes
come mighty early.
The sponsors of the
ball and band members
appeared to be irritated
about the entire costume
contest. Their agitation
showed and left costumers
feeling silly to have gone
to all the trouble of
dressing for the occasion.
Another dampening
factor of the ball was that
to even be eligible to be
"judged" in the costume
contest, entrants had to
pay $1 in addition to the
14 price of attending the
event.
To make a long story
short, the judging was
based on audience ap-
plause. The finalists of the
contest were the Statue of
Liberty and "Qualude
After a long evening of
partaking of the "spirits
need I say which finalist
won?
Personally, I was dis-
appointed with the out-
come of the contest. It was
obvious that many had
spent a great deal of time
and creativity for this
special occasion and more
rightly deserved the $100
prize.
The Fifth Annual Hal-
loween Masquerade Ball
was a good time for most.
I sincerely hope that the
profits from this event will
help the Roxy to pay off
old debts and apply the
earnings to the acquisition
of a new building so they
can help bring some
"culture" back to Green-
ville.
WOODSTOCK, ILL.
(AP)-Elvira, Elvira. Oh,
wherefore art thou, Elvira?
Since the turn of the
century, Elvira has been
the beloved resident ghost
of the 90-year-old Wood-
stock Opera House.
Although she is a ghost
of all seasons, she seems
to get most restless when
Halloween approaches.
Doors click shut,
moans come from above
the stage, radiators pound,
clank and chatter.
"I don't think I believe
in Elvira, but I go along
with it said John
Scharress, technical direc-
tor. "There are explan-
ations for everything. A
door near the stairs, if left
ajar, will click shut when
on the grid above the
stage sometimes give off
spooky, moaning sounds.
Most old radiators clank
when they are warming
up
Elvira is a welcomed
ghost who lives in the
Opera House, not haunts
it. Some school children in
this community northwest
of Chicago have heard
more about her than about
Orson Wells, Paul New-
man, Geraldine Page,
Shelley Berman, Tom
Bosley, Betsy Palmer and
Lois Nettleton�all one-
time summer-season
Woodstock Players.
Elvira, so the story
goes, was a beautiful
actress who hanged her-
self in the Opera House
belfry when her actor lover
spurned her.
Most of those who
have performed on the
stage believe they have
seen Elvira during rehear-
sals, sitting in her re-
served seat, DD113, on
the aisle in the balcony.
During regular per-
formances, that seat
usually is the first of the
440 to be sold said Doug
Rankin, 30, director of the
Opera House.
"About 12,000 people
tour the Opera House
during the season and 50
percent of them want to sit
down on seat DD113, and
nine out of 10 of them will
ask about Elvira
Rankin said he never
has seen Elvira in the four
years he has been dir-
ector. "I just don't think
she comes around the
administrative offices he
said.
Esther Wanieck, who is
active in Woodstock opera
affairs, insists she has
seen Elvira a half dozen
times.
"She wears a diaphan-
ous, full-length, pink
gown said Mrs. Wan-
ieck. "Her flaxen hair
flows over her shoulders.
She is tall and slender.
Those who have not seen
her have felt her spirit.
She never talks, but her
sighs can be heard of
approval, disapproval,
boredom, frustration or
happiness.
��
o�
&
&
l� TRAVEL FILM
f
.
A Travel-Adventure film,
Escape to the South Seas,
will show on Nov. 15, at
8:00 p.m. in Hendrix
Theater.
JUBILEE!
The Theater Arts Com-
mittee presents Jubilee a
celebration in song with
tunes from Porgy and
Bess, Showboat, the Wiz
and more. Jubilee! will be
held in Hendrix Auditor-
ium at 8:00 p.m. on
Thursday, Nov. 8.
�rAMW6 Atoor CouxU- t�c I)io w�f
ti QfNio Atoms
nooMMrrr rua)k�p our-
AofMTl' kicttp rti our
Amo I 6�ClYl�fT)r
ifcip A oo rtqec, so





Page 6 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 6 November 1979
Weekly Album Review
By Pat Minges
Features Writer
Tom Petty and The Heart-
breakers � Damn The
Torpedoes �
The first thing I ever
heard by Tom Petty was
the release of his pretty
hot single "Breakdown"
several years ago. About
this time, an FM station in
Charlotte was offering a
free trip to Atlanta to see
I he Heartbreakers sold
out performance at the
Fox Theatre. "Who is this
guj and how did he sell
"lit the Fox? I pondered.
To borrow a quote, "I
have seen the future of
rock 'n' roll, and it is Tom
etty.
While there is a lot of
experimentation in rock
(i.e. new wave, power
pop, mod revival), there
are only a few artists
caressing in main strea
rock 'n' roll. Tom Petty is
one of them.
Petty is in the same
realm as Bruce Spring-
steen and Graham Parker,
having a strong, urban (if
not urbane) orientation in
his music. On the back of
the album, Petty is
pictured on stage with a
bottle of Jack Black at his
side now this is a man
after my own heart.
His voice is a cross
between Roger McGuinn
and Bob Dylan, but Petty
is a rocker in the strictest
definition of the word. The
guitars are superb, the
keyboards are equally
good, and the songs are
driven by an excellent
rhythm section.
Damn The Torpedoes
takes over where Spring-
steen left off with Born To
Run and is in the fine
tradition of strong Ameri-
can rockers.
If you like forceful rock
with a good melodic basis,
you've got to like Tom
Petty. Damn the torpedoes
and full speed ahead.
Bob Marley And The
Wailers � Survival �
With this album, Bob
Marley re-establishes him-
self as the most potent
force in reggae and one of
the most prophetic lyricists
in modern music.
Reggae is the undis
puted voice for the third
world. It speaks out
against the injustices of a
place where a small
majority (Babylon) lives a
luxurious life of wasteful
decadence, while around
the corner individuals
starve from lack of the
basic necessities.
It is this dichotomy
which serves as the focal
point of Marley's lyrics,
and Survival is perhaps
Marley's finest lyrical
endeavor. Moreover, this
album is his finest album
musically since Natty
Dread in 1975.
It possesses the out-
standing production that
has been missing since
that album.
Survival shows a
stronger jazz influence
than has been in evidence
See ALBUMS, page 7
Electrolysis
Permanent Removal
of Unwanted Hair
Free Consultation
Mrs. Vicki Smith,
Licensed Electrologist
103 Oakmont Dr. Greenville
756-3780
Tues. Wed. Fri. 10:00-5:00
Thurs. 2:00-7:00
Discount to college Students
!��������� CLIP COUPON
Buy a bowl of Chili at regular price,
get another
for
) OLD rASHIONCD
HAMBURGERS
Offer good any day of the week
after 4PM
Expires: November 30. 1979
PLUS
Good at all participating
Wendy's
CLIP COUPON
F
THE DRIFTERS
MAURICE 'WILLIAMS
& THE ZODIACS
BILLY SCOTT
& "THE "PROPHETS
BENEFIT CONCERT
cFor The
Showmen
"Tuesday- November 6th 9-00 TM
at the
CELBO WOOM
PLUS Special drawing Tor A Weekend �At
beachcomber' Motel Atlantic eact)
c?lll Proceeds Go To The SHOWMEN
To Recoup Accident Losses
Tickets Available At The Door' $3.00
Country Fresh
Ice Milk
Vi gal all flavors
79
Shepp's Spread
Margarine
3$1.00 lib. v4,s
J. F. G.
quart Jar
Mayonnaise 89
Llmss;fea
announces
ECU NIGHT
every Wed. 6:30-10:00
featuring
All students admitted for $1.00
(includes skate rental) when
presenting ECU I.D.
104 Red Banks Rd.
Behind Shoney's
756-6000
CLIFF'S -
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
AIX YOU
sa.7s CAN EAT!
MONDAY-THURSDAY
TROUT, FLOUNDER,
CRAB CAKES
TEA is included with meal
CLIFF'S SUPER
SPECIAL
WEDNESDAY
CRAB CAKE SPECIAL
2 Golden Fried Crab Cakes
French Fries, Slaw, and
Hushpuppies. QQ
California
Red Grapes
49lb
Large
Honeydew
Melons
$1.29 each
2 Litre
Shasta Drinks
59
All Flavors Reg & Diet
Simthfield
Sliced Bacon
T - Bone
Steaks
$2.29
12oz pkg
89
lb.
WELCH'S 20 oz.
9rape jelly or jam
2$1.00
Sirloin Steaks
$2.19
lb.
J. F. G.
Peanut
Butter
3lb Jar
$1.99
f






6 November 1979 THE EAST CARm im.a
in earlier endeavors, and
Marley's shouting style
that brought him acclaim
ha? been eclipsed by a
more flowing vocal beauty.
Bob Marley has the
ability to make his listen-
ers shout with joy in a
celebration of life and yet
weep in sorrow for our
brothers who starve. It is
time to take a long look at
Bob Marley and an even
ger one at ourselves.
To quote Marley, "There
- so much trouble in the
world now All you got to
is give a little
Way Ion Jennings � What
s iround. Comes A-
und �
This job has idiosyn-
rases, but it offers sheer
, leasures also. Normally, I
would never buy this
in and in all probabil-
never get a chance to
on hear it.
'w hat I would have
oil out on!
Admittedly, I never
had much of preference
Waylon and Willie or
even much of a liking for
the cowboy lifestyle.
This album has taught
ne a whole new respect.
H hat Goes Around
Comes Around is an ex-
ellent release, from the
ountry rockers on side
one to the subtle, strong
ballads on the second half.
Jennings's voice can be a
hearty boom or a deep
mellow instrument. The
dee personal statements
presented are indeed the
most impressive facet.
Prejudice is based in
ignorance, and from my
own lack of enlightenment,
I had preconceived ideas
about what this type of
music was like.
Sometimes it is good to
be proven wrong.
It teaches a healthy
respect for the complexi-
ties of existence and the
good in each of us.
I heartily recommend
this album for anyone,
because if you are into
outlaw-country, you don't
need me to tell you about
avion Jennings, except
that he has got a new
um.
April Wine � Harder
Faster �
This group is a living
example of what Clone
rock is. These guys are
Boston clones, if they are
anything at all.
April Wine has a lot of
the flavor of Boston, but
the group lacks that one
essential factor � origin-
ality.
A line from Pat Bena-
L�th�r Baits
$6 to $19
Leather Handbags
$10 to $25
Shoes Repaired To Look
Like Now
Riggan Shoo Repair
& Leather Shop
111 WEST 4TH ST.
DOWNTOWN QREENVILLE
750-0204
Parking in Front
and Rear.
SfifitfijMtfS
Feast
LOTSA GOLDEN FRIED
SHRIMP � FRENCH
FRIES � HUSH PUPPIES
� COLESLAW
2.99
SHONEYS
432 Greenville BK&
Album Reviews
continued from page 6
tar sums up this release,
"My clone sleeps alone
You can take whatever
insinuations you wish from
that statement and take
this album, or leave it.
Lonnie Liston Smith � A
Song For The Children �
Go out and buy this
album.
Before you accuse me
of payola, let me explain
that this album is related
to a cause close to my
heart. This is the Inter-
national Year of the Child,
and this album is dedicat-
ed "to the future of the
universe, the children of
tomorrow. May they guide
the planet with love,
wisdom and understanding
for the sake of all
mankind (Lonnie Liston
Smith) The proceeds of
this album, if I am not
mistaken, go to the Inter-
national Save The Children
Foundation.
A few of the songs are
disco, but that shows what
a smart man Smith is,
utilizing a trend to assist a
good cause. Make no
mistake, this is a very
good jazz album. Smith is
an excellent keyboard
artist, and he has secured
a good band to assist him.
Gotta love this album.
Chick Corea, Herbie Han-
cock � CoreaHancock �
This album features
two of the most respected
pianists in jazz music.
It was recorded live in
a duet performance on a
couple of Steinway pianos.
This is the second
double album released
from the 1978 concert tour
by this dynamic duo, and
its sister album was
released on Hancock's
label, Columbia. Most of
the songs were written by
Corea.
"Maiden Voyage" and
"Ostinata" are taken from
Mikrokosmos for Two Pi-
anos, Four Hands.
Although this album
would be great for jazz
buffs, it is not for the
general public.
George Duke � Master of
The Game �
He may be the master,
but what kind of game is
he playing?
This album is too funky
to appeal to his former
fusion audience, but not
quite funky enough to
appeal to most blacks. In
fact, Duke is one of
George Clinton's accursed
funk clones.
There is no doubt as to
George Duke's virtuosity
on his chosen instrument,
keyboards, but as interest
in his career among
listeners declines, Duke
continues to flee into his
funky disco fantasy. So,
his game seems to be
some type of musical
master-baiting.
Who wants to play?
Roy Gallagher � Top
Priority �
This Irish lad is one of
.the most durable and
professional guitarists to-
day. He has been record-
ing for nigh on ten years
and has been able to
withstand a plethora of
changes that have occur-
red in the music industry.
Gallagher is still recording
the same type of frenetic,
lightening-fingered rock
blasters he did on his first
album.
He has always been
known as the "people's
guitarist" and has been
credited as being one of
the most accomplished
guitarists in rock.
Top Priority is an
electric album that will
surely please any guitar
enthusiast. Gallagher's
three-piece band is a very
powerful trio, and the
album features many over-
dubs and multitracks on
guitar, producing a much
more dynamic sound.
If this album is suc-
cessful, maybe he can
afford a new shirt.
Columbia jazz artists �
Individuals �
Maybe I am mellowing
out due to old age or
perhaps, as some have
suggested, I have become
a tool of the recording
industry, but I have come
to grips with my hatred of
Columbia jazz. I now
understand that they have
a place in jazz. Columbia
is bringing jazz music (?)
to the people by present-
ing it in a popular format.
It is my hope that
people not acquainted with
jazz will develop a taste
for it and move on to more
progressive forms than can
be found on Columbia.
This album is some-
what of a promotional
album for Columbia jazz.
It features a single select-
ed cut from most of the
artists recording with Co-
lumbia, pieced together
into a double album, and
sold for the list price of a
single album.
(Albums courtesy of Re-
cord Bar, Carolina East
Mall and Pitt Plaza.
Thanks to David Miller for
his being a nice guy.)
ATTIC
N.C. No. 31 Nightclub
Tues.
FULL CIRCLE
10 Beverage
while it lasts
Wed
Bill Deal & The
Rhondels
(IFC Special)
Thurs.
BRECKENRIDGE
Fri. & Sat.
SIDEWINDER,
Sun.
STREET TALK
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is re-
quired to be readily available for sale at or
below the advertised price in each A&P
Store except as specificity noted in this
ad.
PRICES GOOD THRU SAT NOV. 10, AT ASP IN
Pizza inn
AMERICA'S FAVORITE PIZZA
PIZZA BUFFET
ALL THE PIZZA AND
SALAD YOU CAN EAT
$2.39
MonFri. 11:30-2:00
- � Mon. �P Tues. 6:00-8:00
Evening buffet 0S.89
758-6366 Hwy 264 bypass Greenville , N. C,

ASP QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN
GRAIN-FED BEEF
T-BONE STEAKS
OR porterhouse'
ASP QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN
GRAIN-FED BEEF-BOTTOM
ROUND ROAST
TALMADGE FARM BRAND
CAROLINA PRIDE
COUNTRY HAMS SLICED BACON
WHOLE
12 LB. TO 15 LB.
AVG. WEIGHT
LB.
$38
1-LB.
PKG
y
C
A&P COUPON

CLOROX
LIQUID BLEACH
LIMIT ONE WITH THIS COUPON
AND ADDITIONAL $7 50 ORDER
LIMIT ONE COUPON
to GAL.
BTL.
I















I � AND ADDITIONAL �7.50 ORDER gj -H 694
! "2m LIMIT ONE COUPON nDCCklllll I C
XmMmMW GOOD THRU SAT. NOV. 10. AT AAP IN GREcNVILLfc I
A&P COUPON
� LIMIT ONE WITH
I THIS COUPON
� AND ADDITIONAL
I $7.50 ORDER
ALL VARIETIES�LAYER & PUDDING
DUNCAN HINES
CAKE MIXES
AP
18VJ-OZ.
PKG.
LIMIT ONE COUPON ODCCIUVII I C
GOOD THRU SAT NOV. 10, AT ASP IN I H C t IM V IL L C
A&P COUPON

J
� IC4T
O'CLOCK
'NSTANT
COFFEE
A&P COUPON
I LIMIT ONE
�WITH THIS
COUPON
CONTAINS RICH BRAZILIAN COFFEES!
EIGHT O'CLOCK
INSTANT COFFEE
$7159
Colombia
COFFEfc
,A&P COLOMBIAN
REG.
DRIP
10-OZ.
JAR
LIMIT ONE COUPON GOOD THRU
P COI I LIMIT ONE WPTH
WOltO . THS COUPON
COFFEE
1-LB
VACUU
CAN �� 695 .
IvjLiflP SAT, NOV. 10. ATASPINOSXCMVlCLi IVkJliflpPSA �J" tl Jt � Yif"�f
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
A&P COUPON

LIMIT ONE WITH THIS
COUPON AND ADDITIONAL
7.50 ORDER
PURE CANE
SUGAR
696 I
m
GOOD THRU SAT NOV 10 AT AtP IN GREENVILLE
ANN PAGE 2 LOWFAT
MILK
,89
SENECA
APPLE JUICE
xV,UI"
"mttw
64-OZ.
BTL
99
VE FAIVto
CALIFORNIA CRISP ICEBERG
LETTUCE
LARGE
HEAD
3$1
novemBeR 8,1979 � 8,00 p.m.
henfccix theatpe � east CaboIiiu Univeasity
. aovance tickets .
JBf �CU Students. $1.00, faculty anO Staff, $3.00, Jff
MKfMf PUBLIC. $4.00, QROUPS Of 20 OR mOQ6, $3.00 MfMM
41 4l All tickets at the &oor. $4.00. li H
USTCAMUM
STUDENT UNION
tickets avAiUBle At ecu centeal ticket of pee 757-6611. ext. 366 ��"

i
?
i

i


A Theatre Arte Presentation j
CALIFORNIA SWEET EMPEROR
RED GRAPES
49C
JUICY FLORIDA
TANGERINES
OR � ORANGES
� TANQELOS
YOUR EACH
ONLY
8�

ATTENTION: Music Appreciation Students receive double credit for attending.






'he East Carolinian
iian � m
sports
Tuesday, November 6, 1979 Page 8
Greenville, N.C.
Pirates run past Appalachian St 38-21
(Photo by John H. Grogan)
Anthony Collins struggles for yardage
In Boone Saturday
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
BOONE � Halfback Anthony Collins scored three
touchdowns and rushed for 122 yards to lead East
Carolina to a hard-fought 38-21 victory over Appalachian
State Saturday.
The game, billed as an "offensive show" by ECU
coach Pat Dye, certainly lived up to its heading as the
Pirates, now 4-3-1, accumulated 544 yards total
offense-450 rushing- and the Mountaineers 470 yards.
Collins' touchdowns came on runs of seven, one and
three yards. The Penn Yann, N.Y. native, who went
over the 800-yard mark for the season with his
performance, was not the only Pirate back who sparkled,
though. Fullback Theodore Sutton rushed for a team
season-high of 134 yards and added one TD.
"Usually you have to key on one back said
Appalachian coach Jim Brakefield, "but today this
wasn't the case
Aside from Collins and Sutton, tow other Pirate
backs rushed for over 50 yards apiece, halfback Sam
Harrell rambling for 83 and quarterback Leander Green
running for 52 more.
For the Mountaineers, now 2-7, it was the passing
attack which was their most effective weapon.
Quarterback Steve Brown completed 16 or 27 passes for
277 yards. Split end Rick Beasley, the nation's leading
receiver coming into the game, caught six of those
passes for 159 yards and two touchdowns.
ECU coach Pat Dye said after the game that he was
"in awe" of what the pass combination of
Brown-to-Beasley could do. "It's almost like they have
ESP, and combine that with ability and they're awfully
tough to stop said Dye.
The Pirates got on the scoreboard early, going 62
yards in eight plays on their first possession for the
game's first TD. A 25-yard Sam Harrell run set up a
later seven-yard jaunt by Collins, who scored with just
under five minutes gone in the first period.
The Apps got on the board when, with 2:21 left in
the first half, Brown hit Beasley with a 57-yard
touchdown pass. Mark French's extra-point tied the
6Big Four' sparkles
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
BOONE � The Big Four. Most people think of North
Carolina, Duke, North Carolina State and Wake Forest
when the term is mentioned. But last Saturday afternoon
the term applied more fittingly to four individuals-
Collins, Sutton, Brown and Beasley.
While the four universities that are considered "The
Big Four" were all losing their games Saturday, the four
individuals were exciting a weather-chilled crowd in
Appalachian State's Conrad Stadium in a game featuring
the host Mountaineers and East Carolina.
The game, a 38-21 Pirate victory, turned out to be a
ground show for ECU and an aerial display for the
Apps. Led by halfback Anthony Collins and Fullback
Theodore Sutton, the Pirates accumulated 544 yards
total offense, 450 of them on the ground. Meanwhile,
the Apps totaled 470 yards, 285 through the airways.
Collins went over the 800-yard mark for the season
with his 122-yard performance. The Penn Yan, N.Y.
native also scored three touchdowns on runs of seven,
one and three yards. He did little to hurt his pre-game
yards per carry of 8.1, tops in the nation, as he gained
his yardage on only 19 carries.
"This is like a dream-come-true for me said
Collins when told that he had three games to gain 200
yards and go over the 1,000-yard mark for the season.
"It's really hard for me to believe
It wasn't very hard for the 13,000-plus fans packed in
Conrad Stadium Saturday, though. Many "oohs" and'
"aahs" were expelled from the crowd as Collins
exploded for one exciting run after another.
Also thrilling the crowd was ECU's burly fullback
Sutton. Somewhat unimpressive in the first half, Sutton
exploded for 97 yards in the second half alone on the
way to a 134-yard performance. Twenty-eight of those
yars came on the Pirates initial touchdown of the
second half.
Sutton constantly bulled his way through the
Mountaineer defense in the final half, often carrying two
or more defenders on his back in an effort to gain more
yardage. "Our game plan in the second half was to run
straight at them, and run hard said Sutton. "So that's
exactly what I tried to do
Sutton's 134 yards was the most by a Pirate back this
season and his second-best total ever, second only to his
performance in last year's Independence Bowl.
The second half of "The Big Four" belongs to the
Mountaineers in the persons of quarterback Steve Brown
and split end Rick Beasley. Brown completed 16 of 27
passes for 277 yards and two touchdowns in the App
loss.
Six of Brown's passes went to Beasley, the nation's
leading receiver coming into the game, for 159 yards.
Two of Beasley's receptions went for touchdowns of 57
and 38 yards.
"I can't come up with the words to describe Brown
and Beasley said ECU coach Pat Dye after the game.
"It's almost like they have ESP, and combine that with
ability and it's tough to stop
On the two touchdown passes, Beasley was forced to
ad-lib when he found his initial routes blocked by Pirate
defenders. "They're a great combination said ECU
safety Ruffin McNeill. "We lost containment on Beasley
a couple of times and he always seemed to be in the
right place at the right time
The same can be said for the fans who were in
Conrad Stadium Saturday afternoon. For they got to see
"The Big Four" in action, all in one day and on one
football field.
ECU field hockey team
finishes second in state
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
After a season marked
by disappointment after
disappointment, the Lady
Pirate field hockey squad
salvaged what had the
potential to be a disastrous
1979 campaign.
Under the direction of
assistant coach Anne
Holmes, the Lady Bucs
traveled to Rock Hill, S.C
for the NCAIAW Division
II tournament beginning
on Thursday and surprised
even themselves by cop-
ping second place honors,
losing only to Pfeiffer
College 3-0 in the finals.
ECU opened the tour-
ney with a 1-0 win over
Wake Forest University,
who was seeded sixth
prior to the match. Senior
Kathy Zwigard netted the

necessary goal midway
through the first half.
"We were seeded
fourth in the tournament
said Holmes, "so we kind
of expected to beat
Wake
The next Pirate victim
was High Point College,
whom ECU lost to 3-2 in
regular season play. This
time, however, it was the
Lady Pirates who were
victorious, 1-0.
Again Zwigard pro-
duced the only offense in
the contest.
ECU head coach Laurie
Arrants joined the team
before the final matchup
with Pfeiffer on Friday
after attending a seminar
in Atlanta.
"I flew in Friday
morning and everyone I
saw was telling me how
well East Carolina was
playing said Arrants. "I
thought 'my goodness; is
this the same team I
watched all season?'
"They were doing
things that we had talked
about all year, but they
had never done in a game
situation. They were inter-
changing and passing
beautifully.
"Against Pfeiffer, they
just mentally weren't able
to pull themselves to-
gether. They had played
two games the day before
and they were already
tired. I think maybe the
realized they were playing
for the state championship
and it frightened them.
"You can't be too
upset when a team that
has only won two games in
regular season play comes
on and gets second place
in the state. They really
played great hockey
The end of the NCA-
IAW tournament did not
mean the Bucs could
return to Greenville for
rest; the annual Deep
South Tournament began
immediately after.
An opening round 4-0
victory over Converse Col-
lege Friday afternoon was
to be the last of this
decade for the Lady
Pirates, as they dropped
their next two bouts 5-0 to
Clemson and 2-0 against
Appalachian State.
Zwigard, Carol Bel-
cher, Sandy Adams and
Donna Nicholson provided
the offensive punch for the
Converse victory.
"Dana Salmons was
accidentally hit in the face
with a stick and Zwigard
See FIELD HOCKEY,
psge 11
game at seven.
The Pirates then took the ensuing kickoff and
marched downfield for a go-ahead Bill Lamm field goal
at the end of the half. Lamm's 39-yard boot gave ECU a
scant 10-7 lead over the underdog Mountaineers at the
half.
The second half was a different story for the Pirates,
who had been frustrated in the first half by a confusing
ASU defense.
"It seemed like they used every defense in the
world noted ECU quarterback Green.
It took the Pirates less than one minute to get on the
board in the third period. A quick 65-yard drive was
capped by Theodore Sutton's 28-yard run. Lamm's
extra-point put the Pirates on top 17-7.
It was pretty much clear sailing for the Pirates after
that, as their wishbone began to click with the efficiency
that was absent in the first half. The Pirates used two
long drives in the final half, of 75 and 89 yards, to put
the Mountaineers away.
"We definitely executed better in the second half
said ECU coach Pat Dye. "We kinda tried to hit some of
their soft spots rather than their hard ones. Wee did a
lot of automaticing on the line of scrimmage
Fullback Sutton, who gained 97 of h ���$?
yards in the second half, said the P.rate game plan in
he final half suited him perfectly. We ��"�.? �
minds that we would run the ball straight at them, sam
The burly Kinston native. "A lot of the traps that I ran
n the firs, half did no. work, so ,n the �- �
ran a lot of read plays. It was up to Uander to make
decisions as to what we did ,
Another big factor in the big Pirate s��dJf �
the play of the offensive line. "Our line really blew
them out said sutton. "They're a great unit
A biK plus for the Pirates on this chilly afternoon
also was8 the fact that they committed no turnover-
"We kept the ball away from them and I m miglm
proud of our offense for that said Dye.
P Meanwhile, the Pirate defense forced four
Mountaineer turnovers. Cornerback Charlie Carter
sparkled with an interception of a Steve Brown pass and
a fumble recovery. n
Though he was obviously proud of his troops, Uye
seemed to dwell on the Appalachian offense as, he spoke
to reporters after game. "I'd rather play North Carolina
ten times that to play this bunch fivet.mes said Dye
"Their offense is awesome. I'm awfully glad to get cut
of here alive
Valentine adjusts to NFL
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
Being a rookie in the National Football League is not
easy. It is especially not easy for one who must try to
make it on a team that is the defending Super Bowl
champions. But for one Zack Valentine, the challenge
was a welcome one.
Selected in the second round of last year's NFL draft
by the world champion Pittsburg Steelers, ex-East
Carolina defensive end Valentine faced the difficult task
in training camp of making the squad at the linebacker
position, a position where the Steelers were loaded. But
make the team is exactly what Valentine did. Since that
time he has been a big help to the team in more wa s
than one.
"It was really tough making the team said
Valentine via telephone last week. "But I'm glad I
ended up here bacause I want to play with the best in
the league
The Steelers, drafted the 6-3 215-pound Valentine
strictly for duty at linebacker. At first glance, the
Zack Valentine
thoughts of making the Steeler team must have been
frightening for Valentine. Already on the Pittsburgh
Squad at that position were All-Pros Jack Ham and Jack
Lambert along with seasoned pros like Lawrence Toews,
Robin cole and Dennis Winston.
"It did look a little crowded at linebacker when I first
got here said Valentine. "There's no doubt that the
Steelers have the best linebacking crew in pro football
After making the team, Big Zack had to devote his
time into becoming the best linebacker he possibly
could. The job was quite a transition, as he had never
played anything but defensive end at ECU.
The transition, said Valentine, has been rather,
smooth. "The biggest thing he said, "is that in
college all my movement at defensive end was forward
and here in the pros all my movement at linebacker is
lateral, from side to side.
"I've had to learn to drop on the blitzes and all like
that. It was kinda tough at first, though
Steeler coaches are pleased with Zack's progress at
'his new position. "Zack's doing very will for a rookie,
said Pittburgh defensive coordinator Woody Widenfofer.
"We have such a complex defense that it is very
difficult for a rookie to develop, especially a linebacker
Valentine has more experience at this point that he
expected at first due to the large number of injuries at
linebacker that the Steelers had earlier this season.
"They used me a lot on Blitzes during that time said
Valentine , "in order to utilize my speed
At least one time, the Valentine blitz paid off.
Several weeks ago, with the Steelers playing Denver on
Monday Night Football, the Edenton native hurried into
the Bronco backfield and sacked quarterback Craig
Morton.
"That has to be my biggest thrill so far said
Valentine, "because I was all alone in the spotlight
On the play, the ABC-TV announcers referred to
Valentine after the sack as "Zack Valentine from East
Colorado State an error that enfuriated many ECU
fans.
"The coaches down there (at ECU) told me what
they said Valentine said. "But with a little experience
everyone will know me as Zack Valentine from East
Carolina
Valentine says the Steelers have "big plans" for
him. "If they didn't he said assuredly, "they would
not have drafted me as high as they did
"We difinitely expect Zack to be a starter someday
said Widenfofer. "He has excellent potential and it is
only a matter of time for him
Valentine realizes, though, that for now he must
wait. "I feel like I will start here someday he said.
"But with the caliber of players that we have here, you
have to wait your turn. The guys ahead of me have done
the same thing. Hey, I'm with the best, you know
Being with the best is a big thrill for Valentine, who
says the Steelers are probably the best and most
confident team in the NFL. "There is a lot of intensity
on this team. They all know what it takes to wm and
they go out on the field and do it. Everybody here feels
that the only thing that can stop the Steelers from
winning the Super Bowl is the Steelers themselves
Valentine pointed to the intense practices that the
Steelers have, as compared to other teams who
"practice to get it over with "We do a lot of
classwork said Zack, "a lot more than in college. It's
sort of like going to classes at school. Then we take
what we learned in class and put it to use on the
practice field
One thing that makes Valentine happy about practice
is the fact that the Steelers have designed several plays
on the special teams especially for him. 'They have
some plays just for me he said. "They do a lot for me
anyway. They really are dedicated to making me the
best that I can be
"We have designed a play on the extra-points and
field goals explained Coach Widenfofer, "Especially
for Zack to block the kick. We thry to take advantage of
his exceptional leaping ability
Valentine says that he has learned a great deal in the
world of pro football but that some things he learned at
ECU under head coach Pat Dye will always stick with
him. "Coach Dye stressed being mentally alert at all
times he said. "That will always stay with me. He
also always wanted his team to 'play together Coach
(Chuck) Noll wants the same thing here
valentine said that he is still following the Pirates
quite avidly, as a matter of fact, he was watching the
Arkansas-Houston game on television a couple of weeks
ago while the Pirates were facing arch-rival North
Carolina when Pirate score was flashed on the screen.
"The score read East Carolina 24, North Carolina 21
in the fourth quarter Valentine said, "and I jumped
straight up out of my chair and yelled 'I knew we would
win I knew we would win Then I went downstairs
and told some of the guys on the team what my old
school was doing.
"When I came back upstairs to my TV, the game
was over and it was a 24-24 tie. I sure was disappointed
and I know the team was too
Valentine surely soon forgot that disappointment,
though, and went on with the business of being a
professional football player. He spoke of his goals.
"Someday, before I retire, I'd like to make All-Pro.
And, of course, this year I'd like to play in the Super
Bowl
With his enthusiasm and the Steeler organization on
his side, both seem like real possibilities.
���
I
now a Steeler linebacker
f





6 Novemoec tatf lrt tAbl hLihm. ray
bUms closing in on 1,000 yards
'It's like a dream come true for me
ho�N Collins said it but everyone knows Pat Dye
,j jusl as easily have uttered those words
lins, the Pirates' star halfback, went over the
.yard mark for the season last Saturday with his
l-yard performance against Appalachian. His 802
i- make him the nation's 20th leading rusher with an
b-age oi 102.0 per game.
I junior from Pern, Yan, N.Y. could easily move
L up the ist with a big game this weekend against
limond. He � only 12 yards behind Thomas Vigorito
irginia, who ranks 16th. Last year's Heisman Trophy
iner, Bill) Sims of Oklahoma, is 12th on the list with
yards, only V7 more than Collins. Both have played
I games and have three remaining.
I illins also ranks high in the nation in all-purpose
jning. His 150.9 yards per game rank him fifth in the
i m this category. Ceorge Rogers of South
i.lma is jusl ahead of him at 156.2. Charles White's
5 average leads the nation.
Collins now has 1,376 yards for his career. Should he
�ver the 1.000 yard mark this season, and he has
t games to do it. he would move into the tenth spot
B. c all-time ECU rushers.
lib- would become only the fourth back in Pirate
his to go over 1,000 yards in one season. Carlester
Crn npler did in 172 and 1973. Dave Alexander and
Bu olson also eclipsed the magic mark during their
EC
NOTHER PIRATE BACK, fullback Theodore
Sut i- already in the ECU top ten. With his 134
yai igainst Appalachian Saturday, Sutton pushed his
se? V v2 and his career mark to 1,889. That
figi As him sixth on the all-time list. Crumpler tops
the " with 2.88') yards. Eddie Hicks, now a New York
Gin is just ahead of Sutton in fifth place with 2,101.
Re I his first year, Sutton could possibly return to
pla r the Pirates again next season with his sights set
on Crumpler's all-time mark.

�THE PIRATES LEAD the nation in fewest turnovers
with ten after eight games. Dartmouth, last week's
Iea . has committed only eleven and ranks second.
he amazing thing about ECU leading the country in
itegory is the fact that the Pirates are a wishbone
Deacons ranked
Oth in AP poll
and you don't figure
Tennessee is going to lose
to them at home. And
irginia
Yes. Virginia, Virginia
went down to Georgia and
did in those Bulldog No,
they didn't just do them
in, thev beat them 31-0.
team, which usually spells out numerous turnovers as
the option offense affords many fumble opportunities.

THE "PIRATE OFFENSE as a whole continues to stay
among the national leaders. ECU ranks fourth nationally
in rushing offense with an average of 334.6 yards per
game, seventh in total offense, averaging 443 yards and
14th in scoring offense with an average of 30.1 points
per contest.
Many school records are likely to fall before the
Pirates complete their season at William and Mary on
November 21. The team is only 586 yards away from the
all-time single season rushing mark of 3,263, set in
1976. With tliree games left, this figure should be easily
eclipsed, as should the total offense record of 4,245
which was set in 1973. The Pirates need to gain only 701
yards in the final trio of games to break the latter mark.

AN INTERESTING ASPECT of Saturday's 38-21
victory over Appalachian State for the Pirates was the
fact that star end Billy Ray Washington did not
touch the football. He faced stiff coverage from the
Mountaineer secondary all day. Despite shutting off
Washington, the Apps still gave up 544 yards total
offense to the Pirate attack.

THE PIRATES BLESSED of course with an
excellent offensive attack, will get to see the other side
of the coin Saturday in Ficklen Stadium when they face
the hapless Richmond Spiders. Richmond, 0-9, has
scored but 59 points all season long.

DAVE ODOM, ECU's new head basketball coach,
announced last week that he would unveil the Pirates to
the public on Nov. 14 when the squad will play a
Purple-Gold scrimmage game. The women's team, led
by second-year coach Cathy Andruzzi, will precede the
men with a similar scrimmage. The Lady Pirates will
begin play at 6:30 with the men's game immediately
following. There will be no admission charge for either
game.
y
wA
J. 6. Hook
Sportswear
Dean Sweaters
Largest Selection
In Town
Also new
Selection of Kilts
Bring Your
National
Student
Consumer
Card ,
$
2
Afc
u
C WEBER FORBES
Evans Mall
Downtown Greenville
B DICK BR1NSTER
As vnited Press Writer
blNSTON-SALEM,
N.C. P) � "Are you
sayiiu" 're not going to
be ran I- � asked W ake
Fore- Coach John Mack-
ovic, raising his voh e
about a pie sant conve
tional let-l tor once.
The emphasis was on
the word "we're and
Mackovic was half joking.
His Demon Deacons, the
nation new Cinderella
team. 1 absorbed a 31-0
beati at the hands of
Clem- . and retaining a
spot among college fool
ball - elite was not a major
con �m ii.
"1 imagine we'll drop
out oi the top 20
M k -aid at his
Holiday morning press
�pntronce.
This, 'Mining from the
uad football coach at
ake Forest, represented
t:reat achievement in
itself. Later, when the
- wore tabulated, the
Deacons wound up No. 20
in the weekly Associated
ess poll of the nation's
� g� football writers.
i rue, it's the bottom of
barrel, but what a
barrel! After losing a
football game, being
iwn away mind you,
W ake Forest is still being
ntioned with the Ala-
Oklahomas and
whatnots.
And the reason is
-imple. Winning football
mes, according to Mac-
kovic. is no easy task. And
that statement comes from
a man who inherited a
1-10 team last season and
brought it home 1-10 in
his first try. Now the
Deacons are 7-2 and
headed for a bowl.
"Let me tell you, 7-4 is
a pretty good record he
said, "and 8-3 is very
good. A team that goes
9 2 these days is some
team, although the alumni
might not think so
Mackovic long has ex-
tolled the virtues of the
NCAA's 30-95 scholarship
rule, but he believes a
general improvement n
the quality of football
staffs is another major
reason for the leveling out
of play.
He points to a number
of shocking results in
support of his conclusions.
"Cincinnati makes Flo-
rida State � and they're
ranked what, 6th? � come
from behind to beat them.
Rutgers - they beat
Tennessee down there,
(Photo by John H. Grogan)
Theodore Sutton36 increases his career rushing mark
� 1977 Brewed by Milter Brewing Co Milwaukee Wl USA
classified
� �
FOR SALE: 1980 Spirit
Deluxe 2 door liftback,
economy special, 4 speed,
1- cylinder, brown metallic
with brown rally stripes,
radials, t-glass. List $5496,
Sale $5185. 752-9520.
FOR SALE: Hohner 12
string accoustic guitar.
Excellent condition, four
months old. $150. Call
George at 758-6708.
FOR SALE: VW Beetle,
automatic stick shift, ex-
cellent condition. Must
sell! Call 752-8152 after 5
ask for Ron.
FOR SALE: 1978 MGB
conv. 4 speed, 4 cylinder.
Locally owned, dark green,
tan interior, sharp. $5500.
752-9520.
FOR SALE: Hirsch-Weis
sleeping bag for camping,
never been used. $25. Call
752-5669. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
only.
FOR SALE: 1976 Datsum
280-Z. 65000 miles, metal-
ic blue, excellent cond.
Call 752-9013.
FOR SALE: 1972 Vega
Cot. Station Wagon. Must
sell. For more information
call 752-5422.
pereoncKj)
PART TIME: position
available for mature per-
sons who like children and
enjoy meeting the public.
To work at Santaland at
Carolina East Mall. Nov.
3-Dec. 24must be avail-
able to work the entire
season. Interested? Call:
Kay Sckenck at 756-6851.
HELP WANTED: Wait-
resses, bartenders, bar
backs. Apply in person.
Must be 21. Good pay plus
tips. Call 756-8060.
NEED TYPING? Call
Cvnthia anytime after 5
p.m. at 758-4693.
NEED X-TRA CASH: Fair
prices paid for gold and
silver and silver coins.
Mixed Media. 120 E. 5th
St. 758-2127.
RIDE NEEDED: To and
from Plymouth. Anytime.
Will help with expenses.
Call 752-8043.
LOST: Eastern Waye High
Class ring, year 1976.
Reward Offered. Call 758-
6084
IN A STORE NOT BUT A FEW UGHT YEARS AWAY
YOU CAN EXPERIENCE
'D.A. KELLY'S


mrit 9
BLAST OFF WITH SKY-ROCKETING VALUES THIS WEEK AT
D.A. KELLY'S, ESPECIALLY PROGRAMMED TO PROVIDE YOU WITH
YOUR PRESENT AND FUTURE WARDROBE NEEDS
WITH A $20 OR MORE PURCHASE YOU CAN STEP INTO THE
D.A.KELLY FLYING SAUCER FOR AN OUT-OF-SIGHT FREE GIFT
ROOMMATE wanisd to
share two bedroom apart-
ment. Phone 752-7202.
PARKING: Leased parking
directly across from ECU
on corner of 5th and E.
Holly Sts. $30 per semes-
ter. 30 spaces available.
Call Bull Ritter Realtors
756-5458 and leave name
and number if interested.
Tuesday
THERE WILL BE DISCOUNTS FAR BEYOND YOUR
IMAGINATION ON LUREX, FLANNEL, AND PLAID
SKIRTS AND BELTS.
WoHnoeHau DISCOVERS D.A. KELLY'S ATOMOSPHERE
weunebudy floating with sales 30off all reg. price
DRESSES.
VISIT
CENTRAL NEWS & CARD SHOP
FOR
Local & out of town papers
Hardback & paperback books
Complete Selection of magazines
Thursday
Friday
321 Evans St.
752-3333
HOURS 9-9
7 DAYS A WEEK
Saturday
LANDS EARTH SHAKING METEORS CRASHING FAR
OUT VALUES OF 25 OFF ALL REG. PRICE SKIRTS
AND DEEP WITHIN THE GALAXY THERE WILL BE A
SPECIAL VISITOR FROM A PLANET UNKNOWN TO
ASSIST YOU THROUGH A LIVE WRQR
REMOTE 3:00-5:00.
NOV. Oth AN UNLIMITED AMOUNT OF 20-40 OFF
SALES WILL BE ANNOUNCED EVERY 30 MINUTES.
WILL END THE LONG JOURNEY OF D.A. KELLY'S
SPACE ADVENTURES WITH SHOOTING STAR
VALUES OF 30 OFF SELECTED TOPS AND 25
OFF ALL VELOUR SWEATERS
DON'T MISS YOUR SPACE SHIP TO WITNESS
THESE SHOCKING FUTURE VALUESI!
.
V
V
�M





Page 10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 6 November 1979
1M team handball begins
By RICKI GLIARMIS
Intramural Correspondent
The Intramural Team
Handball season got off to
an exciting start Wed
Oct. 31. Team handball, a
relatively new sport at
ECU, is rapidly gaining
popularity.
There is a field of 30
teams this year, 23 of
which are men's teams
.with seven teams vying
for the women's cham-
pionship.
In the men's division,
the King's Royal Netters
were the preseason num-
ber one choice. Alpha Xi
Delta I received top billing
in the women's bracket.
The men's fraternity
league is divided into two
divisions. In the Hercules
Division, Tau Kappa Epsi-
lon is back to defend their
all-campus championship.
They defeated Sigma Nu
16-5 in their first game.
Lambda Chi Alpha crush-
ed Kappa Sigma, 21-11, in
a very impressive start.
The Zeus Division ap-
pears to be very balanced.
Sigma Tau Gamma edged
Kappa Alpha, 14-13, in
their first game while Phi
Kappa Tau won by default
over Delta Sigma Phi.
The dorm division has
not started play yet. Play
opens today. The Scott
Withdrawals and Belk
Gola figure to be the
strong teams in the
division.
The Independent divis-
ion appears to have the
largest number of strong
teams. In their first game,
the top-ranked King's
Roval Netters slipped past
the Ball Slingers, 17-14, in
a surprisingly close game.
The Renegades upset the
previously fourth-ranked
Doiemites, 13-10. Also,
the Six Killers looked
impressive in downing Phi
Epsilon Kappa, 12-9. Se-
cond ranked Alien re-
ceived an opening round
bye.
Recently, several
members of the Fitness
club have been competing
in varous events. Bob FOx
and Bob Morrison com-
peted in the Fourth
Annual Marine Corps
Marathon in Washington,
D.C. The marathon was a
26.2 mile course. Fox and
Morrison finished in the
top eight percent with
times of 3:04.
Nancy Mize is involved
in the Raleigh Racquetball
Tournament while Wayne
Edwards, Nancy Mize,
Bob Fox, Bob Gutwals,
Emory Ramsey, Pat Cox,
Maureen Fox, Ken Mur-
ray, Linda Mason, and
Tony Guiterrey are in the
Pitt Plaza Seven Miler.
Adaptive Intramurals
The Adaptive Intramu-
ral Program will get
underway on Thurs Nov.
8, at 9 p.m. in Minges
Coliseum.
A variety of activities
have been scheduled in-
cluding floor hockey,
horseshoes, basketball,
and volleyball.
All interested persons
are encouraged to come
and join the fun. For
additional information,
please call Ms. Mize or
Vanessa Higdon at 757-
6387.
Dates and Deadlines
The Intramural Council
Meeting will be held
Thurs Nov. 8, at 4 p.m.
in Memorial Gym, Room
104.
Racquetball Singles
entrv deadline is Nov. 8,
with Captain's meeting
being held Nov. 2 a t 4
p.m. in Memorial 104.
Plav begins Nov. 13.
Co-Rec Volleyball entry
deadline is Nov. 7. Cap-
tain's Meeting will be held
Nov. 8 at 7 p.m in
Memorial 104 with play
beginning NOv. 12.
Pre-season basketball
Tournament registration
begins Nov. 12.
The women's and
men's team handball clubs
will meet on Thurs Oct.
8, at 3:30 p.m. in 104
Memorial Gym. All inter-
ested students are encour-
aged to attend this impor-
tant meeting.
In the women's league,
an exciting race is shaping
up as the stronger teams
dominated play in the
opening round. The
fourth-ranked Fleming
Goalie Trotters trounced
ALpha Xi Delta, II, 21-0,
while the second ranked
Tyler Heartbreakers hum-
bled Sigma Sigma Sigma
19-1. P.E. and Company
defeated Carries Unmen-
tionables 15-6.
Top-ranked Alpha Xi
Delta I received an
opening round bye.
Players of the week are
Larry Fike, King's Royal
Netters with five goals and
Anita Marsh, Fleming
Goalie Trotters scoring 10
goals.
The top five men's
teams are King's Royal
Netters heading the list
with Alien coming in
second and Renegades,
third. Tau Kappa Epsilon
and Lambda Chi Alpha
round off the list.
Alpha Xi Delta I is
holding the number one
position in the -women's
league
SAAD'S SHOE
REPAIR
113 Grande Ave.
758-1228
Quality Shoe Repair
The Minority Arts Film Series
presents
m&

imntmutit
SMh
1RW
WEDNESDAY
All Day Hump
Day
Taco's 29
wm
un Fi'&ht Inflation) MigMt
25 A&M OTHfcR Specials
LAOlCS FRfcfc AMiSSioN
fcftiNG MICKEL.S
L - DANJCg. CoKT�ST
VQk CSH -FIRST PfttXE
&m
doniaWright Afro-American
Cultural Center
Wed Nov. 7
8pm
STUDENT UWON
EAST CAKOUNA UMVEftSiTY
STUDENT UNION
AST CAROLINA UNIWlRSITt
Coupons Expire Nov. 10.
Please have coupons clipped.
"Home of Greenville's Best Meats'
Located on corner 3rd and Jarvis St.
"A" Whole Fryers $J
Delta Paper Towels
Giant Roll
3$1.00
Coca Cola
Qt. Btl.
28
Plus Deposit
Pride of the Farm Vegetables
White Potatoes, Lima Beans, or Golden Corn
303 cans
Golden Bananas
4 Lbs
4$1.00
$1.00
Green Cabbage QLb'
Fab Detergent
Giant Box 88 witn tnis coupon
and $7.50 food order excluding
specials. $1.08 without coupon
Clorox Bleach
12 Gal. Jug 38with this coupon
and $7.50 food order excluding
specials. 58' without coupon.
'
Charmin Tissue
4 Roll Pkg.68 wit" this coupon
and $7.50 food order excluding
specials. 88' without coupon.

PIRATE COUPON
10 Discount on $10
or more food order
Expires Nov. 10
Amt. off Purchase
I ID Number
�saS
limit one per order i
ar?T.
I
t

� s





6 Noember 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 11
I
I
I

I
(Photos by John H. Grogan)
ECU tackle Joe Godette (77) blocks for FB Theodore Sutton, ASU QB Brown goes down and ASU HB Albert Floyd dives forward in 38-21 ECU victory Saturday.
Thompson, Lady Pirates dominate Peace in scrimmage
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
ECU Lady Pirate bas-
ketball opened its home
exhibition schedule Mon-
dav against an outmanned
Peace College squad,
soundly defeating the vis-
itors in each of three 20
m.nute periods.
Perennial team scoring
leader Rosie Thompson led
the Lady Bucs with 30
points, though she was
platooned throughout the
night.
Junior guard Lydia
Rountree added 22, fol-
lowed by freshman for-
ward Mary Denkler with
14 and junior college
transfer Kathv Riley with
13.
Junior point guard
Laurie Sikes and freshman
forward Donna Brayboy
added 12 each.
Each of the twelve
squad members participat-
ed in the Scrimmage, and
each exhibited her own
characteristics and playing
style.
Thompson showed that
she was ready to pick up
where she left off in the
1978-79 season; leading all
Lady Pirate scorers with
1774 points and bring
attention to the ECU
program.
The limelight will have
to be shared this year,
however. Rountree and
Girven, the only other
starters returning, have
improved considerably du-
ring the hiatus.
Rountree takes on a
new assignment after serv-
ing as the point guard last
season. She will play the
shooting guard position
and the point slot will be
filled by Sikes and speedy
Lillion Barnes.
"I think that Sikes and
Lillion are doing much
better than they did
earlier said second-year
Lady Pirate Coach Cathy
Andruzzi. "She's (Sikes) a
natural ball handler.
"Lydia is a real threat
from outside and she has
become a better team
player
The addition of Sikes
gives ECU an added
dimension that was sorely
missed last season; a
dazzling ballhandler with a
record of success including
being named All-Region
Junior College AIAW.
"I think Laurie has
relieved a lot of the
pressure from Lydia said
assistant coach Marcia
Richards. "The thing I'm
really worried about is that
we're not getting the ball
to the high post enough
The post again will be
anchored by the lanky
Girven (6-0, 135), but her
backup will be considerab-
ly more dependable than
in the past.
Fellow six-footer Donna
Moody will be the top
reserve, with Denkler able
to see spot action at
center, also.
"We're trying to get to
where we can platoon the
girls said Andruzzi. "I
liked what I saw tonight
(Monday).
"I think Marcia is
much more physical than
she has been in the past.
Having the freshmen who
can come off the bench
makes a big difference
Riley and Thompson
appear to have the starting
slots filled at forward, but
from there it's a toss-up.
"Riley is a real hust-
ler Andruzzi said. "She
always gives everything
she's got. She's a very
strong player.
"When Rosie's playing
with better ballplayers like
she is this year, then she
plays better
Transfer Heidi Owen,
Brayboy and walk-ons
Sandy Reneiri and Fran
Hooks will share the
chores at forward.
Andruzzi pointed out
several areas which the
Lady Pirates will have to
improve upon before the
season opener November
17 against William and
Mary.
"We made them
(Peace) play out style of
game she said. "They
weren't able to fast break
against us.
"Our fast break begat
to look better, but they
were giving us the first
option and we weren't
setting up the offense and
working the ball around as
much as we want the girls
to.
"We're going to have
to become a much more
patient team on offense,
and defense too for that
matter.
"We've got to gain a
lot more speed.
"Defensively we were
working on the transition
from our man-to-man to
the zone and I think it was
very good
Sikes dazzled the
crowd with around-the-
back passes and 20-foot
jump shots
Field hockey
Cont'd from page 8
i
suffered a foot injury in
the Clemson game said
Holmes. "Before the
weekend was over, I think
everybody had an injury of
some kind or another.
"I think the teams
were pretty evenly ba-
lanced, though. We
weren't as aggressive
inside the circle as we
should have been against
Clemson and I think that
made the difference
Arrants explained that
for the NCAIAW tourna-
ment to be completed
prior to the Regional
Tournament, it had to be
played the same week as
the Deep South.
"I would have liked to
have done better against
Clemson and Appalachian
State she said, "but
you've got to remember it
was our fifth and sixth
games and only their
second and third.
"The girls were really
exhausted when we got
back. It was nice to see
the girls come on so
strong at the end of the
season. We return all but
two to compete next
year
The season is not quite
over for three standout
ECU performers.
Wendy Kennedy and
Carol Belcher were selec-
ted after Deep South
competition to compete in
the No. II m which will
compete this weekend at
the regionals in Towson,
Maryland. Dana Salmons
was also chosen to com-
pete with the No. Ill team.
Teams in the regionals
are comprised of club
team members and college
team members.
Pantana Bob's
The brothers of Pi Kappa Phi would like to
thank these sponsers of the 3rd
Annual Halloween Festival !
U. B. E.
528 Cotanche St.
Complete selection of
Greek Jerseys
only $7.50 ea.
Silk Screens
Pizza Inn
South Sea Pet Shop
Stereo Village
Sonic Drive - In
Crow's Nest
The Pro Shop
Sharpe's Formal Wear
Wine & Cheese Shop
Radio Shack
TREE House Restaurant
H. L. Hodges
Mikes' Bike Shop
Post Halloween Party with the Pi Kaps
at Pantana Bob's 8:30-ffim.Tonight
Prizes
ATTIC





Page 12 THE EAST CAROL INIAN 6 November 1979
THE E.C.U. FRATERNITIES
AND SORORITIES
PRESENT THE3rd OF 4
GREAT GREEK CONCERTS
WED. NOV. 7th 8:45l:00
AT THE ATTIC
WITH
m-
WEAR YOUR GREEK
JERSEY'S AND RECIEVE
A REDUCTION





Title
The East Carolinian, November 6, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 06, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.20
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy