The East Carolinian, October 30, 1979






"Were it left to me
to decide whether
we should have a
government without
newspapers or
newspapers without
government, I
should not hesitate
a moment to prefer
the latter
�Thomas Jefferson
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, October 30,1979
If you have a story
idea, a tip, or a
lead, please tele-
phone us:
757-6386
757-6367
757-6309
Greenville, N.C.
Circulation 10,000
SGA legislature
postpones funds
What apparently began as a spontaneous Halloween celebration on Oct. 31, 1975 ended as a small-scale riot
involving 56 arrests. (photo by pete podeszwa)
Riots remembered
By TERRY GRAY
Assistant News Editor
Some seniors and
graduate students may
recall it, but few other at
ECU remember the Hal-
loween riot of 1975. It was
one of the most provoca-
tive events that ever
occurred in Greenville,
and its effects are not
entirely absent today.
Late on the night of
October 31, 1975, a group
of approximately 500 peo-
ple, most of them ECU
students, assembled spon-
taneously in the downtown
area. The Halloween
crowd, many of them
dressed in costumes, grew
so large and unruly that
traffic on Cotanche Street
was blocked. What hap-
pened afterwards was to
become a subject of
year-long investigation and
debate.
In a statement released
later that week, Greenville
Police Chief E.G. Cannon
said that by 11:45 p.m
the 'riotous' crowd had
become so unmanageable
that additional assistance
from State ABC officers
and the Pitt County
Sherriffs department had
to be called in. By the
time these officers arrived,
said Cannon, "the revelers
had gotten completely out
of control, and I directed
Lr. J.H. Tripp to use a
megaphone and order the
crowd to disperse from the
area within five minutes. I
further instructed the
Lieutenant to warn them
that anyone left in the
area after five minutes
would be arrested
Instead of scattering,
continued Cannon, the
crowd seemed to get
worse. At this point, police
used a Pepper Fog (not
tear gas) generator to
move the crowd � a tactic
which did not work, but
only served to enrage the
group. Bricks and bottles
flew, and the rear window
of one of the police cars
was broken out.
Police answered with
tear gas and dozens of
arrests. The tear gas drove
the crowd away, scattering
the rioters into groups that
fled to the intersection of
Fifth and Reade Streets to
reassemble.
' m
�,with no tear gas
to protect them,
they had no
alternative but
ii
to retreat.
99
During the regrouping,
Cannon said, one of the
police officers was shot in
the face with a pellet gun.
"I then instructed my
officers to make arrests for
'inciting a riot At ap-
proximately this time in
the sequence of events,
the Pepper Fog generator
stopped working and our
supply of tear gas was
exhausted reported the
police chief.
Then, according to the
report, a fire truck was
dispatched to the scene
and began spraying the
crowd, which was advan-
cing again up Fifth Street
towards the downtown
area. The fire truck was
soon called back to the
Main Station by fire
department supervisors,
leaving a crowd of 300 in
the street.
"My officers formed
a riot control formation
and tried to drive the
crowd back once more.
However, with no tear gas
or shields to protect them
from bricks, bottles and
glass they had no alterna-
tive but to retreat said
Cannon.
At this point, the
rioters moved up Fifth
Street, breaking store
windows, damaging other
property and looting a
jewelry store window
counter.
Before the night was
over, 56 persons were
arrested and $3,075 in
property damage had oc-
curred. A total of 54 law
enforcement officers from
three agencies had been
involved in the distur-
bance.
This, of course, is the
police version of the
events, and it did not go
uncontested. Although
most of the charges
against those arrested
were subsequently drop-
ped, the already-strained
relations between ECU
students and the Green-
ville establishment were
further weakened.
In following issues of
The Fountainhead, alter-
native accounts were pub-
lished. Most of these came
from students, but at least
one Greenville merchant
wrote citizens of
Greenville will not tolerate
the undue force and war-
like tactics that were used
(by police) Friday night
This statement reflects
the general concensus that
developed among stu-
dents. Others, however,
recalled Kent State and
praised the police for their
restraint in the face of
such provocation. All a-
greed that there was a
serious lack of communi-
cation between students
and authorities.
See RIOT, page 2
By CHRIS CAGLE
Staff Writer
Despite a plea from
SGA President Brett Mel-
vin, yesterday the legis-
lature postponed the fund-
ing of the SGA transit
budget until the next
meeting.
"The legislature must
make a decision today
which will affect it the rest
of the year remarked
Melvin.
According to Melvin, if
the transit system receives
the $70,504.50 appropri-
ation requested, there will
be less money available
for other campus organi-
zations.
Melvin remarked to the
members, "The decision is
not the transit getting
money, but do we need to
fund other organizations,
also. The transit system
serves 10,000 students a
week. It is in need in
future years, and more
students are living off
campus. Do we owe these
students transportation on
and off campus?"
"The transit system
helps to remedy the
problem with parking on
campus. It is the entire
legislature's responsibility,
not an individual. We are
setting a precedent to-
day he stated.
Melvin also informed
the legislature that Colonel
Blake, assistant to the
chancellor, and Leonard
Fleming, operations man-
ager of the transit system,
had met with the Green-
ville City Transit System
to come up with an
alternative and also to
work out a feasible
solution for the SGA
Transit System.
Katherine Vollmer, a
member of the legislature,
also spoke to the members
regarding the transit sys-
tem appropriation and the
conduct and work of the
members in the weekly
meetings.
There is no point
ramgling on or staying
here for a half-hour to an
hour without doing what
we came here to do. For
all the new members, if
you don't understand, ask
questions. No one is going
to look down on you
because you don't under-
Transit cut
Normal service to resume
By KAREN WENDT
News Editor
Only about $100 in
damage resulted from
Wednesday's bus acci-
Inside
Today
No respect
see page 4
Greek news
seepage 5
Beaux-arts Ball
see page 6
Soccer
see page 10
dent, but there is still only
one SGA bus1 running
today.
Two buses are ex-
pected to be in operation
tomorrow.
According to Leonard
Fleming, SGA transit
manager, the backing
lights and dents have been
fixed on the bus involved
in Wednesday's accident.
Fleming also said that
some work was done on
the bus's brake system.
Fleming cited difficulty
in finding parts to be the
major reason for the buses
not being in operation.
The Purple route will
be running today, and the
Purple and Gold routes
will be running on Wed-
nesday.
The driver involved in
Wednesday's fender
bender will probably go
through a proposed driver
training program, added
Fleming.
Fleming says the tran-
sit system may install a
driver training and re-
training program for all of
their drivers.
Freddy Simon, one of
the current drivers, will be
conducting the retraining
seminars.
Drivers will be taken
on each of the routes and
then asked to drive the
routes again. On the
second run they will
receive a pass-fail grade,
according to Fleming.
Simon will be pre-
senting the proposal to
Fleming, and it is ex-
pected to be put into
action as soon as possible.
"Nothing can be done
overnight said Fleming,
referring to the problems
the SGA has had with the
buses in the past 10
months.
Ana Sanchez
From Asseri to ECU
By MARGARET BUNCH
ECU News Bureau
Ana Sanchez is a
bright, happy person who
laughs frequently when
she talks, especially if she
has to hesitate for an
English word to complete
a sentence. Even though
she has had only two and
one half years of formal
English training, she is
attending East Carolina
University, studying En-
glish literature and lin-
guistics and getting along
very well to be a 'stranger
in a strange land
Ana is one of the
students who have come to
East Carolina to study as a
result of a cooperative
program between ECU
and the Unbersidad
Nacional in Costa Rica.
The Universidad is about
the same size as ECU,
having 11,000 students.
The exchange program is
not the classic exchange
with students being traded
for students, but a trade of
facilities at the Univer-
sidad Nacional for three
assistantships at East
Carolina for Costa Rican
students.
Ana, an undergraduate
senior, works in the
Spanish Language Lab six
hours per week and
teaches Spanish four hours
per week in the fifth grade
at Wahl-Coates School.
Another Costa Rican stu-
dent, Miguel Gutierrez, is
working on the graduate
level in the School of
Education at ECU.
Asseri, a small town
about the size of Green
ville, is Ana's home town
and she describes it as
being very much like
Greenville with its own
Hardee's, McDonald's and
Pizza Hut. She is im-
pressed by the friendliness
of the people in Green-
ville, likes the movies very
much, enjoys the ECU
band at football games,
but is not impressed by
the discos which have not
reached her home town in
Costa Rica as yet. She
attended the Pitt county
fair and has been to
Atlantic Beach, both new
experiences for her. Ana
would like very much to
see California, but says
that she "does not know
why" as she pronounces
every syllable in 'Califor-
nia' distinctly in a Spanish
accent. i
See SANCHEZ, page 5 Ana Sanchez with Dr. Cramer
(Photo by M. Balnea)
stand Vollmer said.
"Between the transit
system and the executive
salaries, both are going to
take up the entire bulk of
what we have to appro-
priate. Think about it �
the decision you make
today will determine the
rest of the meetings, is
SGA just going to fund the
transit system or other
organizations
Transit System Admin-
istration Manager Chubby
Abshire spoke to the
members regarding the
importance of the appro-
priation and the transit
system. "We serve more
people off campus than
on, and the students who
live off campus pay as
much as the ones who live
on campus
According to Abshire,
the transit system is
operating now with three
buses because of the
wreck last week of the
fourth bus. The two big
buses were purchased in
1975 and are designed for
road travel and charter
purposes, not for the use
of travel around town. The
other buses were bought
in 1971 and the legislature
supposedly set aside mon-
ey for new buses.
"Before long we will
not have a transit system.
The buses should have
been gradually taken care
of. We are trying this year
to turn it around. Unless
we pull the system back
we won't have buses so
we should be putting
money aside now Ab-
shire said. The transit
system now owes a great
deal of money for repairs.
If the transit had not used
vans this summer it would
be operating in the red,
but instead it saved
$6,000, according to Ab-
shire.
Judy Allpn, chairper-
son of the appropriations
committee, spoke to the
legislature regarding the
amendment of the transit
system bill. "As of
November 1, the transit
system will e out of
money for gas, etc. The
essence of bringing it out
early is to the transit's
advantage commented
Allen.
See SGA, page 2
1 Leonard Fleming (P100 hr ChaP Gurley)
NAACP against
UNC proposal
WASHINGTON (AP)
�A new proposal by the
University of North Car-
olina to resolve a desegre-
gation dispute with federal
officials has drawn criti-
cism from the NAACP
Legal Defense and Ed-
ucation Fund.
Joseph Rauh, an at-
torney for the group, said
in an interview that the
UNC proposal to review
duplicating programs on
its 16 campuses again is
weaker than earlier plans
already rejected by Joe
Califano, former secretary
of the Department of
Health, Education and
Welfare.
"If they buy this,
they've sold out integra-
tion. It's so much weaker
than what Joe turned
down. It's hard to under-
stand how North Carolina
would have the chutzpah
to offer it Rauh said.
The NCCAP Legal
Defense Fund is among
the agencies that have
called for a shutoff of
nearly 196 million in
federal funds to the UNC
system. HEW has de-
manded that UNC elimi-
nate some of its duplicat-
ing programs on the
various campusues to en-
courage racial mixing.
An administrative
hearing on the dispute is
scheduled for next March.
Rauh charged that the
latest UNC proposal "is
nothing but a political
plan, but the way the
White House is giving
away dough for political
purposes, they may well
give away civil rights
"Since Gov. Jim Hunt
is head of the Democratic
governors for Carter, any-
thing can happen he
said. Rauh has supported
Sen. Edward M. Kennedy,
D-Mass for the Demo-
cratic presidential nomin-
ation.
The UNC proposal was
among the problems that
will be turned over to
Roma J. Stewart, a
43-year-old black lawyer
designated Friday aa the
new director of HEW's
Office of Civil Rights. Ms.
Stewart, whose specialty
bas been employee-dis-
crimination ante, wiM suc-
ceed David S. Tatel, who
has resigned.





Page 2 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 30 Qctahur 1070
SGA
continued from page 1
According to Allen,
purchasing a 15-passenger
van and cutting spending
on motor vehicle and office
supplies in the long run
will save money. The
15-passenger van can be
used on the brown route
and night routes.
Abshire told the legis-
lature, "This bill is very,
very important. The mon-
ey belongs to us, we are
entitled to $3 per person
each semester and there is
an average enrollment of
12,000 students each year.
We let the SGA hold on to
our money for us, and
what we don't need we
give back to the SGA he
added.
Strikers reach
tentative truce
TARBORO, N.C. (AP)
�Carolina Telephone and
Telegraph Co. and the
Communications Workers
of America reached a
tentative agreement Sat-
urday on a new two-year
contract, but a union
official said the union's
negotiating committee
would not take a position
on the proposal.
Delbert Gordon, chair-
man of the union's negot-
iating committee, said it
would not recommend that
the union members either
i
approve or disapprove of
the proposed contract.
"We are merely taking
it back for a vote he
said. But he added that
"The Great bus will
not take us on now unless
we can stand on our own
feet
In other business, SGA
Treasurer Ricky Lowe
reported that $103,212.14
is available for appropria-
tion this year.
SGA Speaker Mike
Adkins read a letter to
legislators from Chancellor
Brewer regarding the ex-
tension of library hours, a
suggestion discussed ear-
lier.
According to Brewer,
the library hours at ECU
are comparable to other
universities. Library hours
are longer than those at
UNC-Chapel Hill, USC and
Princeton. Also, the hours
here are extended during
exam time.
RIOT
continued from page 1
The SGA of that year
reacted swiftly and formed
a committee to investigate
the incident.
The work of this
committee began a dia-
logue between ECU stu-
dents and Greenville city
government which con-
tinues to this day. As a
result of their efforts, a
non-voting position on city
council was created for the
President of the SGA. This
council seat still exists,
and provides the council
with student input when-
ever the need arises.
Another result of the
Halloween riot was a
process of mutual educa-
tion between police, stu-
dents and authorities. In
the weeks following the
riot, The Fountainhead
published several articles
analysing all sides of the
event, including comments
from police, students,
faculty, administration and
city government.
As Halloween ap-
proaches us four years
later, memories of the
night of October, 1975 are
all hut faded away. But
after all was said and
done, after the tear gas
and the bricks, after the
arrests and the hard
feelings, Greenville em-
erged with a new con-
sciousness of the different
elements that make up
its community. It was an
awareness bought with
sticks and stones, and one, Greenville police battled rioters with tear gas and physical force on th
that has made words of Oct. 31, 1975.
reason all the more
possible today.
e night of
the
had
agreement
50-50 percent chance of
not passing He said the
membership vote should
be completed by mid-
week.
' i mTFt 'j J
PRESBYTERIAN STUDENT MINISTRY
East Carolina University
Greenville, N.C. 2783
the" DEN
401 E. 9th St.
Stewart LaNeave, Campus Minister
A listening ear
A sounding board
A guiding spirit
Z52r72WOR758-qi5
PROGRAMS AT THE DEN
Tuesdays 5:30 $1.50
Dinner & Bible Study
Sundays
10:00 Free
Coffee, Donuts, Discussion
(A ride to 11:00 worship at
First Presbyterian Church)
Thursdays
I
12:30
Bring your burger lunch
Fellowship & Discussion
Free Tea or Soft Drink
l
it's Miller time
ica
l3,
CLIFF'S
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
.ini.iT �� C Bin iO���� w��"�
1 �d vn
AIX YOU
a.7t CAVEAT!
MONDAY-THURSDAY
TROUT, FLOUNDER,
CRAB CAKES
TEA is included with meal
CLIFF'S SUPER
SPECIAL
WEDNESDAY
CRAB CAKE SPECIAL
2 Golden Fried Crab Cakes
French Fries, Slaw, and
Hushpuppies. Qf)c �
Students Supply Store
of
East Carolina University
announces an
autographing session for
the novel, Vision Quest,
authored by Terry Davis
of the
English Dept. faculty
MONDAY-TUESDAY-WEDNESDAY
Do You Dare to Come To
D.A. Kelly's House of Values?
Our Goulies have gone all out with prices that will shake you up.
MONDAY AND TUESDAY
PRE-HALLOWEEN SALES
20-30
Off Selected
Fall Merchandise
REGISTER FOR A BEAUTIFUL
HIGH FASHIOH WARDROBE
VALUED AT $200.00
Also register for a "Trick or a Treat
No purchase necessary. Do not have
to be present to win.
HALLOWEEN DAY
SURPRISE JAR OF
TREATS
YOU GUESS THE
AMOUNT-ANDWIN A
$25.00 GIFT CERTIFICATE.
The novel, Vision Quest, has been highly
received by many critics and is scheduled for
printings in French in the near future.
John Irving, author off The World According to
Garp, has this to say:
DURING WEDNESDAY, COME
DOWN & "BOB" FOR A COUPON
DISCOUNTAND IF YOU
ARE ESPECIALLY DARING-
FEEL YOUR WAY FOR ANOTHER
POSSIBLE HIGH FASHION OUTFIT.
"Terry Davis is a wonderful storyteller
�comic and wise. Vision Quest is the
truest novel about growing up since
The Catcher in the Rye; and it's a bet-
ter novel about wrestling, and wres-
tlers, than The World According to
Garp�John Irving
Mr. Davis will be in the Students Supply
Store Wednesday, Oct. 31, from 2:00pm
to 4:00pm to autograph copies of his book
BE SURE TO SHOP

DOWNTOWN EVANS MALL
OCTOBER 29, 30, 31 FOR
THESE BEWITCHING SALES
"All Trickers Will Be Treated
Open 9-6
20 OFF
ANY ONE ITEM
One coupon per customer
)






Pecple. places, and

i
1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Pare 3
law
The Law School Ad-
mission Test will be
offered at East Carolina
University on Saturday,
December 1, 1979. Appli-
cation blanks are to be
completed and mailed to
Educational Testing Ser-
vice, Box 966-R, Prince-
ton, NJ 08540. Regis-
tration deadline is Nov. 5,
1979. Applications may be
obtained from the ECU
Testing Center, Speight
Building Room 105.
ll 4til l�l Isll CCISC
supfc
The Student Union
Program Board will meet
Nov. 1, at 7 p.m. in Room
212 of Mendenhall Student
Center.
May we remind stu-
dents that all announce-
ments for the People,
Places and column must
be typewritten, double
spaced, and turned in
before the deadline, or
they will not be accepted.
These rules will be strictly
enforced.
We cannot guarantee
that all of the announce-
ments that we receive will
be published, but we will
do our best.
Deadlines are 2 p.m.
on Tuesday for the Thurs-
day edition and 2 p.m.
Friday for the Tuesday
edition.
All announcements
should be directed to the
news editor only.
There wiH be a Rho
Epsilon meeting on Thurs-
day, November 1 at 4:00
p.m. in Room 221 Men-
denhall. All members are
urged to attend.
act
The American College
Testing (ACT) will be
offered at East Carolina
University on Saturday,
December 8, 1979. Appli-
cation blanks are to be
completed and mailed to
ACT Registration, P.O.
Box 414, Iowa City, Iowa
52240. Registration dead-
line is November 9, 1979.
Applications may be ob-
tained from the ECU
Testing Center, Speight
Building Room 105.
bowling
Take advantage of
these bowling specials at
Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter: "Red Pin Bowling" �
7 p.m. to 10 p.m. every
Sunday bowlers get a
chance to win one FREE
GAME with every game
bowled. "Rent-A-Lane" �
Every Saturday from 12
noon to 6 p.m. you can
rent a lane for $3.00 for
one hour. "Discount Day"
� 13 off the price of
bowling every Monday
from 2 p.m. until 6 p.m.
There are immediate
openings for tutors of
Chemistry 1120 and 1050.
Applicants may be grad-
uates or undergraduate
students who are profi-
cient in these areas.
Contact Dr. Bridwell or
Dr. Hensel in 208 Rags-
dale Hall or call the
Center for Student Oppor-
tunities at 757-6122, 6081,
or 6075.
CORSO, the club for
those interested in either
social work or corrections
will meet this Tuesday,
Oct. 30 at 5 p.m. in Belk
A-101. All members and
prospective members are
urged to attend this
important meeting. A spe-
cial welcome is extended
to all recently accepted
majors into the depart-
ment.
Jaycees
The Greenville Jaycees
will be sponsoring a
Haunted House during the
Halloween season. The
dates will be October
20-22 and October 25th
through Halloween night.
One third of the proceeds
will go towards assisting
in the construction of the
local Boys' Club. The
house will be located on
Airport Road and will open
at 7:00 p.m.
plhciie bccfe�
The 1979-80 phone
books are in. If you do not
have one yet, they are
available in the SGA office
located on the second floor
of Mendenhall, Room 228.
Ml I US. I
ecu ccc
The ECU Collegiate
Civital Club will have an
organizational meeting at
7 p.m. on Nov. 6 in
Flanagan 201.
The ECU Club is
sponsored by the Green-
ville Civital Club.
Collegiate Civitan Clubs
are dedicated to service to
others with special em-
phasis on mental health
and mental retardation.
Any student carrying 12
semester hours or more is
eligible to become a
member. For further in-
formation, see Dr. R.A.
Klein, Flanagan 235 or
phone 757-6274.
si i tt le bus
The shuttle bus be-
tween the Allied Health
Building and Mendenhall
Student Union will not
operate after November 2,
1979.
iriur
There will be a general
meeting of the ECU
chapter of Model United
Nations this Thursday at
2:00 in Brewster C-105.
All members and inter-
ested people are urged to
attend as we will be
making preliminary plans
for the upcoming con-
ference at the University
of Pennsylvania. No prior
experience is necessary.
amerccin
If you like pinball, pool
or foosball, the place to be
is the MRC GAMEROOM.
Located in the basement of
Aycock Dorm, it is open
from 10 a.m12 p.m.
every day. The gameroom
also serves as the check-
out area for tents, canoes,
car racks and life preser-
vers. Remember, the
Men's Residence Council
provides these services.
�hardball
An organizational
meeting for women's and
men's Team Handball
Clubs will be held on
Thursday, Nov. 1, at 3:30
p.m. in 104 Memorial
Gym. All students inter-
ested in this action-packed
Olympic sport are invited
to attend.
(re
I 14 l II ill
The ECU Racquetball
Club is trying to identify
all interested faculty, staff
and students. Clinics and
tournaments are being
planned with competition
between schools being
scheduled. All interested
persons, please contact
Nancy Mize, 757-6387, 204
Memorial Gym.
The Graduate Record
Examination will be offer-
ed at East Carolina
University on Saturday,
January 12, 1980. Appli-
cation blanks are to be
completed and mailed to
Educational Testing Ser-
vice, Box 966-R, JPrine.
ton, NJ 08540r � Regfsrrr-
tion deadline is November
28, 1979. Applications may
be obtained from the ECU
Testing Center, Speight
Building, Room 105.
The James B. Mallory
Men's Residence Council
scholarship will be award-
ed this semester to a
young man who is a
member of the Men's
Residence Council. The
scholarship will be based
on need and residence hall
contributions. Applicants
must have at least a 2.5
grade point average. Ap-
-pffC&ffons-Tnay te picked
up in each dorm coun-
selor's office.
Got a story,
idea, lead,
or tip ?
Let us
KNOW!
Call 757-6366
FRIDAY
1890
Seafood
Friday's Seafood
2311S. Evans St.
LUNCH ONLY
Lunch 11:30-2:30
SunThurs. 430-9:00
Fri. and Sat. 4:30-10:00
MOP Ladle's Day-Free trip
to salad bar with
each full meal
ZlLSSi Ladle's Day
Free cap of clam
chowder with each
full meal
$2.2$
Soup n'Salad
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Flounder $3.$o
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The East Carolinian
Editorials
& Opinions
Tuesday, October 30, 1979 Page 4
Greenville, N.C,
To crucify a movie
Monty Python's latest movie, Life of
Brian, is causing more controversy than
it deserves, but no more than director
Terry Jones expected.
South Carolina Senator Strom
Thurmond recently succeeded in closing
the movie in Columbia after the heated
protests of a minority of residents
(constituents). If he had waited just two
days, he would have seen an even
larger demonstration in favor of
showing the movie.
People who have not seen the movie
believe it is a spoof of the life of Christ.
One of those people spearheaded the
move to prevent Life of Brian from
showing in the capital city. But if this
gentleman had bothered to see the
movie, he would have realized that it is
not a spoof of Christ.
"Life of Brian is about people; it
just happens to be in Judea Jones
explained in a recent interview with
Rolling Stone. "We're laughing at man,
not God. Nothing so divides men as
belief in the same God
If movies were to be closed down as'
a result of popularity contests, there are
many movies worse than Life of Brian.
Thurmond acted on the spur of the
moment, and he will probably regret it.
The movie is reopening in Columbia
and opened in Charleston with large
crowds lining up for tickets.
Unfortunately, Thurmond is not the
only public figure to have heeded
protests from religious groups in the
Bible Belt and elsewhere, nor will he be
the last. But these people should at
least see the movie before making a
judgement for the rest of the
community if, in fact, they really have
the right to do so.
As for Life of Brian, it is right on
target. The people living in Judea
during the life of Christ were a joke.
After all, many of his so-called
followers turned on Christ and crucified
him. And now a handful of people want
to do the same to Life of Brian. Being
misunderstood just ain't popular.
We get no respect
East Carolina University never gets
any respect.
They cut us down and call us a
"stepsister" to the larger, firmly
established school at Chapel Hill.
They keep most of the money there.
They even get national rankings in
football. Sportswriters across the state
follow blindly, and they pick UNC to
beat the hapless ECU Pirates by two
touchdowns or more.
Not any more.
The Pirates went to Chapel Hill last
Saturday and ignored the critics. They
ignored the writers, the Carolina fans,
and the fact that it was Carolina's
homecoming. They went to Chapel Hill
for one reason and for one reason only.
And from the opening kickoff, the
Tar Heels found out why the Pirates
were there.
Soon it was apparent to the Carolina
student section that those boys from
down east play football. Cries of
disbelief filled the afternoon air at
Kenan Stadium as the Pirate eleven
blocked and grunted their way through
the Carolina secondary.
Eighteen seconds to go, and
Carolina had the ball. They decided to
try the impossible. A 47 yard field goal
went up and through the uprights to tie
the score at 24-24.
We didn't win the game, but we
didn't lose either. We feel it should be
remembered that Carolina had to come
from behind to tie the game, and that
they did not walk away with an easy
two-touchdown win, as some who
profess to know the game feel that they
should have.
This game changed a lot of opinions
about our university. We are catching
up to Carolina in many ways, and we
suspect that UNC isn't too happy about
it.
All facets of the university
community are looking up, and we are
becoming aware of a new identity here
at ECU. We can only hope that young
people considering higher education in
North Carolina are thinking of this as
they are making their plans.
To this end, UNC lost more than a
football game.
It was more like the beginning of a
new era of respect. It's high time we
shed the EZU image and start
respecting each other and our school.
And it's time that state legisoators and
others realize that ECU is a major
educational and athletic institution.
Does he or doesn't he.
uf P6i
Uppity Women
Burden of shame imposed
By LARRY POPELKA
Long hair is a drag.
Ten years ago a full
flowing head of hair
served a useful purpose.
At just a glance it told
everyone what your opin-
ion was of sex, drugs,
wars and politics.
But today long hair is
useless. It no longer has
meaning. Every 50-year-
old disco duck has a full
head of blow-dried locks to
toss around.
And judging from the
advertising, you'd think
hair care was as important
as hemorrhoid relief.
We've got Farrah
Fa wcett-Majors shampoo,
herbal-smelling cream
rinses and conditioners,
the Dry Look, the Dry
Look look and all sorts of
super power jet stream
blow driers.
If the hippies had had
all this stuff in the '60s,
nobody would have written
a play called "Hair It
would have been called
"Gee, Your Hair Smells
Terrific" instead.
And what about hair-
cutting?
No longer can you go
to a barber shop, plunk
down a couple bucks and
get your hair trimmed.
Today you've got to get
it "styled You've got to
go to a "hair stylist" and
pay $20 for what amounts
to nothing more than a $2
haircut in disguise.
But that's not all. Now
we've also got hair
transplants, hair growth
stimulators and all sorts of
other gimmicks to ensure
that nobody's ever short
on hair.
What are we going to
be forced to put up with
next? Farrah Kawcett
shampoo for dogs?
Well, a few weeks ago
I discovered something
that just may end our
hairy woes.
Head shaving.
Actually, I discovered a
magazine devoted to head
shaving. It's called Razor's
Edge, "the voice of
recreational haircut ting
Every issue of this
bimonthly magazine is
chocked full of heads
being shaved, bald beau-
ties and "hairmail" (let-
ters from readers).
The magazine, which
was started two years ago
by a group of hair fanatics
in New York City and is
published by Talisman
Press (P.O. Box 685,
Palisades, N.Y. 10964),
has a circulation of 1,400.
But according to Bob Fitz-
gerald, the photo editor
and magazine spokesman,
the number of subscrip-
tions is doubling every
year as more and more
long hairs discover the
beauty of baldness.
"In English insane
asylums they used to
shave everybody's head
Fitzgerald says. "It was
punishment. Social out-
cast.
"It's been capitalized
on by Hollywood, too. In
the 1950s there was a
movie called 'Five Brand-
ed Women and they all
had their hair cut very,
very short.
"There is some atti-
tude that a woman who
shaves her head is the
type who would do any-
thing. The problem is that
we associate beauty with
hair
I was fascinated.
(Q1979 by Larry Popelka
By G.C. CARTER
Who can tell how many
millions of lines of poetry
have been written in
celebration and lamenta-
tion of "la difference
with regard to men and
women? This timeless,
and evidently tireless sub-
ject has undoubtedly oc-
cupied the minds of almost
every human inhabitant �f
this planet, at some point.
This assumption is based,
in part, on the obvious
evidence that some type of
close collaboration be-
tween these two polar
entities (that is, female
and male) has indeed
taken place on a large
scale for an undetermined
number of centuries; and
also, there is reason to
assume that the customs,
taboos and ntuals regard-
ing the two sexes have, in
almost all cultures,
strongly emphasized both
inherent and contrived
differences, presumably in
an effort to enhance the
attraction and fulfill the
age-old paradox of oppe-
sites.
In any case, popular
opinion, with regard to the
distinctions between con-
trived and inherent sex-
related characteristics, has
no rival in diversity, with
the possible exception of
proposed solutions to the
most ancient riddle ever to
have stumped humanity:
Which came first � the
chicken or the egg?
Now, if we knew the
answer to that one, it
would solve all kinds of
other questions, which are
really only chicken-and-
egg riddles in disguise.
For example: Which e-
volved first � the female
or the male? Some people
(I won't mention any
names) believe that they
have cornered the market
as far as reliable informa-
tion concernation this
question.
While the answer
seems so obvious � that
females and males must
have evolved simultan-
eously � many cultures
have seen fit to establish a
sexual hierarchy, and the
patriarchy is in the lead at
this point, by at least
two-and-a-half millenia.
As is invariably the
case when an artificially
it the unique perspectives
and wisdom of half the
human race, has been
"revised reviled and,
most successfully of all,
omitted from the "valid"
historical texts and myth-
ologies of "civilized" cul-
tures.
These past records
would be "dangerous" to
the status quo of male
superiority, for they would
recall a time when women
were free from the cul-
turally-imposed burden of
inherent shame, which
"While criticized for lacking the
capacity for intellect, reason,
and general creativity, women
have traditionally been sorely
censored for trying to 'usurp9
the privileges of men
contrived stereotype is
forced upon a natural
situation, something has
got to give, in order to
"make it fit In the case
of male-dominant ex-role
stereotypes, sad to say, it
appears that there wasn't
enough room for the whole
of women's characters,
perceptions, and possibili-
ties, after the men had
been assigned their
"rightful shares So the
women were "forced to
fit by denying the true
extent of their human
potential.
In every political sys-
tem based on tyranny,
there has been the "ne-
cessity" of "re-organiz-
ing" the culture and "re-
educating" and, if neces-
sary, restricting those who
are to be controlled.
Women's history, and with
in
served to keep them
their place
There would be epics
of female community and
religious leaders, who
inspired and guided their
people with love and
peaceful vision. Mothers
would draw strength from
the honor and deference
rightly granted to them, as
advocates and valiant de-
fenders of the birth of new
life, in the face of death �
rather than the legacy of
self-abasement and degra-
dation which came with
the knowledge that they,
as women, were con-
sidered to be privately-
owned breeding animals,
who were valued according
to how many male off-
spring they could whelp.
The crumbs tradition-
ally offered to women have
been fatally tainted with
chaotic contradiction. The
cursed origin of lust, held
responsible for the down-
fall of the entire race,
woman has been allowed
to seek her redemption by
modelling herself after a
virgin mother.
The sex of supposedly
"inferior" character has
been given responsibility
for the upbringing of the
next generation, and is
held responsible tor xWvt
moral development. While
criticized for lacking the
capacity for intellect, rea-
son and general creativity,
women have traditionally
been sorely censored for
trying to "usurp" the
prerogatives and privileges
of men, whenever the
women have attempted to
present their own view
points and artistic and
social interpretations.
The notion of the
equality of the sexes is.
today, an unofficial
"heresy There is no
formal patriarchy � there
is instead the insidious
blind tradition, and the
inertia which is charac
teristic of those who have
been conditioned not to
think � only to accept.
The penalty for this
"heresy" is, of course, the
charge of treason �
against the "natural or-
der against God, against
prevailing custom. Con-
demnation is heaped on
swiftlv and the traitors are
exiled to the ranks of the
"radicals" and advocates
of uni-sex, where they are
effectively imprisoned be-
hind a "label" that the
short-sighted society will
never attempt to see past,
because that attempt, in
itself, would be trea-
sonous.
The East Carolinian
MANAGING EDITOR
Richard Green
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Anita Lancaster
NEWS EDITOR
ASST. NEWS EDITOR
FEATURES EDITOR
ASST. FEATURES EDITOR
EDITOR
Marc Barnes
DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
Robert M. Swaim
ASST. DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
Terry Herndon
ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR
Leigh Coakley
BUSINESS MANAGER
Steve O'Geary
Karen Wendt
Terry Gray
Bill Jones
John Ross
SPORTS EDITOR
ASST. SPORTS EDITOR
COPY EDITOR
AD TECH. SUPER.
Charles Chandler
Jimmy Dupree
Diane Henderson
Paul Lincke
THE EAST CAROLINIAN It the student
off East Carolina University
by the Media Board of ECU
and Is distributed each Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic year
weekly during the summer.
Office are located on the second floor of
Yh Publications Center Old South
Building. Our mailing address Is: Old
South Building, ECU, Greenville, NC
27834.
The phone numbers ere: 757-6366, 6367,
6306. Subscriptions are $10
alumni $6 annually.

v





111
r
n
Greek News
Winter rush keg party
By RICKI GLIARMIS
Greek Correspondent
The Chi Omegas have
been busy planning their
Winter Rush which was
kicked off on Monday,
Oct. 29. Last night, a keg
party was held at Cherry
Court Partyroom.
On Thursday, Nov. 1, a
cookout will be held in the
backyard on the Chi 0
house for the winter
rushees.
The Chi Omegas will
be trick-or-treating on
Halloween night for
UNICEF.
The Sigmas are holding
a birthday dinner for their
housemother, Mrs. M.
Robbins. Alumni from the
area and sisters will be
attending the dinner. After
the dinner, alumnis will
hold a meeting.
The Sigmas are plan-
ning their Annual Sigma
Pie Throw for Nov. 20.
The Pie Throw will be held
at the Chapter X and
tickets will be sold in
advance. Proceeds from
this activity will go toward
the Sigmas' philanthropy,
the Robbie Page Memorial
Fund.
Please don't overlook
the deadline for stories!
Turn your articles in by 9
a.m. Mondays at Dean
Fulghum's office, second
floor, Whichard.
classified
far

FOR SALE: 1980 Spirit
Deluxe 2 door liftback,
economy speical, 4 speed,
4 cylinder, brown metallic
with brown rally stripes,
radials, t-glass. List $5496,
Sale $5185. 752-9520.
FOR SALE: 1978 MGB
conv. 4 speed. 4 cylinder.
Locally owned, dark green,
tan interior, sharp. $5500.
752-9520.
FOR SALE: 1972 Vega
Cot. Station Wagon. Must
sell. For more information
call 752-5422.
FOR SALE: Hohner 12
string acoustic guitar.
Excellent condition, four
months old. $150. Call
George at 758-6708.
pcnonai(�)
�P1
NEED X-TRA CASH: Fair
prices paid for gold and
silver and silver coins.
Mixed Media. 120 E. 5th
St. 758-2127.
RIDE NEEDED: To and
from Plymouth. Anytime.
Will help with expenses.
Call 752-8043.
LET ME TYPE FOR
YOUI have over 12
years of typing experience
to put to use. I'll type your
term papers, tests, theses,
etc neatly, accurately and
with quick turnaround
Work will be done
new Seiko Silver-
typewriter which
in both pica and
Contact Becky
time,
on a
Reed
types
elite.
Overstreet, 746-3798.
HELP WANTED: Wait-
resses, bartenders, bar
backs. Apply in person.
Must be 21. Good pay plus
tips. Call 756-8060.
DANCE: Sunshine Studios
will be offering the
following classes at a
discount rate to ECU
students: Ballet, Jazz,
Yoga, Arabic (Belly
Dance) and Partner Disco
Dance. Classes are within
walking distance of cam-
pus beginning Nov. 4 and
7. Call Sunshine at
756-7235 or 758-0736.
PARKING: Leased parking
directly across from ECU
on corner of 5th and E.
Holly Sts. $30 per semes-
ter. 30 spaces available.
Call Bull Ritter Realtors,
756-5458 and leave name
and number if interested.
m
mm
STUDENT UNION
151 iimum jwvwvry
BLACK
ARTS
FESTIVAL
Nov. I -9
m
mm
STUDENT UNION
ust cmoum mmmmn
� Thurs. Nov. 1 -
� Sun. Nov. 4 -
� Mon. Nov. 5 -
if
Art Exhibition Mendenhall Gallery
"Bound by the promises"
5pm Gospel Concert with New Birth
Chorale Ensemble, Fountain of Life
Choir, and ECU Gospel Ensemble
Hendrix Theatre
3pm Seminar on
"Who Killed Martin Luther King,Jr
Afro-American Cultural Center
8pm Film:
"Who Killed Martin Luther King,Jr
Hendrix Theatre
6pm Soul Food Dinner
Afro-American Cultural Center
Tickets $3.50 (in Advance)
for all you can eat!
tickets available in Program Director's
Office -Mendenhall
8pm Film: "Black Roots and two
Centuries of Black American Art"
Afro-American Cultural Center
� Thurs. Nov. 8 - 8pm Theatre Arts presents
JUBILEE! Hendrix Theatre
Unless otherwise stated all Activities sponsored by theMinority Arts
Writers
Needed
LtathorMts
MtoSit
Leather Handbags
$10 to $29
Shoot Repaired To Loo
Uko Now
Riggon Shoe Repair
& Leather Shop
111 WEST 4TH ST.
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
7564204
Parking in front
and Rear.
SANCHEZ
continued from page 1
The Universidad Na-
tional and East Carolina
are very different in the
way that personal rela-
tionships are developed,
according to Ana. Classes
at the Costa Rican Univery
sity are arranged so that
the same students attend
the same classes together
and warm friendships
develop between the
students and between the
students and professors.
Ana said that she does not
get to know the students
in her classes here at ECU
"so much" because they
scatter immediately after
the bell, so friends are
made in the dorm and
other places where more
leisurely contact may be
made.
The area around Asseri
is mountainous, much like
30 October 1979 THE EAST CAROUNIA'N Page 5
able�he or she will attend
the university with all
expenses paid by the
government if they cannot
pay for themselves.
Costa Rica is a very
poor country, with a per
capita income being about
$2,000 per year according
to Dr. Cramer. The
principal religion is Cath-
olicism and the families as
a general rule are very
large. Ana comes from a
family of six sisters and
four brothers.
Dr. Cramer, an ECU
professor of geography,
will take 15 ECU
to Costa Rica for the
spring semester. They
take classes at the Heredia
Universidad and field trips
are planned for weekends
so that the students get
first hand knowledge a-
bout the country. Ar-
rangements are made for
the East Carolina students
to live in the homes of
selected Costa Rican fam-
ilies.
the western North Carolina
area, Dr. Robert Cramer,
director of the Costa Rican
program, explained, and
the chief crop is coffee
which Ana has helped to
harvest. The flatness of
eastern North Carolina is
strange to Ana and she
remarks about the novelty
of seeing the moon come
over the horizon very early
instead of seeing it only
overhead in the high
elevation (4,500 feet) of
her home town.
When Ana returns to
Costa Rica, she will finish
her Bachelor of English
degree in education and
be prepared to teach
English on the high school
level. The educational
system in Costa Rica is
similar to that in the U.S
but Costa Ricans spend
only 11 years in the
elementary and secondary
schools. After that they
are prepared for university
work and if the student is
worthy�meaningcap-
PEKING
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20 discount
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Mon. - Sat. 10-5:30
Wed. 10-1
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TlL cSexvea urltn Egg Jxop. Soup. �r crjot Jia
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THE E.C.U. FRATERNITIES
AND SORORITIES
PRESENT THE3rd OF 4
GREAT GREEK CONCERTS
WED. NOV. 7th 8:45-1:00
AT THE ATTIC
WITH
� Tues. Nov. 6 -
� Wed - Nov. 7 -
WEAR YOUR GREEK
JERSEY'S AND RECIEVE
A REDUCTION ON
ADMISSION
v
n





Tlit1 Kasl Carolinian
Features
Tuesday October 30, 1979 Page 6
Greenville, N. C
Beaux-Arts Ball attracts
the creative and bizarre �
� i
Jo Anne Seller an arl
he award for
the most bizai re i ostume
: backless nun's
B DIANE HENDERSON
Copy Editoi
The traditional ghouls
and goblins of Halloween
ma, have fell somewhat habit I
out" of place at the
Beaux-Arts Ball last Fri-
day night. Costumes
this festive, early cele-
bration of Ml Hallow E'en
leaned more toward the
creative and bizarn
n.i'
ryptian
guise
or m
- the
en Qna'
iv d
aw ar
One of the highlights
of the evening, organized
for the art. drama and
music department was
the judging o
:
ult) members attended the
Ball, only a few entered
the best costume contest.
Ra Elmore oi the Art
Department made an out-
standing wizard, and
Betsy Ross, also an art
teacher, won best faculty
Lime for her creative
wood nymph. Among
who did not enter
judging were Edward
Reel who was almost
ii n re ognizable in the
� m) an Arab Sheik,
and Dr. Laing, dean oi the
b
!
IIOIIj
of rt
f the best
tudent and faculty, i
tumes. Member- ol the
facultv made their de i
sions on the mosl
standing -tudent
tumes, and these winners
in turn judged the most
I

Most everyone -pent
the i arh part of the
evening staring at every-
- - tumes. I here
� re magicians, punk
- ers, I hree people
dressed as a box o
Crayola crayons, cats �
from the leopard to the
more dome-tie variety, a
Cossack and even someone
who came -imply as a
large cardboard box.
The ECU Jazz Ensem-
ble provided dancing mu-
si( . and by the latter part
of the evening the liquid
refreshment had gotten
almost the entire crowd in
the mood to dance. Earlier
entertainment included
dance performances by the .
Drama Department dance
group, who put on a good
-how. They performed a
sailor dance, a Scottish
dance, a ma-k dame and
ballet.
There mav not have
been one ghost at I
Beaux-Arts Ball, but it
was a lot oi fun anvw a �
,�
Masqu
Even . � ECl
thins a - thi �
Photos bv John Grogan
� �
� � t f
Music history recreated
J
in Jubilee's varied program
Vttructions
Two year old loses legs todisea
yd)
st
INK
Si
pro-
traditi
otic
per-
rs till tl
nbination "t musi
and aciintz.
I utmee
I and
Bc-s ' 'ngs as
"Summert (�o1
Plenty Bess
. o ii i- My V on:
"It Ain't Necessai
and "A w - a
Si met ime are
lassies irom this native
merican foil
In additi ' Porgy
and Bes other Broad-
Jubilee a celebration in song, featuring music Jrom
'Porgy and Bess 'showboat 'The Wiz and traditional
numbers will be presented on November 8, at 8:00 p.m.
in Hendrix Theater.
way hits such as "01 Man
River" from "Showboat"
and "If You Believe" from
"The Wiz" are featured.
The traditional songs
include spirituals such as
"Nobody Knows the Trou-
ble I've Seen "Go Down
Moses" and "Swing Low
Sweet Chariot "Yankee
Doodle "Lift every Voice
and Sing" and "The
Battle Hymn oi the
Republic" are among the
patriotic songs pertormed.
The show is presented
by a cast of young
professionals who are both
singers and actors. They
travel with a pianist, with
special sound and light,
and with costumes and
staging. They offer the
sort of program made
famous by the Fisk Jubilee
Singers who raised they
money to establish Fish
University.
Visual excitement and
professional sound are the
trademarks of the 1979
version of the Jubilee
Singers just as they were
for the 1871 Jubilee
Singers
Tickets are priced at $1
for ECU students, $3 for
ECU faculty and staff, and
$4 for the public. Groups
of 20 or more may
purchase tickets for $3. All
tickets at the door are $4.
For further information,
contact the Central Ticket
Office in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center, 757-6611,
ext. 266.
� t �
Claude Frank will ; m �
to
nighi rhi :
atei e w ill �
� �
and �
WlJ
.it the
ROX ;

The Roxy Music, rts and;
Crafts
their 5th Halloween i
Masq i ed-
lay, 0 at Twin
Rinks on ! 1th St Four
bands �- 11 pro ide enter-
tain m
60SP1
There will be i Gospel
I itut ing the New
Birth Chorale Ensemble,
'1 he intain Life
Choir. td The hCl
pel Ensemble on Sun-
day, No . at 5:00 p.m.
in Hendrix Theater.
�������������'
i ������
By PATRICIA ROBERTO
ssot uitcd Press Writer
0 UCLAND, Calif. (AP)
Little Eddie Smith
clutched his doll with
- mpathetic understanding
as the two left Children's
Hospital, where Eddie's
legs were amputated alter
complications from chicken
pox.
child psychologist
who had prepared the
2-year-old patient for the
surgerj had removed the
doll's legs and replaced
them with bandaging sim-
ilar to Eddie's.
The boy suffered a rare
blood-clotting complication
of the common childhood
disease and underwent
surgerv four times to treat
the problem before gan-
grene forced the amputa-
tion.
"It's been a long
ordeal, but we got him
back. They said he wasn't
-upposed to live Eddie's
mother, Linda, said Sun-
day as they left for home
in Manteca.
"I believe he under-
stands that he doesn't
have any legs. And 1 also
think he accepts it. e
knew if we accepted it. he
would said Mrs. Smith.
23.
Dr. Byron Aoki, direc-
tor of the pediatrie inten-
sive care unit at Children's
Hospital, said the compli-
cation is somewhat ol a
mystery.
'No one knows why it
happens. It is known to
accompany chicken pox on
rare occasions and is
nearly always tatal he
-aid.
Eddie's illness began
last June while he appear-
ed to be getting over a
simple ease oi chicken
pox. Mrs. Smith noticed
him rubbing a large purple
-pot on his leg, but
thought it was an insect
bite.
She said when the spot
grew bigger, she took
him to a local hospital.
Then more spots, and
bruises, appeared and
spread to Eddie's thighs
am bui
hos,
pupura
order
- stem trig
lati
low er (
Eddie's .
placed ;
bleeding
OUt 01 -I:
ant
wa- admin:
at tern .
clotting
said.
The
ments w
drug fai
clotting and
pea
on his thigh- I
and he had no .
feet. Eddie
lose, the officials
ascular surg -
performed in an unsu
cessful attempt die
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30 October 1979 THE EAST cam imiak,
Weekly Album Review: New releases
By PAT MINGES
Features Writer
�The Cars � Candv-0 ;�� �u-
Byu bure this is old, but th��
pickings were not so great this week tk- iu
certified anlH �n tk- week. lhls album is
ertiiied gold and the group ,s supposedly one of the
forerunners of the New Wave
Exposure of The Cars' musie has e�n reached
mainstream America, but excuse me if I fall asleep
Allhough the keyboards are excellent and he 'guitars
are some ,mes entertaining, the group lacks variation
and this tend, to dt.h excitement. The Cars stick wUh
.he same droll beat that propelled them �
superstardom. v
There is at least one good side of music on Candy-0
e second one), and the album has not been
�appointing to Cars' fans. Yet, why can't this group
me on over instead of straddling the fence between
New V ave and punk?
�The Atlanta Rhythm Section - Are You Ready -
Atlanta Rhythm Sectionis not a typical Southern rock
band, not a purveyor of Clone rock
Clone rock "catches all those groups who are
followers, instead of leaders, which have a synthetic
heaviness and mask whatever talent they have with
volume ind special effects (The Vinyl Edition "A
Great Flyswatter")
Like the Dixie Dregs, the Atlanta Rhythm Section
departs from Allman riffs, and presents an innovative
progressive Southern rock appeal.
ARS is an exciting group to catch live, and Are You
Heady was recorded on the band's last tour The
compilation features all of the group's best rockers,
recorded live with some studio tracks. The recordings
were produced by Buddy Buie and all post-production
was done at Studio One in Doraville.
Mellow tunes like "Get Your Head Out Of Your
Heart' and "Jesus Hearted People" and "Dog Days"
This is a good album.
Bob James and Earl Klugh � One on One � It would
be pleasing to take one of the matches from the cover an
hum this album.
My apologies to Earl Klugh, a talented guitarist, but
what is he doing recording with Bob James?
This is not jazz; this is Muzak.
It's not bad; it is disgusting.
Bob James should stick to television soundtracks and
top perverting good people like Earl Klugh, Ron Carter
and, for God sakes, Kenny Loggins.
�The Records � The Records � Seeing these guys on
'Midnight Special I found them a bit too good looking
to be New Wave. Their music, though pleasant, is just
more neo-pop dreck that attempts to pass for New
v ave.
What makes these guys even more presumptuous is
that they come from England, the source of the new
British invasion.
The Records are the Freddie and the Dreamers of
the New Wave. They're just too well fed to do anything
but pop music.
�Barbra Streisand � Wet � This is the hot one.
Honestly folks, I have always been a Streisand fan,
but this album really knocks me out. Wet gets a
nomination for album of the year, for it is strong
musically, and the production is really superb.
Barbra's voice is dynamic and has lost none of
beauty with age.
The styles range from rock to jazz, from disco to
lovely ballad and are performed by such outstanding
musicians as Donna Summer, Larry Carlton, Paulinho da
Costa, Fred Tacket, Billy Payne, Richard Tee, Tom
Scott, Ian Underwood, Jeff Porcaro, Skunk Baxter, and
David Hungate. The arrangements are really good arid
utilize well the variety of instrumentation. To repeat for
emphasis, the production is as fine as any album this
year.
I lost all control and was even disco dancin' to
"Enough is Enough" and was really wooed by "Come
Rain or Come Shine" because of Michael Frank's
similarity.
Don't pass this one up, or you'll regret it.
�Gruppo Sportivo � Mistakes and More Mistakes �
Were it not for the sheer strength of the Streisand
album, this first release in the states for the Dutch
group Gruppo Sportivo would get the nod for the pick
hit. This band has a fresh, new sound that is vital
creative and tends to avoid definition.
Although the album has a neo-pop orientation its
influences are derived from various sources the
strongest being the New Wave.
The music is very beautiful, tasteful, and among the
strongest that has been produced by a new group in a
long while. Each of the artists possesses a great deal of
talent, both instrumentally and vocally. Mistakes is of
considerable worth for another reason as well. It
See ALBUM REVIEW, Page 8
November Specials
Mon. Slices off Beef , Toast &
Potato 92.49
Tues. Soup & Salad 91.49
Wed. Srloin Tips, Toast &
Potato 92.49
Thur. Old Fashion 91.49
Cheeseburger & Soup
Fri. Filet off Chicken Sandwich
& Potato 91.39
Sat. Chowder & Salad 91.79
Slin. �oz. Sirloin , Toast &
Potato 92.49
3005 E. 10th St. Greenville 758-8550
A-
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Mall
Come Wednesday for
Halloween Specials and
Surprises
Giving Away
$50.00 Gift Certificates
756-8242
SUPER MARKETS
7
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PRICES GOOD THURS FRI SAT.
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15 count-
save 40





Page 8 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 30 October 1979
Gray Gallery to host exhibition
GREENVILLE - A
new multi-media art exhi-
bition will open at East
Carolina's W.B. Gray
Gallery in November.
Works organized by the
Southeast Center for Con-
temporary Art (SECCA) in
Winston-Salem will repre-
sent 28 southeastern art-
ists.
The exhibition will run
from Nov. 8 through Dec.
5 with a reception open to
the public 8-10 p.m
Thursday, Nov. 8.
The title "Art Patron
Art" refers to the dis-
tinguished collectors,
members of SECCA's
Advisory Council, each of
whom recommended three
artists from their home
base state, in consultation
with state museum di-
rectors and curators.
A 76-page color cata-
logue accompanies the
exhibition and will be on
sale for $4.
Works in the exhibition
offer a cross section of the
best contemporary art in
the southeast in a wide
range of media. Among
the trends represented are
minimal sculpture and new
realist painting as well as
works in photography,
fiber, ceramics and metal.
The SECCA Regional
Advisory Council's found-
ing members were: Mr. &
Mrs. George Clark, Nash-
ville, Tenn Mr. & Mrs.
Edward Elson, Atlanta,
Ga Mr. & Mrs. Gordon
Hanes and Mr. & Mrs. R.
Philip Hanes Jr Win-
ston-Salem, N.C. Other
founders include: Mr. &
Mrs. Joseph Hirshhorn,
Naples, Fla Mr. & Mrs.
Henry Hope, Ft. Lauder-
dale, Fla Dr. & Mrs.
Melvin Horowitz, Spartan-
burg, S.C Mr. & Mrs.
Sydney Lewis, Richmond,
Va Mrs. P.R. Norman,
New Orleans, La Mrs.
Samuel Rautbord, Palm
Beach, Fla Dr. & Mrs.
Donald Saunders, Colum-
bia, S.C. and Mr. & Mrs.
Ray.mond Zimmerman,
Nashville, Tenn.
The Gray Gallery is
in the Leo W.
Fine Arts Center
Street in Green-
located
Jenkins
on 5th
ville.
Tennessee Williams'
"Summer and Smoke" �
A prim spinster and a
reckless doctor in a
dramatic duel between
spirit and fleshBy all
odds, Tennessee Williams'
best play"
-N.Y. Mirror
I
"Summer and Smoke" is
about a woman struggling
to overcome a desperate
predicament. Alma Wine-
miller (played by Jeanne
Cullen) is as painfully
lonely as the pathetic
Laura who collects glass
animals in "Menagerie
festival
"Summer and Smoke"
is a story of tragedy in a
small Southern town. Fes-
tival Stage Company (a
non-profit, professional
theatre operated by The
N.C. Shakespeare Festival
in affiliation with the N.C.
School of the Arts) will
bring to the High Point
Theatre the tender and
haunting drama from the
pen of America's foremost
dramatist.
Tennessee Williams'
"Summer and Smoke"
plays November 1-4 and
November 6-10 at 8:15
Like "The Glass Men-
agerie" and Pulitzer
Prize-winning "A Street-
car Named Desire
The theme of the
drama is Alma's hopeless
love for the man next
door, John Buchanan
(played by Terrence
Mann). From a social
point of view, she would
become the victim of sociai
circumstances which have
imprisoned her.
This Broadway success
will be directed by Peter
Bennett, an award-winning
director who also directed
the premiere N.C. Shakes-
peare Festival production,
"The Taming of the
Shrew" in 1977.
Oliver Goldsmith's
"She Stoops to Conquer"
will be presented by
Festival Stage Company
November 30 and Decem-
ber 1-8 at the High Point
Theatre. A new production
of Dickens' immortal clas
sic, "A Christmas Carol"
will be presented Decem-
ber 18-22, also at the High
Point Theatre.
ALBVM REVIEW
continued from page 7
contains an album and a half of music.
If all this appeals to you, check it out; you will not be
displeased.
�Melissa Manchester � Melissa Manchester � This
lady has been trying to make it big on the pop scene for
some time, but aside from a few singles, she has not
been able to achieve commercial status. This new
album, although it is nice, will not bring her the acclaim
she desires.
Too many of the songs on this release walk the line
between pop and disco to appeal to very many people.
Manchester should decide whether she wants to sing
pop or disco and stop trying to please everybody; it is
too hard a task.
If she ever wants to get out of the clubs and make it
big time, Manchester has got to find a more powerful
vehicle for her strong voice than this album.
�The Jukes � The Jukes � These guys are Springsteen
cronies from the Stone Pony on the boardwalk at Asbury
Park. New Jersey. ("Sandy, the waitress I was seeing
lost her desire for me).
Their first album was an instant classic, being a
mixture of rhythm and blues and boardwalk boogie.
This, the follow up, though very good, does not match
up to the quality of the first endeavor.
The group seems to have lost some of its fire,
perhaps because of the departure of Miami Steven Van
Zandt. Another contributing factor may have been that
Southside Johnny (the leader) had his arm severed, then
surgically replaced, during the production of this album.
Springsteen did not give the guys any help this time,
so the album lacks that certain joie de vivre, but Barry
Beckett helped to negate this deficit.
If you like horns andor goodtime music, you might
like to check out The Jukes. At least, they are not as
bad as the Xallikaks.
Albums Courtesy of The Record Bar, Pitt Plaza and
Carolina East Mall.
East Carolina Playhouse
Presents
For Colored Girls
Who Have Considered
Suicide
When The
Rainbow
Is
Enuf
by ntozake shange
A passionately spellbinding choreopoem
which captures the inner feelings of
today's Black woman.
Directed oy
Edgar R. Loessin
October 31 through November 3
November 5 thrqugh 7
8:15p.m.
Studio Theatre
Tickets are $2.50
ECU Students $1.50
For reservations and information
call 757-6390
between 10 and 4
Monday through Friday
1
ABRAMS
Bar - B - Q
FREE BEVERAGE WITH
COLLEGE I.D.
Daily Specials from
$2.25 $2.50
Located Just Across
the Bridge on
N. Greene St.
Student Union Artist Series
presents
8pm
Tues,Oct.30
Hendrix Theatre
Taste the pride of Canada
Molson.
Student$2.00
Public $5.00
tickets at the
door $5.00
?
STUDENT UNION
EAST CAROUNA UNIVERSITY
t
L 'MPORTED
h���,�si tefeji
r &"T �� � � -�. Bt'V - � -� j� �

&& "j1
JJ
kfctSv-tS- " itf�ifcAi! � �ii'Li
Bk-r- ���"

Ut
raw- ����" w'
Nfc mm ���
. � rnz
�gisgm.
m&
�NV
,0
r�
You'll get a taste of
nearly 200 years of brewing heritage every time you open
a cool, green bottle of MOLSON GOLDEN ��
fTf? & brewcry � its back
m 1786. John Molson, our founder, wouldn't recoRnia
our modem breweries, but he'd be proud of the
good, smooth taste of GOLDEN.m
A taste that says Canada in every refreshing sip.
�� j �j l-muj i. r1 fl . ff .flfniLi






The East Carolinian
lian 1 �
sports
Tuesday, October 30, 1979 Page 9
Greenville, N.C.
FG leaves Heels, Pirates tied 24-24
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
CHAPEL HILL - A 47-yard field goal by North
Carolina kicker Jeff hayes with 13 seconds remaining in
the game gave the Tar Heels a 24-24 tie with
upset-minded East Carolina Saturday.
The 15th-ranked Tar Heels had to drive frantically
downfield from their own 30-yard line in the last 1:11 of
game to salvage the tie. Each play on the drive
leatured a pass by Tar Heel quarterback Matt Kupec.
Completions from Kupec to fullback Doug Paschall, tight
end Mike Chatham and split end P.J. Gay of 11, 18 and
yards, respectively, moved the ball into Hayes'
range.
I he Hayes field goal came on a fourth and ten
tuition at the ECU 31-yard line. The fact that North
Carolina coach Dick Crum opted for the tie instead of
gambling tor a possible win came as a surprise to
Paschall, who gained 151 yards on the ground.
It -hocked me to see him (Hayes) come on the
said the fullback from Greenville. "I just
irally thought we'd go for it
Crum said after the game that there was no doubt in
ind at the time that he would kick for the tie. "We
lecided before the last drive even began that we'd
the field goal if we got into a fourth-and-long
situation Crum said. "That kick has got to do a lot for
Jeffs confidence
rhe last-minute comeback by the Heels was not the
eback in this game that had most all of the
1 Kenan Stadium fans on the edge of their seats
much of the contest.
t halftime the Heels owned a 21-10 lead thanks to a
-yard drie that began with only 42 seconds remaining
in the initial half. The drive was culminated by an
18-yard touchdown toss from Kupec to split end Jeff
Gre.
That touchdown pass was the third of the game for
Kupec. giving him 13 for the season, a new school
record. He now has 28 for his career, only six away from
Atlantic Coast Conference record held by South
- Tommy Suggs.
Pirates wasted little time in the third period
fore chopping away at the Tar Heel lead. Cornerback
W illie Holley's driving interception of a Kupec to Wayne
Tucker pass set up the Pirates' first second-half score.
Alter Holley's steal, quarterback Leander Green directed
a beautiful 89-yard ECU drive that was capped by a
21-yard scoring jaunt by halfback Anthony Collins. Bill
Lamm's extra point narrowed the Heels' lead to 21-17
with 7:26 remaining in the third quarter.
It was at almost exactly the same point of the fourth
period that the Pirates scored their go-ahead touchdown.
Again, the score came after a long drive. A 22-yard run
by fullback Theodore Sutton and a 23-yard pass from
Green to Vern Davenport highlighted the 92-yard drive
that took over five minutes off the clock and ended in a
12-yard pass from Green to Davenport. Lamm's point
after made it ECU 24-21.
The Tar Heels then wasted no time in their
comeback attempt. An 18-yard pass from Kupec to end
Phil Farris carried the ball to the ECU 43. But Farris,
who dropped a pass in the end zone late in earlier loss
to Wake Forest, fumbled on the play. The ball was
recovered by ECU safety Ruffin McNeill.
The Pirates were not able to sustain a drive and had
to punt to the waiting Heels. The two teams exchanged
punts again before the Heels drove for the tying field
goal.
Pirate quarterback Leander Green was disappointed
that his club was unable to control the ball for very long
after taking the lead in the fourth quarter. "A couple of
first downs at the end could have put it out of reach
he said.
After Hayes' field goal, the Tar Heels tried an onside
kick that was recovered easily by East Carolina. With
(Photo by John Grogan)
ECU linebacker Mike Brewington (96) chases UNC QB Matt Kupec (12)
the ball on the UNC 41-yard line, Green attempted a
pass to Davenport, who was on about the 20, in order to
move the Pirates into easy field goal range. The pass
failed and Davenport was forced to try a 57-yarder that
fell just short and left the game in a tie, and both teams
frustrated.
ECU Coach Pat Dye said the kick was not an
impossible one for Davenport. "I've seen Vern kick
them from over sixty yards in practice said the Pirate
coach after witnessing the first tie of his head coaching
career. "If it hadn't been so late in the game, he would
have been able to kick it. He was just so tired at tho
time after playing all day
Dye said that he felt his club had come through
when least expected just to tie the favored Heels. "I
don't think I've ever had a football team come into a
game facing as great odds as we faced today he said.
"I'm talking about the surroundings here, a
nationally-ranked and well-coached team and all
Dye was well-pleased with the play of a number of
individuals on the team. "Fullback Theodore Sutton just
played an excellent game, both blocking and running the
football he said. Sutton finished the game as his
team's leading rusher with 93 yards on 16 carries.
Anthony Collins tallied 91 yards.
"If our number ten (quarterback Green) can't play
then there aren't many players anywhere said Dye
with a shake of his head. Green directed the Pirate
option attack to near-perfection all day. Surprising to
many were his 124 yards passing.
"We had to go to a combination of things today
said Green. "We mixed our runs up, going inside
sometimes and outside sometimes, and passed on
occasion also
The game was an offensive showcase all the way, the
Tar Heels accumulating 475 yards total offense and the
Pirates 383 yards.
Kupec had an excellent day for the Heels,
completing 18 of 32 passes for 265 yards. "Matt threw
the ball very well said Crum. "He'means an awful lot
to our attack
Dye had respectful words for the Tar Heel
quarterback also. "He's really great said Dye. "I'm
glad we don't have to face him again
Though Dye was evidently upset to come away with
a tie, he did feel his team had proven a lot. "I told the
squad they didn't win he said, "but that they won a
whole lot of hearts today
The tie left the Heels with a 5-1-1 record going into
this Saturday's game with ACC foe Maryland. The
Pirates are 3-3-1 and will face Appalachian State in
Boone Saturdav afternoon.
Should ties be discontinued or not?
(Photo by Chap Gurley)
Leander Green's expression reflects tie
"Nobody likes a tie
North Carolina coach Dick Crum said it right
following Saturday's 24-24 tie between his Tar Heels
and East Carolina. It seems that no one is happy to
settle for only a tie. It leaves everyone with a strange,
sort of empty feeling.
"This feels real strange said Pirate linebacker
Mike Brewington after the game, "not like a win or a
loss
It was a game that saw both teams work oh so hard
for a victory that neither could claim in the end. "I'm
pretty beat said safety Ruffin McNeill as he sat in the
Pirate locker room after the game. "All of us hustled so
hard today. I know we tied, but we're all winners
inside.
So maybe the Pirates got a little more consolation
from the tie than did the favored and nationally-ranked
Tar Heels, right? WRONG.
"You won't see any celebrating in our locker room
said ECU coach Pat Dye to a group of reporters
following the tie. "Our players are heartbroken. The
character that comes out of playing football and the
other things that you learn can come from this, but it's
mighty disappointing
The North Carolina players and coaches were no less
pleased with the tie than were the Pirates, despite the
fact that it was the Tar Heels who made a late comeback
to tie the game.
"This was not a bad game for us said UNC
punter-defensive back Steve Streater, "but not a good
one either. This tie just leaves you with an awful
feeling
Saturday's tie brought up something that has been
discussed for quite some time. Why not have a
sudden-death playoff to decide college football ties like
they have in high school and professional ball?
The answer, well why not. Tradition has a great deal
to do with it. After all, the college game has always
been played this way.
Another reason is pointed out by a statement that
Dye made following Saturday's game. When asked if he
thought there should be a playoff in case of a tie, Dye
replied, "Naw, you prepare to play 60 minutes of
football and if it's not settled then, then let everyone go
home frustrated
But the fact is that every other level of the game has
a playoff. Even most little leagues now have some sort
of system to decide a tie. College football is about the
long supporter of the traditional "let it be" system.
Pirate assistant coach Henrv Trevathan was a very
frustrated man following Saturday's tie with the Heels.
As he stood alone in a corner of the ECU locker room
thinking back over the game, he was asked if he would
like a playoff to decide such games. "Yeah he said,
"we'd love to play this one off
Before anyone gets all fired up about having a
system in college ball to decide ties, one thing must be
remembered about Saturday's game. It was a game
featuring two fierce rivals, so the tie hurt more for the
players, fans and coaches of the two teams because they
wanted badly to win this particular game.
Still there is always that terrible feeiing that a tie
leaves with anyone involved. Fans seem to ask, "What
was settled by all this? Did these guys play 60 minutes
of football for thisV These fans have a point.
But so does Dye. The teams do prepare to play 60
minutes and 60 minutes only.
But wouldn't a rule change change all that? A team
that knows a head of time that a tie would mean
sudden-death could prepare for such a situation.
Such a rule change seems necessary. True, no one
deserved to lose Saturday's game, but there's no doubt
that somebody deserved to win it.
Despite 151 yards
Paschall disappointed
By JIMMY DuPREE
assistant sports editor
CHAPEL HILL � "We didn't play up to our
potential said UNC running back Doug Paschal following
the 24-24 tie between the Heels and the ECu Pirates
Saturday. "When you don't, you're in trouble.
Paschal may call it not playing up to their potential,
but the Tar Heels still had to credit the Pirates with one
of the most galient come-backs of the season.
It took a Jeff Hayes field goal from 47 yards out with
13 remaining in the contest between interstate rivals for
the 18th ranked Heels to salvage a tie.
"It shocked my to see him (Hayes) come onto the
field said Paschal. "I really thought we would go for
it.
"I always think about winning; a tie just never
entered my mind .
Paschal led the Heels' first two touchdown drives,
though never crossing the goal line himself.
"We didn't take them lightly he said. "It s really
a disappointment not to win
Paschal charged through the ECU defense for 151
yards on 31 carries for his best performance of the 1979
season. . , ,
"As far as I know, they stuck to their basis
defense Paschal stated.
Quarterback Matt Kupec threw for 265 yards while
completing 18 out of 32 passes on the afternoon
including an 11-yard pass for a crucial first down which
led to the deciding field goal by Hayes.
"I'm capable of doing both (running and receiving)
said paschal. "I usually just stay back and block on pass
plays, though
Kupec out-manuevered the Pirate blitz several times
in the game, includeing a second quarter 18-yard
touchdown toss to tight end Jeff Grey.
"East Carolina is a team that doesn't really hide
their blitz offered paschal. "We thought we had
picked up some tendencies through watching the films,
and the plays we called just paid off
"1 didn't see where there was any easy yardage
anywhere
Paschal may physically be the best proof of that
statement.
Sitting in his lockert in the Heels' dressing room,
Paschal looked more like a war casualty than a football
player; both elbows absent skin as well as the knuckles
of his right hand, along with a bruise covering the upper
portion of his left leg.
"East Carolina is a fine ball club he replied when
asked how much the game meant to his team. "Tying
East Carolina is not like tying some high school team
Carolina moved the ball 225 yards on their first 30
plays from scrimmage before the Pirate defense stopped
them for no gain. Paschal accounted for 59 of that total
on 11 carries.
The Greenville native said that playing the school
from his home town added no pressure to him.
"It makes the game a little more fun he said. "I
know a lot of the players for East Carolina; I played with
a lot of them at Rose High.

(Photo by John Grogan)
Theodore Sutton rolls up the yardage
Dye, Pirates
frustrated
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
CHAPEL HILL � "You won't see any celebrating in
our locker room said a teary-eyed East Carolina
football coach Pat Dye to a group of reporters following
Saturday's 24-24 tie with 15th-ranked North Carolina.
"Our players are heartbroken
Indeed, the scene inside the Pirates' locker room was
heartbreaking. The players took an unnecessarily long
amount of time leaving the crowded, hot room. Why?
The team had just seen what could have been the
biggest win in Pirate football history go down the drain
following a 47-yard field goal by North Carolina kicker
Jeff Hayes with 13 seconds remaining in the contest that
tied the game. Instead of a big win, the Pirates had to
settle for a mere tie.
"I've never had a football team come into a game
facing as great odds as we faced today said Dye. "I'm
talking about the surroundings here, a nationally-ranked
and well-coached team and all
After losing three straight games early in the season,
all to Atlantic Coast conference and Big Four schools
the Pirates needed this game to save their season and
put them back into the bowl picture.
"A win Saturday could get us back in the picture
Dye had said last week before the game with the Heels.
"A win over North Carolina and wins in the remainder
of our games should make us attractive to someone
And that win it seemed the Pirates had when the had
See PIRATES, page 12
00 �jJ)'? &- �-�- " � �� ll" - � �� �
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�"��MMlMBMBMMl





Paoe 10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 30 October 1979
Heels down ECU inOT
CHAPEL HILL - The
upset hopes of East
Carolina's soccer team
were dashed when with
five minutes remaining in
overtime North Carolina
scored to defeat the
Pirates 2-1 Saturday
morning.
David Blum scored his
second goal of the day on
an assist by Ricky Marvin
to give the Heels the win
and break a tie that had
stood since the first half.
The Pirates got on the
scoreboard first when Phil
Martin stole a pass
intended for the goalie and
cashed in at 7:08 of the
first period.
Fifteen minutes later
Blum tied the game at one
on a penalty kick.
Big Ten to be
renamed 'Big Two'?
By
HERSCHEL NISSENSON
AP Sports Writer
The Big Ten looks like
the Big Two once again �
what else is new? � and
Ohio State and Michigan
both have No. 1 on their
minds.
There's just one little
difference Ohio State
has its sights set on a No.
1 national ranking while
Michigan is grateful for
the last-second heroics of
freshman wide receiver
Anthony Carter, who
wears uniform No. 1.
While Ohio State, tied
for No. 4 with Arkansas in
The Associated Press rat-
ings, was mauling Michi-
gan State 42-0, 10th-
ranked Michigan needed a
last-second 45 yard touch-
down prayer from John
Wangler to Carter to
salvage a 27-21 victory
over Indiana and remain
tied with the Buckeyes for
the Big Ten lead. They
meet in Ann Arbor, Mich
on Nov. 17.
Art Schlichter threw
scoring passes of 53 and
12 yards to Doug Donley
and scored on runs of 3
and 6 yards as unbeaten
Ohio State piled up more
than 500 yards in offense
for the third week in a row
and handed Michigan
State its first shutout in 51
games.
Coach Earle Bruce,
whose eight victories in
his first year at the helm
have surpassed last year's
seven under the ousted
Woody Hayes, was asked
if he thought the Buckeyes
should be No. 1 nationally.
"I don't know about
that he replied.
Blum's play throughout
the contest was impres-
sive, said his coach. "The
game ball should go to
Blum said Tar Heel
head man Anson Dor-
rance. "He makes me look
like a good coach
North Carolina con-
trolled the ball for most of
the game, taking 20 shots
to just five for the Pirates.
Yet Dorrance was very
impressed with the play of
the Pirates. "East Caro-
lina really hung tough
Dorrance said. "They gave
us a good game the last
time we played them and
did so again this time.
"In all honesty it
should have been a tie. If
we were going to score,
we should have done so
earlier
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East Carolina coach
Brad Smith was also well-
pleased with the perfor-
mance of his squad.
"Everybody really played
well for us said Smith.
"You don't play a team
like North Carolina the
way we did unless every-
body plays well
The Pirate cause was
hurt by the ejection of
leading scorere Phil Mar-
tin with nine minutes
remaining in the first half.
"We were hurting without
Martin said Smith. "He
is half our offense. We
played 74 minutes one
man down. The other guys
did real well to hang in
there like they did
The loss left the
Pirates at 4-9-2 for the
season.
Winchell twins key hooters
If you've ever seen the East Carolina sofccer team in
action, you probably thought that your eyes were
deceiving you as two of the top Pirate players, Brad and
Brian Winchell, came onto the field.
These brothers are twins in more than one respect.
Of course they look alike physically, but they are also
"twins" in their play. Both young men are considered
excellent players by Pirate coach Brad Smith.
As sophomores, Brad, the school's first scholarship
soccer player, and Brian, the starting goalie, are looking
forward to East Carolina's remaining matches which
include one against North Carolina at Chapel Hill on
Oct. 27 at 11 a.m.
Brad, the leading scorer last year as a freshman with
nine goals and four assists, feels that his quickness is
his biggest asset to the team.
"I think that my speed is my main contribution to
the team Brad said with a smile.
Brad, even with his tremendous potential, strong
right foot and excellent speed has his areas where he is
working for improvement, too. In practice, he is trying
to develop his skills with his left foot and better ball
control. He has three goals and assists this season.
Brian, the other half of this duo, is experiencing his
first year with the team since transfering from LbU last
year. At the beginning of the season Brian was not the
starting goalie but has since earned the starting nod.
"As a a team, we haven't been gettmg all the
positive results we would like said Brian, the more
talkative of the two. "We have already won more games
than any team has before, but there have been some
other matches that I feel we could have won. We'll have
to work harder for those, I guess
Brian has enjoyed some good matches for East
Carolina this fall including an impressive showing
against William and Mary last weekend when he shut
out the Indians for the first half.
Like his brother, Brian believes that his speed is the
key to his play.
"Speed is my greatest asset as a goalie said Brian.
His coach agrees about his athletic ability.
"Brian is an excellent all-round athlete stated
Smith. "He has had some excellent matches for us and
continues to improve
With Brad on one end of the field as a right halfback
and Brian on the other end as a goalie the W'nchell
brothers seem to be everywhere, but they know that
they can't do it alone.
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1






30 October 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 11
Yanks oust Martin
(Photo by Chap Gurley)
UNC fullback Doug Paschall is snowed under
By KEN RAPPOPORT
AP Sports Writer
NEW YORK (AP) -
Billy Martin is out, after
another strike call. In the
wake of an alleged fight in
Bloomington, Minn the
free-swinging Martin was
fired Sunday as manager
of the New York Yankees
and replaced by one-time
coach Dick Howser.
Yankee owner George
Steinbenner, supportive of
Martin in many of his
earlier controversies, ap-
parently had reached the
limit of his endurance
after the manager's latest
news-making incident last
week.
Martin, who has a long
history of similarly sordid
affairs, was accused of
punching an Illinois man
last Wednesday night in
the lobby of a Bloomington
hotel. His alleged victim,
Joseph Cooper of Lincoln-
shire, 111 was sent to a
hospital where he required
15 to 20 stitches to close
cuts on his lip.
Martin denied throwing
any punches. But just the
news was enough to get
Steinbrenner up in the air
over the weekend, jetting
off to New York from his
home in Florida to inves-
tigate the case. The owner
appeared to prejudge
Martin when he com-
mented:
"We just can't have
him getting into these
things every two months.
It's not good for organized
baseball
But Steinbrenner had
nothing to say Sunday
after letting Martin go,
ending a stormy relation-
ship that started in the
middle of the 1975 season.
No definitive statement
concerning Martin was
included in the Yankee
announcement, just these
succinct words:
"The New York Yan-
kees announced tonight
that Billy Martin will not
be returning as manager
of the Yankees
It was the second time
in his controversy-studded
career that Martin has
parted with the Yankees.
In the middle of the
1978 season he resigned
under pressure after a
series of problem with
management and super-
star Reggie Jackson, ut-
tering his infamous phrase
that Steinbrenner and
Jackson deserved each
other because "one is a
born liar and the other is a
convicted liar
But less than one week
after Bob Lemon had been
hired to replace Martin,
Steinbrenner reversed his
field with the shocking
announcement that Martin
would return as manager
in 1980.
It didn't take Martin
quite that long to come
back, however. He re-
turned prematurely in the
middle of 1979 in an effort
to fire up a flagging team.
Martin's return did no
good as the Yankees
finished a desultory fourth
in the American League
East.
While neither Stein-
brenner nor Martin was
available for comment
Sunday, Howser was.
"I've been around New
York 12 years he said.
"I understand what a
manager of the Yankees
has to go through
Howser said he then
flew Sunday to Ocala.
Fla where Steinbrenner
has a horse farm, to see
the owner and "the deal
was consummated
Although Howser had
settled in the Tallahassee,
Fla area to get out of the
glaring major league spot-
light, he said: "It would
be hard for anyone to turn
down the New York
Yankees' managing job.
especially when you've
been part of the organi-
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Yankee. I know the
players fairly well
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1 I
Page 12 THE EAST CARQ1INIAN 30 October 1979
IM point standings beginning to shape up
By RICKI GLIARMIS
Staff Writer
With Fall Semester
half over, and several
Intramural activities fin-
ished for another year, the
point standings are begin-
ning to take shape.
In the fraternity div-
ision, the top three teams
after tallying flag football,
golf, track, and IM
Council, are Kappa Alpha,
Phi Kappa Tau, and Sigma
Nu. Top Three Residence
Hall division teams are
Scott, Aycock, and Belk
and the leaders in the
Club-Independent Division
are ROTC, Phi Epsilon
Kappa, and the Dolemites.
The Women's point
standings have been to-
taled including track, One-
on-One, golf, archery, flag
football, horseshoe sin-
gles, tennis singles, and
IM Council. In the Sorority
division, Sigma Sigma
Sigma is leading, followed
by Alpha Xi Delta and
Alpha Omicron Pi.
Residence Hall Division
leaders are Tyler holding
first place, with Fleming
and Cotten in second and
third places, respectively.
The Independent Divis-
ion's Streakers are in first
place, followed by PRC.
These points are to be
tallied throughout the
entire school year with a
winner from each division
named at the end of the
year. Each winner will
receive the prestigious
Chancellor's Cup.
Top Team Projections
Co-Rec Flag Football
projections include the top
two teams from each
division. In Punter's Div-
ision, Driftv Derelicks and
Ame's Army are top two.
Blitz Division lists Slighty-
ly Used and Double
Trouble as its top two.
Talking Hands and On
Your Back take the
starting polls in PAT's
division with Tri Sig Tau
Gamma and Lambda Chi's
taking the top two pos-
itions in Touchdowns Div-
ision.
Pre-season picks for
Team Handball list Alpha
Xi Delta as number one in
'he Women's division
followed by Heartbreakers
II, P.E. and Company, and
Fleming Goalie Trotters.
In the Men's Division,
King's Royal netters are
number one followed by
Alien, TKE, Dolemites,
Phi Epsilon Kappa, and
Belk Gola.
Frazier's Soccer Se-
lections (Men's Division)
gives top billing to Scott
Rogues, while Independ-
ents and Pi Kappa Phi
closely follow. Sigma Nu,
Belk Gola, Phi Kappa Tau,
and Aycock Desolation
Angels, follow the top
three teams. The Slash,
Tau Kappa Epsilon, and
Kappa Alpha round off the
list.
Two-on-Two Basketball
Biff Jones, graduate
assistant, files the fol-
lowing report on Two-on-
Two Basketball, which he
refers to as Big Four
Tournament.
"Gerald Hall and
Cookie McPhatter are the
favorites to win, I have
heard. They play Tom
Pupa and Linda Burt, but
you sure can't count them
out, they're good too.
ell, how about Dexter
Wingfield and tempsie
Jones? They're nothing to
N.C. State ha
the week off
VC. State gets a
chance to watch its
pursuers in the ACC race,
Wake Forest and North
Carolina, battle Clemson
and Maryland Saturday.
The much-maligned Wolf-
Is defense threw up a
late goal line stand against
Clemson and won on the
-trength of Nathan Ritter's
third field goal of the day.
The fans here at
Clemson saw two great
lootball teams going at
each other said Wolf-
pack Coach Bo Rein.
You've heard about how
beat up these teams were
and how they weren't
going at full strength, but
you sure couldn't tell it
todav

Ritter's field goals
were the difference for
N.C. State, while two bv
Dale Castro were inci-
dental in Maryland's rout
of Duke. The first, a
42-yarder, set an NCAA
record, however. It was
Ritter's 14th straight, and
he extended the streak to
15 with a 30-yarder in the
fourth period.
"I'm real happy for
him said Terrapin Coach
Jerry Claiborne, who was
even happier for the team.
The Terrapins, who
will try to all but eliminate
North Carolina from the
race Saturday, had lost
four games in succession
for the only time in
Claiborne's eight years at
the helm.
Virginia, which was
idle Saturday, will have its
hands full at Georgia.
Pirates frustrated
Cont'd from page 9
possession of the football on their own 17-yard line with
a 24-21 lead and only 2:20 remaining to play. All, it
seemed, the Pirates needed to do was get one first
down. But the Tar Heel defense held and the Pirates
were forced to punt.
The Tar Heel offense then went to work and drove
the ball downfield for the tying field goal. As Hayes'
kick split the uprights perfectly, a sigh of shock fell over
the Pirate players, coaches and fans.
"We all hustled so hard said safety Ruffin McNeill
after the game. "We needed and wanted this one bad. I
know we tied the game but I know too that we're all
winners inside
ECU linebacker Mike Brewington was no less
satisfied with the outcome. "We're definitely not
happy said Brewington. "But we proved a point. We
can play with anybody when we're ready
And ready the Pirates were said Dye. "I think we
were well-prepared said the sixth-year Pirate mentor,
"it was our game all the way in the second half
Dye wanted this game for reasons that he had
probably not revealed to many. "This is really
disappointing he said after the game. "I wanted it so
bad for our players. Heck, before the game I looked at
some of their shoes and saw the holes he said
before stopping to fight back the tears.
To come so close yet be so far away is the biggest
hurt for quarterback Leander Green. "A couple of first
downs at the end could have put it out of reach said
the senior from Jacksonville.
Split end Vern Davenport likes the way the Pirates
accepted the tie. "I think we showed a lot of class he
said, "despite all the disappointment. I keep thinking
that all we needed at the last was to make a first
d ��
own.
Though he himself was disappointed, Dye offered a
word of comfort for the players following the game. "I
told tie squad that they didn't win he said, "but that
I'm sure they won a lot of hearts today
laugh ar, they could very
easily win. Of course, they
have to beat Tarn Bobbitt
and Cindy Beck and boy,
they sure can shoot them
in from way out! Tune in
next show for the exiting
conclusion of the Big Four
Tournament
Rugby Club
The Rugby Club, one
of ECU's fastest growing
sports clubs, helds its
Second Annual Invitational
Tournament, Oct. 21.
Among the eight teams
that entered the compet-
ition, ECU's Rugby team
finished the runner-up,
second only to the Old
Charlotte Originals, an
extremely talented, estab-
lished club. Leading scor-
ers in the tournament
were Roby Robertson,
Scott Taylor, Chris Her-
man, John Hill and Keith
Dickson. Leading scrum-
mers were Possum Mc-
Lamb, Omar Rafey, Alan
Poindexter, and Eric
Johnston.
The Rugby Club is still
looking for recruits. The
club is open to all students
at ECU. The club has
three seasons during the
year, fall, spring, and
summer.
Congratulations to the
Rugby Club for its excel-
lent performance in the
tournament.
Deadlines
Team Bowling Cap-
tain's Meeting is being
held Nov. 5, at 4 p.m. in
Mendenhall 244, with play
beginning Nov. 6.
The deadline for CoRec
Volleyball registration is
Nov. 7, with deadline for
Racquetball Singles regis-
tration being Nov. 8.
The FencingClub meets
from 4 p.m. until 6 p.m.
each Wednesday.
ATiTIC
N.C. No. 3
Nightclub
Tues
"Hat Party"
BrecKenridge
Thurs.
EAZE
Fri.& Sat.
loth Ave.
& EAZE
Sun.
SUPER GRIT
6o4c $Ual SmMMC Hhc
PHONE 758-2 T 83
We Now Have TWO
Locations to To Serve You!
HALLOWEEN OCT. 31
117 W 4th St.
jGreenville, N.C. 27834
JOpen 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
402 Evans St.
Greenville, N.C.
Downtown on the Mall
ODefi.l0:00a.m.to5:00
ABORTIONS UP TO 12TH
WEEK OF PREGNANCY
$175.00 "all inclusive'
pregnancy test. Dirtu control and
problem pregnancy counseling For
further information call 832-0535 (toll-
free number 800-221-2568) between
9 A.M5 PM weekdays
Raleigh Women's Health
Organization
917 West Morgan St
Raleigh, N.C. 27603
Monday-Friday
2:00-5:00 p.m.
small draft (to oz.) 30
large draft (16 Oz.) 4S'
with student I.D.
Come by and visit our complete
game room.
Pinball, video games, footsball.
208 E. 10th St. 758-2446
ALL YOU CAN EAT
SPECIALS
4 008:00PM NOCARRYOUT
SALAD�50 EXTRA
ASST. VAR 9 9
ONLY
TUE.
PIZZA.
WITH FRIES & COLESLAW
FRIED S -t 9 9
CHICKEN ?�� I"
WITH GARLIC BREAD
ITALIAN $400
SPAGHETTIotvl "
WITH FRIES & COLE SLAW
FRIED t-fQQ
FISH. . .� 1 "
STUDENT
The folks at Kroger Sav-on know the
complete student has a party side,
too. So they have what East Carolina
University students need for any bash
from party platters to disco plat-
ters all in one convenient loca-
tion. Don't be incomplete this
year�shop Kroger Sav-on today.
Records and
Tapes
30
COSMETICS
AMP
FRAGRANCES
fDISCOUNTED ffl
TIMEX
WATCHES
Ret.
UP TO
REG. OR DIP
COUNTRY OVEN
Potato
Chips
8-Oz. Twin Pak
OFF MANUFACTURER S
SUGGESTED RETAIL
LET THE DELI DO IT! Planning a party? Let the
Kroger Sav-on Deli supply the fixin's. Finest
quality meats, delicious cheese, & tasty
salads combine to make our party trays
perfect for entertaining. Just phone ahead to
place your order!
12-oz. 99
cans
Rossetto
B'

BUSCH BUSCH BUSCH
�S-� 4 r
15
Lambrusco�;
Off
MFR
SUG
RETAIL
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
SEXISTS �dvfd "�"� '� rsqulrsd to be readily available for
2 h 1?m Kto9� Sav-on Store except aa specifically noted in this
J! . ��12i!L0i of �L�dv�rt�� '� we will offer you your choice
?JJ�ZZ��Zwhn ����"�. '�"�cttag the eame savings or a
2��whteh wlH entttle you to purchase the advertised Item at the
advertised price within 30 days.
NONE SOLD
DEALERS
OPEN 7 AM TO MIDNIGHT
MON
THRU
SAT
OPEN SUNDAY
9AMT09PM
FOOD, DRUG, GENERAL
MERCHANDISE STORES
PRICES EFFECTIVE TUES
OCT. 30 THRU SUN NOV. 4,1979
600 Greenville BlvdGreenville
Phone 756-7031
f
i






Title
The East Carolinian, October 30, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 30, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.18
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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