The East Carolinian, October 23, 1979






"Were it Wt to me to decide
whether we should have a
government without newt-
papers or newspapers without
government. I should not
hesitate a moment to prefer
the latter
�Thomas Jefferson
The East Carolinian
If you have a story idea, a
tip, or a lead, please
telephone us:
757-6366
757-6367
757-6309
11
Vol. 54 No.T'
12 pages today
Tuesday, October 23,1979
Greenville, N.C.
Circulation 10,000
SGA issues
resolution
By KAREN WENDT
News Editor
At yesterday's SGA
meeting, the legislature
passed a resolution in
opposition to the Faculty
Senate resolution that
would temporarily convert
residence hall parking into
day student parking.
The resolution reads:
The legislature of the
Student Government As-
sociation of East Carolina
University do enact:
WHEREAS: The mid-
campus parking spaces
between Fifth and Tenth
Streets are assigned to
residence hall students,
and
WHEREAS: These stu-
dents arrived at this
university with the expect-
ation that parking would
be available, and
WHEREAS: Resident stu-
dent parking is already
scarce due to parking lot
renovations, and
WHEREAS: Parking away
from campus may cause
safety and security prob-
lems for women students
walking from their dorms
at night,
BE IT THEREFORE RE-
SOLVED: That the Student
Government Association
requests that these park-
ing areas remain as dorm
student parking areas.
Dr. Elmer Meyer, vice
chancellor of student life,
said that he planned to
-uggest to the Faculty
Senate that they request
students who do not use
their -ars very often to
voluntarily park off of
campus.
The resolution was
passed by the legislature
under a suspension of the
rules due to the time
factor involved in the
presentation.
Chubby Abshire and
Leonard Fleming were
heavily questioned by SGA
members concerning the
recent bus accidents and
what was being done to
prevent possible accidents
in the future.
Members questioned
the hiring procedures of
drivers, in addition to the
cause of the most recent
accident.
In recent months, while
Fleming was hospitalized,
Fleming commented that
"Chubby did a commend-
able job
One member question-
ed whether the transit
managers had been in-
volved in any of the
accidents themselves.
Fleming answered no,
though Abshire admitted
to being involved in three
of the accidents.
Honor Council and
Appeals Board members
were approved and sworn
in at the meeting.
Honor Council mem-
bers are: Jay Barbour,
Debi Dixon, Beth Wolfe,
Paul Knechteges, Clint
Barnes, Mark Chandler
and Jami Inman. Alter-
nates for the council will
be Pam Truelove, Jeannie
Robertson, and Chet Jer-
nigan.
Appeals Board mem-
bers are John Aldridge,
James Gorham, Steve
Jones, Ken Tamarashiro,
Clyde Johnson, Chip
Couch and Ed Goodwin.
Alternates will be Louis
Roseborough, Ann Gillooly
and Laura Williams.
The SGA Cabinet offi-
cials were also approved
by the legislature. Dorothy
Horner was approved as
secretary of the Fine Arts
Forum and Academic Af-
fairs, and Ellen Fishburn
was approved to the
position of secretary of
communications and ex-
ecutive assistant.
Cabinet members are
Dorm parking like this may come to a screeching halt, a resolution will come before the Faculty Senate today to
due to the shortage in other areas on campus. New determine whether or not to recommend that some dorm
parking facilities which have not yet been completed parking be eliminated to create more spaces for
have been blamed by some for causing the problem, and Faculty,Staff and Day student spaces.
chosen by the SGA
president, but must be
approved before they can
take their positions.
Leonard Fleming and
Chubby Abshire were also
approved as transit mana-
gers.
Nick Francis, Graduate
Student President, pre-
sented a resolution to pass
the Executive council bud-
get. Francis asked for a
suspension of the rules so
that the budget could be
passed and salaries could
go through.
The changes in salaries
were questioned along
with some readjusting in
the SGA cabinet, and the
proposal did not pass. It
will have to come before
council before it can be
passed.
The changes in salaries
concerned the raising of
the Vice President's salary
from $100 to $120, and the
See SGA, page 2
Legislature meets
Members of the North
Carolina Student Legis-
lature met in Greenville
this weekend and passed a
resolution against a pro-
posed constitutional con-
vention which would con-
sider making a balanced
federal budget part of
constitutional law.
East Carolina Univer-
sity hosted the organi-
zation's October Interim
Council at the Willis
building Sunday. Over 20
North Carolina colleges
and universities sent rep-
resentatives to the meet-
ing, some of them from as
far away as Western
Carolina University and
Appalachian.
The resolution, al-
though it has no legal
weight, will be forwarded
to the state legislature as
an expression of student
views on the matter. Last
year, legislators in Raleigh
joined 26 other state legis-
latures around the nation
when they approved the
controversial convention.
Gary Williams, an ECU
delegate to the council,
said that the students
approved the idea of a
balanced federal budget
but did not consider a
constitutional convention
the correct means of
achieving it.
Keynote speaker at the
gathering was Dr. John
East, an ECU political
science professor and a
possible candidate for U.S.
Senate in the upcoming
national elections. East
commented on a variety of
subjects and issues and
lauded the delegates for
their participation in the
politics of nation and
state. He received a
standing ovation after his
address.
According to Williams,
the purpose of the organi-
zation is to provide a
medium through which
students can get involved
in state government.
Several members of the
N.C. Student Legislature
have established contacts
in the State legislature, so
that the relations between
the two bodies are roSire
personal. During its an-
nual assembly, the student
legislature is active in
lobbying, thus providing
the State government with
a unique source of state-
wide student input.
Internships in both
state and federal govern-
ment are also provided for
interested members.
Campus alcohol discussed
By MARTIN AMOS
In a meeting Thursday
night, the Student Union
Program Committee dis-
cussed East Carolina Un-
iversity policy on the
possession
consumption
beverages.
Currently, there are
only two locations on
campus where alcoholic
beverages are permitted�
the student residence halls
and Mendenhall Student
of
and
alcoholic
Center. The committee
considered the possibility
of expanding this to
include some social events
on the mall. Most of the
discussion, however, cen-
tered around regulations
regarding alcohol
consumption in Menden-
hall.
Within the student
center, only unfortified
wine and beer are per-
mitted, and these are
allowed only by recognized
campus organizations at
scheduled events. The
regulations limit alcohol to
certain areas of the
building. All alcoholic
beverages must be served
by the sponsoring organ-
ization except at dinners
sponsored by the center,
at which participants may
bring wine.
Assistant Vice Chan-
cellor Rudolph Alexander,
the committee advisor,
opened the discussion by
summarizing other major
state universities' policies
regarding alcohol. He
concluded, "The policies
we have here (at ECU) are
about as liberal as you can
have
State law prohibits the
sale of alcohol on univer-
sity premises and also
forbids charging admission
to events at which free
alcohol is served. THere-
fore, alcohol cannot be
served at the coffeehouse
because there is a small
cover charge.
To remedy this, Stu-
dent Union President
Charles Sune suggested a
change in university policy
which would permit stu-
dents to bring their own
beverages. He added,
however, "I think we do
need restrictions to protect
the facilities because I
think we owe it to the
university students, both
present and future
The committee con-
sidered suggestions to
allow other organizations
to sponsor events at which
students could bring beer
or wine under controlled
situations. Controls in-
cluded checking I.Ds,
having sponsors collect,
and serve the beverages
and a one-week advance
notification of events.
, The session was con-
cluded without a formal
decision, but discussion
will be continued at next
Tuesday's meeting.
In an unrelated de-
cision, the committee
agreed unanimously to
remain financially
uninvolved in a cooper-
ative effort with downtown
nightclub owners hosting
a concert to feature the
Atlanta Rhythm Section.
Inside Today
Pat Dye on Tar Heels see page 6
Beaux-arts Masquerade e page 10
Holly Arts and Crafts see page 11
Weekly album review see page 12
Fac ulty
members
vote today
The Faculty Senate of East Carolina University is
scheduled to vote today on a resolution that would
temporarily ban dormitory students from parking their
cars in the mid-campus area.
Dr. Wilson Luquire, Associate Director of Library
Services, submitted the resolution to the senate during
their last meeting on 25 Sept. 1979.
The text of the resolution reads as follows:
WHEREAS, Many parking spaces on the mid-campus
area (between 5th and 10th Streets) are assigned to
Residence Hall Student parking, and
WHEREAS, Residence Hall students who are in the
central campus area do not need a car to get to the
university daily, and
WHEREAS, Remote parking lots are particularly
inconvenient for day students, facutly and staff who
must always commute to campus, and
WHEREAS, Faculty and staff have professional and
university business which take them to and from 'ampus
frequently, and
WHEREAS, The parking lots in the J. Y. Joyner Library
and Mendenhall Student Center area are unavailable
until at least mid-December;
THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, That as a reasonable
temporary solution all Residence Hall parking
(sometimes called Dorm spaces) be converted to day
student, faculty, and staff parking until the parking lot
construction is complete, that central campus Residence
Hall students be provided flexible shuttle service to and
from the more distant lots near the College Hili area,
the Ficklen Stadium area, Belk Building area, and the
Willis Building area.
According to Richard Blake, Assistant to th
Chancellor, the resolution carries no authority in itself,
since the role of the Faculty Senate is essentially one of
an advisory body. Blake said that such resolutions are
submitted to the Chancellor, who may then appoint a
committee to look into the matter. The committee, which
is usually comprised of members from varying sectors of
the university, makes recommendations to the
Chancellor based upon its research. The final decision
then rests with the Chancellor, said Blake.
Dr. Luquire commented Monday that he does not
consider his resolution to be the ultimate solution
campus parking problems.
"When I submitted the resolution, I didn't intend for
it to be the solution, but only an interim measure until
the construction on the other parking lots is completed
he said. Luquire added that the support among faculty
members for the resolution would probably ber based
more on the desire to see some form of constructive
action taken than on the resolution itself.
If the item is approved and passed on to the office of
the Chancellor, there would be little chance that the
SGA transit system could provide the type of shuttle
routes that are proposed. Leonard Fleming, Operations
manager of the Transit Authority, said Monday that "as
it stands now, we couldn't even conceive of it because
we just don't have the vehicles or the funds
The Faculty Senate will meet Tuesday at 2:00 p.m. in
room 221 Mendenhall to vote on all current resolutions.
United Way holds
fund drive here
Umstead students
arrested in bust
By ARAH VENABLE
Staff Writer
Greenville police
apprehended several peo-
ple recently involved in
various incidents including
possession of drugs, theft
of road signs and car
vandalization.
A drug bust was made
the weekend of Oct. 12 in
Umstead Dorm, but no
one has been charged yet.
Charges will be made
pending a report from lab
analysis, which usually
takes from 10 days to two
weeks. The drugs are
thought to be LSD and
marijuana.
Three male students
were recently arrested for
taking road signs, which
they used to decorate
dorm rooms. Police Chief
Frances Eddings said six
traffic signs have been
recovered, and several
students have been refer-
red o Dean Mallory. The
offense is a misdemeanor
for , which a conviction
could mean up to two
years in prison.
Eddings said taking the
signs could lead to persons
being killed.
"This is really serious.
People can get killed
because of this foolish-
ness
Another theft, on Fri-
day October 19, involved a
pair of ladies' shoes being
stolen from Clement
Dorm. Police Chief Edd-
ings said the thief took the
shoes to Belk-Tyler and
told the sales clerk that
she wanted to exchange
them. After the trans-
action had taken place, the,
owner of the shoes went to
Belk-Tyler and recognized
them as the pair that was
stolen from her.
The case is still
pending investigation, and
no charges have been
made.
In another incident
Friday, eight vehicles were
vandalised. An estimated
$2,000 worth of damage
was done by someone who
appeared to be walking by
kicking the cars.
East Carolina students
and the Greenville area
United Way will be
holding a fund drive
Wed Oct. 24 on the ECU
campus.
Five booths will be set
up to take donations from
students to support the
United Way. They will be
located at the corner of
Tenth and College Hill
drive, the Croatan, Men-
denhall Student Center,
Jenkins and the Student
Store.
In the past, faculty
members were asked to
pledge certain amounts,
but this year, the students
are being asked to help
support the organization.
The booths will be
manned by members of
Phi Beta Lambda and
Gamma Sigma Sigma fra-
ternities, MRC members
and WRC members and
will be open from 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m.
Hansen Matthews,
coordinator for the drive
hopes to receive an
average donation of fifty
cents per student. The
goal is 12000.
Matthews urged stu-
dents to donate to the
United Way. "It benefits
so many organizations
with one donation Mat-
thews said.
The United Way helps
in funding many Green-
ville organizations, includ-
ing the REAL Crisis
Center, the Salvation Ar-
my, Pitt County Assoc-
iation for the Blind, Pitt
County Mental Health
Center, the American Red
Cross, and the North
Carolina United Way.
ECU Chancellor Tho-
mas B. Brewer is cam-
paign chairman for the Pitt
County United Way.
The Ecwf Carolinian office
will be closed Thursday and
Friday. Normal office
hours resume Monday.





Page 2 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 23 October 1979
classified
tone
FOR SALE: Bose 301's
JVC Cassette Deck
Technics Turntable !400.
Vill sell separately. 102
C. Cherrv Ct. Drive after
FOR SALE: 1973 Toyota
pickup. Good condition.
Long bed. Good mileage
and good tires. Call Steve
Curry 52-4379.
FOR SALE: Classical Ya-
maha Guitar. (G-65) 1978
model excellent condition.
'125.00. Contact Debbie
758-0269.
FOR SALE: Sports Car,
1Q71 Fiat 124 Sport
Sypder, Convertible, 5
speed, good condition.
Call 757-6777. Ask for Bob
dams 8-5.
FOR SALE: Royal Medal-
lion II Type Writer. 76
del. Excellent cond-
n. Price negotiable call
16-9485.
FOR SALE: 1972 Vega Cot
Station Wagon. Must seP.
for more information call
752-5422.
NEED X-TRA CASH: Fair
� - paid for gold and
er and silver coins.
Mixed Media. 120 E. 5th
St. 758-2127.
� liter- m
WANTED: Apartment and
female roommate begin-
ning Spring, 1980. Prefer
a graduate student, but
will consider a senior. Call
Cathv Mills day-toll free
1-800-662-7300 (say it's
personal! after 6 (919(
772-0667.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED TO SHARE
FURNISHED TWO BED-
ROOM APT. AT Oakmont
Square. Pay one-half of
rent and utilities. Call
Jean at 756-1794.
MALE ROOMMATE
WANTED. Reasonably
clean, quiet, serious stu-
dent preferred. !55 plus
utilities. Call 752-4043.
AM LOOKING for a
roommate to share apt.
with ECU student. 5
blocks from campus. Call
Ashe 758-3219.
FURNISHED ROOM for
one female in house on N.
Charles St. 2 blocks from
campus. Rent !85 . Phone
758-7010.
PARKING: Leased Parking
directly across from ECU
on corner of 5th and Holly
Sts. !30 per semester. 30
spaces available. Call Bull
Ritter Realtors 756-5458
and leave name and
number if interested.
PRIVAf ROOMS: Share
bath ana kitchen, East 3th
Str,
PRIVATE ROOMS: Share
bath and kitchen, East 3rd
Street. 752-5296.
pgwond(ft)
DANCE-Sunshine Studios
will be offering the
following classes at a
discount rate to ECU
students: Ballet, Jazz,
Yoga, Arabic (Belly
Dance( and Partner Disco
Dance. Classes are within
walking distance of cam-
pus beginning Nov. 4 & 7.
Call Sunshine at 756-7235,
or 758-0736.
CAN YOU DRIVE to
Chapel Hill and back on 6
gals, of gas? For the cost
of 6 gals (!6.00( of gas,
we'll take you to Kenan
Stadium and back. CALL
Now 752-2476 or 752-8925.
NEED A PAPER TYPED?
Theses, reports, term pa-
pers, etc. Call Leigh
Coakley at 752-8027. Rea-
sonable rates.
FRIMYS
189�
Seafood
Tuesday Night
Specials
TROUT $2.95
PERCH $2.95
all you can eat
No take-outs please.
Meal includes:
French Fries, Col slaw,
Hushpuppies.
We are proud to
announce that we
have added
one of the
AREAS FINEST
SALAD BARS
for your
dining pleasure.
OPEN FOR LUNCH
Daily
(except Sat.) 11:30 - 2&
HOURS
MON � THURS.
StCO � ft�
FRI. & SAT.
ftPO � 10J30
fi I �
SGA
(cont. from pg. 1)
secretary's salary from $50
to $75. There was also
discussion on the differ-
ences in salaries of the
secretary of minority af-
fairs, who will teceive $25
a month; the secretary of
Fine Arts and Academic
Affairs, who will receive
$50 a month; the secretary
of communications and
executive assistant who
will receive $75 a month,
if the resolution passes.
In the resolution one
cabinet position has been
eliminated, and two posi-
tions have been combined.
The Executive Council
also requested money for
nine different line items,
those being communica-
tion, office supplies, law-
yer's fee, student helper,
equipment repair, elec-
tions, printing, travel and
miscellaneous.
The council is asking
for a total appropriation of
$20,549.52.
SGA president Brett
Melvin asked the legisla-
ture to look into the
possibility of a slight
surcharge on all student
emergency loans, quoting
a possible figure of one
dollar per loan.
Melvin cited the cur-
rent default rate and said
the fee would help the
SGA to break even on
their loans.
Bishop is
ecuted
By BRENDAN RILEY
Associated Press Writer
CARSON CITY, Nev.
(AP) � Spurning appeals
for his life, convicted killer
Jesse Bishop died early
today in the Nevada gas
chamber, the second man
to be executed in the
United States this year.
State Prison Director
Charles Wolff, who gave
the order to strap Bishop
in the two-seat gas
chamber that had not been
used since 1961, described
the inmate as "tough"
and "self-controlled
Last-minute appeals to
two U.S. Supreme Court
justices Sunday were re-
buffed. Like Gary Gilmore,
who was shot by a Utah
firing squad in January
1977, Bishop had repeat-
edly spurned efforts by
those who wanted to stop
his execution.
It marked the third
execution in the United
States in a dozen years.
The last person to be
executed before Bishop
was John A. Spenkelink, a
convicted murderer who
was electrocuted in Florida
on May 25. Spenkelink
had fought his execution.
The prison chief had
offered Bishop a chance to
appeal even up to the
point at which Bishop,
clad in blue denim pants,
a white shirt and white
socks, was strapped in the
chair.
Guards drew straps
across Bishop's chest and
a stethoscope was taped to
his chest, with a long tube
extending through the
death chamber wall so a
doctor could determine
when he had died.
A heavy metal door to
the 10-foot-by-10-foot
death chamber clanged
shut. Three volunteer
guards flipped switches to
activate the device which,
with a faint humming
noise, lowered cyanide
pellets into acid beneath
the death chair.
Only one of the
switches was live and none
of the guards knew which
one would take the life of
Bishop, who killed a
Baltimore newlywed dur-
ing a Las Vegas casino
robbery in 1977.
The gas which formed
beneath Bishop rose up
slowly. He lapsed into
unconsciousness about a
minute after the fumes hit
him.
When the doctor certi-
fied Bishop was dead, the
witnesses were ushered
out into the near-freezing
night air, and prison
guards began the process
of venting the deadly gas.
Bishop dined late Sun-
day on a final meal of
steak, sent his compli
ments to the cook, and
refused to pick up the
telephone provided him so
that he could file an
appeal on his own �
something he flatly re-
fused to do.
More hash ashore
MANTEO, N.C. (AP)
� A Virginia boater and
Dare County sheriffs de-
puties turned up five more
inner tubes full of hashish
along the coast Sunday,
making the total weekend
haul worth about $4
million.
Sol Rose of Franklin,
Va spotted three inner
tubes bobbing along in
Hatteras Inlet, five or six
miles offshore, and
brought them in. Deputies
who were using heli-
copters to search the
beach near Manteo dis-
covered the other two
inner tubes washing a-
shore.
Officials said Sunday
that no arrests had been
made and they had no
idea where the hashish
came from.
The take apparently is
a record haul for North
Carolina. A research ves-
sel spotted the first inner
tube Friday. By Saturday,
more than two dozen inner
tubes, containing 700 to
1,000 pounds of the drug,
had been found. Officials
seized a similar amount
Sunday.
Drug Enforcement Ad-
ministration officials in
Washington estimate the
value of the dru at
$1,600 per pound. but
State Bureau of Investi-
gation officials aid it-
street value may be as
much as $2,500 a pound.
In the last large seizure
of hashish, a drug made
from concentrated man
juana plant resin. U S
Customs agent- confis
cated 320 pounds at
Charlotte's Douglas M
cipal An port in 1972.
The drug was 'und
packaged in plastic, s
in truck tire inner tubes
and wrapped in burlap.
ALL YOU CAN EAT
SPECIALS
4 00 8 00 PM
SALAD-50' EXTRA
ASST. VAR
PIZZA. �Lyw
WITH FRIES & COLESLAW
FRIED e
CHICKEN ?�y
WITH GARLIC BREAD
ITALIAN 14
SPAGHETTIotl
WITH FRIES & COLE SLAW
FRIED ' $-�
STUDENT
The folks at Kroger Sav-on know the
complete student has a party side,
too. So they have what East Carolina
University students need for any bash
. . . from party platters to disco plat-
ters all in one convenient loca-
tion. Don't be incomplete this
year�shop Kroger Sav-on today.
WED.
COSMETICS
AMP
LDISMiyiTEDj
UP TO
TIMEX
WATCHES
REG. OR DIP
COUNTRY OVEN
Potato
Chips
8-Oz. Twin Pak
OFF MANUFACTURER S
SUGGESTED RETAIL
LET THE DELI DO IT! Planning a party? Let the
Kroger Sav-on Deli supply the fixin's. Finest
quality meats, delicious cheese, & tasty
salads combine to make our party trays
perfect for entertaining. Just phone ahead to
ace your order!
Records and
Tapes
18301 up
Budweiser
Beer
HEARTY BURGUNDY, PINK CHABLIS,
ROSE, CHABLIS BLANC OR
Gsllo ' toaa
ra - 1 5 Liter f "JQO
Rhine � .
OfF
MFR
SUG
RETAIL
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised Hems is required to be readily available for
sale in each Kroger Sav-on Store except as specifically noted in this
ad. If we do run out of an advertised Item, we will offer you your choice
of � comparable Ham, whan available, reflecting the same savings or a
raincheck which will entitle you to purchase the advertised Item at the
advertised price within 30 days.
FOOD, DRDG, GENERAL
MERCHANDISE STORES
PRICES EFFECTIVE TUES
OCT. 23 THRU SUN OCT. 28, 1979
NONE SOLD
I
MERS
OPEN 7 AM TO MIDNIGHT
MON
THRU
SAT
OPEN SUNDAY
9 AM TO 9 PM
600 Greenville BlvdGreenville
Phone 756-7031





Pecple, places, and
23 October 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 3
tactyainiTicEn toner
mneJIeval
The Dept. or the Navy
Civilian Personnel Co-op
recruiter who will be
on campus October 26 is
looking for students to fill
computer science posi-
tions. However, he will
also interview students for
the following job descrip-
tions: Automatic Data
Processing, Statistician,
Supply and Transportation
Management, Quality and
Reliability Assurance Spe-
cialist Personnel Man-
agement, Education Spe-
cialists, Industrial Spe-
cialists, Logistics, Man-
agement, Housing Man-
agement,program analysis,
Financial Managment,
Managment Analysis, and
Procurement. If there is
enough student interest,
the recruiter may be able
to come to the campus
Thursday afternoon, Oct.
25.
Interested students
should review the CAP-
SON file in 313 Rawl. If an
appointment is desired,
the student should arrange
an interview with a Co-op
coordinator through Mrs.
Harrizene Keyes, Co-op
Secretary. The coordinator
will provide information
concerning forms which
must be completed prior to
the interview with the
CAPSON recruiter.
t I �I(IT13 f I
The Tau chapter of Phi
Sigma Pi National Honor
Fraternity will hold its
monthly dinner meeting
Wed. Oct. 24, at the
Western Sizzlin restaurant
on Tenth St. at 6:00 p.m.
ptoinetoc.k�
The 1979-80 phone
books are in. If you do not
have one yet, they are
available in the SGA office
located on the second floor
of Mendenhall Room 228.
eish
Rush meetings for
Gamma Beta Phi will be
held Tuesday, Oct. 23 and
Wed. Oct. 24 at 7:00 p.m.
in Rawl 130. Members are
encouraged to attend.
fcrclr(
The Fencing Club meets
each Wednesday from 4
p.m. until 6' p.m. in
Memorial 108. Free in-
struction for ECU students
is provided by the club's
advisor, Dr George Wei-
gand.
knew
afceft
The Air Force Officer
Qualifying Test (AFOQT)
will be administered on 20
and 23 October 1979, at
8:30 a.m. in Wright
Annex, room 201. This
test is open to all qualified
individuals desiring to
enter the Air Force ROTC
program during their last
two years at ECU and all
AFROTC GMC cadets.
Those people interested in
taking the AFOQT should
contact Captain Moyer at
757-65976598 or stop by
Wright Annex, Room 209.
May we remind stu-
dents that all announce-
ments for the People,
Places and column must
be typewritten, double
space, and turned in
before the deadline or they
will not be accepted.
These rules will be strictly
enforced.
We cannot guarantee
that all of the annouce-
ments that we receive will
be published, but we will
do our best.
Deadlines are 2:00
p.m. on Tuesday for the
Thursday edition, and 2:00
p.m. Friday for the
Tuesday edition.
All annoucements
should be directed to he
news editor only.
ccmlcs
The East Carolina
Comic Book Club will meet
Tuesday Oct. 23 at the
Nostalgia Newstand 919
Dickinson Ave Green-
ville. The meeting will
start at 7 p.m. and is open
to all interested persons.
Topics of discussion will
include the upcoming Dec.
2nd convention. For more
information, call 758-6909.
program
The Student Union
Program Board will meet
Tuesday, October 23, at
7:00 p.m. in room 212 of
Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter.
Javcees
The Greenville Jaycees
will be sponsoring a
Haunted House during the
Halloween season. The
dates will be October
20-22 and then resume
October 25th through Hal-
loween night. One-third
proceeds will go towards
assisting in the construc-
tion of the local Boy's
Club. The house will
located at the 01d fair
grounds on Airport Road
and be open from 7 p.m.
until.
clild
There will be a Family
Child Association meeting
on Tuesday, Oct. 23, at
5:00 in Room 143 in the
Home Economics Building.
All Child Development and
Family Relations majors
and minors are urged to
attend.
ctorrilstry
There is an urgent and
immediate openings for
tutors of Chemistry 1120
and 0150. Applicants may
be graduate or under-
graduate students who are
proficient in these areas.
Contact Dr. Bridwell or
Dr. Hensel in 208 Rags-
dale Hall or call the
Center for Student Oppor-
tunities at 757-6122, 6081,
or 6075.
beau arts
The 1979 Beaux Arts
masquerade ball promises
to be better than ever,
with entertainment includ-
ing the ECU Jazz Ensem-
ble and the Drama Dept.
dance group performing.
Various booths, door prizes
and 15 kegs of ice cold
beer will also be available.
Tickets can be pur-
chased in the Art, Drama,
and Music offices in
advance for $2.
Tickets at the door will
be $2.50.
The ball will be held
Oct. 27. For more infor-
mation call the Art Dept.
office and get your ticket
now for this extravaganza.
The deadline for regis-
tering for the ACU-I
BACKGAMMON Tourna-
ment is Friday, Nov. 26.
All full-time students who
wish to participate must
register at the Mendenhall
Billiards Center. The dou-
ble-elimination tournament
will begin Monday, Oct.
29 at 6:00 p.m. in the
Multi-Purpose Room in
Mendenhall.
This tournament will
determine the one winner
who will represent ECU in
the regional ACU-I Recre-
ational Tournaments at
UNC-Charlotte in Febru-
ary. The three-day all
expense paid trip for the
delegate will be sponsored
by Mendenhall Student
Center.
Sigma Tau Delta, Eng-
lish Honorary, will hold its
second meeting Wed. Oct.
24 at 7:30 in Mendenhall
Coffeehouse. All inter-
ested faculty and students
are encouraged to attend.
There will be a guest
speaker and refreshments
will be served.
f M lift
ttteta
Initiation for Phi Alpha
Theta will be Thursday,
Oct. 25, at 7:00 p.m in
the Multi-Purpose room in
Mendenhall. All prospec-
tive members must attend.
Dr. Ragan, history chair-
man, will speak, and a
reception will be held
afterwards.
The next meeting of
the ECU-Greenville branch
of the Society for Creative
Anachronism will be Wed-
nesday, Oct. 24, at 7:00
p.m. in Room 248 Men-
denhall. A nationwide
medieval interest group
the SCA is for those who
enjoy recreating the au-
thenic arts, sciences, and
pastimes of the Middle
Ages. Coming weekend
events in the NC-VA area
will be discussed.
hiMtill
The Team Handball
Official's Clinic will be
held on Wed Oct. 24.
The meeting will begin at
7 p.m. in Memorial Gym,
room 104.
DAIRY CUP
FORMERLY BURGER BARRELL
IS
NOW OPEN
"DELICIOUS & NUTRITIOUS"
FOOT LONG
HOT DOGS
(tthapfrrX
PROUDLY PRESENTS ONE OF EASTERN
N.C'S TOP BEACH AND TOP 40 BANDS
RALEIGH'S OWN
BAND OF OZ
WED. OCT. 24th SHOWTIME 9:30
LIMITED NUMBER OF ADVANCED TICKETS
75c
FAST
SERVICE
REGULAR FAVORITES
�HOT DOGS
�HAMBURGERS
�FRENCH FRIES
�FISH SANDWICHES
�MILK SHAKES
�MANY MORE ITEMS
OPEN
HAM TOllP.M
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
CHICKEN SNACK
SANDWICH
Only JS J
BANANA BOATS
CHOCOLATE & VANILLA SOFT
ICE MILK CONES
LARGE SELECTION OF
SUNDAES
"GOOD FOOD FOR GOOD TIMES'
Located Beside Krispy Kreme
Corner Oi 10th & Evans St.
Phone 758-0414
MEN'S RESIDENCE
COUNCIL
WE WORK WITH
YOU AND FOR YOU
Questions and Comments
Welcomed
Grady Dickerson
David Murray
Bob Thompson
Steve Moore
Keith Taylor
President
Vice- President
Secretary
Treasurer
Publicity Chairman
OFFICE LOCATED IN SCOTT DORM LOBBY
mimiu
tMattHHiMnu!
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J





The East Carolinian
Editorials
S?0p
lnions
Tuesday, October 23, 1979 PaQe 4
Greenville, N. C
Parking threatened
There's hope for the Student
Government Association (SGA) yet.
The SGA passed a resolution
yesterday requesting that all dorm
parking areas remain the way they are
now, rather than being converted to day
and staff parking.
According to a proposal submitted
by Dr. Wilson Luquire to the Faculty
Senate, a great deal of dorm parking on
campus would be temporarily eliminat-
ed to provide faculty members and day
students ample parking while the new
parking lots are being paved.
The reasons the SGA cite in
opposition to the elimination of dorm
student parking are sound. To begin
with, these lots were originally assigned
to dorm students, and the students
expected them to be available when
they arrived at ECU. Secondly, parking
is already scarce on campus, and there
may be security problems for students
walking to and from their dorms at
night.
These reasons are sound, but we
can think of better reasons why this
would not work out.
First of all, Luquire's suggestion is
unfair to dorm students who have paid
the exorbitant fee of $25.00 to park
their cars near the dorms. If they had
known at the time that they would be
shuttled to their dorms from the
stadium or some other God-forsaken
part of campus, they may not have
registered their cars at all.
Secondly, it is this very parking fee
� which signifies the right to use a
specific parking lot � that is paying for
the new lots near Mendenhall. To
expect students to help pay for paving a
parking lot, and then telling them they
cannot park in the places they were
promised, is too much to ask.
Thirdly, it is not the students' fault
that work on the lots continues into the
school year and inconveniences people.
Why then should dorm students suffer?
It is our understanding that the lots will
be finished soon, but parking lot
construction, like all construction on
this campus, falls under the jurisdiction
of the university administration. Maybe
the Faculty Senate should encourage
the administration to do something
about it rather than asking the students
to shuffle their lives and schedules
around in a way intended to suit the
faculty and staff.
A better system would be to divide
the dorm parking into "nearby" and
"fringe" areas. Those students who
work and use their cars every day
would be able to park near the dorms.
Those students who leave their cars
parked in one place all week would be
assigned to the fringe lots. To make the
lots on the edge of campus more
popular to students, Campus Security
could charge less for them, and more
for the lots close to the dorms.
It is our opinion that this would free
more spaces on campus for the faculty,
staff and day students. It would ease
congestion. Best of all, it would be a
more equitable system for all con-
cerned.
One thing that should be said about
the current parking situation: It is up to
everyone to work things out in a logical
manner. It is illogical and unfair to
switch parking around in the middle of
the year.
Vice Chancellor of Student Life Dr.
Elmer Meyer said in a speedi last week
to the SGA that "students are the most
important people in our work We can
only hope that the Faculty Senate does
not lose sight of this fact when they
vote today.
Pop's People
)

4L1
HO PARKIN6
VIOLATORS
WILL &E
WASHEP AWAY.
V
3i
L
1-6-11
I
Lettors to the Editor
Show leaves 'sour taste in mouth'
Everybody knows a Jim Smith
By LARRY POPELKA
Everybody knows a Jim
Smith. Maybe he's your
teacher. Or maybe a
friend. Or perhaps he lives
down the hall in your
dorm.
Jim Smiths are every-
where. There are thou-
sands in the United States.
In Chicago where I live
there are 158 listed by that
name in the telephone
directory and several oth-
ers listed as J. Smith.
All this seems harm-
less enough and perhaps
quite amusing � unless
your name is Jim Smith.
If you thought living
with the name Engelbert
Humperdinck was tough,
consider the plight of
every poor sucker stuck
with the name Jim Smith.
You get other Jim
Smiths' mail. You get bills
intended for other Jim
Smiths. And try cashing a
check. Who's going to
believe a name like Jim
Smith? Every con artist in
the world has probably
used it at least once.
Or when you get
married try getting a
motel room with your wife.
The clerks smirk and
snicker and then offer you
a room with a mirror on
the ceiling. "Jim Smith?"
they say. "That's a great
name. I've used it once or
twice myself
Living with this undis-
tinguished name was par-
ticularly troublesome for
one James Henry Smith
Jr of Camp Hill, Pa
who is now known simply
as Camp Hill Jim.
"I used to be a police
reporter for a newspaper
Harrisburg says
in
Camp Hill Jim. "When-
ever I called up someone
to interview them, they
wouldn't believe me. No-
body believed that was my
real name. It became quite
a problem, so I decided I
had to make up a card or
something to let people
know I was really Jim
Smith
But a card along
wasn't good enough for
Camp Hill Jim. Any con
artist can make one of
those. So Camp Hill Jim
decided to go one step
further and start a club:
The Jim Smith Society.
Anyone named Jim
Smith could join. For $5
you'd become a life
member and receive a
membership card, a certi-
ficate to prove your name
really was Jim Smith and
a quarterly Jim Smith
newsletter with news a-
bout other Jim Smiths.
You'd also get a birthday
card on your birthday.
"I wanted to do it first
class says Camp Hill
Jim.
He started the club 10
years ago, and now has
889 Jim Smiths from all
over the country who are
members � whites,
blacks, grandpas, college
students, ditch diggers,
the attorney general of
Florida and even three
women, named Jim Ann,
Jimmie Mae and Jimmie
Lou Smith.
Every summer all the
Jim Smiths get together
for a weekend and have a
Jim Smith Fun Festival.
They take pictures of each
other, sing their Jim Smith
Society anthem (called
"Jim Smith Forever") and
play games, including
Jim go (a takeoff on Bingo)
and softball with two
all-Jim Smith teams, Jim
Smith umpires and a Jim
Smith announcer. A local
sportswriter, who remains
generally confused
throughout the game, tries
to keep score.
But that part doesn't
really matter. "Jim Smith
always gets the winning
hit and scores the winning
run explains Camp Hill
Jim.
Keeping all the Jims
To the Editor:
A few days ago, I had
the opportunity to witness
one of the service Greek
fraternity "block show"
from which I still have the
sour taste in my mouth.
It was in the evening
when most of the students
has finished their classes
for the day. Dinner time
was over. So everyone was
out looking for a place of
relaxation, just something
to ease their mind before
going back to study for the
next day's assignments.
As you walk through
behind Mendenhall you
could see students coming
from all directions, all
The show started with
a group who called
themselves "The Pearls
They all danced, they
sang, they turned cart-
wheels and almost stood
on their heads as they in New York, Chicago or
sang their ethnocentric any other big city where
female students stood
there adamantly in humili-
ation. As you listen to all
the profanity, you get the
feeling of being in some
street corner somewhere
songs. I could see one
young girl in their midst
standing there singing
until three long veins in
her neck, visible fifty
yards away nearly popped
out as evidence of how
much she loved being the
so called "Pearl" to this
fraternity. Anyway, as
they finished and dis-
some low class groups
might gather and just
open their mouths, with
dragon breath and let
anything go. It came to my
mind that many of the
female students who stood
there were so astonished
at what they were hearing
that they couldn't move,
so embarassed that thev
appeared, then came the wished they didn't show
big show everyone had up.
been waiting for which is like all fraternities,
eggs in your mouth and
spit them out to show how
much vou hate the
"Chicks that laved the
egg. When members of
such organization could
publicly demonstrate how
much they sexually as-
saulted my mama and
sisters and talk about
women as if they them-
selves were test tube
babies, such organization
should be kept in check
and guidelines set as to
their conduct on this
campus or anywhere for
that matter.
Can you imagine
someone with chains
around his neck, doing all
these things he talked
gathering at the patio of the Point l am tryin8 t0 that's why l belong t0 one about? Who knows, if let
the Student Center. There
were about 75 females
present because of the
close proximity to their
dorms. I guessed the show
was staged there with
some purpose in mind.
Because if you did not
show up for the show and
happen to be in your room
make.
This was a group of
male students, wearing
some baggy kaki uniforms
with rusty painted hel-
ments and long chains
around their necks. I
thought that I was having
a nightmare of World War
III.
As I stood there and
but when any fraternity or loose, just pray your sister J
sorority gets so low, and or � you know who don't
you could easily hear some
of the nicest things being listened to their descrip-
said about females in tion of women in general,
general. wondered how so many
deviates from a service
organization to improve
and uplift the living
standard of his people;
when such social organi-
zation underminds the
moral and academic quali-
ties of fraternities, sorori-
ties and the University
they belong to and become
a profanity club where you
practice how to crush raw
Trash is at an 'all time high9
straight has often frustrat
ed motel clerks, reporters
and other outsiders at
their annual gatherings.
"I remember your
name perfectly says a
sign they bring to the
festival. "I just can't think
of your face
To ease the confusion
most of the Jims use
middle names or home-
towns. Some go by nick-
names, such as "Oil City
Jim" from Oklahoma or
"Film Jim the Smith
who takes home movies of
every festival.
Camp Hill Jim, age 58,
who spends festival week-
end walking around in his
"Jim Smith Power" T-
shirt drinking beer and
chatting with members, is
married to the former Jane
Black.
"They call me Black-
Smith says Jane.
Jim and Jane also have
a daughter named Nancy,
29, and a son named Eric,
33.
"Kind of makes you
want to change your name
to Jim Smith, doesn't it?"
says Camp Hill Jim
sipping his beer. "All the
Jim Smiths I know are
nice guys. There's a spirit
of cooperation
(copyright
To the Editor:
The trash on the ECU
campus is at an all time
high. I could not believe
my eyes when I happened
by a trash can yesterday
and saw drink cans and
plastic wrappers decorat-
ing the hillside and
sidewalk. (The trashcan
was almost completely
empty!) How many people
at ECU are completely
mindless?
I estimate at least 30 if
there were one person for
every can I saw. The
rational must be "It's OK,
maintenance will pick up
after me How can
anyone be so stupid and
slovenly?
Until The Hooded
Croundskeeper comes
around, all civilization
must be subjected to the
unsightliness of a garbage
sup-
bulbs
infested campus. I
pose that the dim
don't have the foresight to
realize that such filthy
habits synergize to become
major problems.
Please, don't make
Mother Nature the victim
of mindlessness, give eco-
logy a break and put your
trash where it belongs!
Marji McDade
get in his way.
At least that's the way
it looks from here.
Andv C. Adiele
4
Prisoner
wants
letters
To the Editor:
I'm Darrell Lewis, 25
years of age, born and
raised in Los Angeles,
California. I'm presently
incarcerated in Butner
federal institution for try-
ing to be something that
I'm not.
If you have any love
and compassion in your
heart write me. I thank
you kindly.
Darrell T. Lewis
20035-148
State-Unit
P.O. Box 1000
Butner, N.C. 27509
The East Carolinian
MANAGING EDITOR
Richard Green
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Anita Lancaster
NEWS EDITOR
ASST. NEWS EDITOR
FEATURES EDITOR
ASST. FEATURES EDITOR
EDITOR
Marc Barnes
DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
Robert M. Swaim
ASST. DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
Terry Herndon
ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR
Leigh Coakley
BUSINESS MANAGER
Steve O' Geary
Karen Wendt
Terry Gray
Bill Jones
John Ross
SPORTS EDITOR
ASST. SPORTS EDITOR
COPY EDITOR
AD TECH. SUPER.
Charles Chandler
Jimmy Oupree
Diane Henderson
Paul Lincke
THE EAST CAROLINIAN Is the student
newspaper off East Carolina University
sponsored by the Media Board of ECU
and Is distributed each Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic year
weekly during the summer.
Offices are located on the second floor of
the Publications Center Old South
Building. Our mailing address la: Old
South Building, ECU, Greenville, NC
27834.
The phone numbers are: 757-6366, 6367,
6309. Subscriptions m $10 annually,
alumni $6 annually.
,
mu ii m � ����
�� ii �iMtar���u������'w
� � " ��� i�I' ' Hill IIWIMlWI! �ii '
iw,i�i�m iw .�- -�
- �
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,





Greek News
23 October 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 5
Sigmas, Betas win competition
By RICKI GLIARMIS
Greek Coorespondent
Lambda Chi Alpha
Field day was held Sat-
urday at the bottom of
College Hill Drive.
The winner in the
fraternity competition was
the Beta Theta Pi's. The
Betas also came in first
place last year.
The sorority winner
was Sigma Sigma Sigma.
The Sigmas have won field
day for the past five years
and retired the trophy
after their third win in
1977.
The Alpha Delta Pi's
would like to thank all
pledges and sisters that
participated in the campus
blood drive. The ADPi's
received the first place
trophy in the sorority
division.
The ADPi's would also
like to congratulate Lisa
Zack for being clowned
Homecoming queen along
with Joni Wheeler and
Nan Potter for receiving
first and second place,
respectively.
The Kappa Delta's
held a rush cookout party
on Thursday, Oct. 11.
They also held a happy
hour Oct. 18 at the Elbo
Room.
The KD's wish to
congratulate pledge Lydia
Thomas on being elected
Cotten Dorm SGA legis-
lator and Carol Holt for
being elected president of
Sigma Tau Gamma Little
Sisters.
Alpha Xi Deltas extend
its warmest
congratulations to three
new sisters who were
initiated Thurs Oct. 18.
AXiD's will hold its annual
parents' weekend Nov. 10
and 11. The affair will
consist of an open house
and pre-game buffet and
cocktail party.
The Sigmas are holding
a dinner for their house-
mother next Tues. night.
Sisters and alumni will be
attending the dinner.
The Alpha Omicron
Pi's would like to congrat-
ulate Leanne Teague as
the new sorority repre-
sentative for Student Ad-
visory Committee for In-
tramurals. The AOPi's
would also like to 'congrat-
ulate Sandy Lewis and
Cindy Rogers as new Little
Sisters for Lambda Chi
Alpha fraternity.
Tonight, the AOPi's
are having a "Wild Wild
West" Happy Hour at the
Elbo Room.
will be supplied by Tenth
Avenue. There will also be
costume contest with
a
first, second, and third
place prizes being
awarded to the winners.
Remember the dead-
line for Greek news
articles is Monday morn-
ings by 9 a.m. The articles
are to be put in the Sigma
Sigma Sigma box in Dean
Fulghum's office, second
floor Whichard.
the Happy
prizes, beer
straw
will be
During
Hour, door
chugging, and
drinking contests,
featured.
The Pi Kappa Phi's
opened their soccer season
Thurs Oct. 18, by edging
the Sigma Tau Gamma's
1-0. The Pi Kaps are now
1-0 for the season.
Coming up on Wed
Oct. 31, the Pi Kaps are
sponsoring their Third
Annual Halloween Fest-
ival, to be held at the Pi
Kap house starting at 9
p.m. and lasting until
There will be a three
dollar cover charge. Be-
verages are free and music
yersfor
officials
WASHINGTON (AP) -
The state of North Caro-
lina has already paid
$381,284 to a Washington
law firm to get ready for a
desegregation hearing a-
gainst the Department of
Health, Education and
Welfare.
The University of North
Carolina has retained the
firm of Charles Morgan
and Associates to repre-
sent it against HEW.
Andrew Vanore, state
deputy attorney general, is
also at work on the case,
as is much or UNC-
President William Friday's-
staff on Chapel Hill.
"This case is really
bevng lawyered to death;
the state is really getting
its money's worth an
HEW official said recently.
At stake is much of the
S89 million the 16-campus
system receives annually
from the federal govern-
ment. But North Carolina
mav be making a sizable
investment to keep that
money before the govern-
ment holds an adminis
trative hearing March 10.
The U.S. Justice De-
partment also has a group
of lawyers working on the
case. At HEW, Secretary
Patricia Harris has two
teams at work-attorneys
in the office of her general
counsel and attorneys in
the office of civil rights.
Another set of attor-
nevs represents the NA-
ACP Legal Defense and
Education Fund. That
team includes the Wash-
ington law firm of Joseph
Rauh, a veteran civilrights
and labor lawyer; and the
New York City firm of
Jack Greenburg, another
civil rights attorney.
Attorneys on both sides
say privately they see little
hope of a negotiated
settlement before the
March hearing.
200-pound prank
MORGANTOWN, W.
Va. (AP) � The sisters of
Kappa Delta sorority got a
big surprise last weekend
when they found a 200-
pound calf munching hay
in their living room.
So did .Alfred Barr.
chairman of the Division of
Animal and Veterinary
Sciences at West Virginia
University here. The calf
was taken from the
university's dairy farm.
The calf was turned
loose in the sorority house
bv a group of women
known as pledges who
intend to join the organi-
zation. "It's the best
pledge prank that's ever
been pulled here � it can
never be topped said
Gretchen Moats, a sorority
member.
But Barr said he was
upset because the farm
manager had allowed the
calf to be taken by a group
of women who said it was
for a student project.
mmrs
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The East Carolinian
Features
Tuesday,October 23,1979 Page 6
N
Greenville,N.C.
"Children's Hour9
Auditions
to be held
The East Carolina
Playhouse will hold audi-
tions on Monday and
Tuesdav for award-win-
ning playwright Lillian
Hellman's compelling
drama "The Children's
Hour The gripping work
vividly depicts the shatter-
ing effect of a lie, told by
a frightened young girl, on
the lives of her teachers at
a girls' boarding school.
Hellman's tragically
moving work will be
directed by Travis Lock-
hart of the ECU Drama
faculty. Lockhart's credits
include work at several
professional theatres, in-
cluding the Tyrone Guthrie
Theatre in Minneapolis, as
well as directing work at
major universities.
The auditions will be
held in room 214 of ECU's
Drama Building from 3:00
to 5:00 and 7:00 to 10:00
on Monday, October 22,
and from 7:00 to 10:00 on
Tuesday, October 23.
The play contains roles
for 14 women and 2 men.
Auditions are open to ECU
students, faculty and staff,
and to members of the
Greenville community at
large. Audition materials
will be provided at the
auditions.
"The Children's Hour"
will run November 28
through December 8 at
8:15 p.m. in the Studio
Theatre at ECU.
Shange 9s hit
opens next week
'We are pessimists9
By LOUISE COOK
Associated Press Writer
The average American
today believes that the
past was better than the
present and that the future
will be even worse, says
pollster Daniel Yankelo-
vich.
"We've gone almost
overnight from a nation of
optimists to a nation of
pessimists Yankelovich
said at a recent conference
in Philadelphia on "Cop-
ing with Economy Un-
certainty
Yankelovich told the
conference: "The Ameri-
can personality is not
changing, but changes in
the environment are pos-
ing an almost unique
problem of adaptation
Fewer people show a
"raw, competitive edge
he added. Only 10 percent
express the determination
to get to the top,
monetarily and profession-
als.
Paul Hartley and Ray Elmore, of the ECU School of Art, costumed as Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy.
Coming Attractions
Beaux-arts
The 1979 Beaux-arts
Masquerade Ball promises
to be the best fine arts
Halloween party ever, says
Cindy Efird, chairperson
of the Beaux-arts Com-
mittee. (Beaux-arts is the
French term for the fine
arts.)
The annual affair is
sponsored by the Visual
Arts Forum.
Adding a new twist
this year, a carnival
atmosphere will prevail
with various booths, door
prizes, a "not-so-conven-
tional" ghosthouse, a pie
throw and fifteen kegs of
cold draft beer to drink.
There will also be costume
photography and silk-
screening of t-shirts, ac-
cording to Efird.
Entertainment will be
provided by the ECU Jazz
Ensemble and a Drama
Dept. dance group.
The ball is scheduled
for 8:00 p.m Friday, Oct.
26, in the Grey Gallery,
and the adjoining patio
will be torch-lit.
Tickets are on sale in
the offices of Art, Drama
and Music Depts. for
$2.00, but will cost 12.50
at the door.
Slenczynska
World-renowned pianist
Ruth Slenczynska will be
featured in a recital on
Thursday, ct. 25, at 8:00
p.m. in Wright Audi-
torium.
Ride On!
Ride On an art exhibition
about cycling, is on
display in the Mendenhall
Student Center Gallery,
now through Nov. 1
Roxy
The Roxy Music Arts and
Crafts Center will host
their 5th annual Halloween
Masquerade ball on Wed
Oct. 31 at Twin Rinks on
14th St.
Claude Frank toperform
Noted pianist Claude Frank will perform works by
Beethoven at Hendrix Theater on Tuesday, Oct. 30, at
8:00 p.m. Tickets are available from the Central Ticket
Office, at So each.
A three-fold tradition of greatness comes to
Greenville on Tuesday, October 30, at 8:00 p.m. The
great master Ludwig Von Beethoven's compositions will
be interpreted by internationally reknowned pianist
Claude Frank under the auspices of the traditionally
excellent Student Union Artists Series Committee.
Wherever Claude Frank appears, he returns to play
again and again and again! His record of
re-engagements is indeed astounding. Since his debut
with Leonard Bernstein and the New York Philharmonic
in 1959, there is hardly an orchestra, festival, univerisity
music club or Community Concert series which has not
asked Mr. Frank to return, usually many times.
Mr. Frank recently made his fifth Latin American
tour which included the performances of the complete
Beethoven cycle at Santiago's Teatro Municipale and a
series of thirteen of the sonatas in Sao Paulo. The
reviewer for Diario Popular (Sao Paulo) stated: "Claude
Frank is one of the greatest Beethoven players of
international calibre
Claude Frank began his 1977-78 season with a
coast-to-coast recital and concerto tour followed by a
tour with the New Jersey Symphony under the direction
of Leon Fleisher. He appeared in New York on three
separate occasions: in recital performing the last three
Beethoven sonatas at Hunter College under auspices of
the Beethoven Society, at Alice Tully Hall in a concerto
performance, and at Carnegie Hall as part of the
American Symphony Orchestra's Schubert Festival
under the direction of Sergiu Comissiona. U.S.
engagements included sonata recitals with violinist
Jaime Laredo and performances with the Michigan
Chamber Orchestra and with the Guarneri Quartet.
Highlights of his annual European tour included his
Vienna debut under the direction of Erich Leinsdorf, his
debut with the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande and a
return engagement with the London Mozart Players.
During the 1978-79 season Mr. Frank appears in
New York three times again: another sonata recital with
Jaime Laredo and in two Beethoven recitals under the
auspices of the Beethoven Society. He makes hs annual
recital tour of the United States, appears in recital at
Chicago's Orchestra Hall, and is engaged once again
with the Baltimore Symphony. His European
engagements include the Edinburgh Festival, his fourth
appearance in recent years with the Berlin Philharmonic,
a tour of Switzerland and England highlighted by a
performance in London's Festival Hall with the London
Mozart Players and a second tour of Switzerland.
A milestone in Claude Frank's career was RCA's
release of his performance of the 32 Beethoven sonatas,
and his worldwide performances of the cycle including a
New York City series on the acclaimed Hunter College
artists series.
Ntozake Shange's long-
running hit "For Colored
Girls Who Have Con-
sidered SuicideWhen The
Rainbow Is Enuf" will
open at the East Carolina
Playhouse on Wednesday,
October 31. The passion-
ately spellbinding choreo-
poem offers a theatrical
change-of-pace for Play-
house audiences.
Fluidly staged by Ed-
gar R. Loessin, Chairman
of ECU's Drama Depart-
ment, "Colored Girls" is a
collection of vivid narrative
pieces, some in prose and
some in free verse,
depicting the cavalier and
sometimes downright bru-
tal treatment accorded
women by their men.
Capturing the inner feel-
ings of today's black
woman, the play proceeds
further to achieve a kind
of universality in its proud
reaffirmation of life in the
face of despair.
Assisting Mr. Loessin
in the staging of "Colored
Girls" is Alfred Gallman,
Guest Choreographer with
ECU's Department of
Drama and Speech. Mr.
Gallman recently returned
from the national touring
company of the Broadway
musical "The Wiz and
has studied dance on
scholarship with the Alvin
Ailev American Dance
Center in New York.
The cast for the
production includes Mrs.
Charla L. Davis of the
ECU psychology faculty as
the Lady in Brown; Gloria
Brewington, a senior from
Greenville, as the Lady in
Blue; Deborah Arlena Hall
of Greenville, who works
in the Pitt County School
System, as the Lady in
Red; Penelope Alford, a
Fayetteville junior, as the
Lady in Yellow; Debra
Zumbach, a junior from
Cary, as the Lady in
Purple; Crystal Barnes, a
senior from Washington,
D.C as the Lady in
Orange; and Renee Du-
Laney, a senior from
Montgomery, West Vir-
ginia, as the Lady in
Green.
The members of the
musical ensemble are Ver-
non Jones, a Durham
senior; Pamela Henry, a
sophomore from Wilming-
ton; Winston-Salem fresh-
man Melinda Richardson;
Earlie M. Washington of
Rocky Mount, a sopho-
more; Tony Becton, a
sophomore from Fayette-
ville; and Tony Joyner of
Greenville.
Production Stage Man-
ager for the show is
Michael L. Banks, a senior
from Aurora; Tim White.
Windsor freshman, is as-
sistant state manager.
"For Colored Girls"
will 'run October 31
through November 3, and
November 5 through 7 at
8:15 p.m. in the Studio
Theatre at ECU. Tickets
are $2.50 for the public.
$1.50 for ECU students
with activity card. Reser-
vations may be made by
calling 757-6390 between
10:00 and 4:00 Monday
through Friday.
The current Playhouse
production, 'The Streets
of New York will
continue to run this week
through Saturday October
27, at 8:15 in the Studio
Theatre.
Another ECU professor will publish
By RICHARD GREEN
Managing Editor
East Carolina English
professor and editor of Tar
River Poetry, Peter
Makuck, has had a book of
his poetry accepted for
publication.
Where We Live will be
published by BOA Edi-
tions, by the spring of
1981, in the "New Poets
of America" series.
Peter Makuck
(Photo bv John H. Grogan)
"I had the book
finished about three years
ago Makuck said. He
sent the book to a number
of different publishers,
and each time it came
back he "went through the
same process, weeding
out, revising, strengthen-
ing the book
"One positive aspect of
this (process) is that
though the book was
rejected, I think that was
good fortuneIt gave me
an opportunity to revise
and tighten up. The
book that was finally
accepted is a much better
book than the one I
finished three years ago
Makuck explained.
Makuck's first pub-
lished work, a poem
entitled "Iziadek" (grand-
father in Polish(, appeared
in Southern Review in
1970. Nation, Yankee,
Virginia Quarterly Review,
Denver Quarterly and
other magazines have
featured Makuck's work.
"I've published more
poems than will appear in
(Where We Live)" said
Makuck.
The "New Poets of
America" series will debut
poets not yet nationally
recognized as well as
featuring established poets
such as W.D. Snodgrass,
Richard Wilbur, William
Stafford and Louis Simp-
son.
The interesting thing
about the series is that
established poets write
prefaces for the books of
poetry by the new poets,
Makuck said. Snodgrass
wrote the preface for
Barton Sutter's Cedar
Home, another book in the
series.
"It's nice because you
get the endorsement, the
vote of confidence of an
established poet Makuck
said. "They haven't yet
determined a major Amer-
ican poet to introduce
mine so that's a kind of
pleasant suspense
Makuck still must go to
New York to discuss the
book with his editor, A.
Poulan, Jr before it is
ready to go to press.
Poulan edited Contempor-
ary American Poets, the
book Makuck uses in
teaching his Advanced
Poetry Writing class.
Both Makuck and Terry
Davis, whose book, Vision
Quest, was just released,
had to wait long periods of
time to see their first
efforts succeed, but both
stressed the need to keep
working hard. If it is
quality material, the right
editor will finally accept it.
"You have to do it
because you're committed
to the process, and the
process in itself is im-
portant to you � writing
as a form of discovery and
self-discovery. You're in it
for the knowledge, not the
acknowledgement Mak-
uck said.
L�fl(t0lM6 IfcCMT COLU TH� H)RP i
I f&L SO STUPJ0
LEFT MV JOHN D0HHE
MO I HlvfTO
Hr)l� FT lli CLA55
THIS AfTEWOON f
Marines bomb
local fishermen
HOBUCKEN (AP) � "You can't do away with the
bombing station. That's their business
Fishermen on the Pamlico Sound say they know they
can't get the Marines to do away with bombing. They
just want them to take their bombing range some place
else.
The Marine bombing range near Hobucken is under
fire again. The commercial fishermen want it relocated
because it restricts use of a prime fishing area.
State and federal officials are considering a proposal
to move the range about four miles southeast of its
present location on Brant Island Shoal. Aircraft from
numerous military bases use the range for practice
bombing.
The move will be considered by the N.C. Marine
Fisheries Commission today at a meeting in Bayboro.
This isn't the first time objections have been voiced
about the bombing range, which is located about seven
miles from Hobucken near the mouth of Jones Bay.
Last year area residents complained that the
bombing shook buildings on the mainland and killed
thousands of fish. So Marine Corp officials limited the
use of large bombs. Aircraft now use 500-pound bombs
two days in every 60 and small ordinance and smoke
bombs at other times.
Roy Watson of Mayo Seafood Co a spokesman for
the fishermen, said Monday that relocating the range
would improve navigation in the area and benefit
fishermen who could catch shrimp, oysters and crabs
without interference.
"The range takes in the best fishing in the area he
said. "The fishermen have to work there to make their
livelihood
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23 October 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 7
Stabler, Blanda head list
Bryant provides QBs for the pros
By WILL GRIMSLEY
AP Special Correspondent
NEW YORK (AP) - It
was a shootout at Shea
between a couple of the
Bear's boys.
There was the old-
leather-tough, knowledge-
able Ken Stabler of the
Oakland Raiders, a 10-year
pro veteran, a man who
has seen the football's
summit � the Super Bowl
� anMoonquered it. Then
there was the kid �
Richard Todd of the New-
York Jets, a relative
rookie, injured most of last
season, a second-stringer
at the start of this one,
-till seeking recognition.
One can visualize Bear
Bryant, the legendary
coach of the University of
Alabama Crimson Tide,
ensconced in his swank
headquarters in Bryant
Manor in Tuscaloosa, Ala
stealing a few minutes
from his film-viewing ol
Saturday's tough game
with Tennessee to see how
a couple of his proteges
were doing up North.
He must have been
running over with pride �
especially over the matur-
ing of the new kid on the
block, Todd.
The 25-year-old Todd
completed nine of 18
passes for 161 yards and
hit his target for three of
the touchdowns in the
Jets' 28-19 victory. After a
slow first half, he directed
his team marvelously. The
old man, Stabler, 33, was
a veritable workhorse,
throwing the ball 47 times.
Despite three intercep-
tions, he accounted for 360
yards and two TDs.
Stabler and Todd, al-
most a decade apart in
age, are just two of the
remarkable field generals
who have rolled off the
Bear's relentless assembly
line.
George Blanda and
Babe Parilli emerged from
Bryant's flock at the
University of Kentucky,
the former destined to set
records for longevity and
place-kicking proficiency.
There has been a
succession of great quar-
terbacks spawned in the
Bear's pressure-cooker at
Alabama � Joe Namath
perhaps the most cele-
brated, followed by Stab-
ler, Scott Hunter, Steve
Sloan and Jeff Rutledge,
who went on to make
marks in the pro game.
Yet none of them was
as impressive as were
their performances in the
collegiate game. None
ever won the Heisman
Trophy, the symbol of
undergraduate football
greatness.
"The Bear concen-
trates on team play. No
one man is given priority
over another. It's the unit
that counts � not the
individual. Naturally play-
ers such as Namath,
Stabler, Sloan and Todd
suffer in the battle for
national attention. But the
teams keep on winning
says one Bear watcher.
No one can dispute
VRMY-NAVY STORE
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Field, Deck, Flight, Snorkel
Jackats, Peacoats, Parkas,
Shoes. Combat Boots Plus
Over 400 Different Gl Items
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that. There's not a coach
in the country � pro or
college � who has built a
more impressive monu-
ment of success.
Contrary to popular
belief, Bryant is no genius
at recruiting. He is a
building genius � that's
the reason he's never gone
pro. His red-shirted le-
gions look scrubby and
underfed when measured
by the behemoths of
Southern Cal, Oklahoma
and Notre Dame.
He has no Charles
Whites on his roster, no
Billy Sims
Fergusons.
or Vagas
He just has a bunch of
tough kids who win and
win.
At last look, tney were
No. I. Can you name their
quarterback?
Correction
� � �
In the October 18 edition of The East
Carolinian, it was erroneously reported in
the page 7 story on the ECU Invitational
Volleyball Tournament that the Lady
Pirates are competing in Division II of the
NCAIAW this season.
ECU competes in Division I in volley-
ball and three other women's sports.
The sports staff regrets the error and
apologizes to the team and its coach, Alita
Dillon.
Laathar Belts
$6 to $19
Laathar Handbags
$10 to $25
Shoot Repaired To Look
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Parking in Front
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WED. SPECIAL 4-7
LADIES NIGHT 9-?
Music by MITCH BO WEN
Wed. & Thur.
CLIFF'S 4
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With a valid student ID you can open a
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TROUT, FLOUNDER,
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TEA Is included with meal
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CRAR CAKE SPECIAL
2 Golden Fried Crab Cakes
French Fries, Slaw, and
Hushpuppies. JJ)C
Home of Greenville's Best Meats
Grade "A" Whole Fryers
33 Lb.
Franklin 24 Oz. Butter Split
Bread Or Frank Franklin's
10 oz. Party Style Rolls
Buy one package at regular price
and get second one free
soft -n-pretty Toilet Tissue
4 roll pkg 78
Coca-Cola Qt. Btl. No limit
Morrell Pride T-Bone
Sirloin Steaks $2.19 Lb.
Golden Ripe Bananas 4iLbs.
White Potatoes
10 Lb. Bag 68
New Minute Maid 100 Pure
Fresh Orange Juice
12 Gal Ctn. $1.18
Star Kist Chunk Lite Tuna Fish
6 Oz. Can 68 Limit 2 per customer
Pitt County Grade "A" Brown
Medium Eggs 2 Doz. $1 .oo
28 plUS depOSit coupon expire Oct. 1. PUaaeh coupon clipped.
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J L.
.
1
V
n a





Page 8 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 23 October 1979
Th(
j
Praises Pack rally
Rein looks ahead to battle with Clemson
By DICK BRINSTER
Associated Press Writer
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP)
� North Carolina State
Coach Bo Rein says he
and the Wolfpack aren't
Saturday at the hands of
the Tar Heels.
That loss spoiled N.C.
State's perfect ACC record
and threw the conference
race into a virtual four-way
dwelling on the bitter loss tie among the Wolfpack,
to arch-rival North Caro- North Carolina, Defending
is
champion Clemson and
surprising Wake Forest.
Any observer of the
event who failed to point
out that N.C. State got the
short end of three contro-
versial calls by referee
'They look at the films Robert Carpenter's crew of
and see what they have officials would be less than
done and forget it said honest.
Rein, when asked Monday
how his Wolfpack would But Rein isn't claiming
accept its 35-21 defeat last the Wolfpack was robbed
lina Saturday. Instead,
they're looking to the
contest with Clemson this
weekend.
For all intents and
purposes, the Atlantic
Coast Conference title
on the line.
of the victory or a chanc
at the league crown.
"He ruled it was a first
down at the 16 yard line
said Rein, when asked
about the first call, a pass
from Matt Kupec to Jeff
Grey.
"Last year they had
the best offense and the
defense in the ACC, and
this year they only have
the best defense
Clemson is led by
defensive tackle Jim
Stuckey, whom Rein calls
"an Ail-American and a
whole host of no-names on
offense when one con-
siders the injury to
tailback Lester Brown.
Rein said it would have
been nice had the game
been baseball where the
manager had the right to But Danny Ford's
file a protest. Beyond that Tigers, despite a slow
he dwelt with the problem start, have managed a 5-1
younger players.
Rein said the Wolfpack
must get out of the gate
quickly and maintain a
field-position advantage if
it is to win.
"You,have to get on
top to quiet that crowd
he said. "You have to
make them drive the
length of the field to beat
you
N.C. State hopes to
control the ball on the
ability of quarterback Scott
Smith, who led a furious
second-half comeback that
saw the Wolfpack over-
come a 28-7 halftime
deficit against North Caro-
lina.
Only the disputed
calls and some clutch
defensive plays by the Tar
Heels kept the Wolfpack
from bettering its record
to 6-1.
"We showed character
and came back enough to
get into the game said
Rein. "But we didn't come
through enough to win it
of beating Clemson
Death Valley.
at
"It is entirely different
preparing for them this
year he said.
record. They are the
defending ACC and Gator
Bowl champions, and
could repeat with con-
tinued maturity on the
part of some of their
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GOING HOME FOR THE
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Don't delay making airline
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23 Ortober 1979 THE EAST C
N
9
Bandits, Heartbreakers claim IM titles
Bv RICKI GLIARMIS
Staff Writer
The intramural flag
football season came to a
close on Oct. 15 with the
crowning of two all
campus champions, the
Belk Bandits and Tyler
Heartbreakers.
The Bandits, despite a
previous playoff loss, were
tctorious in the men's
division championship,
defeating the Animals
36-24.
In the women's divi-
sion, the Tyler Heart-
breakers captured the title
as they defeated the Tyler
Termites, 28-6.
The Bandits were upset
in the finals of the dorm
league by the Jones
Raiders, 30-28. They came
hack to defeat the Inde-
pendent league runners-
up. Phi Epsilon Kappa,
42-12, to gain entrance
into the all-campus tour-
nament.
The Animals won the
Independent division as
they defeated Phi Epsilon
Kappa 32-16 in the finals.
Kappa Alpha's narrowly
edged Sigma Tau Gamma
in overtime 34-28. The
Jones Raiders were the
dorm division representa-
tives.
In the semi-finals of
the all-campus tourna-
ment, the Animals barely
edged past the Kappa
Alpha's 14-12. The Belk
Bandits demolished the
Jones Raiders, 22-0. The
Raiders had previously
upset the Bandits in the
dorm championship.
The finals brought
together two of the best
quarterbacks in the
league, former E.C.U.
football star Gerald Hall,
of the Bandits, and Bruce
Bright of the Animals. The
scoring remained close
throughout the game with
the Bandits securing a
victory with an insurance
touchdown in the last
minute, making the final
score 36-24.
In women's division,
the Tyler Heartbreakers
and Tyler Termites dom-
inated the dorm division,
and each easily won their
respective leagues. They
met in the dormitory
division finals with the
Heartbreakers winning 36-
18.
In the sorority division,
Alpha Xi Delta and Sigma
Sigma Sigma were the
prominent teams in the
league and battled in the
sorority championship
game, with Alpha Xi Delta
winning 16-14, in a close
game.
In the women's all-
campus semi-finals, the
Heartbreakers defeated
Sigma Sigma Sigma 30-6,
while the Termites
stomped the Alpha Xi
Deltas 42-0. In the wom-
en's finals, quarterback
Ginger Rathemel led the
Tyler Heartbreakers to a
llllfffllllF
28-6 victory to capture the
campus crown over the
Tyler Termites.
The men's B division
champion was determined
as the Aycock Sidewinders
defeated the Aycock Third
Regiment, 38-16, conclud-
ing an undefeated season
for the Sidewinders.
Thanks to Freddie
Frazier for this accurate
account of the intramural
flag football playoffs.
ADAPTIVE
INTRAMURALS
UNDERWAY
The intramural pro-
gram for special popula-
tions has been initiated
with attempts being made
to find persons on campus
who may be interested in
such an opportunity.
Plans for the 1979-80
program include activities
such as track and swim-
Ma
ming meets, wheelchair
basketball, Softball and
floor hockey, other events
range from horseshoe and
archery competition to
table tennis matches, and
bowling tournaments.
Minges Coliseum will
be reserved on a regular
basis once a week for the
games and activities, and
access to the weight room
and swimming pool will be
available.
Several special events
like square dancing and
beach ball volleyball are
being planning in co-
operation with the Pitt
County Memorial Rehabi-
litation Center.
Two qualified graduate
assistants, Vanessa Hig-
don and Susan Jeffrey,
along with Ms. Nancy
Mize, Associate Intramural
Director, will conduct the
program. All activities will
be planned with specific
modifications for the hear-
ing impaired, visually
impaired, and mobility
handicapped individuals.
If you know anyone
who would be interested in
this program or could
benefit from such an
opportunity, please inform
them of our Adaptive
Program. All persons in-
terested in working with
the program are encour-
aged to contact Ms. Mize
in 204 Memorial Gym or
call 757-6387.
Bowling
This year's team bowl-
ing competition will be
highlighted by a tourna-
ment which is being co-
sponsored by the Intra-
mural Department and
Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter.
The five men and
women with the highest
total score will participate
in an all-expense paid
Association of College
Unions-International face-
to-face regional tourna-
ment. The competition will
be held in Charlotte, N.C
on Feb. 14, 15 and 16,
1980.
Registration will begin
Oct. 22 and extend
through Nov. 1. Play
begins Nov. 6
Co-Rec Volleyball
and Racquetball Singles
Co-Rec Volleyball and
Racquetball Singles entries
open Oct. 29. Sign up in
Memorial Gym, Room 204.
Deadlines and Dates
Team Handball dead-
line is 5 p.m Oct. 25 with
the Captain's meeting
being held on Oct. 29 at 7
p.m. in Brewster B-102.
Team Handball
Officials' Clinic
Team Handball Offi-
cials' Clinic will be held
Wednesday, Oct. 24, at 7
p.m. in 104 Memorial
Gym. All interested per-
sons should attend.
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HoU
he East (Carolinian
nan 1 am
sports
Tuesday,October 23,1979 Page 10
.
Pat Dye comments
on 'The' contest

- Doug Pasehall
Program expands
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
With North Carolina scheduled to play his Pirates
this Saturday, East Carolina head football coach Pat Dye
was very interested in the playing and outcome of last
Saturday's Atlantic Coast Conference showdown
between the nationally-ranked Tar Heels and N.C. State.
The Pirate mentor was more than impressed with the
Heels 35-21 victory.
"All I can say is that they're big, mobile, agile and
hostile said Dye with a grin. "They just out-muscled
and out-played State
The Tar Heels won the game despite the fact that
star tailback Amos Lawrence was sidelined for all but a
few plays with a groin injury. In his stead at tailback
was regular fullback Doug Pasehall, a Greenville native.
All Pasehall did was run for over 100 yards � up the
middle, and heart, of the Wolfpack defense.
"Pasehall is just a good, solid back said Dye. "He
hurt us last year and will most likely be a problem again
this year
Dve is concerned with the inside game of the Tar
Heels just as he is the outside game, which should again
be spearheaded by a healthy Lawrence come Saturday.
"Carolina just ran straight at State for 35 points he
said. When asked if he felt the Pirates could stop the
Heels' inside attack, Dye said grimly, "I don't know, I
just don't know
Many observors doubted the real quality of the Tar
Heel team going into the State game, saying they had
caught quality teams like South Carolina and Pittsburgh
on bad days and simply were lucky to win earlier in the
season. These critics pointed to the Heels' loss to Wake
Forest a week earlier.
But all doubts about the UNC football team were put
aside in Raleigh Saturday says Dye. "I knew they were
good to start with, but I didn't think they could run up
and down the field like they did.
"Carolina simply put their mind to doing something
and went through with it said Dye.
So now Dye and his team must prepare to face this
highlv-talented and highly-ranked team on Saturday.
The game could be a big turning point for the Pirate
season should the team win.
The entire Pirate squad and coaching staff is treating
this week like no other. Assistant coach Henry
Trevathan was asked by an ECU student "How are
things going?" Trevathan replied simply, 'This is the
week
The things that the Pirates will work on during the
week prior to the game concern basics. "We just want
to be able to do what we do best as good as possible
said Dye.
A win Saturday would definitely put the Pirates back
into the bowl picture. A win over the Heels followed by
victories in the Pirates' last four games would surely
make them appealing to some bowl committee
somewhere.
That is why Trevathan refers to this week as the
week.
Lady Bucs begin practice I

IIMMY DuPREE
S Editor
) season with an
18-11, Lady Pirate
set out to create a new
nt
th the first annual Cathy
ir girl- which was held this
-��urn. and continued with
Joyce Kennedy Invitational
i throughout the eastern portion of
nterested in with the camps is getting
"ur campus and showing them what East
offer -aid Andruzzi.
with her 1979-80 squad already over a
into practice and less than a month from their
r, Andruzzi and assistant coach Marcia
mtinue to carry the gospel of Pirate country
i a -
zi and Richards served as directors at a
mini-clinic this weekend at West Palm Beach,
air will also he traveling to several other
the next three weeks, with the primary
xposing the girls to basketball and East
� - Andruzzi.
has been unbelievable said
VU ��- gotten letters from all over the south
rested in the clinics
int -tride forward for the Lady Bucs
as Mrs. Thomas Brewer hosted a
the team and invited guests at the
me to kick-off the season ticket sales
gn.
Mrs Brewer has been instrumental in helping us
ith the women in the community praised
Andruzzi. "This is the year that we want to expose the
program. We want to get the women in the community
involved with Lady Pirate basketball
The most drastic change in the program, however,
has been that of personnel.
ECU lost only two players to graduation last year,
but only four players return.
All-time Lady Pirate assist leader Lydia Rountree and
speedy Lillion Barnes return at guard, while potential
all-American Rosie Thompson returns at forward and
lanky Marcia Girven at center.
Andruzzi and Richards set out to recruit "blue chip"
players and returned with a unit which will provide
depth and speed absent from last year's squad.
Peace College transfer Laurie Sikes provides ball
control and great awareness on the court at the guard
position. Junior Heidi Owen (a transfer from Wagner
College) and walk-on Fran Hooks will alternate at guard
and forward.
Junior Kathy Riley and freshmen Donna Brayboy,
Mary Denkler, Donna Moody and Sandy Ranieri will
battle for the forward positions. Moody and Denkler
could also alternate with Girven at center.
Andruzzi reports that thus far several of the players
have been hampered by minor injuries, but all are
progressing well.
"There's a big difference in last year's team, so far
as skill she praised. "We hope they continue to
maintain the hustle they've showed us so far. They're
really working hard
Andruzzi feels the team will have better speed than
before.
"We've worked on the man-to-man defense she
said. "Last year we couldn't keep up that well. We're
working on positioning
The balance of the team will also give Andruzzi the
freedom to substitute which was a problem last season.
(Photo by
ECU Invitational action
Kip Sloan)
Greenville,N.C
One of Pat Dve fear
Southpaw finds
advantages with
volley technique
l sing your left hand
can be awkward and
inconvenient for some
people but not for Loretta
Holden, East Carolina's
first and only left-handed
volleyball player.
Holden feels that being
a left-handed spiker has
its advantages.
"Since I'm the only
left-handed plaver, I have
the advantages of either
faking or dinking with mv
right and then spiking
with my left she said.
"Spiking is my main
contribution to the team
w hile playing with
Louisburg Junior College
last year, the 5-7, 138-
pound sophomore from
Henderson was named to
the All-East Carolina In-
vitational team.
Holden's outlook for
the Invitational is full of
confidence which applies
to bot the team and
herself Looking back on
last year's Invitational,
Holden had confidence for
the Louisburg team, but
also had a certain praise
for the East Carolina
team. She felt that East
Carolina was one of the
best.
"I looked up to East
Carolina because every-
time 1 saw them play they
looked good Holden
said.
Everyone has their
probhms though, and
Loretta is not exception.
Earlier in the year -he had
some problem- with her
defensive play. Being the
striving player that she -
Holden worked hard and
feels she has bettered
herself in that department.
"Ive improved m y
defense. I'm coming a-
round. I'm more of in
all-around player now
said the left-hander with a
bit of poise
Injuries have thinned
the ranks for East Carolina
this year, hut Holden still
has the enthusiasm and
confidence which helps
her to hold true to her
view- on East Carolina's
chances in the Invitational.
"The seven people that
we have left are goin to
work hard. We want
everybody to know that we
can do it stated Holden.
casting her vote oi confi-
dence.
PIN
Th.
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hur-t.
3,
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bits
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wa
with -
will
B
Fee
hand-ci
Turquoi
Jewelr,
Solid Bi
Buckle:
Leather
20
01
wil
Mon.
Wed.
c
Leg ready for action
Godette set to return after injury
Senior tackle Joe Godette
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
With the offensive unit averaging over 436 yards per
game, naturally the Pirate running backs deserve a
great deal of respect and attention. On the other hand,
without a strong and experienced line to open the holes,
there would be no rushing yardage.
After being sidelined with a knee injury since the
second game of the season against N.C. State, senior
tackle Joe Godette returns to the lineup Saturday as the
Bucs visit the UNC Tar Heels in Chapel Hill.
"We're real happy that he'll be back said assistant
coach Dick Kupec. "He's a little behind on his
conditioning, but he haa kept up mentally. Joe is a very
conscientious ball player
Whether or not he will be in the starling lineup will
not be known until later in the week, but Kupec
reported that he would see extensive action.
"We'll be playing him said Kupec. "So far in
practice there's been no sign of him favoring the leg or
limping.
"Joe was playing very, very well before he was hurt
in the State game. He's experienced and a spirited
player
Godette, a participant in the North-South all-star
game following his senior year at Rose High School,
feels he will be ready for the cross-state rival Heels
when the Pirates travel to Kenan Stadium.
"The knee feels real strong now Godette said
happily. "It took some time to adjust to hitting again
after being out for so long, but I expected it
Godette said that his rehabilitation program was a
"new" technique which allowed him to return after only
four weeks.
"I was able to ride a bike to help keep my upper
legs in shape he said. "Then I was running for two
weeks before they gave me the okay
Godette is a key member of the offensive line which
has been together for the past several years; along with
seniors Matt Mulholland, Mitchell Johnston, Jeff
Hagans and junior Wayne Inman.
"We all came along about the same time said
Godette. "We were usually platooned together, so we
know each other pretty well
The glory netted by the running backs in recent
outings has a positive effect on blockers, according to
Godette.
"We're extremely proud of it said Godette. "It's a
good feeling to see our backs doing so well
Godette stated that although his roommate, fullback
Theodore Sutton, is not leading the team in rushing as
he has for the past two seasons, the offense will be able
to run against Carolina.
"They're keying on him now explained Godette.
"That's why our outside game has been so effective in
picking up the big yardage
"If Carolina does have a weakness offered
Godette, "it's with their defensive secondary. They can
be passed on, but we're going to mix in the run as
well
Godette said that after the three earlv season losses,
the Pirates had to regroup and establish new objectives.
"Now we're just shooting to win the rest of our
games and try to go to another bowl he said. "A lot of
people have counted us out of the bowls, but we can still
mat1 it.
"We're becoming a more complete unit offensively
and defensively. At Wake Forest, we became a team
Godette particularly regretted missing the Pirates
49-7 Homecoming romp over The Citadel.
"After you've played for three years it's hard to miss
the last Homecoming game; that really hurt
ECU also won big against the Keydets of VMI
(45-10).
"We didn't expect them to be that big of wins said
Godette. "We just had enough team leadership and
good coaching to regroup after all the losses
After graduation in the spring, the former Morehead
Scholarship nominee plans to enter graduate school and
continue his education. If the opportunity should arise,
Godette would like to continue to play football in the
professional ranks.
"I guess it's every college football player's dream
he humbly added.
Lei

t





Holly Arts and Crafts in Pinehurst
���,

23 October 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 11
Annual festival expanded
PINEHURST, N.C. -
The first Holly Arts and
Crafts Festival at Pine-
hurst, Saturday, November
3, has proved so popular
that the number of exhi-
bits has been expanded.
The streets and side-
walks of the Village of
Pinehurst will be filled
with spectators and more
than 75 exhibitors, who
will present and sell their
wares amidst a Christmas
theme.
The festival will be
held from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. in the village center.
"We originally hoped
to attract at least 50
exhibitors noted Barbara
Bowles, manager of com-
munity affairs for Pine-
hurst. "Eventually, more
than 100 requested exhi-
bition space. We were
surprised and pleased with
the response but sorry to
have to turn down so
many craftsmen in our
first year Ms. Bowles
said.
Plans for the festival,
co-sponsored by the Sand-
hills Arts Council and
Pinehurst, Incorporated,
have generated much ex-
citement locally. Several
area artists will participate
and the festival will
feature a full range of
presentations: art, paint-
ings, sculpture, ceramics,
handicrafts, prints, weav-
ings, needlecrafts, leath-
erwork, jewelry, pottery,
stained-glass design, sil-
verwork and more.
Special entertainment,
selected and provided by
the North Carolina School
of the Arts, will include a
mime act, clowns and a
magician.
A special one-hour
performance by one of the
world's leading classical
and concert guitarists will
be held in the village.
Myrna Sislen is a
multi-talented performer
who is accomplished not
only with a guitar but with
the bihuela, an unusual
lute-like instrument of
Spanish origin.
Ms. Sislen is a member
of the music faculty of
George Washington Uni-
versity in her hometown,
Washington, D.C, and
she plays regularly for the
Washington Performing
Arts Society.
A musician in resi-
dence at North Carolina
State University for two
years through 1976 � a
unique appointment in the
music world � she has
made two major concert
tours of Europe and has
performed in the U.S.
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Wed. 10-1
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Embassy in Vienna,
Austria.
A Latin tour in 1973
took Ms. Sislen to several
South American Destina-
tions and Puerto Rico. A
Canadian performance was
taped by the Canadian
Broadcasting Corporation
radio network and played
nationwide.
She has studied jazz
guitar with Charlie Byrd,
classical and jazz guitar
with Laurindo Almeida
and with Sophocles Papas.
Ms. Sislen is a forr?"1
head of the music depart-
ment at Montgomery Col-
lege in Rockville, Md.
She will play the guitar
from 2 p.m. during the
festival.
Ms. Sislen will also
perform in the parlor of
the Carolina Dining Room
in the Pinehurst Hotel
Saturday and Sunday eve-
nings, November 3 and 4.
Other events planned
for the festival include
Santa's first arrival of the
year, via horse and buggy
to the village center, at 2
p.m.
Given Memorial Li-
brary in Pinehurst will
make a presentation of the
photographic work of
famed photographer John
Hemmer, who captured
the history of the Village
of Pinehurst through four
decades.
"The day will be filled
with these and other
activities summed Ms.
Bowles of Festival Satur-
day. "With a pre-Christ-
mas theme, the festival
provides an excellent first
opportunity to purchase
unusual Christmas gifts

,i-
V'
PHONE 758-2183
We Now Have TWO
Locations to To Serve You!
Mother-ln-Law Day Oct. 28
5117 W. 4th St. 402 Evans St.
Greenville, N.C. 27834 Greenville, N.C.
Open 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Downtown on the Mall
Open 10:00 a.m. to 5:00
ABORTIONS UP TO 12TH
WEEK OF PREGNANCY
$175.00 "all inclusive
pregnancy test, birth control and!
problem pregnancy counseling. Forl
further information call 832-0535 (toll-
free number 800-221-2568) betweenl
9 A M5 P M weekdays
Raleigh Women's Health
Organization
917 West Morgan St.
Raleigh, N.C. 27603
Support East
Carolinian Advertisers
ajw Fight Inflation MigMt
25 AtM OTM6R SP�CIALS
U)�� LADIES Night
LADtas Fftfc� ADMISSION
bring hkck2.l.s
- dance. Contest
'O cash-first pRtxe
A 5
Large Crisp Iceberg
Lettuce
Grade "A
Whole Fresh Fryers
2 per bag
34Mb.
39 head
PFEIFFER
Thousand Island
or Blue Cheese
Dressing 8oz 3 $1100
Carrots
19pkg

mOmm
Morton
J.F.G. Mayonnaise
QT. Jar
89
Radishes
19pkg
Hi Dri Towels
Jumbo Roll
3$1.00
irf � '���
Mini Cream Pies
Lemon, Banana, or Coconut
ZVzoz
3$1.00
(A�)
Fresh Grade "A
Large White Eggs
59doz
MM
Crisco Oil
48oz
$1.79





Page 12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 23 October 1979
Weekly Album Review: New releases
By PAT MINGES
Features Writer
�The Police � Regatta de Blanc
W hen analogies were first made concerning reggae
and New Wave, the whole affair seemed to be above my
comprehension. Yet after all, each possesses a raw
driving power, a revolutionary spirit and has its roots
deep in the working class of the world.
The Police have blended the sounds of these blood
brothers into one of the most virulent forces in the New
Wave. Even The Clash are drifting towards the
combination first attempted by the Police. Reggatta de
Blanc (White Ships) should rocket to fame (it went to
l in Britain the first week it was released and will
probably propel The Police to monumental stature in the
Y'u Wave.)
I his new album is so powerful and melodic it is
likeh to become a popular sensation among a large
audience not yet acquainted with New Wrave. The Police
are definitely a band with a brilliant future.
"This new album is so
powerful and melodic "

less than thirty min-
utes of music. "
y
PICK HIT: Police
AVOID: Sly Stone
l and The Family Stone � Back on The Right Track Rick Derringer � Guitars and Women
W hat can I say about Sylvester Stone that you don't
'ad) know? Ten years ago, Sly was among the
blacks m the recording industry and one of the
in figures of psychedelia.
Fhis is Stone's first effort in an extremely long time,
is a welcome addition to a hungry market. Sly
nakes the transition to the '70s very well but
that happy, hazy, goodtime feel that
terized his earlier endeavors.
major problem with this album is that although
- s intilating, there are less than thirty minutes
X ith the catapulting prices of albums, we
demand more time for our monev.
on, vou knuckleheads or no nookies for vou.
Benatar � In The Heat of The Night
Women's liberation, where have you been all my
Had I known it would be like this, we would have
�tier on the front line long ago. The number of
�� female artists continues to take leaps
ind it is we. the listeners, who benefit.
i- yel another of the exciting new wave,
- saj permanent wave (aargh-aargh), of
tists who have been able to achieve acclaim
effort of "people's liberation
j. Benatar possesses a goodly amount of
d has attracted an excellent band to
women and most of the old traditional
stii k with this kid as she wields her versions
Neil Geraldo (remember the name), Nick
Parsons, John Cougar and herself.
good album, though she is not t! :J if
home to mom, but, then again, w
ereotj pe anyhow?
3-D. Souther � You're Only Lonely
sts have contributed as much te country rock
D Souther in his long service to artists and
rs in :� - genre. He has been one of the most
- rtgwriters in the recording industry, having his
rded by virtually everyone in his field.
has contributed significantly to the careers of
Linda Ronstadt, Bonnie Raitt and the whole
rnia cowboys. He has recorded with his
r. Hillman. Furay band, and this is his
all)urn.
mp -itions and the stars Souther has
perform with him, You're Only Lonely
to become one of the better eountrv rock
I the vear.
Distributed By
Taylor Beverage Co
Goldsboro
IMPORTED

Heinekeri
HOLLAND BEER
THE 1 IMPORTED BEER IN AMERICA
Plaza irasTrcTi
cinema 1m2m3
PITT-PLAZA SHOPPING CFNTPP
There is a renaissance of good music on this album
uniting two individuals who have had a profound
influence upon rock music � Rick Derringer and Todd
Rundgren.
Derringer first burst onto the popular music scene
with the McCoys, then played with Johnny and Edgar
Winter and with Edgar's White Trash before embarking
on a solo career with his All American Boy release. Yet
more recently, Derringer has been dorman.
Todd Rundgren, who handles production on Guitars
and W omen, has always been one of the most
progressive individuals in rock music and has taken it
upon himself to assist the careers of many artists
through his production endeavors.
Guitars and If omen features Derringer on scorching
guitar. Nick Geraldo (remember the name?) on
keyboards, Rundgren and Kasim Sulton on backing
oals. This new release runs the gamut of Derringer
styles from acoustic beauty to rocking power.
?No Vacancy � D.M. One
No Vacancy is Fred Midgett and Todd Stilley � both
individuals who have a close association with this dear
university of ours. Midgett is a very talented musician
who composes, sings and plays guitar, keyboards and
percussion. Stilley is one of the finest young guitarists I
have ever witnessed and is also a song writer and
co-producer of D.M. One. This album is a truly unique
product, being recorded in Eastern North Carolina, sent
to California for intensification and sold .through Apple
and Rainbow Records.
The musical influences on D.M. One range from
heavy metal to funk to New Wave. It's major fault is
that the vocals are sometimes weak. This band needs
our support, for seldom does something so original and
creative come out of this region. No Vacancy doesn't
have a lot of money, fancy equipment, or a wall of
speaker cabinets, but they do have that one thing
essential in rock 'n' roll � a dream.
�Jennifer Warnes � Shot Through the Heart
This is a very nice release and should rise rapidly in
the charts. Though it contains primarily pop ballads, this
album does not have the superficial dollar orientation
evidenced in more commercially acclaimed female
singers.
Warne's album features the pop tunes "I Know a
Heartache" and "Don't Make Me Over but thi-
production is not as overindulgent as those of her peers.
Shot Through the Heart is a refreshing sight in this, the
winter of the disco trend. The album has tunes penned
by Warnes, Burt Bacharach, Jesse Winchester. Bob
Dylan, Leo Sayer and Stephen Foster.
The personnel on the album is excellent, ther-
rendering a good album musically. With all these factor-
complementing each other, how could Jennifer K arnes
miss?
�Van Morrison � Into The Music
Earlier this album had been given a somewl
unfavorable review, but on further listening and
consideration, I am forced to reiterate. Into The Music is
very possibly Morrison's finest alburn, rivaling i
Moondance in ultimate worth.
Morrison's voice is at its subtle best, anil the h
and string arrangements are marvelous, with tht
addition of banjo and violin making the sound uniqueh
Van Morrison's. Musical influences range from IS
Atlantic to jazz, with rock contemporaries Springsteen
and Jackson Browne showing an effect upon Morn-
sound. It takes a little time to get this album into
soul, but once it finds its place, it will b
endearment.
�The Shoes � Present Tense
These guys must have picked up on No Vacancy'
sound, for their similarities are amazing. Although
is a pleasant album, the emphasis is on pop with a V
Wave sound and not the more original rev
Wouldn't you rather support the home team of
Vacancy and not the production model.
Albums courtesy of Record Bar. Carolina East Mai
Pitt Plaza.
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Buy one Single Hamburger
at regular price, get another
fonK: ecu
MONDAY THRU
THURSDAY
AFTER 4 PM
OFFER FXF1RFS OCTOBER 31.W9
v"litt hell s Hair Styling
TLC-ri iv llr Norfh Carolina 7�34
STUDENT SPECIAL
Any style permanent
or Body Wave
(including style & cut)
Reg. $33.50
SALE PRICE $19.95
For More Information Call: 756-2950
PITT PLAZA GREENVILLE
East Carolina Playhouse
presents
THE STREETS OF
NEW YORK
The rollicking musical based
on the famous old-time
melodrama
directed by
Del Lewis
October 17-20
October 22-27
8:15 p.m.
Studio Theatre
ECU Students $2.50
For reservations and information
call 757-6390
between 10 and 4 Monday through Friday
SAVE MONEY!
ffoSnn C�Up�ns for a" si shO"s this year are only
51Z.UO. To order your season tickets call the
Playhouse Box Office.
Buy aw, SAVE 25!
This Weeks Coupon Special!
COUPON
ZIPPER FRONT HOODED
SWEATSHIRT
REG. 9.9 now 7.9S
$2.00 OFF
COUPON GOOD
THRU SAT. OCT27
528 S. COTANCHE
GREENVILLE, N.C.





Title
The East Carolinian, October 23, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 23, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.16
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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