The East Carolinian, October 25, 1979






Wi e it left to �
to decide whether
we hould have
iment with
(wspapers

it, I
The East Carolinian
' rou rave a st
idea, a ; a
ead, please tele-
phone us
757-6366
757-6367
54 No 16
12 pages today
Greenville, N.C
Thursday, October 25, 1979
- !0,00(
Driver error may be cause of yesterday's wreck
�nFF irts
SGA rransit stem
when the I
the Mendenhall
mother
mated at $100 b
by bshire,
Da t sun was
:
' aid,
�n md
tv, said the
the
I
if he
said the lull report will probably be completed today.
Calder explained that Cannon was the only officer
available to investigate a number of accidents yesterda)
I lie other officers were busy making a traffic surve on
campus.
Another accident occurred yesterday when a white
Camaro rolled backwards into a parked Toyota. Russell
1). Stanton parked his Camaro and wont into Jones
Dorm for a moment, leaving Pam Jenkins in the
Suddenly the car began rolling backwards. "I
ildn't stop it she said. "It wasn't funny
then
' is just those freak ones1 Sgt. Cannon
id. Little damage was done to Si i's car, but the
" front corner of the Toyota was dented and the
parking light smashed.
I h - the ninl idents
have plagued the SGA transit system since
January
� b� �us accident occurred last week and
involved drivi i Mark I o allegedlv struck a tr
le driving his normal route. Though Folsom i lai
-�� failure, witnesses felt that the accident was dm I
driver error.
The brakes on the bus had to be removed so thai it
i ould be m�cd alter the wreck.
"wo students were injured in the accident.
Damage incurred to the bus will total over $6,0
rdmg to reports.
So tar, damage to SGA buses this year has ami
to over $10,000.
Brake failure was also listed as the cause
Januan 15 accident. This incident involved a dr
Billy ("lark, who allegedly struck the car in front ol him
while the vehicle was stopped at a stop light. Dan
was estimated at $1,400.
Chubb) Abshire, assistant SGA transit manager h is
been involved m three of the accidents, the first
I ol which involved backing into vehicles -topped
behind the bus.
Damage was estimated at $339 in the I
Vbshire's a i ident.
i
Rand h
TdMr
� j MM
A
IA l I nmsil System
The SGA trans , gued to driver errors,
with problems, ranging from brake failure
Senate unanimously rejects
parking resolution at meeting
; uire
n to
the
-
�M y e r, � h � I the ling
drawn thir

1 -the � ii students 'Tslt p tation ol ing. � ited
The East
Carolinian office
will be closed
Thursday
and
Friday.
Normal office hours
resume Monday.
f
unty reasons as
grounds for opposing the
i nate resolution.
Noting that students
who purchase pa rking
permits expect to be able
to park on campus, Meyer
the assemb
tilt) members, " e re
all in the -ano boat. "
Meyer questioned the
w isdom oi adopting such a
measure, especially since
university officials are
presently awaiting the
arrival ol a national -Judy
group which will research
East Carolina's parking
problem.
"To change the current
parking configuration now
would only make the work
ol the study group more
difficult said Meyer.
The parking consul-
tants should conduct theirr
I! e Htrking consul-
tants should conduct their
study in mid-December,
according to Meyer
Mover also cited cost
and security factors in his
defense of the status quo,
especially as it regarded
the problems involved in
gettmg students to and
from their displaced cars.
"At this point, it would
be very difficult to imple-
ment this program without
causing more trouble than
it is worth Dr. Meyer
summarized.
Dr. Luquire was not
present at the meeting,
but commented on the
proceedings Wednesday.
"I understand that the
problems concerning the
parking lots under con-
struction were brought to
light, and I am quite
tsed thai it turned out
the way it did. Maybe now
the faculty an park there
withoul fearing that they
will be tow- 1
Senate delegates then
questioned Dr. Meyei
about the contusion sur-
rounding the unfinished
parking lots behind Men-
denhall and Joyner Lib-
ran. Some members were
unsure whether or not it
was safe to park there,
since signs on those lots
have not been consistent.
Meyer -ui that the
situation had been clar-
ified, and that the lots
gently under construc-
tion may be used.
A subsequent vote
rejected the resolution
unanimously.
In other business, the
Senate tabled until the
next meeting action on a
resolution to create a
� pei iai advisor cadre for
general college students.
S
The parrot was an enthusiastic participant at the ECU
vs. WCU game this season.
Hearing held
concerning last
bus accident
After h ii
dents '� '
meeting ruesda
transil advisor) committ1i
arm-
bus driver Mark�
will 1 e issued a w rittenappear id�
reprimand for speedin.visor i v eU �
1 he comm ittee als �th idiv idua
annoum ed plans :� initiateti d.�
a general retraining pro-Tie' sludents w i"
gram tr all student busLancaster, ks,
drivers.
The purpose ol :B:
hearing was to leci le on as
course of actioi f�heard
an October 16 bus ai
near the intersection Fifth and Jarvis Streetshad operated 1 bus jus HEARIM
Folsom was drh ing-�
SGA-operated bus
time ol the mishap.Inside
According to n,
the accident occurredheloda
when a brake failiilly dri �
forced him to swenit
1075 International inthat aFree concert
tree to avoid hitting a caiagains 1S�11?
that had stopped on rbut all f ur thought th
Street. However,brakes shi uld
eyewitnessesr
Folsom was driving fast and following' 1 . V rd :Marlin
closely.Abshire, tri(Hi the it
The accident was� ttivi m r,
eighth in the las t
months 1 hat have bbeenPirates fact
attributed to either tanks
brakes or driver error erI Saturday
Although there were noCaudill
serious injuries in thedidn notice any thing1
accident, personnelunus tut the brak
ECU's own
Pirate's parrot speaks
By KAREN WENDT
News Editor
The Pirate Parrot i.s an
interesting person. As a
matter of fact, he is a
collage of different per-
sonalities.
In addition to being the
Pirate Parrot, he is the
Discorilla at the Elbo
Room and the owner of
Willie, the dog with a
penchant for frisbees and
who tore the Citadel
Bulldog's tt4 at the
Homecoming game.
The man behing the
costume is Furlin Coggins.
manager of Georgetown
apartments. He is spon-
sored by Hallow Distn
buting, though they only
supply Coggins with the
costume.
"I love to do it aid
Coggins, when asked why
he plays the parl
parrot. Coggins receives
no pay tor his sei n ices
"1 like to promote the
EC I
aid
- : 11 at
Coggins.
Wen asked about ap-
pearing in front ol the
large crowds at ECl
games. Coggins replied,
"1 put a costume on and
who knows me He
explains that this is how
he can perform some of
his stunts on the tield.
Though Coggins is not
the official mascot at ECl ,
he has he come very
ng ECU fans.
He says he has received
permission to appear on
Id from Bill Cain,
athletic director.
"I'm not trying to
change the Pirate sym-
bol sai ggins
just trying to promo! a
litt -
For a ��
i on the field, but
evidently the problem was
straight-
The costume weighs
about 32 pounds, accord-
ing to Coggins. It allows
very little movement,
pecially in the arms. But a
new costume is being
made that will allow much
more freedom ol move-
ment for our feathered
friend.
Coggins got the jov
being the Pirate P i
when he appeared one
night at the Elbo Room as
the Discogrilla.
That night he met Joe
Hallow. �f H i m Dis-
tributing, who offered him
the job as the parrot.
Willie. his dog, is
See PARROT, page 3





Armv
Raleigh hosts recruiting investigation
Though it appears to be at a standstill,
construction on new ECU parking lots is
on
schedule. (Photo by Richard Green)
Lots on schedule
WASHINGTON (AP)
�The Army recruiting
malpractice scandal has
shifted to the Raleigh
District where 11 re-
cruiters are expected to be
suspended from duty this
week as part of a national
recruiting fraud investig-
ation.
"The Army officials
have decided on them, but
they have not yet informed
them a Washington
source told the News and
Observer of Raleigh.
"They'll be given their
packet. It gives them the
information for and a-
gainst them and gives
them a chance to rebut
The Army began its
recruiting scandal probe in
Charlotte last May. So far,
182 recruiters have been
relieved of duty nation-
wide, including 32 in the
Charlotte district.
altering educational, birth,
criminal and Social Secu-
rity records to help
recruits gain admittance.
There are 45 regular
By KAREN WENDT
'eus Editor
Work on the new
paved parking lots is going
"right according to sch-
edule says James
Lowry, director of Plant
Operations at ECU.
Work is scheduled to
be completed about Dec-
ember 14.
The paving of the
parking lots has been a
itroversial topic, espec-
ially between the faculty
and staff of the university
local nature enthus-
Many students
objected to the paving of
the parking lots because
trees would have to be
removed from the areas.
A compromise was
reached, and work began
earlier in the semester.
The dirt lots caused
difficulties for students
who had to use them, ac
mud was a major problem
when it rained.
The construction costs
are expected to run about
$230,000. All of the lots
are expected to be paved
at the same time.
At present the lots are
in use in order to pack
down the gravel and dirt
to make paving easier.
Charges leveled
against the recruiters who
have been relieved of their
duty include coaching
enlistees on the Army
entrance examination and
Army recruiters and 15
Army Reserve recruiters in
the Raleigh District, which
includes 48 Eastern North
Carolina counties.
The Army has pressed
charges only in the
Charlotte district where
nine soldiers face court
martial and four others
face administrative
charges.
A military court-martial
had been scheduled to
begin Thursday at Fort
Bragg for Sgt. 1st Class
Marshall B. Jackson, the
first of the Charlotte area
recruiters to go before a
trial board. The Army said
today, however, that Jack-
son's hearing was post-
poned. No reason was
given for the delay, nor
was a new date an-
nounced.
A lawyer for some of
the suspended recruiters
said Monday that two
more officers and three
non-commissioned officers,
four of them in the
Charlotte district, will be
charged with recruiting
abuses by recruiters
already implicated.
Meanwhile, an Army
spokesman Tuesday con-
firmed that North Car-
olinian Maj. Gen. Maxwell
Reid Thurman has been
chosen to head the Army's
Recruiting Command. Of-
ficial announcement of
Thurman's appointment is
expected Friday.
Thurman, 48, a High
Point native, succeeds
Maj. Gen. William Mun-
die. .
Mundie has been the
subject of criticism from
Sen. Robert Morgan, D-
N.C for his handling of a
malpractice investigation
in Raleigh late last year.
Then the current scandal
surfaced in Charlotte in
May of this year.
Mundie announced in
August that he would
retire Dec. 1. At that time,
his
re-
not
re-
the Pentagon said
retirement was not
quested and was
connected with the
cruiter fraud probe.
Staff position open
I The East Carolinian is now accepting applications
for the position of Assistant to the Editor.
I Journalism experience and office experience are j
I helpful, but not required.
1 Come by our office in the Old South Building j
I and fill out an application. j
Open from
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily j
1 Monday thru Friday j
lllllllllllllllllllllllllltllllWIllllWllllllllllllW
classified
ALL YOU CAN EAT
SPECIALS
4 00-8:00 PM
xtt
m
MUST SELL BY MON-
DAY: Hatchcover Coffee-
table, Yamaha 3-way
neakers, Technics SL-23
turntable, assorted fur-
niture. Call Rich at
758-1963.
HELP WANTED: Wait -
resses, bartenders, bar
backs. Apply in person.
Must be 21. Good pay plus
tips. Call 756-8060.
NEED X-TRA CASH:
prices paid for gold
Fair
and
silver and silver coins.
Mixed Media. 120 E. 5th
St. 758-2127.
SPORTS CAR FOR SALE:
1971 Fiat 124 Sport
Spyder, convertible, 5
speed, good condition.
Call 757-6777. Ask for Bob
Adams 8-5.
FOR SALE: Classical Ya-
maha Guitar. (G-65) 1978
model. Excellent
condition. $125.00. Contact
Debbie at 758-0269.
BOSE 301's JVC Cassette
deck Technics turntable.
$400. Will sell seperately.
102 C. Cherry Ct. Drive.
After 6 p.m.
FOR SALE: 1973 Toyota
pickup. Good condition.
Long bed. Good mileage
and good tires. Call Steve
Curry 752-4379.
FOR SALE: 1972 Vega
Cot. Station Wagon. Must
sell. For more information
call 752-5422.
NEED A PAPER TYPED?
Theses, reports, term
papers, etc. Call Leigh
Coakley at 752-8027.
Reasonable rates.
SALAD�50 EXTRA
ASST. VARa
I PIZZA. .�w I
I WITH FRIES & COLESLAW
FRIED -f
CHICKEN? I
WITH GARLIC BREAD
ITALIAN
SPAGHETTW
WITH FRIES & COLE SLAW
FRIED -f
FISH �K I
The folks at Kroger Sav-on know the
complete student has a party side,
too. So they have what East Carolina
University students need for any bash
from party platters to disco plat-
ters all in one convenient loca-
tion. Don't be incomplete this
yearshop Kroger Sav-on today.
LAST CHANCE To get
your seat on the bus to the
Carolina game, just $6.00
gets you there and back.
Call 752-2476 or 752-8925.
DON'T WAIT
m 9
DANCE: Sunshine Studios
will be offering the
following classes at a
discount rate to ECU
students: Ballet, Jazz,
Yoga, Arabic (Belly
Dance) and Partner Disco
Dance. Classes are within
walking distance of cam-
pus beginning Nov. 4 and
7. Call Sunshine at
756-7235 oi 758-0736.
LET ME TYPE FOR
YOU -I have over 12
ye f typing experience
to use. I'll type your
term papers, tests, theses,
etc. neatly, accurately and
with quick turnaround
time. Work will be done
on a new Seiko Silver -
Reed typewriter which
types in both pica and
elite. Contact Becky
Overstreet 746-3798.
V
WANTED: Apartment and
female roommate begin-
ning Spring, 1980. Prefer
a graduate student, but
will consider a senior. Call
Cathy Mills. Day-toll free
1-800-662-7300 (say it's
personal). After 6 (919)
772-0667.
PARKING: Leased parking
directly across from ECU
on corner of 5th and E.
Holly Sts. $30 per semes-
ter. 30 spaces available.
Call Bull Ritter Realtors
756-5458 and leave name
and number if interested.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: To share a two
bedroom apt. at River
Bluff. Pay half of rent and
utilities. Call 758-8529.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED to share fur-
nished, two bedroom apt.
at Oakmont Square. Pay
half of rent and
COSMETICS
W
FKftGRAHCeS r
iDISCOUMTEb; &i
UP TO
TIMEX
WATCHES
o�
Mtr
Sugg
REG. OR DIP
COUNTRY OVEN
Potato
Chips
8-Oz. Twin Pak
OFF MANUFACTURERS
SU6QESTE0 RETAIL
LET THE DELI DO IT! Planning a party? Let the
Kroger Sav-on Deli supply the fixin's -Finest
quality meats, delicious cheese, & tasty
salads combine to make our party trays
perfect for entertaining. Just phone ahead to
place your order!
Records and
Tapes
jgjjHfil
Budweiser j
Beerca.ns. �
HEARTY BURGUNDY, PINK CHABLIS,
ROSE, CHABLIS BLANC OR
Gallo �
1.5 Liter p
Rhine. .B
one
utilities. Call
756-1794.
Jean at
MALE ROOMMATE
WANTED. Reasonably
clean, quiet, serious stu-
dent preferred. $55 plus
utilities. Call 752-4043.
PRIVATE ROOMS: Share
bath and kitchen, East
Third Street. 752-5296.
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of thaaa atfvortiaad Kama la raqulrad to bajaadWy j�0'
Ml inaach Krogar Sav-on StoraaxcaptaaapacMteally notad intNa
�d Hwadorunofanaorartiaaditam,��wiaollafyoMyourcholoa
of � comp�V.bt tern, whan avaitaMa, raflactJng tha aama aayinga or a
ralnchock which will �ntltto you to purchase thai
advartJaad prlca within 30 day
NONE SOLD

DEALERS
OPEN 7 AM TO MIDNIGHT
MON
THRU
SAT
0PENSUNDAY
9 AM TO 9 PM
FOOD, DRUG, GENERAL
MERCHANDISE STORES
PRICES EFFECTIVE TUES
OCT. 23 THRU SUN OCT. 29, 1979
600 Greenville BlvdGreenville
Phone 756-7031
i
mmm
i�i,jwr





25 October 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Pecple, 111� . arid
lelctatlcr beat ait� raqietfr ill
�upb
fitness
The Student Union
Program Board will meet
Nov. 1, at 7 p.m. in Room
212 of Mendenhall Student
Center.
it lUtiu
The ECU Christian
Ensemble will meet Thurs-
day at 7:30 p.m. at First
Presbyterian Church. This
contemporary choir and
orchestra will be minis-
tering the gospel of Christ
to the students as well as
to area churches and
Christian rallies. Vocalists,
instrumentalists and sound
and lighting technicians
are needed. If you would
like to know more about
this exciting ministry, call
Mark Sexton at 752-9612.
alpha delta
Alpha Delta Mu Na-
tional Social Work Honor
Society will meet Monday,
Oct. 29 at 3:45 in Belk
building. All members are
encouraged to attend this
meeting.
The ECU-Pepsi Physi-
cal Fitness Club is holding
its next meeting on
Monday, Oct. 29 a 7:30
p.m. The club will meet in
Room 104, Memorial Gym.
The meeting will include
viewing of the filmOlym-
pic Trials Marathon The
speaker will be Butch
Robertson of Phidippedes.
fercw
May we remind stu-
dents that all announce-
ments for the People,
Places and column must
be typewritten, double
spaced, and turned in
before the deadline, or
they will not accepted.
These rules will be strictly
enforced.
We cannot guarantee
that all of the announce-
ments that we receive will
be published, but we will
do our best.
Deadlines are 2 p.m.
on Tuesday for the Thurs-
day edition and 2 p.m.
Friday for the Tuesday
edition.
All announcements
should be directed to the
news editor only.
ecu ccc
The ECU Collegiate
Civitan Club will have an
organizational meeting a 7
p.m. on Nov. 6 in
Flanagan 201.
The ECU Club is
sponsored by the Green-
ville Civitan Club.
Collegiate Civitan Clubs
are dedicated to service to
others with special em-
phasis on mental health
and mental retardation.
Any student carrying 12
semester hours or more is
eligible to become a
member. For further in-
formation, see Dr. R.A.
Klein, Flanagan 235 or
phone 757-6274.
Jaycees
The Greenville Jaycees
will be sponsoring a
Haunted House during the
Halloween season. The
dates will be October
20-22 and October 25th
through Halloween night.
One third of the proceeds
will go towards assisting
in the construction of the
local Boy's Club. The
house will be located on
Airport Road and will open
at 7:00 p.m.
The Navy Civilian Per-
sonnel Co-op recruiter will
be on campus October 26
looking for students to fill
computer science posi-
tions. However, he will
also interview students for
the following job areas:
automatice data process-
ing, statistician, supply
and transportation man-
agement, quality and re-
liability assurance special-
ist, personnel manage-
ment, education specialist,
industrial specialist, logis-
tics, management, housing
management, program an-
alysis, financial manage-
ment, management analy-
sis, and procurement. If
there is enought student
interest, the recruiter may
be able to come to the
campus Thursday after-
noon, Oct. 25.
Interested students
should review the CAP-
SON file in 313 Rawl. If an
appointment is desired,
the student should arrange
an interview with a Co-op
coordinator through Mrs.
Harrizene Keyes, co-op
secretary. The coordinator
will provide information
concerning forms which
must be completed prior to
the interview with the
CAPSON recruiter.
ECU professor to attend briefing
ECU NEWS BUREAU
Professor Janice H.
Faulkner of the East
Carolina University De-
partment of English is
among 50 North Carolin-
ians invited to a SALT II
briefing by President Car-
ter and his national
security affairs assistant
Wednesday at the White
House.
Mrs. Faulkner has long
been actively interested in
local, state and national
political affairs and is a
regular participant in a
television political issues
and debate series pro-
duced in Greenville.
She was notified of her
invitation by Anne Wexler,
a presidential assistant.
Prior to the White House
visit, the North Carolina
group will have lunch with
Sen. Robert S. Morgan,
D-N.C. The 2 p.m. brief-
ing will be conducted in
the East Room of the
White house by the
president and his as-
sistant, Zbigniew Brzez-
inski. Following the brief-
ing there
reception in
Dining Room.
The East
was unable
Professor Faulkner for
comment.
will be a
the State
Carolinian
to reach
Beer policy discussed
A subcommittee of the
Campus Solicitation Com-
mittee met on Tuesday to
discuss changes in ECU's
beer consumption policy.
In their meeting, the
committee chose to make
several suggestions, ac-
cord in gtoCharles Sune,
president of the Student
Union.
The first suggestion
was to allow brown
bagging of beer in the
Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter. This suggestion would
only apply to recognized
organizations of the uni-
PARROT
continued from page 1
another enigma on the
ECU campus. Willie is
most famous for his
destruction of the Citadel's
flag at the Homecoming
game.
Coggins swears that
the destruction of the flag
was not planned, and he
commented, "Willie's a
dedicated ECU fan
According to Coggins,
Willie required very little
training. "He's just a
smart dog
Willie most recently
appeared at Lamba Chi
Field Day, and has been
invited to attend the
Second Annual Greenville
Tobacco Festival to be
held the first week in
November.
Willie is also well
dressed, since area or-
ganizations donate t-shirts
to Willie's wardrobe to
promote their organiza-
tions.
The parrot is presently
restricted to what it can do
while on the field. He has
been requested to sit near
the band during games or
to sit on the Pirate ship.
However, Coggins readily
admits that it is unlikely
he will be able to stay put
for very long.
Coggins asked that any
student who has sugges-
tions for routines for the
parrot, or for Willie, to
please suggest them to
him.
Coggins plans to attend
the upcoming UNC-Chapel
Hill-ECU game to cheer
for the team.
But Coggins commen-
ted, "When you walk out
on that field and you hear
those people applaud, it's
a great feeling
versity who notify the
center at least one week in
advance of their plans.
They also plan to
suggest brown bagging of
beer be allowed on the
mall again by recognized
organizations with a one
week advance notice to the
university. This also in-
cludes the field at the
bottom of College Hill
Drive, Wright Auditorium,
the Ledonia Wright Afro-
American Cultural Center
and the amphitheatre be-
hind Fletcher Dorm.
In the past, permission
for consumption of alco-
holic beverages in these
areas had to come directly
from the chancellor's of-
fice, according to Sune.
These are only sugges-
tions to the solicitation
committee, not final
changes. Changes must
first go through the board
of trustees before be-
coming operational.
HEARING
continued from page 1
before the committee to
give his version of the
incident. He told the
committee that he thought
he was a scapegoat victim
of circumstances, but ad-
mitted that he was travel-
ing 5 miles over the 25
mph speed limit on Fifth
Street. Folsom added that
the bus in question could
not make it up the hill on
Fifth Street unless it was
going 30 mph or more and
said that he was not
following the car ahead too
closely.
The committee then
debated what action to
take in the matter. Half of
the six-member committee
thought initially that no
action should be taken
against Folsom.
Further debate resulted
in the decision by Operat-
ing Manager Leonard
Fleming to issue Folsom a
written reprimand for
speeding. According to
Fleming, another charge
ofl speeding against Fol-
som would be grounds for
his dismissal from the
driver pool.
The committee simul-
taneously decided to begin
retraining all bus drivers,
since it Appeared that
incautious driving was a
general problem among
them.
Fleming said Wednes-
day that a timetable for
the retraining program is
forthcoming.
Members of the ad-
visory committee were Ed
Waiters, Colleen Flynn,
Jesse High, SGA Presi-
dent Brett Melvin, Chubby
Abshire and Leonard
Fleming.
Go 4faot SmvJc 9hc
PHONE 7Se-2183
We Now Have TWO
Location to To Serve You!
Mother-ln-Law Day Oct. 28
117. 4th St. 402 Evans St.
Greenville, N.C. 27834 Greenville, N.C.
Open 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Downtown on the Mall
Ooefi.10:00 a.m. to 5:00
ctieinisUy
There are immediate
openings for tutors of
Chemistry 1120 and 1050.
Applicants may be grad-
uates or undergraduate
students who are profi-
cient in these areas.
Contact Dr. Bridwell or
Dr. Hensel in 208 Rags-
dale Hall or call the
Center for Student Oppor-
tunities at 757-6122, 6081,
or 6075.
There will be a meet-
ing of the ECU delegation
tonight at 7 p.m. at
Brewster 103-B. All mem-
bers are urged to attend.
��!��
CORSO, the club for
those interested in either
social work or corrections
will meet this Tuesday,
Oct. 30 at 5 p.m. in Belk
A-101. All members and
prospective members are
urged to attend this
important meeting. A spe-
cial welcome is extended
to all recently accepted
majors into the depart-
ment.
The 1979 Beaux Arts
masquerade ball promises
to be better than ever,
with entertainment includ-
ing the ECU Jazz Ensem-
ble and the Drama Dept.
dance group performing.
Various booths, door prizes
and 15 kegs of ice cold
beer will also be available.
Tickets can be pur-
chased in the art, drama,
and music offices in
advance for $2.
Tickets at the door will
be $3.
The ball will be held on
Oct. 27. For more infor-
mation call the art depart-
ment office, and get your
ticket now for this extra-
vaganza.
The ECU Racquetball
Club is trying to identify
all interested faculty, staff
and students. Clinics and
tournaments are being
planned with competition
between schools being
scheduled. All interested
persons, please contact
Nancy Mize, 757-6387, 204
Memorial Gym.
pN)inet)cck�
The 1979-80 phone
books are in. If you do not
have one yet, they are
available in the SGA office
located on the second floor
of Mendenhall, Room 228.
fccvlir
Take advantage of
these bowling specials at
Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter: "Red Pin Bowling7
p.m. to 10 p.m. every
Sunday bowlers get a
chance to win one FREE
GAME with every game
bowled. "Rent-A-Lane
Every Saturday from 12
noon to 6 p.m. you can
rent a lane for $3.00 for
one hour. "Discount Day"
13 off the price of
bowling every Monday
from 2 p.m. until 6 p.m.
tacfe(3nincn
The deadline for regis-
tering for the ACU-I
BACKGAMMON Tourna-
ment is Friday, Oct. 26.
All full-time students who
wish to participate must
register at the Mendenhall
Billiards Center. The dou-
ble-elimination tournament
will begin Monday, Oct.
29 at 6 p.m in the
Multi-Purpose Room in
Mendenhall.
This tournament will
determine the one winner
who will represent ECU in
the regional ACU-I Recre-
ational Tournaments at
UNC-Charlotte in Febru-
ary. The three-iay tu
expense paid trip Jot the
delegate will be sponsored
by Mendenhall Student
Center.
Students Supply Store
of
East Carolina University
announces an
utographing session for
the novel, Vision Quest,
authored by Terry Davis
of the
English Dept. faculty
The novel, Vision Quest, has been highly
received by many critics and is scheduled for
printings in French in the near future.
John Irving, author of The World According to
Garp, has this to say:
"Terry Davis is a wonderful storyteller
�comic and wise. Vision Quest is the
truest novel about growing up since
The Catcher in the Rye and it's a bet-
ter novel about wrestling, and wres-
tlers, than The World According to
Garp�John Irving
Mr. Davis will be in the Students Supply
Store Wednesday, Oct. 31 , from 2:00pm
to 4:00pm to autograph copies of his book
Student Union Artist Series
presents
8pm
Tues,Oct.30
Hendrix Theatre
Student$2.00
Public $5.00
tickets at the
door $5.00
STUDENT
EAST CA&OUNA
l!





The East Carolinian
nian ' I �
editorials
& Opinions
Thursday, October 25, 1979 Page 4
Greenville, N. C.
Marlin Perkins:
where are you?
The editorial board of The East
Carolinian has noticed the existence of
several endangered species on campus,
and we felt it our responsibility as
working journalists to let the students
know exactly what is going on.
Unfortunately, we could not get an
interview with any members of these
species, as they are inanimate objects.
We can, however, identify the
predator. Like hunters and hydroelectric
projects, SGA buses are responsible for
making several species scarce. Several
victimized groups have been seen late
at night talking about their adventures,
and the pervading fear in the university
community. Despite frequent pleas from
the working press, as well as local
environmentalists, the buses continue
their rampage unchecked. The en-
dangered few huddle in garages and
near curbs, hoping that a bus will pass
without incident.
We have heard that the following
species are endangered at East Carolina
University:
�Volkswagens (germanus beetlebug).
This small, lovable creature, which
originally comes from Germany, cer-
tainly does not pose any threat to an
SGA bus, which outweighs it by
approximately seven tons. Without
warning, the SGA buses have been
known to leap across entire inter-
sections in a single bound (like the
campus police jump on unregistered
vehicles).
�State owned vehicles (bureaucratis
daytrip automobileus). This creature,
despite its great numbers and total lack
of movement, actually runs little risk of
becoming an endangered species.
However when feeding at a gasoline
pump, the brown Belchfire-8 runs the
risk of being backed into by an SGA
JACK ANDERSON &JOE SPEAR
bathroomus).
its outward
active social
passive and
bus � a surprise tactic which usually
works.
�Fire hydrants (canine
This creature, despite
appearance of being an
climber, is really very
quiet. It shakes and trembles whenever
it sees an SGA bus approaching, as well
it should. Its feet are sunk in concrete,
and its rear end is a water main, which
unfortunately do not make possible a
quick getaway.
�Trees (droppitus leavus). This creature
is the only one who has had a chance of
defending itself against a bus. In a
recent foray, for the first time, the
vulnerable front end of the bus was
shattered by a hard left hook from a big
one, allegedly an elm, who had taken
karate training while serving as a
hospital-tent pole in Korea. Unfor-
tunately, droppitus leavus children have
to worry. The best they can do is score
a direct hit on a small bumper.
�Datsun 280Z's (vroom vroomus). This
sedate gentleman from Japan tried to
sidestep the dreaded bus. Unfortunate-
ly, by backing up (which seems to be
the modus operandi of the buses) the
bus was able to take a swipe at the
hood and left front end of the Datsun,
inflicting dents scratches, and a
terrible headache. Th� OaSn dutifully
reported to the ECU Infirmary, where it
got a dose of cough medicine and was
sent home.
Who knows which species will be
the next to fear for its existence;
bicycles, parking meters, light poles,
dumpsters, small animals and human
beings.
One day Marlin Perkins may devote
an entire show to the rescue of all
species at ECU smaller than a building.
WEEKLY SPECIAL
By Jack Anderson
and Joe Spear
WASHINGTON The
Bermuda Triangle is a phe-
nomenon! that mystifies
many scientists unable to
explain the high rate of air
navigation disasters occur-
ring there. But even more
puzzling is the Bahama Tri-
angle that runs from fugi-
tive crooked financier, Rob-
ert Vesco, to an oil-rich
Arab dictator, Libya's
Muammar Qaddafi, and
thence to the doorstep of
Jimmy Carter's White
House.
Vesco, a Wall Street buck-
etshop operator, did a moon-
light flit from this country
to find refuge in the Carib-
bean from federal charges
of fiduciary finagling. He
took with him millions of
dollars bilked out of inves-
tors and escaped extradition
efforts by the U.S. govern-
ment. We have evidence that
Vesco is luxuriating at a
tropical hideaway in the
Bahamas.
From Vesco, the next line
of the triangle runs to
Qaddafi, the fanatic Libyan
strongman who is using his
country's OPEC oil as a
whip to promote his obses-
sive Arab" nationalistic
dreams. Qaddafi channels
his petrobuck millions into
terrorist groups around the
world, surreptitiously seeks
to obtain nuclear weapon
cipability for the Islamic
cause and is relentless in
advocating a war to the
death against Israel.
His Arab neighbors are
chary about setting off the
dynamite keg of war in the
Middle East, so the hawk-
like Qaddafi is resorting to
Bahama Triangle Includes
Vesco, Qaddafi and Billy
economic warfare to bring
the Jewish state and its
allies to their knees.
We've learned from a
secret intelligence report
that Vesco and Qaddafi have
had an unholy alliance since
the early 1970s to help the
Libyan dictator's economic
warfare. Both found com-
mon cause in their animosi-
ty to the United States
government.
Vesco, the report relates,
has provided financial
advice to the Libyan leader
on how to manipulate oil
production and prices in
ways that will keep the
American dollar hostage to
Qaddafi demands.
Sources from the intelli-
gence community tell us
that Qaddafi is driving the
dollar down by using his oil
wealth to buy gold. Libya
was the first OPEC govern-
ment to announce it was
raising the price on its sore-
ly needed petroleum. This
threatens to set off another
.disastrous round of OPEC
oil hikes for the free world.
From the canny financial
schemer Vesco and the
fierce Arab leader Qaddafi,
the triangle leads to two of
Carter's most intimate asso-
ciates - Brother Billy, and
White House chief of staff,
Hamilton Jordan.
Billy Carter has become
so closely involved with the
Libyans that he could be
considered a kissing cousin.
A federal grand jury in New
York is looking into his ties
with both Qaddafi and Vesco
on a warpiane deal.
A Vesco move to reach
Carter's ear and end
Washington's extradition
proceedings against the con-
victed swindler was aimed
at Jordan's inner sanctum. A
Jordan subordinate listened
to a Vesco emissary who had
been offered a million dollar
commission to get the
Carter administration to
lower the heat. Another fed-
eral grand jury is looking
into this.
"Legitimate" Crime:
More and more law-abiding
Americans are unwittingly
doing business with the Mob.
Even though John Q. Citizen
may never deal with drug
peddlers, loan sharks or
racketeers, he's helping the
Mafia Godfathers live high
and mighty.
A classified report from
the files of the Drug
Enforcement Administra-
tion shows how organized
crime has gone legitimate.
The report gives this stark
picture: "Organized crime
figures have invested in a
wide variety of businesses
that encompass almost eve-
ry sector of the U.S. econo-
my. A preliminary survey of
a wide variety of basic data
on illicit drug traffickers
identified at least 500 busi-
nesses that are entirely or
partially owned by orga-
nized crime figures
The underworld's Fortune
500 list doesn't consist of
corner speakeasies or bookie
joints. The DEA has found
the heirs of Al Capone own-
ing banks, stock brokerages,
insurance companies and
real estate ventures. Their
secret domain extends to
trucking companies, con-
struction businesses and
auto repair shops.
The Mafia's portfolio also
includes bars, clubs, cafes
and restaurants; retail
stores and service indus-
tries; hotels, social clubs and
resorts, medical clinics and
labor union interests.
With the muscle of the
Cosa Nostra and the untaxed
profits from illegal enter-
prises, the Mob has the
weapons to drive any com-
petitors out of business.
Headlines and Footnotes:
The bloated oil companies
aren't likely to let the
embryo gasohol competition
siphon off any of their prof-
its. The oil giants are refus-
ing to let their credit cards
be honored at stations that
offer gasohol and are forc-
ing service station owners
who want to sell the new
economy fuel substitute to
buy new pumps. The Feder-
al Trade Commission is
investigating the squeeze
out.
CIA insiders are keeping a
sharp eye on Soviet moves in
the backwater kingdoms of
the Middle East such as
South Yemen and Oman.
They've detected evidence
that Kremlin agents are
encouraging -dissident tribal
movements within the sn��il
Arab kingdoms. Analysts
agree that the Soviet Union
eventually must turn to the
Middle East for their own
oil needs and are trying to
get the Russian Bear's paw
under the tent.
Copyright. i�7t,
United Feature Syndicate, lac
JaeMbN C
SHE KEPT TRW TO VflRN rtEBUTI DIDN'T USTEti! SHE
SfllO"FRED YOU B�TF�RNOT RWi THAT ECU TRANSIT BJT I DIDN'T
LISTEN
Letters to the Editor
Reader defends 'show'
To the Editor:
As I turned through
the pages of Tuesday's
issue of the East Caro-
linian I came across an
article concerning a Greek
Fraternity Block Show in
which my fraternity per-
formed and I myself had
participated in. The article
contained criticism that
would have normally pro-
ducted immediate anger
and resentment but due to
the writer's appearent dull
knowledge of Black Greek
Fraternities I found it
quite amusing.
Later I found out that
the writer of the article
was a member of another
Black Fraternity on cam-
pus. This did not amuse
me. He himself had
participated in Block
Shows but not of such
outstanding quality. His
fraternity by chance hap-
pen to be the first Black
Fraternity to establish a
charter on this campus
and the first to perform a
block show this semister.
I'm sure that his article
did not represent the
collective opinion or efforts
of his fraternity. Being a
foreign student he ex-
pressed the views of "At
least the way it look from
here" himself.
This rebuttal is not
to discredit the writer's
personal opinion because
we all have one, but to
explain to him and others
what members of Black
Fraternities have tried to
explain for the last five
years.
The
reason for Block
legality of Block
Shows
The
Shows
The reason for pro-
fanity, dog collars and
other attraction mecha-
nism
The legality of pro-
fanity, dog collars and
other attraction mecha-
nism
Block Shows have been
an activity of Black
fraternities as early as
1920. They are designed to
coincide with the stereo-
types and trademarks
gathered by individual
fraternities throughout the
years. They serve as
entertainment, attraction
mechanisms for potential
pleadges, and a means of
Fraternity competition.
The most important
thing that should be said
is that Block shows are
just that "Shows They
do a very poor job at
projecting the personalities
or ideas of the individuals
that perform them and this
should be taken into
consideration. The Three
Black Fraternities on this
campus are comprised of
very fine young men who
have beyond any doubt
contributed their share to
promoting social and ser-
vice activities on this
campus and the sur-
rounding community.
Sylvester Graves
Disco music is criticized;
Reader longs for 'golden oldies'
To the Editor places. The songs have no to Bill Haley and the I think that new
f an A� ,k meanmg' and ey mostly Comets? Or Buddv Holly? countrv place out on te
1 went downtown the seem to e�rv� �c � tl � j � . r n i
nt. r � i t . , . T f , , l0 serve as a They just don't make edge of town will make a
�ww disfressiL to " for nervous music like that anymore, killing, if they plav the
TZLt A�T JL'lJd frtShmen tFying t0 ask at least not around here cards right. Lord, now I
say the least As I walked other nervous freshmen to And they really should
the streets, all I could hear dance,
was disco music.
long sometimes for a good
Johnny Pavcheck song, or
Now, I like all kinds of h �fc � ifkeTJor - Y�U g��" ?-
MUSIC, but I have a
complaint when what I
have to wear the Gosh-
hea? Turning bV'eir"0" ' hear about is something
STSTyS ahout somebody shaking their
hear the words to the booty or something
songs, you can t see your K jg
dancing partner (although more people, all jumping damndest looking clothes
that might not be such a up and down in the dark. to the disco. I saw a girl
bad idea, judging from the If the discos had any the other night, and she
looks of some people you sense, they might play wasn't leaving anything to
see in disco places.) some good music once in a the imagination at all. I
It's not the places while. They should play have seen pieces of
themselves that make me some Elvis, or some Fats Kleenex that were thicker
mad, or get me upset at Domino, or something like than the scarf she was
all, it's the music in the that. Whatever happened wearing for a shirt.
come over the radio. But
all I hear is something
about somebody shaking
their booty or something.
It gets terrible to have
to live in this the greatest
country in the world, and
to have to know that all
my children will ever have
to listen to is disco.
I sure hope that no one
takes offense at this little
note.
But I have had mv sav,
and now I feel better.
John Nilsson
The East Carolinian
MANAGING EDITOR
Richard Green
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Anita Lancaster
NEWS EDITOR
ASST. NEWS EDITOR
FEATURES EDITOR
ASST. FEATURES EDITOR
EDITOR
Marc Barnes
DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
Robert M. Swaim
ASST. DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
Terry Herndon
ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR
Leigh Coakley
BUSINESS MANAGER
Steve O'Geary
Karen Wendt
Terry Gray
Bill Jones
John Ross
SPORTS EDITOR
ASST. SPORTS EDITOR
COPY EDITOR
AD TECH. SUPER.
Charles Chandler
Jimmy Dupree
Diane Henderson
Paul Lincke
TH CAST CAROLINIAN Is the student
newspaper of East Carolina University
sponsored by the Media Board of ECU
and Is distributed each Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic year
(weekly during the summer
Offices are located on the second floor of
the Publications Center Old South
Building. Our mailing address Is: Old
South Building, ECU, Greenville, NC
27834.
The phone numbers are: 757-8366, 6967,
6306. Subscriptions are $10 annually,
alumni $6 annually.






Key HEW
25 October 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 5
Loan procedures changi
for needy ECU stude
The infirmary is offering flu shots to students for a small fee
(Photo by Richard Green)
� -� fl campus system
M M L � . achieved withou
hots available u�
WASHINGTON (AP)
�A federal official who
played a key role in the
government's desegrega-
tion battle with the
University of North Car-
olina has resigned.
David S. Tatel of the
Health, Education and
Welfare's Office for Civil
Rights since 1977, re-
signed to return to private
law practice. His resign-
ation is effective Oct. 31.
Tatel said earlier this
year he would leave the
federal agency. And he
said Monday he was hot
resigning because of a
publicized rebuke from
HEW Secretary Patricia R.
Harris, who reportedly
called Tatel politically
insensitive.
Concerning the UNC
HEW dispute, Tatel told
The News and Observer of
Raleigh that he did not
believe further desegreg-
ation of the state's 16�
campus system could be
achieved without elimin-
ation of some of the
duplicate programs at
nearby predominantly
white and predominantly
black schools.
"You need something
affirmative, something
positive to dismantle the
dual system. And the
heart of the dual system is
identical programs for
blacks and whites. That's
true aM over the South
Tatel said.
Program duplication
has been the main sticking
point in the negotiations.
When university officials
rejected HEW's call for
elimination of the similar
programs on nearby cam-
puses, the negotiations
broke down and HEW
began administrative pro-
ceedings to cut off por-
tions of the near $90
million the university
system receives annually
in federal funds.
Tatel said he believed
the dispute could be
settled through negotia-
tions rather than in court.
His successor has not
been named.
The procedures for getting an SGA
loan have changed, according to a
memorandum from Elmer E. Meyer, vice
chancellor for student life, to Joy Clark,
student fund accounting manager.
Effective immediately, SGA loan
applications will be available from both
the Student Fund Accounting office and
the office of Student Financial Aid.
Also loans can now be approved by
either the SGA president (currently Brett
Melvin) or the SGA secretary.
In the past, students had to go to
Whichard building to get signatures for
loan applications and then return to the
student center.
Also according to the memo, Melvin
will be developing an information sheet
which will explain such things as the
amount of the loan, the eligibility
requirements, terms of repayment and
enforcement procedures.
At the present time, there is no extra
charge for the loans; that is if the student
pays back the same amount that he or she
borrows.
However, Melvin has brought the idea
of charging $1 for each of the loans before
the SGA so that the student government
could regain some of the money it loses
each year through default.
The matter of a service charge on the
loans is expected to come up again at a
later SGA legislative meeting.
ECU infirmary
I SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE
I
I
Flu shots will be
available for students in
the ECU Infirmary, before
the upcoming flu season,
according to Kay Van-
Nortwick, administrative
assistant to the infirmary.
A small fee will be
charged for the shots.
VanNortwick stressed
the fact that students who
have chronic ailments,
such as asthma, diabetes,
chronic bronchitis, emphe-
sema and heart disease
and also paralytics (per-
sons who use wheelchairs)
should get the shots as
soon as possible.
The shots are available
from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
daily except Saturday and
Sunday.
People under the age
of 26 will have to have a
back-up shot about one
month after the first
in order for it to be
effecitve.
People over the age of
26 will only require one
shot, and those who had
the shot last year will need
a booster this year.
Students beyond 26
years of age and those
who require boosters- will
be charged $1.50 for the
shot. Students under the
age of 26 will pay $2.50.
Normally, January and
February are the months
when most students get
the flu, according to
VanNortwick, but getting
the ihots early helps to
prevent having the illness
in the early months of the
year.
Students are strongly
urged to have the flu
shots.
CAUTION
You may lose money if
you miss the Shoe
Gallery's, buy one pair at
lull price get the second
pair at �2 price, COUPON
SALE. You must bring
I
I
I
coupon with you.
10-6, MonSat.
1st pair must be
at least $10.00
The Shoe Gallery
720 Atlantic at
Dickinson Ave.
hjafR, by Nature's Way
specializing in natural hair cuts for men & women
Downtown Mall
Greenville
appointments only
758-7841
We've told you it was coming and now it's here!
Carolina East
Mall
V
GRAND-OPENING
SPECIALS
FREE GIFT WITH EACH $10.00 PURCHASE
LARGE GROUP
SWEATERS
$6� to '990
Reg Values To $17
ASSORTED STYLES
�ZIP CARDIGANS
�BUTTON-FRONT CARDIGANS
�COWL NECKS
I
WOVEH-TRIM
ACRYLIC KNIT TOPS
$3
Reg. $10
PERFECT WITH PANTS
AND SKIRTS.
BUY SEVERAL

"LUCKY DAY
WARDROBE GIVE-AWAY
REGISTER BELOW IN D. A. KELLY'S
FOUR-LEAF CLOVER FOR A
BEAUTIFUL NEW FASHION
WARDROBE VALUED AT $200
POLY-WOOL
BLEND SKIRTS
�TWEED TEXTURE
�SUT FRONT
$15 Values
HOW$8"
TWEED PANTS
�BLOCK-TWEED TEXTURE
�PIN-DOT TWEED TEXTURE
�BELTED
$16 Values
NOW"
LARGE GROUP WOVEN PLAID SKIRTS $T
SPECIALS ALSO AVAILABLE IN OUR DOWN-TOWN STORE
Woody
Allen's
Interiors
This Friday and
Saturday night
7 and 9 p.m.
Hendrix Theatre
Sponsored by the
Student Union Flints Committee
So get ready!
the place to see
the place to be i
Carolina East Mall
PHONE 7564242
VISA'
CCCNING
WEDNISDAY, OCT. M
10 AM. - f fcM-
ALSO LOCATED DOWNTOWN,
EVANS ST. MALL
I





The East Carolinian
Th
mian 1 m
features
Thursday, October 25, 1979 Page 6
Greenville, N. C.
J
A
ECU Symphonic Wind Ensemble
Sunday concert will be free
Coming Attractions
ROW
For the fifth consec-
utive year, The Roxy
Music Arts and Crafts
Center, Inc. wil be
sponsoring their
Halloween
Ball.
The Ball will take place
Wed Oct. 31, at Twin
Rinks on 14th Street from
Annual
Buford T. Band and the
hard rock Two Dollar
Pistol Band.
The Roxy, a non-profit
organization, lost money
on several concerts held in
and were
By BILL JONES
Features Editor
The ECU Symphonic
Wind Ensemble will pre-
sent it's Fall Concert on
Sunday, October 28 at 8:15
p.m. in Wright Audi-
torium.
One of the School of
Music's major performing
groups, the Wind Ensem-
ble will perform works by
such artists as Barber,
Vivaldi and Grainger.
Ann Flounders Searl,
piccolo soloist, will be
featured in the perfor-
mance of Vivaldi's Con-
certo in C Major. Searl,
who teaches and performs
piccolo and flute in the
Greenville area, began
studying piccolo at the age
of 9. She attended the
Eastman School of Music,
where she majored in flute
and woodwind pedagogy.
Her teachers have in-
cluded Joseph La Monaco,
John Fischer and Eleanor
Mitchell, among others.
the Symphonic Wind
Ensemble's Fall Concert
will be conducted by
Herbert L. Carter, chair-
man of the School of
Music's Instrumental
Faculty.
The Ensemble will
present the same program,
by invitation, to the North
Carolina Music Educator's
Association's Convention
on Monday, November 19
at Benton Convention
Center in Winston-Salem.
The Ensemble's per-
formance Sunday is free to
the public. The selections
offered should appeal to a
wide variety of tastes.
Barber's "Commando
March" utilizes constant
contrast of rythms. Bas-
sett's "Sounds, Shapes
and Symbols" is some-
what aggressive in nature
and is intended to display
the talents of a fine
ensemble. "Lincolnshire
Posy composed by P.A.
Herbert L. Carter conducts
a rehearsal for the ECU
Symphonic Wind Ensem-
Grainger, consists of six
characteristically inventive
settings of English folk-
songs. The program will
also feature a 'Polka' folk
tune.
ble's Fall Concert. The
concert will be held on
Sunday, Oct. 28, in Wright
p.m.
Auditorium at 8:15
The concert is free
(Photo by Marianne Baine)
Rick James lives out his
fantasies through music
Masquerade the summer
forced to close
The Fifth Annual Mas-
querade Ball will serve as
a fund raiser helping the
cover rental ex-
penses, pay musicians,
past
8 p.m. until 3 a.m. The
Ball has previously been joxy
held at the Roxy Movie
Theater building on Die- cjear past" debts and to
kenson Avenue. initiate savings for the
acquisition of a new
Fresh local talent who building,
will be featured at the
event are: Real Gone Cats, General admission is
a '60s progressive, original $4 and 12 for Roxy
rock band; the Jerry members. A prize of $100
Thomas Band, adding a will be presented to the
bit of rhythm and blues; individual with the best
some jazz rock from the costume.
SLENCZYNSKA
World-renowned pianist
Ruth Slenczynska will be
featured in a recital on
Thursday, Oct. 25, at 8:00
p.m. in Wright Audi-
torium .
BEAUX-ARTS BALL
The 1979 Beaux-arts Mas-
querade Ball, sponsored
by the Visual Arts Forum,
will be held on Friday,
Oct. 26, at 8:00 p.m. in
the Grey Gallery at
Jenkins Art Building.
FRANK
Noted pianist Claude
Frank will appear at
Hendrix Theater on Tues-
day, Oct. 30, at 8:00 p.m.
By PAT MINGES
Features Writer
Rick James is one of the most intense
forces in Black music and is beginning to
manifest an even stronger impetus in all
popular music. He and George Clinton
live out their fantasy world through their City � 'The city high in your mind
music. Musically, Fire It Up is a vibrant
Moreover, the create an idyllic world endeavor ranging from hard driving funk
force of Fire It Up, and indeed all of funk,
is to liberate oneself from this limiting
environment. Rick James' last album was
Busting Out Of L Seven. To break out of
"L Seven" is to cease to be "a square, a
roid in a closed box Only if you bust out
of L Seven can you proceed to reach Stone
of brotherhood, good vibes and boogie
times. Each is a platinum recording artist;
they have sold two million or more of one
album.
Rick James is the driving force of punk
funk. "What in the world is punk funk?"
some may ponder. "This punk is bad
to mellow, sophisticated ballads. An
impressive facet of this album is Rick
James' ability to shift easily from the
slow-tempo love music to frenetic dance
ditties that will drive you to the stainless
steel floor. The horn arrangements on this
album are excellent, at times breaking
enough, but what's this punk funk jive?" into solos that have a distinct jazz flavor,
Punk funk is "To be one with yourself; To and the strings support the gentle
be rebellious, aggressive, Able to do and
say what you feel at all times, without
inflicting mental or spiritual pain (Rick
James)
His new album has a transcendental
quality, breaking through cultural bound-
melodies in a subtle but effective manner.
Try as it might, few artists can match
the emotional content and concern for the
welfare of the individual found in James'
music. It is a unique paradox, the pairing
Nigroids, Whiteroids, Buddaroids, Jew-
roids, Mexiroids, Orieroids Fire It Up is
James' latest, in reference to the
"Cannabis delectus or perhaps the title
of James' first big hit, "Mary Jane
One of the central concepts behind the
Coffeehouse presents Perry Leopold,
quality entertainment for a song
This Friday, Oct. 26,
the Student Union Coffee-
house Committee will pre-
sent Perry Leopold in
concert in the Multi-pur-
pose room of Mendenhall
at 9 and 10 p.m.
Admission is 50 cents.
His music has been
described as a cross
between Jethro Tull and
Jackson Browne. Perform-
ing a largely original
repertoire, Leopold has
toured extensively in the
U.S opening for acts
such as Supertramp, Janis
Ian, Daryl Hall and John
Oates, Cheech 'n' Chong,
Firefall, The Outlaws,
Jerry Garcia, The Nitty
Gritty Dirt Band and
others. He has performed
over 100 major concerts.
aries with its powerful appeal and drive, of goodtime party music with such deeply
This album is for 'Roids: All y'all, personal statements, but perhaps it is an
attribute not uncommon in Black music.
The concepts behind James' music are
deeply rooted in black consciousness, and
therein lies its appeal to all individuals
concerned with these ideals.
Rick James is the supreme being in his
fantasy world presented in Fire It Up in
that he handles the major tasks in the
presentation of the album. James writes
all the music, renders the superb
arrangements, and manages the produc-
tion chores on Fire It Up. Would you let
anybody funk with your fantasy?
Once again, one of the major trends of
the seventies is a flight from the harsh
reality of an increasingly complex
environment through various methods of
fantasy. Rick James attempts to free
individuals from their restrictive in-
fluences and allow them to visit his
fantasy world of Stone City, and the gift
of love that is his can become yours, too.
As Rick says:
"Don't just sit there in your chairs
Actin' like L-Seven squares
Don't ever get too hip to sing and shout
now
Funk was made to get you high
His material is largely
personal, with a richly
baroque, melodic side
offset by dramatic, mascu-
line accents and tied to
finely filigreed guitar fig-
ures and bittersweet
chording that pay off. His
vocfl.1 talents hsvc been
compared tc CatSteven� L�)KMll0G A60UT C0CUG�THC HM WW
Keith Carradine and �
lyrics to Jackson
Rick James has released a new album
which he wrote, arranged, and
produced himself, called "Fire It Up
Albums courtesy of The Record Bar,
Carolina East Mall and Pitt Plaza.
Inspiration by the Transition Class,
Greenville Middle School.
Humor
Good morning, you groggy-eyed creatures.
I'm working on the assumption that all of vou have
mothers who have told you a thousand times to get
plenty of rest. The training of our formative years
supposed to remain with us. My only question, then, is
why the hell do college students make a habit of pulling
all-nighters?
Admittedly, I'm one of the worst offenders of the
"early to bed" rule T have a terrible habit of finding
myself hunched over the books at ungodly hours of the
morning, and even though I hate myself for it. I'm
continually repeating the process.
What process, you may ask.
Aw, come on. The system by which we all put things
off until we realize at midnight before a mid-term that
hey, there are only eight more study hours until the big
moment. So, we always find ourselves pulling out the
musty texts at the witching hour, with the adrenalin of
pure panic pushing us onward.
Frankly, I'm getting sick and tired of greeting 4:00
and 5:00 in the morning with coffee cup and highlighter
in hand. I begin to value the beauty of uninterrupted
sleep at moments like that and tend to lose sight of my
studies.
The other day 1 decided to get entirely caught up so I
wouldn't have to pull any more all-nighters. After losing
two nights of sleep trying to catch up. 1 gave up and
resigned myself to the'fact that 1 will be welcoming the
dawn before every test of this semester.
I would really like to meet the genius who invented
No-Doze. The man must be a millionaire by now who
can probably sleep all day if he so chooses. I like to
visualize him as an apathetic college student, much like
mvself, who many years ago got tired of guzzling coffee
to'stav awake while studying for finals. I see him at 3:00
a.m mind wandering from Darwin's theory
evolution, thinking, "There's got to be a better way
I mean, if vou think about it, you lose an awful lot of
time tracking 'back and forth to the bathroom, relieving
vourself of vour liquid eye opener. So I see this guv
thinking, "Eureka! I'll put caffeine in a pill He drop
out of school, makes and markets his pill and sleeps
soundly all the way to the bank. I really hate that guy. If
he'd given me time, could have thought of putting
caffeine in a pill.
And hey guys, what would the vast majority of us do
if we didn't have cigarettes to keep us company? 1 d
lose my mind without them. I did, in fact, try to pull an
all-nighter without cigarettes once. I craved a shot of
nicotine all night and ended up flunking a test due to
lack of concentration. The pack I bought and smoked
after the test made me feel much better though.
I think one of my fondest memories of my college
years will be that of myself nodding off over a pile of
books at 6:00 a.m. with my mouth tasting like a dust
bowl. Yes, I'll remember the over-flowing, still
smoldering ashtray and the coffee cup, half-filled with
stone-cold liquid � and, of course, the over-turned
bottle of No-Doze.
I'll never forget those precious moments when I
confronted my professors with blood-shot eyes and
apologized profusely for falling asleep in mid-lecture;
nor will I forget the after-test sessions with professors
who couldn't decipher my shakey handwriting. Yes, I
have a lot of great memories of dozing off during
post-final parties and sleeping Christmas break away.
Because of my years at ECU, I think I've learned
how wonderful going to bed at a decent hour really is,
and when I graduate, I may try it for a while.
Yours,
775I3j
and
his
Browne and Joni Mitchell.
6t Pavio A)ois
Perry Leopold will be the Coffeehouse this Friday,
special guest of the at 9:00 and 10:00 p.m.
Leopold's metier is the
mystic-melancholy love
song � with a visionary
slant that seems to widen
the scope of his message,
however personal � sung
over flourishing guitar or
piano.
As usual, the Coffee-
house will also offer a
wide variety of snaks for
the audience's enjoyment.
10V) CfliO tUfO I STCftfO
powNfr rue socijc, if
DOMT OfUHK A�i 0��


4
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25 0M.1BI THE EAST CAROLINIAN
English-Speaking Union Summer Study
Applications being accepted
ECU NEWS BUREAU
GREENVILLE-The
Greenville Branch of the
English-Speaking Union is
now accepting applications
for its annual Summer
Study Scholarship which
will be awarded to an
eastern North Carolinian
who wishes to pursue for
formal credit an authorized
course of summer study in
England.
In order to qualify for
the award, an applicant
must be a resident of the
environs of the Greenville
Branch of the English-
Speaking Union and must
plan to continue residing
in the area, which includes
Pitt, Greene, Lenoir,
Wayne, Craven and ad-
jacent counties.
Among the study pro-
grams available to
scholarship applicants are
those at the University of
London, Oxford Univer-
sity, the University of
Birmingham or the Uni-
versity of Edinburgh.
These programs are spon-
sored by the Institute of
International Education,
56-17th Street, NE,
Atlanta, GA.30309.
The English-Speaking
Union is an international
organization whose pur-
pose is to promote under-
standing and good will
among the English-speak-
ing peoples of the world.
Dr. Ralph Hardee Rives,
associate professor of En-
glish at East Carolina
University, is president of
the Greenville Branch,
which is one of seven
branches in North Car-
olina. John H. McLean,
Elizabeth Webb and Dr.
Keats Sparrow serve on
the Greenville Branch
Scholarship Committee.
Scholarship applicants
must submit a letter of
application, a detailed
curriculum vita, a recent
photograph and three let-
ters of character and
academic reference to the
ECU Scholarship Commit-
tee.
The application and
supporting documents or
inquiries about the sch
olarship and study pro
grams should be addres
sed to Elizabeth Webb
Department of English
East Carolina University
Greenville. Deadline for
submitting an application
is Dec. 21.
Ron Hinson sprints to victory in the 4th annual Greenville Criterium.
(Photo by Kip Sloan)
'Rocket' Hinson sprints to victory at race
By KIP SLOAN
Features Writer
Sunday's warm temp-
eratures brought bicycle
racers from several states
to compete in the 4th
Annual Greenville Criteri-
um.
The event was or-
ganized and sanctioned in
a scant iwo weeks by the
East Carolina Road Club,
in an effort to have the
race for the fourth con-
secutive year. Prizes and
cash donated by numerous
Greenville merchants drew
riders from Virginia, South
Carolina and Georgia to
compete in the 40-mile
Senior I and II race. The
one-half mile race course
on 1st, Reade, 2nd and
Washington Streets pre-
sented a test of handling
and strength, accelerating
at 320 corners in the
course of the race.
Many riders held the
lead at various points,
including Boyd Fusic
(CVC), Mike Throop
(Team Toyo), Pat Day
(CVC), and Jack Lassiter
(James River Schwinn),
but the man who took the
lead when it mattered
most was Ronnie "The
Rocket" Hinson, of Ral-
eigh (CVC).
Hinson rode away from
the field early in the race
and led by as much as 20
seconds at one time. He
looked sure to lap the pack
on the half-mile course.
The heat cut him short,
however, and he drifted
back into the group by the
halfway point.
He collected several
prizes for being the leader
in given laps.
From past experience,
Hinson knew that he
almost certainly had the
best sprint of the field.
Even though the other
riders were fully aware of
Hinson's spring, there was
nothing they could do
about it in the last lap.
Hinson roared out of
the last corner into the
lead a couple of seconds
before teammate Pat Day
reached the line, arms
lifted high and face full of
exhaustion. Boyd Fusic of
Raleigh took third.
Hinson has been used
to winning races since he
was 15, usually racing in a
category above his own.
He was the North Carolina
State Road Champion in
1978 and is one of the ten
racers in the area who
carry a Senior I license.
Besides being an ex-
cellent athlete, Hinson is
one of the best racers a
sponsor could have. He
never forgets to thank
sponsors, promoters and
even the crowd for having
a race.
Hinson presently rides
a graphite fiber and
aluminum bicycle manu-
factured by the Exxon
Chemical Corporation. As
with most racing bikes
today, the bicycle is
equipped with Campag-
nolo super Record com-
ponents, including several
parts made of titanium.
The 12-speed bike weighs
about 18 lbs. and is worth
over $1,500.
The possibility of land-
ing a spot on the United
States Olympic Road Team
is not out of range for
Hinson, who has another
year to go at North
Carolina State before
graduation. To be com-
petitive in the Olympic
trials, a racer must do a
minimum of 20 to 30 hours
a week of riding or 2000 to
3000 miles a month.
Unlike most athletes,
bicycle racers physically
peak in their mid-to-late
twenties, being able to
take more stress and push
hard for longer times as
they accumulate milage
over the years. At 21,
Hinson has nowhere to go
but up.
4th Annual Greenville
Criterium
1) Ronnie Hinson,
Carolina Velo Club,
Raleigh, N.C.
2) Pat Day,
Carolina Velo Club,
Raleigh, N.C.
3) Boyd Fusic,
Carolina Velo Club,
Raleigh, N.C.
4) Jack Lassiter,
James River Schwinn
Norfolk, Va.
5) Mike Throop,
Team Toyu,
Greensboro, N.C.
East Carolina Playhouse
Presents
Society hosts symposium
For Colored Girls
Who Have Considered
Suicide
When The
Rainbow
Is
Enuf
by ntozake shange
A passionately spellbinding choreopoem
which captures the inner feelings of
today's Black woman.
Directed Dy
Edgar R. Loessin
October 31 through November 3
November 5 through 7
8:15p.m.
Studio Theatre
ECU EWS BUREAU
GREEyVlLLE�
"From the First Draft
Forward a symposium
on preparing scholarly
manuscripts for public-
ation, will be sponsored by
East Carolina University's
Beta .u chapter of Sigma
Theta Tau Honor Society
in nursing Saturday, Nov.
3.
The program will begin
at 8:30 a.m. in the School
of Nursing building and
run until 4 p.m. It will
feature presentations by
four ECU faculty members
who have had success in
publishing scholarly pa-
pers, journal articles and
books.
The speakers will in-
clude Winona Ackerman
(Ph.D State University of
New York), Dixie Kold-
jeski (Ph.D Indiana Un-
iversity), Donald Lawler
(Ph.D University of Chi-
cago) and Therese Lawler
(doctoral student, N.C.
State University.)
Participants are invited
to bring "rough drafts" of
their manuscripts to after-
noon workshops on aspects
of style and editing.
AJJ interested persons
are invited to attend the
workshop. Sigma Theta
Tau members will be
admitted free of charge,
and other participants will
be charged a fee of $5
($2.50 for students).
Checks, payable to Sigma
Theta Tau, may be sent to
Howard Cummings at the
ECU School of Nursing,
Greenville.
Further information a-
bout "First Draft For-
ward" is available from
the School of Nursing.
SAAD'S SHOE
REPAIR
113 Grande Ave.
758-1228
Quality Shoe Repair
Eight senior medical technology
students achieve outstanding scores
By ECU NEWS BUREAU
GREENVILLE
� East Carolina Univer-
sity's eight senior medical
technology students ac-
hieved outstanding scores
on a national examination
sponsored by the Amer-
ican Society of Clinical
Pathology.
All of the eight passed
with scores in the top 30
percent of 6,000 U.S.
students taking the exam.
ECU student James
Kleinert Jr. of Greenville
scored higher than any
previous ECU graduate
and ranked in the top 10
percent nationwide.
Other high-scoring stu-
dents were Linda Braddy
of Greenville, Dare Cline
of Sanford, Kathy Dixon of
Winsont-Salem, Rebecca
Green of Maggie Valley,
Stanley Humienny of New
Bern, Sandra McLouglin
liles of Charlotte and
Brenda Sessoms Hum-
ienny of Bailey.
"Our departement is
understandably proud of
these students said Dr.
Susan Smith, chairperson
of the ECU Department of
Medical Technology.
'Students in ECU's
medical technology pro-
gram, a part of the School
of Allied Health and Social
Professions, must com-
plete courses in chemistry,
biology, mathematics and
the social sciences, as well
as specific medical tech-
nology courses and part-
icipate in two clinical
education phases of affil-
iated hospitals in Eastern
North Carolina.
PART
TIME
JOB
Looking for a part-time
job with flexible hours
and real business
experience? Northwest
Mutual Life Ins. Co.
has openings for college
agents. Call before noon
for appointments!
7SS-40SO
756-0088
Plaza
cinema P2-3
ow
THE GREAT "X" PERM SALE
Super Perms i
Super Prices!
Let them
eat steak!
-Jack
College students cannot exist on bread alone. Every so often they, too,
need to sink their teeth into a T-Bone.
As our contribution to higher education, Jack's has come up with the
coupon below, knocking 500 off any regular steak or seafood dinner
(sandwich platters excluded). All dinners come with a big baked potato,
roll and butter. The coupon will let you take a friend at the same 500 off
deal, if you like. .
50
C
JACK'S
STEAK HOUSE
50
C
Etrvww
pf-C�9tON
Higher Education for Less!
M�tt�reharg� and flu
756-8694
236 Carolina East Mall
II Steak eating 101. Course includes choice of any regular steak
or seafood dinner (sandwich platters excluded).
I�J Steak eating 102. Same, but with a friend. I get 500 off twice.
Offer good throughout 197980 school year.
Not valid on Tuesdays and cannot be used in addition to other specially-priced offers.
264 BY-PASS
I
i
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Pane 8 THE EAST CAROUNIAN 25 October 1979
��. ��� �����: ����:
Allen's Interiors is violently compelling
This Friday and Satur-
day night, Oct. 26 and 27,
the Student Union Films
Committee will salute the
comic genius of Woody
Allen with a special
popular film presentation
of Allen's seventh film as
a directorwriter, Inter-
iors.
The film will be shown
at 7 and 9 p.m. on both
evenings. Admission is by
Student ID and Activity
Card for students and
Faculty or Staff Card for
university personnel.
Allen's long-threatened
"serious" film is an
incredible achievement.
Coming from another di-
rector, Interiors might
have been heartbreakingly
disappointing. But coming
from Woody Allen, even
after the triumph of Annie
Hall, the film is violently
compelling.
Allen's tribute to Ing-
mar Bergman could not
have been much better
had Bergman himself di-
rected it.
Allen's study in
"beiges and earth tones"
is the ultimate midcult
American movie of the
seventies; it shares all of
the pluses of that bour-
geoise sensibility.
Fifteen years ago,
when the reigning Ameri-
can cultural set was
Philistine, Interiors
wouldn't have been given
a second thought by most
critics, who might have
dismissed it out of hand as
some "egghead" non-
sense. Certainly, now that
the dominant cultural sen-
sibility has reached the
level of midcult, seeing
Interiors is a must.
Gene Shalit, arbitor of
movie taste for the power-
ful Today show, pro-
claimed the film a "Mas-
terpiece A Work of
Art On just about every
level, Interiors is a
masterpiece.
It is clearly well made.
The colors used in the film
are very effective shades
of muted browns, tans and
grays, and the cinema-
tography is striking
throughout.
As far as subject
matter is concerned, "ser-
ious" may well be an
inappropriate appellation.
The tenuous possibility
exists that Interiors was
meant as a grand burles-
que, a parody of cosmic
proportions. Even if Allen
didn't mean it as such,
this remains one of the
many ways that audiences
can view the film. Who
knows? In twenty years
Interiors may well be
regarded as ultra-camp.
One way or the other, the
film warrants its attention.
our time.
In some strange way,
Woody Allen's own opera-
tion as a performer is
Kafkaesque � he accepts
the gross dangers of the
world with a terrified
innocence disguised as
comic equanimity.
One of his funniest
club routines is an account
of his inidvertent abduc-
tion by th s Ku Klux Klan
(Allen says he recognized
the Grand Dragon because
"he was the one wearing
the contoured sheet"). As
the Klansmen are about to
hang this Yankee Jewish
interloper, his life passes
66
It deals with the spiritual
turmoil, the floating unrest
that can only be traceable to
the bad choices in life And
how a lover can possess the
loved one as an object
95
ALLEN AS HERO
Woody Allen became a
national hero when his
movie Annie Hall won four
Academy Awards � for
best picture, for Allen
himself as best director,
for Allen and co-writer
Marshall Brickman as best
original screenwriters, and
for Diane Keaton as best
actress. Allen is without a
doubt one of the most
successful funny-men of
before his eyes. "I saw
myself as a kid again.
Goin' to school. Swimmin'
at the swimmin' hole.
Fryin' up a mess o'
catfish. Goin' down to the
general store. Gettin' a
piece of gingham for
Emmy Lou. And I realize
it's not my life. They're
gonna hang me in 1wo
minutes and the wrong life
is passing before my
��
eyes.
Comedy itself is Al-
Woody
Allen's
Interiors
This Friday and
Saturday night
7 and 9 pm
Hendrix Theatre
Sponsored by the Student
Union Films Committee
LMONDAY THRU
THURSDAY
AFTER 4PM
OFFER EXPIRES
len's psychoanalysis. He
denies that he has ever
felt particularly Jewish,
but his routines and
writings are filled with
sharp and funny refer-
ences to the dislocations of
being an urban Jew.
He is greatly fond of
his parents, who had to
scramble in various busi-
nesses during the Depres-
sion and are now retired.
He hated school and was
kicked out of New York
University and the City
College of New York and
knew that hurt his par-
ents. His way of handling
this was to say: "My
mother is a sensitive
woman. When I was
thrown out of college she
locked herself in the
bathroom and took an
overdose of mah-jongg
tiles
Whatever the real
cause of the depressions
and visions of death that
beset him as a kid he can
still joke about the whole
thing: "I was in analysis
for years because of a
traumatic childhood. I was
breast-fed through fals-
ies
Allen has been in
analysis for more than half
his life. More than analy-
sis, it's been the women in
his life that have most
helped to form him. He
married his first wife,
Harlene, when both were
teen-agers. His second
wife, Louise Lasser, who
had appeared in some of
his films, went on to
become the celebrated
"Mary Hartman Allen
says that "She's one of
the brightest, wittiest
women I've ever known
Of course, the most
important woman in his
life has been actress Diane
Keaton. Keaton came into
her own with her perfor-
mance (based on her own
character) in Allen's Annie
Hall and in Richard
Brook's Looking for Mr.
Goodbar.
Keaton has influenced
Allen on a more personal
level. Allen agrees with
Camus that women are all
we know of paradise on
earth. Like most modern
artists, he finds art itself
an embarrassment: "Art is
the intellectual's Catholi-
cism. It's the promise of
an afterlife. Of course it's
all fake
Discussing Interiors,
Allen says "When you do
comedy, you're not sitting
at the grownups' table,
you're sitting at the
children's table Allen
has the guts to get up and
sit at the grownups' table.
"It deals he says, "with
the spiritual turmoil, the
floating unrest that can
only be traceable to the
bad choices in life. Also
the apotheosis of the artist
beyond his real worth.
And how a lover can
possess the loved one as
an object he can control
But Allen's first tra-
gedy is inevitably still an
Allen movie. He is des-
perately afraid of being
pretentious or banal.
While making Interiors, he
watched a lot of soap
operas on television, to
make sure he wasn't doing
"As the World Turns"
without knowing it.
If Allen jumped off a
cliff in search of himself
with Interiors, he finally
and definitively found
himself with his latest
film, a bittersweet love
story and comedy, Man-
hattan.
Certainly the drive for
greater simplicity in one's
statements of complex
artistic truths is the mark
of the maturing artist, as
the work of Allen's idol,
Bergman, testifies. Man-
hattan is, thus, his best
film to date.
But, all things being
equal, the comic vision is
more intelligent and wiser
than the tragic, and in the
end more powerful and
useful. This is why it is
still important to be funny.
Filmmakers like Ingmar
Bergman may let us know
how it feels, but we know
that, to some extent,
already. Filmmakers like
Woody Allen � the comic
Woody Allen � help us to
deal with it.
At the end of the
beautiful Annie Hall,
AllenAlvy comes on again
to deliver one of the great
monologues of all time:
Allen uoos Keaton in 'Annie Hall
"Doc, my brother is
crazy. He thinks he's a
chicken
The Doc says, "Why
don't you turn him in?"
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the eggs
" Life is crazy, irrational,
and absurd.
But we keep going
through it because
I guess most of us
need the eggs
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Ihc East (Carolinian
lian m
sports
Thursday, October 25, .979 Page 9
Greenville, N.C.
Pirates face 15th-ranked UNC Saturday
�w.a m : aav. ,jm n�im iiiw i
oto h ('hap Curlev)
Pirate fumble al I INC in 78
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
To the East Carolina football team and head coach
Pat Dye, this Saturday's football game with 15th ranked
North Carolina is not just any other game.
"It's a big game, there's no doubt about that said
Dye. "People were calling it a big game way back in
July and August
But back then ECU fans had invisioned the Pirates
going into this game with an undefeated record, and a
3-0 slate against Big Four schools. Such is not the case.
As a matter of fact, the Pirates are 0-3 against the Big
Four.
so Saturday's game is not to gain a sweep of the
in-state Atlantic Coast Conference schools, but rather to
avoid a sweep by them.
"With a win at Chapel Hill Saturday we have a
chance to save a little face said Dye. "For that reason
we have probably put more significance on the game.
But nothing can erase those three losses
The losses came in close games at N.C. State and
Wake Forest and in an error-prone one at Duke.
"We're a much better team now than we were in
any of those games, said Dye. "Our two open dates
have helped tremendously
The open dates Dye spoke of came on Oct. 6 and
Oct. 20. In between the two off-weeks the Pirates
manhandled The Citadel 49-7 on Oct. 13.
"The open date before the Citadel game was a big
help said Dye. "I hope the one last week will prove to
be also
When asked at his weekly Wednesday press
luncheon whether or not he thought the Pirates had had
too much time off lately, Dye replied, 'That's hard to
sav until Saturday. But I don't think that will be a
problem, maybe against a lesser opponent but not
Carolina. We have had no problem keeping the players'
attention over the last two weeks
One thing the two open dates have done is allow two
injured stars to heal. Offensive tackle Joe Godette and
defensive tackle Noah Clark are both expected back in
action Saturday against the Tar Heels, though neither is
slated to start. Both suffered knee injuries last month.
"I don't know how much they'll play right now
said Dve. "It's just hard to tell how far they've come
back �
One thing about the contest that must concern Dye is
the home field advantage that the Heels will enjoy. "I
hope the ball will bounce our way a time or two he
said. "Usually if the football bounces in Kenan Stadium
it ends up in the hands of someone in a blue shirt
Dye thinks the Pirates are ready for the Tar Heels,
both mentally and physically. "I don't think our team is
going up there scared. At least I hope not. If we do we
will have some big, big problems
"I would like to think we can make it a good football
game, and maybe even come away with a win
Dye must feel confident about the ability of the
Pirate offense to move the ball on the UNC defense.
ECU ranks seventh in the nation in total offense, fourth
in rushing offense and 14th in scoring offense.
"We've moved the ball all year said Dye, "even in
the loss to Duke. A big key for our offense, though, is
that our defense make some things happen
As for the nationally ranked Tar Heels, who are 5-1,
Dye knows they will be impressive.
"They're playing better than at any time last
year he said. "Carolina has no weaknesses that we
can detect. They're just a sound, very talented,
well-coached football team
Kickoff time is slated for 1 p.m. at Carolina's Kenan
Stadium. A capacity crowd is expected.
-� v
'
ULU
u.
Portrait of a rivalry
- wanl to beat North
Heel fans don't
the essence ol an
till ECTC and EZU to a lot of
Pal Dye. "We have to
i"l -it too vncII with our fans
� i what East Carolina
nts and � through when talking to fans and
Chapl Hill.
and in other parts
Dve said. "It seems that
anti-Carolina. But I've
i vou hate somebody you're most
with ECU, since UNC is a
1.
the intensity and
lv ' ii th rivalry between the
ECU said ECU
e have no history, no
Cat -lina think they re better than
- lid Mike Davis, an ECU senior. "Since
in the ACC, they think we're not
iy them. But we're going to surprise
,een ECU and UNC is not a one-way
r Heels have the same degree of dislike
�ia plays competitively in one sport for a
ed -aid UNC student Bob
illv like u- to beat them so they
VCC.
they're not worthy of that. I
inything on Earth, but I pulled.for
students and fans have actually been
Pirate-Tar Heel game for granted. "I
-till thinking about last week's
ishman Bob Gentry.
- to prove that the rivalry between
See RIVALRY, page 10
I HC roach praises QB Green
Al Tyson
unofficially
withdraws
UNC's "Famous Amos" Lawrence
The up-and-down bas-
ketball career of Ea-t
Carolina center Al Tyson
has seemingly taken an-
other dip, this time for
good.
The 6-11 sophomore
from 1w interville went
through procedures to
withdraw from sehool
Tuesday. This action came
one week after he was
suspended from the team
for academic reason by
Pirate head coach Dave
Odom.
Odom was out of town
Tuesdav when Tyson took
his action. "Al did make
an effort to see me said
Odom. "My secretary has
told me that he came by
Odom made it clear
that Tyson's withdrawal
was strictly unofficial until
he had a chance to talk
with the big center.
"I tried to get in touch
with him several times
today said Odom. "But
this was a very busy day
and things just didn't work
out. But any actions he
made are unofficial until
we meet and I get some
idea of what his plans
are.
Odom admitted that he
was concerned that Tyson
would not return to the
team after the suspension
but that "we were cer-
tainlv in hope- that he
would decide to stick it out
and soon make a positive
contribution to the team
Tyson's career has
been full of -ueh story-
book incident His sign-
ing brought an NCAA
investigation that even-
tually led to the East
Carolina basketball pro-
gram receiving a one-year
probation.
Tyson quit the team
temporarily after last sea-
son but returned upon
persuasion from Pirate
coaches and players.
V-�,
6-11 center
Al Tvson
Crum, Tar Heels wary of Pirate wishbone attack
a
By JIMMV DuPREE
4ssistant Sports Editor
f a spectacular 35-21 triumph over the
fpacl Mate, it would appear that all is well
tor the Tar Heels of North Carolina.
id coach Dick Crum and the rest of his
ipel Hill contingent had no rest before they had to
e for the invasion of the Pirates of East Carolina
Saturday at Kenan Stadium.
"East Carolina will be the quickest team we have
d all season said Crum. "I am happy to be
playing a team of East Carolina's caliber at this point in
the -eason.
"You usually play up to the caliber of the opposition
i with playing someone below your levd, you're likelv
to lose some momentum
The Heels possess the top-ranked rushing defense in
the Atlantic Coast Conference, which could upset the
basically run-oriented wishbone of the Pirates.
"Leander Green is as good a wishbone quarterback
a- I've seen said Crum. "East Carolina is a better
I a-ing team than most wishbone teams, too
The passing defense of the Tar Heels showed signs
of breakdowns against State at Carter-Finley Stadium,
and East Carolina must capitalize on those mistakes.
Wolfpack quarterback Scott Smith repeatedly
contacted with tight end Lin Dawson, his second for the
Pack's first touchdown of the contest. Smith later hit
split end Mike Quick on a bomb to bring State to within
a touchdown of the floundering Heels.
"It's just one of those things explained Crum.
"Smith got excellent protection and he found a
receiver
The Pirates will have to establish a running attack
early and mix in passes to keep UNC off guard.
"We must avoid mistakes and turnovers says ECU
assistant Al Kincaid.
"Last year we turned the ball over to them six times.
We can ill afford to do that this year
Kincaid considers the Heels' linebackers to be
stronger than those of the Wolfpack, with Buddy Curry
(6-3, 221) and Darrell Nicholson (6-2, 223) "the key to
the defense
"Carolina plays a scheme where they try to protect
the linebackers so they can run from side to side said
Kincaid. "Carolina's defense is a lot like State's was at
the first of the year
Head coach Pat Dye states that "Carolina has no
weaknesses that we can detect.
"At most places they have exceptional depth he
said. "Their two inside linebackers are the best we've
ever played against
Offensively, the picture gets no better for East
Carolina.
"Famous" Amos Lawrence will probably not start
due to a continuing pulled groin muscle, but he will
figure into the Heels' game plans extensively.
Lawrence leads the team with 135 carries for 613
yards (4.5 yards per carry, 102.2 per game), even
though seeing limited action the past two outings.
Fullback Doug Paschall filled in at tailback against
State and is scheduled to start at that position against
the Bucs, with junior Billy Johnson lining up at fullback.
Quarterback Matt Kupec has connected on 64 out of
112 passes, including 10 touchdowns and only three
interceptions.
"They're going to run over us, around us, through
us and if that doesn't work, they're going to pass said
ECU assistant Wayne Hall.
"Kupec can throw well and he's an excellent
scrambler. Paschall gives them a real strong running
attack along with Billy Johnson. With those two in the
backfield, Carolina has a powerful running attack.
"Then they'll bring in Lawrence who's great on the
sweeps. They have two completely different offenses,
depending on who's in the backfield.
"It's going to be a real physical game he added.
"Carolina has an excellent offensive line. (Steve)
Junkman, (Ron) Wooten, and (Rick) Donnalley form a
strong wall
Billy Johnson bulls his way





Page 10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 25 October 1979
The Fearless Football Forecast
ECU AT UNC
N.C. STATE AT CLEMSON
MARYLAND AT DUKE
AUBURN AT WAKE FOREST
HOUSTON AT ARKANSAS
FLORIDA STATE AT LSU
NAVY AT PITTSBURGH
WASHINGTON AT UCLA
KENTUCKY AT GEORGIA
MICHIGAN STATE AT OHIO STATE
SOUTH CAROLINA AT NOTRE DAME
FURMAN AT VMI
CHARLES CHANDLER
(55-28-1)
ECU 28-27
N.C. State
Maryland
Wake Forest
Houston
Florida State
Pittsburgh
Washington
Georgia
Ohio State
Notre Dame
VMI
TERRY HERNDON
(51-32-1)
ECU 21-20
Clemson
Maryland
Wake Forest
Arkansas
Florida State
Pittsburgh
UCLA
Georgia
Ohio State
Notre Dame
Furman
JOHN NOLAN
(36-23-1)
ECU 21-20
N.C. State
Maryland
Wake Forest
Arkansas
LSU
Navy
UCLA
Kentucky
Ohio State
Notre Dame
VMI
JIMMY DuPREE
(48-35-1)
ECU 2221
N.C. State
Maryland
Wake Forest
Arkansas
Florida State
Pittsburgh
Washington
Georgia
Ohio State
Notre Dame
Furman
WOODY DURHAM
"Voice of the Tar Heels'
UNC 35-31
Clemson
Maryland
Wake Forest
Arkansas
LSU
Pittsburgh
Washington
Georgia
Ohio State
Notre Dame
VMI
1978 ECU-UNC action
Deacons ranked 18th
Wake getting attention
By DICK BRINSTER
Associated Press Writer
RALEIGH N.C. (AP)
� John Mackovic is a man
living his own impossible
dream at Wake Forest
University.
His name suddenly is
becoming Known to those
outside the Atlantic Coast
Conference and his talents
as a football coach are for
the first time being widely
acknowledged by the me-
dia within the league.
He is a man, unafraid
of controversy, who said
things about his team that
initially drew laughs in
press boxes from College
Park, Md to Atlanta.
The best was a remark
that translated into the
Demon Deacons being a
potential bowl team. Now
Mackovic could get the
last snicker.
His team has been
called meatballs, ragamuf-
fins you name it.
Mackovic didn't mind
when they laughed at him
but he took offense at
what he felt were dispar-
aging remarks that re-
flected on the character of
football players who'd
done everything he'd ask-
ed of them.
"Well, it just wasn't
right he said Tuesday in
a telephone interview.
"I'm proud of our guys.
They made it work
Led by quarterback Jay
Venuto and noseguard
James Parker, the Dea-
cons have established a
6-1 record and share the
lead in the ACC.
The fact that the
Deacons are 6-1 is not only
a tribute to their dedi-
cation, but an endorse-
ment of the quality of
Mackovic and his staff.
They have taken the same
players who knew 1-10 as
a way of life and in two
seasons lifted them into
18th position in the latest
Associated Press poll.
Such an accomplish-
ment must put the former
Deacon quarterback near
the top of any list when
the people who vote sit
down to pick the coach of
the year.
"Certainly, that would
be a great honor, and
anybody would be less
than candid if they said
they wouldn't cherish that
kind of recognition said
Mackovic. "But right now
I've got more important
things to think about
Foremost among them
is Saturday's meeting with
13th-ranked Auburn. The
Deacons, as usual, will be
the underdog, although
the point spreads are
shrinking.
In four of Wake
Forest's first seven games
the opposition was favor-
ed. The oddsmakers never
bought all those Macko-
vician theories on business
administration helping the
coaches and the art of
believing aiding the play-
ers.
You needed a calcula-
tor to figure the odds
when the Deacons went
down to Georgia and beat
the Bulldogs, who at that
point were ranked 12th.
Olympic
decision
NAGOYA, Japan (AP)
� The international 0-
lympic Committee's exec-
utive board was expected
to consider the trouble-
some problem of partici-
pation by mainland China
and Taiwan in the 1980
Olympics at its special
meeting today.
On Tuesday, the IOC
heard a proposal by Henry
Hsu, Taiwan's IOC repre-
sentative, that all nations
carry their Olympic flags
rather than national flags
at the Games' opening
ceremonies.
No decision was made
on the proposal, which
would require altering
Rule 64 of the Olympic
charter. Rule 64 stipulates
that each team must carry
its national flag in the
opening parade.
Later they went to Chapel
Hill and beat Dick Crum's
15th-ranked North Caro-
lina Tar Heels.
So, one would figure
the Deacons had disposed
of the heavies and could
skip down thrt vpH�w brick
road to1 something resem-
bling a 9-2 finish. Forget
it.
Three of the final four
opponents � Auburn,
Clemson and South Caro-
lina � all stand 5-1. The
Deacons must play Clem-
son and South Carolina on
the road. '
"I guess we'll have to
earn everything we get
said Mackovic.
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Rivalry
Cont'd from p. 9
the Pirates and Heels has not grown to the point where
it ranks with the Duke-Carolina and State-Carolina
rivalries.
"The East Carolina game just doesn't mean quite as
much to our students as the Duke and State games
said UNC Sports Information Director Rick Brewer.
"The tradition is the big thing in those games. We
haven't been playing ECU that long whereas we've been
playing Duke and State since way back when
Brewer does believe, though, that Carolina fans
want, and want badly, to beat the Pirates Saturday. "So
many of our students here have friends at ECU. They
would surely like to be able to go home with bragging
rights
And brag is exactly what the Tar Heels will do, says
ECU junior Frank Thornton. "The students there talk an
awful lot of junk said Thornton. "Last year when they
beat us, they talked like they'd just won World War HI
or something
From a player's point of view, Pirate offensive guard
Matt Mulholland thinks Saturday's contest is more thar
just any other game.
"It's always special to play in Chapel Hill said
Mulholland. "There's a lot of tradition there.
"There is definitely a big rivalry between the two
schools. The so Called 'hate factor' is generated by the
schools themselves. For example, East Carolina people
consider Carolina uppity while East Carolina people and
the school are called ECTC and stuff like that. I guess
it's sort of like the farmers playing the city boys
As game time draws near, the chatter about the
contest will grow. The stands will be full of hate talk
come Saturday. And no matter who wins, one can be
sure that the talk will not cease after the game is over.
SUPPORT
East Carolinian
Advertisers
PRESBYTERIAN STUDENT MINISTRY
East Carolina University
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25 October 1979 THE hASi caHouniaN i-aac ,
t
South Carolina, McGuire drama continues
Players make a threat
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP)
� If the University of
South Carolina trustees
fire basketball Coach
Frank McGuire, as news
reports indicate they plan
to do, they'll also have to
come up with a new team.
All 14 team members
told trustees Wednesday
they will not play for
anyone but McGuire,
South Carolina's coach for
the past 15 years.
"It is rumored that at
the board of trustees
meeting this Friday, Oct.
2b, enough votes will be
received not to renew
Frank McGuire's contract
as head basketball coach
unless he agrees to take a
job as vice president for
public relations next
year the team said in a
tatement.
"The team unanimous-
ly agrees that if Coach
McGuire is fired we will
not play.
"Our team is angered
by the way the board of
trustees has seeminly gone
out of their way to
embarrass Coach McGuire
and demoralize our team
on the eve of a season we
know will be a highly
successful one the
statement said.
Captain Mike Doyle,
who issued the statement
on behalf of the team, told
The Associated Press,
"This was the team's
idea. Our coach had
nothing to do about it
Doyle said McGuire
was told of the statement
and "he's real proud of
us. He's happy we're
behind him
Luca says
Shavers
is O.K.
CANTON, Ohio (AP)
� Frank Luca, manager-
trainee of heavyweight
boxer Earnie Shavers, says
an eye injury suffered on
Sept. 28 during his loss to
World Boxing Council
champion Larry Holmes
has not placed his career
in jeopardy.
Luca, a resident of
Canton, was concerned
because published reports
suggesting that Shaver's
career might be over
because of a torn retina.
"Earnie is just fine
Luca said Tuesday. "It's a
very minor situation.
Earnie got thumbed in the
third round of the Holmes
fight, and from that round
on he was having trouble
with double vision. So he
had eye surgery.
"He had a pinhead
tear of the retina. But the
operation was a total
success and Earnie will be
back in the gym sparring
i.i six weeks. In fact, I'd
love to get a fight with Big
John Tate for the World
Boxing Association title
Luca added.
The boxer's stay in
Baltimore's Johns Hopkins
Hospital after his 11th
Columbia radio station
WSCQ on Tuesday said.
McGuire had rejected a
demand by the USC
trustees that he agree by
Friday to step down as
coach and accept a public
relations job at the uni-
versity.
McGuire was unavail-
able for comment Wed-
nesday. But he said
Tuesday he had no
knowledge that he would
be fired, adding that he
expects to coach at least
through next season.
University President
James B. Holderman said
the broadcast report was
based on "unfounded
rumor and trustees
chairman R. Markley
Dennis said the board had
issued no "ultimatums" to
McGuire.
A Columbia newspaper
reported Wednesday that
McGuire turned down the
trustees' offer of a
$75,000-a-year job as spe-
cial assistant to Holder-
man. According to The
State, McGuire also was
told he could conduct
basketball camps at USC's
Columbia and Conway
campuses and could re-
ceive profits from those
ventures.
Doyle said he wrote the
statement because "I
wanted everybody to know
about this. The team is
confused over this. We're
behind Coach 1,000 per-
cent
He said the team is
"going to stand behind
him (McGuire) all the
way no matter who is
considered by the uni-
versity as a successor.
WSCQ reported that Phi-
ladelphia 76er assistant
coach Chuck Daly was
among those being con-
sidered by USC officials.
The statement was
signed by Kevin Dunleavy,
Kevin Darmody, Michael
Schwartz, Cedrick
Hordges, Henry Atkins,
Jim Graziano, Zam Fred-
rick, Derrick Scott, Jimmy
Foster, Mark Connaugh-
ton, Jim Strickland, Tom
Wimbush, Kenny Rey-
nolds and Doyle.
McGuire is the only
college coach to win more
than 100 games at three
schools. A member of the
National Basketball Hall of
Fame, McGuire led North
Carolina to the NCAA title
in 1957. His first collegiate-
coaching job was at St.
John's.
Coach to be fired Friday?
Frank McGuire
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP)
� University of South
Carolina basketball coach
Frank McGuire said if he
is to be fired Friday, he
doesn't know anything
about it yet.
Neither do university
President James B. Hold-
erman, Vice President for
Athletics William B. Put-
nam or several trustees,
judging from their reac-
tions to a broadcast report
Tuesday.
According to Columbia
radio station WSCQ, the
trustees set a Friday
deadline for McGuire,
South Carolina's basket-
ball coach the past 15
years, to accept a new job
with the university. The
radio station said it
learned from unnamed but
Lady Pirates down Wake
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
ECU field hockey took
another step in the right
direction yesterday as the
Lady Pirates soundly de-
feated the Deacons of
Wake Forest, 4-2.
East Carolina jumped
on the Deacs early in the
contest as Carol Belcher
pumped a Dana Salmons
assist into the unprotected
Wake goal for the only
score of the first half.
"We scored in the first
minute of the half on a
penalty corner said ECU
assistant Anne Holmes.
"The rest of the first half
was played around the
center of the field with
neither team gaining an
advantage
A penalty corner occurs
round technical knockout
loss to Holmes drew a lot
of speculation because
Shavers refused to accept
telephone calls and nurses
on his floor denied he was
at the hospital.
In addition, Shavers
was treated at Johns
Hopkins by noted eye
surgeon Dr. Ronald Mich-
els.
"Any time you have an
eye situation in Earnie's
profession, it is very
important that everything
is perfect Luca said.
"You don't want to take
any chances of getting out
of the hospital too soon.
That's why he stayed for
seven days. I think he is
on his way back home to
Warren, Ohio, now.
when a rule infraction
takes place within the
offensive circle around the
goal.
The second half began
with a bang as the Deacs
quickly jumped on the
napping Buc defense to
take a 2-1 edge.
Sophomore Stee Brown
claimed both Wake Forest
goals, one on a break-
away and the other on a
penalty corner.
"When we started out
the second half, things
just weren't clicking
offered Holmes. "We just
weren't in the game
mentally
The Bucs bounced back
though and tied the game
on a tip in by Donna
Nicholson on a shot
blocked by Wake goalie
Dorothy Wright.
Junior left inner Sue
Jones put East Carolina
ahead to stay with less
than five minutes remain-
ing in the contest on an
assist by senior right inner
Kathy Zwigard.
The veteral duo re-
versed the roles with less
than a minute remaining
to give ECU the final 4-2
bulge.
"We had a little
trouble on defense early in
the season explained
junior halfback Debbie
Harrison. "We finally got
it straightened out,
though.
"Each game it im-
proves a little bit
Offensively the Lady
Pirates appeared more
sound than they have in
earlier outings.
'We've worked on
spacing a lot in practice
said Harrison. "We've
worked on our inter-
changes (passes) a lot,
also.
"Compared to last
year, I think spirits are
much higher. We don't
have the inner-team con-
flict that we had last year.
"We're building with
each game she said.
"Last year we peaked at
the state tournament and
it looks like we will again
this year
ECU concludes their
1979 schedule Saturday
and begin competition in
the NCAIAW tournament
November 1 at Rock Hill,
SC.
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"excellent" sources that
McGuire would refuse to
accept any other job.
McGuire, interviewed
by The Associated Press
as the Gamecocks began
practice Tuesday after-
noon, said he knew
nothing of the deadline.
And he said he expects to
remain coach at least
through the upcoming
season.
Holderman and Put-
nam said they had no
knowledge of McGuire's
alleged dismissal. Trustees
board chairman R. Mark-
ley Dennis of Moncks
Corner said the trustees
would have to approve any
"ultimatums" to McGuire,
but hadn't done so.
Dr. Hugh Wells of
Seneca, chairman of the
trustees' intercollegiate
athletics committee, de-
clined to comment.
WSCQ said a possible
replacement for McGuire
would be Philadelphia
76ers assistant coach
Chuck Daly. But Pat
Williams, the 76ers' gen-
eral manager, said Daly
had not mentioned the
matter to him.
The trustees voted in a
closed meeting Sept. 4 not
to rehire McGuire as
basketball coach after the
1979-80 season.
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& M 1 nfc fcASI CAROUNIAN 25 October 1979
Odom focuses on intensity
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
"The word is intensity
This is the law according to Odom. Dave Odom, that
is, the new East Carolina head basketball coach.
And intense is the approach that he is taking as he
tries to turn around the fortunes of a weak Pirate
basketball program.
Intense is also the way Odom will have his players
approach each and every game. "There is no room for
the weak noted Odom with authority.
Odom has been a very busy man since he was
chosen for the East Carolina post this past March 23.
Other than recruiting, one of the first pieces of
business that Odom set out to take care of was the
situation of academics. When Odom arrived at ECU, five
of the nine returning Pirate lettermen were academically
ineligible for the 1979-80 season.
These players had, for the most part, taken a
nonchalant attitude, to say the least, toward academics.
They attended very few classes and therefore had very
little success within the courses. Odom took immediate
action as he tried to get across to the players how
important it was for them to enter summer school and
do well. It was of vital importance not only to the
individual players but to the team as well.
Well, summer school has ended and Odom's first
dealing with a crisis ended with a booming success. All
five players did quite well in summer school and will be
eligible for play when basketball season rolls around.
"We are tremendously pleased in the change of the
attitude: of our players regarding academics said
Odom. "We've spent much time working in this area
and will continue to work hard. I want all the players to
move towards graduation. I'd like to see them all leave
with a diploma
While Odom was solving the problem of his
ineligible players, another problem crept up on him.
During the summer, the East Carolina basketball
program was placed on probation for one year by the
NCAA because of accused violations during the
recruitment of sophomore center Al Tyson.
Odom, ever the optimist, looks at the problem in
a positive manner. "The thing I hate about being on
probation is that we are ineligible for post-season
tournaments. I'm sorry for our seniors in that respect.
But the way we will look at the probation is that we
want to be so good that it will be the NCAA's loss that
they will be unable to invite us
The ex-Wake Forest assistant noted that he was
pleased with the efforts put forth by University officials
in the basketball program's behalf during the NCAA
investigations. "I feel like everything that could have
been done was done he said.
"Student attendence is the atmosphere, the degree
of excitement staged by the fans. From the students is
where the atmosphere must originate
To the avid basketball fan, Odom would appear to be
very organized in his quest to bring supremacy to the
Pirate roundball program. And organized he is.
Organization has been the name of the game with
Odom throughout his coaching career. How else could
he have moved from a high school coach in Durham to
head coach at a major university in four short years?
As for his sudden rise, Odom simply stated that it
was a matter of being ready.
"I've been very fortunate to meet many, many
people who have given me some great opportunities.
The key thing in life is so much in seeing an opportunity
when it arises and being prepared for it. So many don't
prepare. I've been lucky enough to have been ready
"Lucky enough to have been ready he says. The
same can be said for the East Carolina basketball
program when hearing of the availability of a man
named Odom.
Football played at Temple
By
HERSCHELNISSENSON
AP Sports Writer
Quick, who's the coach
at Temple University?
No, it's not Harrv
J
Litwack, although he was
the basketball coach there
for 21 sears, winning 373
games, and it's not Josh
Cody, his predecessor,
who won 122 games in 10
seasons.
You might be halfway
right if you said Don
Casey, but he's the
current basketball coach.
We're talking about the
itbail coach.
You mean Temple has
a football team? Isn't
Temple a basketball
school?
Yes, and a good one,
but it's a pretty good
i'H'tball school, too. The
legendary Pop Warner
coached there from 1933-
38 and Ray Morrison,
famed as the architect of
Southern Methodist's
aerial circus of the '20s
and '30s, coached there
from 1940-48.
The current coach, in
his 10th season, is Wayne
Hardin, the same Wayne
Hardin who led Navy to a
38-22-2 record from'1959-
64 and coached the 1960
and 1963 Heisman Trophy
winners, Joe Bellino and
Roger Staubach.
Temple University was
founded in 1884 as a non-
sectarian institution de-
signed to serve able and
deserving students of lim-
ited means. More than 90
years later, Temple, which
has been a Common-
wealth of Pennsylvania
university since 1965, has
a widely diversified stu-
dent body of some 33,000.
The university is the
largest employer in the
North Philadelphia area,
with some 9,500 persons
employed at the main
campus and the Health
Sciences Center.
But, says Hardin,
There are people in
Philadelphia who don't
even know we're in
Philadelphia
If they don't, they're
learning.
Temple has posted
seven winning seasons
under Hardin, who has
become the school's win-
ningest football coach ever
with a 63-32-3 mark,
including 6-1 this year, the
only setback a 10-9 loss to
12th-ranked Pitt.
"We get kidded about
our short, fat kids
Hardin says. "They may
be 6-2 and 270 pounds but
we don't check 'em in the
40. They may not be too
fast over 40 yards, but
from here to there they're
not too bad, and that's all
we ask of 'em.
"Our players are great
kids. They work their butts
off. They weren't highly
recruited, they're not guys
everybody wanted, so
they've got something to
prove
So does Hardin. He
has this wild dream of
Temple going to the sugar
Bowl and he reminds one
and all that the Owls
played in the first Sugar
Bowl game, losing 20-14 to
Tulane on Jan. 1, 1935.
"Aww Hardin says,
"that's 10 years away, if
it's that. Let's be realistic
we're still Temple
When it comes to
picking bowl teams, it's
not only whether vou win
or lose but where you play
the game, not necessarily
how.
For example, Florida
State is one of the few
remaining unbeaten-untied
teams but don't hold your
breath waiting for the
Seminoles to be invited to
the Orange Bowl, even if
they go 11-0.
The Orange Bowl, like
any other bowl, wants
teams whose followers will
arrive well before the
game � say a week or two
� and spend lots of
money. The Orange Bowl
people are afraid the
Florida State supporters
will drive down from
Tallahassee on game day
and leave shortly after the
final gun.
If the Orange Bowl
frowns on Florida State,
how do you think the
Sugar Bowl feels about the
possibility of having
thrice-beaten Georgia as
the host team instead of
No. 1-ranked Alabama?
It could happen. In-
deed, it will happen if
Georgia wins its remaining
Southeastern Conference
games against Kentucky,
Florida and Auburn, even
if the Bulldogs lose non-
conference games to Vir-
ginia and Georgia Tech
and wind up with a 6-5
record.
If Georgia and Ala-
bama finish with 6-0 SEC
logs, Georgia goes to New
Orleans because Bama
went last year.
"I voted for the current
rule says Tennessee
Coach Johnny Majors. "I
won't second guess my-
self, but I think it will
come up again at the next
conference meeting
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Pete Rose is only a kid
By WILL GRIMSLEY
AP Special Correspondent
"Baseball is a kid's
game. I'm an adult
playing a kid's game. I
admit it. It's like having a
license to steal
Pete Rose is a baseball
anachronism � a Ty Cobb
in tight-fitting double
knits, a $3.2-million com-
modity with a corner lot
psychology, an anachro-
nism whose influence has
not dulled his enthusiasm
for the sport.
Who is this stubby
little guy who is methodi-
cally destroying Ty Cobb's
proudest records, who is
threatening to become the
greatest hitter of all time,
whose fighting grit has
enthralled a nation?
Biblically speaking, by
his words ye shall know
him:
"Money doesn't de-
termine how well I play.
I've got to give it 101
percent every time I go
out on the field, whether I
make $12,000, as I did at
Cincinnati in 1965 when I
got 209 hits, or whether I
make $800,000 or $900,000
as this year when I got
208. I never see my
checks, anyhow They all
go to agent-attorney Reu-
ven Katz.
At 5-11, 200 pounds,
Rose can't be considered a
model athletic specimen,
at 38 he is getting long on
the tooth as ball players
go. Critics say he can't
run or throw.
"I know how to run. I
know how to throw. But
nobody says I can't hit. I
always could hit. As for
my age, I've seen some
guys over the hill at 28
and others good at 40 like
the Cy Young winner last
year Gaylord Perry. Look
at me. I've got strong
arms and strong legs.
They're my assets. They
say the legs are the first to
go. I ought to have three
or four years left
Did Rose think the
Firing of Phillies manager
Danny Ozark was justi-
fied?
"When I put on my
uniform, it doesn't say
'Sparky Anderson 'Dave
Bristol' or 'Danny Ozark'
across the chest. It says
'Phillies I don't play for
the manager. I play for a
team, the city and the
fans.
"But the one thing I
regretted going to Phila-
delphia was that I had to
be a part of Danny getting
fired. It wasn't Danny's
fault. Every man on the
team was responsible. I
was responsible
Rose, who erased an-
other of Cobb's records by
getting 200 hits in his 10th
season and who was on
base more than 300 times
counting walks, showed
his true character when he
was presented the Aqua
Velva Cup for compiling
the year's longest hitting
streak � 23 games. The
award carried a cash prize
of $23,000 � $1,000 for
each game.
"I gave that away
weeks ago Rose said. "I
gave it to the coaches, the
trainers and clubhouse
crew. Just as I gave away
nine Jeeps to guys in
Cincinnati when I left
there. Those guys don
get paid much, but they
are always helping out �
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STUDENT UNION
I
1





Title
The East Carolinian, October 25, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 25, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.17
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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