The East Carolinian, October 18, 1979






"Were it left to me to decide
whether we should have a
government without news-
papers or newspapers without
government, I should not
hesitate a moment to prefer
the latter
�Thomas Jefferson
The East Carolinian
If you have a story idea, a
tip, or a lead, please
telephone us:
757-6366
757-6367
757-6309
It
Vol. 54 No. U
10 pages today
Thursday, October 18,1979
Greenville, N.C.
Circulation 10,000
Damage estimated
at 6,000 for bus
By TERRY GRAY
Assistant News Editor
Service personnel at Hastings Ford have notified
university authorities that the repair bill for the student
bus damaged Monday will be at least $6,000, said
Chubby Abshire of the Transit Authority yesterday.
The bus, a 1975 International, hit a tree Monday
when the driver had to turn to avoid a rear-end collision.
Most of the damage to the bus was done to the front
and the front right side, although Abshire added that
the frame had also been bent.
According to Abshire, Hastings Ford does not have
the facilities for a repair job of this size, and the bus will
therefore have to be towed to the manufacturers in High
Controversy
Point, North Carolina. The cost of towing would add
substantially to the overall cost of repair, said Abshire.
An attempt will be made to repair the bus enough so
that it can be driven to High Point under escort.
Officials at the Thomas-Build Bus Company, which
manufactured the bus, have estimated that the value of
the bus before the accident was $17,000. "We have no
choice but to repair the bus. We couldn't sell it in its
present condition, and there is no way we can junk a
$17,000 piece of equipment said Abshire.
Although there are funds in the transit system's
budget intended to pay for repairs, Abshire noted that
these funds are insufficient to pay for such extensive
damage. Since student transit buses carry no collision
insurance, the majority of the money needed to finance
the repairs must come from general SGA funds, he said.
Collision insurance on the SGA buses was
discontinued in previous years as a cost cutting
measure.
An estimated $6,500 dollars worth of damage was done to this SGA transit bus
when it struck a tree on Monday. It is still not certain whether the accident was due
to brake failure, or driver error.
Ived
Army's recruiters
Questions concerning
the funding of the SGA
newsletter have been re-
solved, according to SGA
President Brett Melvin.
The newsletter, which
was released last month,
caused concern when it
was discovered that no
purchase order had been
approved for its publi-
cation. Under normal pro-
cedures, any expenditure
by the SGA must have
prior authorization in the
form of a purchase order.
Thornton
Dr. Jack Thornton, the
SGA's financial advisor,
declined to approve pay-
ment to National Publish-
ing Company for publish-
ing the newsletter because
there was no purchase
order.
Meyer
1
Inside
today
Pie in the
throwers eye
page 4
World series
ends,
page 5
Slenzynska
at ECU,
page 8
Princess
Margaret
goofs,
page 9
Melvin then took the
matter to Dr. Elmer
Meyer, Vice Chancellor for
Student Life, who ap-
proved the requisition to
pay the publishers.
The cost of printing the
newsletter was approxi-
mately $350.
According to Dr.
Meyer, the failure to
obtain the necessary pur-
chase order is a problem
with many campus organi-
zations despite repeated
directives to follow the
established guidelines.
Dr. Thornton com-
mented that he was only
following university policy
when he declined to
approve the requisition.
When asked why no
purchase order had been
approved, Melvin said,
"Every organization has
problems when it starts
new programs. The news-
letter was a new thing for
us, and it takes a while to
get the kinks out of any
procedure
Melvin added that the
publication of future
newsletters will be a
matter for the SGA legis-
lature to decide.
Leonard Fleming, Operations Manager of the transit
system, said that he was not sure if the $6,000-plus
repair bill would interfere with transit plans to add
another bus to its fleet this year.
Fleming said that the damaged bus has been
replaced on its route by a back-up bus, and .hat service
should proceed as usual. However, Fleming said that
the transit system is now operating without another
back-up, and that any serious breakdown that occurs in
the near future may disrupt service. Hastings Ford has
assured the Transit Authority that everything possible
will be done to keep the buses on the road, said
Fleming.
Chubby Abshire added that any students who might
have been injured in the accident must present their
claims as soon as possible, since there are certain time Carolina, on alleged illegal
limits in insurance claims. Army recruiting practices,
Practices illegal?
Hearing
will be
soon
A hearing to determine
the cause of Monday's bus
accident on Fifth Street
has been set for next
week, said Transit Opera-
tions Manager Leonard
Fleming, Wednesday.
The accident occurred
in front of the Jenkins art
building early Monday
afternoon when bus driver
Mark Folsom had to
swerve into a large tree to
avoid hitting a car.
Eyewitnesses said the car
had stopped in the road to
make a left turn into
Jarvis Street.
According to Fleming,
the Student Advisory
Transit Committee will
meet next Tuesday at 7:00
p.m. in Mendenhall to
hear testimonv from bus
From
staff and wire reports
The senate will hold
hearings, some in North
Interview
White house staffer questioned
By DIANE HENDERSON
Copy Editor
"The press constantly want more
access to the president. You can never
give them enough. I'm a former member
Morgan said. He said he
expects the secretary of
the army and several
recruiters in North Caro-
lina who have been
relieved of duty and
Correction
A story printed in the Oct. 16 issue of The East
Carolinian incorrectly stated that Vice Chancellor Meyer
would be looking for a new Intramural and Recreational
Sports director. This is not correct, and we regret the
error.
Also there has been a misconception concerning the
Media Board budgets. All of the budgets were
tentatively approved this summer, but they did not
receive their final approval. Final approval has not yet
been given to any of the Media at this time.
Sen. Robert P. Morgan,
D-N.C, said Tuesday.
Gary Grifin, who is in
charg of iecruiting for a.
23 county area in this
section of the state, does
not anticipate any prob-
lems in his department,
however.
Morgan said that he
and Sen. Sam Nunn,
D-Ga will co-chair the
hearings which could be-
gin as early as next week.
Nunn is chairman of the
Senate armed services
subcommittee on man-
power and personnel.
"I'm sort of the writer of the staff "I don't know who will
When asked if his job had anything to testify or where the
do with covering up scandals such as the hearings wil
Hamilton Jordan situation, Purks re-
sponded, "We just haven't gotten any
calls from out-of-town press on the
of the press, and I know They can run so-called Jordan scandal We don t really
you over handle matters like that
Tim Purks assistant press secretary to Purks showed an obvious loyalty to the
,heJ prlsidt, feeTs ha, being an president, even .hough he pointed ou. ���&" ���
ex-newspaper man is bo.h helpful and ,ha there are some matters on wh.ch they w,ll teerfed
ctrainintr don t see eye to eye. w� " ,
� � - ' ' "I wouldn't resign over a disagree- he will be subpoenaed to
ment in policy Purks said. appear at the hearings
The assistant press secretary stated During the past five
that he would consider leaving if his honor months, the Army had
Sirg rhispyboy and cub- in "ite Watergate As a result the Army has
reporting experience with" the Raleigh scandal, Purks said, "I would like to think relieved duty
News and Observer, revealed that many what I would have done was get the heck
of the public relations people on the out of Dodge
White House staff have prior press Questioned about President Carters
experience. Although Jody Powell, press leadership and whether Rosalynn Carter s
secretary, is not a former member of the prominent place in the public eye affects
press both Ray Jenkins and Patricia the polls on this matter, Purks answered,
Barrio, deputy press secretary, have "Anyone who knows Jimmy Carter knows
experience as journalists. how disciplined and firm he is. She (Mrs Droblems this area
P"Most of !hem do have a journalism Carter) is a very close confidant with j�
Eft WltH ASS�CUUed himPus said that the Carters meet once � ocd two years
JSSX �S itKLtSibttt saidHe does
"Morale Ts a Little bit low around Purks did all but state that the not believe the Army will
here I tell you, there are days when president would run for re-election. In correct its recruiting sys-
i'm not' sureI can cope Purks said. answer to a question about how the tem without pressure from
Purks' duties primarily consist of president would campaign if he does run Congress. ,
working with out-of-town press. As media Purks said, "I have a feehng he'll "We re not interes ted
Haison he answers letterand complaints probably be on the road a lot. He's quite m the punishment of the
asweli. a campaigner and fighter recruiters, but we are
is
UUlit e
"There are times when I wish I had
more input. Since I have been on the
other side, I can see just how the media is
going to respond said Purks in a recent
interested in seeing that
the root of the problem is
exposed Morgan said.
The recruiters have
oeen charged with supply-
ing potential recruits with
bootleg copies of entrance
examination and falsi-
fying their records.
Morgan has argued
that high enlistment
quotas encouraged the
malpractice.
A later release re-
vealed that about 60
percent of the young men
enlisted in the Army are
"below-average in intelli-
gence according to the
general in charge of
training them.
Gen. Donn Starry,
head of the Army Training
and Doctrine Command,
told reporters Tuesday
that the lower intelligence
factor has been somewhat
offset by "greater moti-
vation" among those who
join. He said recruits with
below average mentality
are trainable, but that it
takes more time to teach
them certain tasks.
driver M rk r 'sop- an.1
from students who were in
the bus at the time of the
accident
Folsom
that he
sw
said
3 ed
Mond?.v
into the
tree after the orakes fai
to stop the bus in time.
However, e- ewitnes ;s
said that the acHc n
resulted chiefly fr-
lowing too closely.
fo1
Chubby Abshire. ad-
ministrative manager of
the transit system, said
that the brakes on the bus
had been serviced at
Hastings Ford on Friday,
Oct. 12 and that the driver
who ran the bus before
Folsom reported no prob-
lems with them. Abshire
also said that the tow
truck driver who pulled
the bus away had to
unlock the brakes before it
could be moved.
The accident was the
eighth since last January
that has been attributed
either to faulty brakes or
driver error despite Transit
Authority attempts to re-
medy these problems.
of duty 162
recruiters and three offi-
cers including 31 of 55
recruiters and the com-
manding officer in the
Charlotte district.
Griffin also said that he
feels one of the reasons
that there have been so
Tau awarded
By KAREN WENDT
News Editor
The ECU Tau chapter
of Phi Sigma Phi honor
fraternity was awarded the
Outstanding Chapter of
the Year Award for the
14th consecutive year, at
the annual Phi Sigma Phi
convention held in Arling-
ton Va. October 5 and 6.
Attending the conven-
tion were chief delegate
Bill Ballance, Linda Bar-
ber, Carolyn Blackwell,
Colleen Flynn, Jim Kitt-
rell, Jean Murdoch, Lowell
Oakley, Jerry Price, Dr.
Jack Thornton, local spon-
sor and national vice-
president, and Dr. Richard
Todd, national alumni rep-
resentative.
The highlight of the
conference, which cen-
tered its theme on "A
Higher Social Expres-
sion was a speech
presented by Dr. Peter
Schoettle concerning Salt
I.
Chapter reports and
national business were
also discussed at the
meeting.
Tuesday's Media Board
Budgets subject at meeting
Board members were trying to settle the final
budgets for the different media at their meeting
By KAREN WENDT
News Editor
Budgeting was again
the major topic of concern
at the Media Board
meeting held on Tuesday.
Assistant Dean of Stu-
dent Life Rudolph Alex-
ander said that he felt
"the individual mediums
ought to be compli-
mented" on how well they
handled the financing
difficulties.
The current budgeting
problem arose when it was
learned that the total
amount of the tentative
budget was approximately
$16,000 over board's allot-
ment.
When informed of the
problem, the heads of the
different media met to try
and solve it without the
intervention of the board.
They decided to base
their budget cuts on a
percentage of the amount
if money each media
�eceives from student fees.
Once they had agreed
on the different amounts
for each, the media heads
looked into their own
budgets to see where the
necessary cuts could be
made.
They then presented to
the board the budget cuts,
which were tentatively
accepted.
Among other business,
the salaries of The East
Carolinian employees were
questioned by board chair-
person Tricia Morris.
SGA president Brett
Melvin also brought up
the earning of advertising
commissions by salaried
employees of the news-
paper.
Melvin said that some
students were "making a
killing off of the student
body of this university
Student Union Presi-
dent Charles Sune pointed
out that the advertising
commission gave employ-
ees added incentive to get
more advertising.
The board decided to
request advertising em-
ployees to come to the
next meeting and explain
the system of commission.
"Everyone should have
the right to face their
accusers Melvin com-
mented.
The hospitality line
item was another topic of
discussion at the meeting.
Clifton Moore, vice
chancellor of business
affairs, feels that state
funds should not be used
for the entertainment of
individuals, cited Vice
Chancellor for Student Life!
Elmer Meyer.
The board adopted this
recommendation as its
policy on hospitality.
Bids for the 1980
Buccaneer will be pre-
sented to the board at the
next meeting.
The Ebony Herald
subcommittee will also
present a report at the
next meeting on Oct. 31.
A dog's life
CHICAGO (AP) -
Thumper, a 200-pound
Saint Bernard, has found
that a dog's life can be
great.
He was chauffeured
around Chicago in a
limousine Tuesday and
pampered in a suite at the
posh Whitehall Hotel.
Accompanied by his
owners, Carl and Betsy
Bodie of Lockport, N.Y
and their two children,
Benjamin, 4, and Nathan-
iel, 8, Thumper was flown
to Chicago by Ken L
Ration to receive its "Dog
Hero of the Year" award.
Thumper rode in a special
traveling cage in the
baggage compartment.
He drew stares as he
made the rounds with his
I
huge head sticking out of
the limousine window
before being honored at an
evening banquet at an-
other swank hotel, the
Ritz-Carlton.
Thumper, not quite 2
years old, beat out other
courageous canines to get
the 26th annual award �
a gold medal, a $1,000
U.S. savings bond, a gold-
plated leash and collar and
a year's supply of dog
food.
Last year, Thumper
Igayed by Benjamin's side
when the youngster wan-
dered from home and was
lost 12 hours in an area
dotted with farm ponds.
Thumper kept Benjamin
away from harm uni
rescuers were attracted
the dog's barking.
itil
by I





Pafle 2 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 18 October 1979
Cancer
victim
dies
TIJUANA, Mexico (AP)
� The parents of 3-year-
old leukemia victim Chad
Green say they will take
their son's body to Ne-
braska for burial Saturday,
then return to Mexico to
await further develop-
ments in the Massachu-
setts eontempt-of-court
charges against them.
Gerald and Diana
Green said Tuesday that a
Massachusetts state Sen-
resolution urging au-
classified
ate
thonties to let them return
to their Seituate, Mass
home to bury Chad
without fear of arrest "just
came too late
The couple became the
renter of controversy last
January when they took
their son out of the
country in defiance of a
Massachusetts court order
barring use of Laetrile in
treatment of Chad's leu-
kemia. Custody of the
toddler at that time was
returned to the state.
Chad did receive Lae-
trile. however, at the
Tijuana clinic of Dr.
Ernesto Contreras. A sub-
stance derived from apri-
and peach pits and
hitter almonds, Laetrile is
severely restricted in the
United States but legal in
Mexico.
Where
FOR SALE: 1973 Toyota
pickup; good condition,
long bed. Good mileage
and good tires. Call: Steve
Curry 752-4379.
YARD SALE: Saturday,
Oct. 20 in front of PRC
building, corner of Co-
tanche and Ninth. Furni-
ture, clothing, knick-
knacks. Time: 8 a.ml
p.m.
FOR SALE: Hohner 6
string guitar with case and
fine leather strap. Mother
of pearl in lay. Excellent
condition. Call 752-6391.
FOR SALE: Royal Medal-
lion II Typewriter. 76
model, excellent condition.
Price negotiable. Call 946-
9485.
MARANTZ 2285 Receiver,
Bose 301's, Technics turn-
table. Will sell separate
102-C Cherry Ct. Drive
after 6 p.m.
PHOENIX SAVAGE KAY-
AK: excellent condition;
Norse paddle, spray skirt,
float bags, helmet, cartop
mounts, $350. 758-3710.
FOR SALE: Classical Ya-
maha Guitar. (6-65) 1978
model. Excellent condition.
$125.00 Contact Debbie at
758-0269.
TURNTABLE: Toshiba SL-
32 single play; belt driven.
Still new (less than 6 mos.
old) $150.00 756-7996.
lfarirt &
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED to share two-
bedroom duplex three
blocks from ECU campus.
72 rent, utilities, phone.
Call 757-6334 between
8:00 and 5:00; 758-5910
after 5:00.
WANTED: Apartment and
female roommate begin-
ning Spring, 1980. Prefer
a graduate student, but
will consider a senior. Call
Cathy Mills after 6 (919)
772-0667.
THREE FEMALE ROOM-
MATES needed to share
apt. at Riverbluff. Rent is
$52.50 per month, plus
utilities and phone. Call
758-5823.
AM LOOKING for a
roommate to share apt. w
ECU student. 5 blocks
from campus. Call Ashe
758-3219.
WANTED: Male room-
mate. 3 bedroom house w
fireplace. $92 month plus
13 utilities. 752-7416.
2-5:00 afternoons. After
9:00 at night.
FURNISHED ROOM for
one female in house on N.
Charles St. 2 blocks from
campus. Rent $85. Phone
758-7010.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
needed to share two
bedroom apartment at
Eastbrook. Pay half of rent
and utilities. Call Cathy at
752-7505.
PRIVATE ROOMS: Share
bath and kitchen, East
Third Street. 752-5296.
BEACH LOVERS! Part-
time student sales rep-
resentative position avail-
able for Spring Semester.
Job involves promoting
high quality sun trips on
campus for commission
and free travel. Individual
must be self-starter and
highly motivated. Call or
write for an application.
Summit Travel, Inc Park-
ade Plaza, Suite 11,
Columbia, Missouri 65201
(800) 325-0439.
DANCE: Sunshine Studios
will be offering the
following classes at a
discount rate to ECU
students: Ballet, Jazz,
Yoga Arabic (Belly Dance)
and Partner Disco Dance.
Classes are within walking
distance of campus, be-
ginning Oct. 29 & 31. CA11
Sunshine at 756-7235, or
758-0736.
PARTY HEARTY at the
ECtJ-Carolina game And
let us do the driving! A
7JX chartered bus will take you
pers, etc. Call Leigh cnancic
r uL� ot 79 ft097 RPfl from Greenville to the gates
Coakley at 752-8027. Rea n Stadium and
sonable rates. back again all for $6.00.
LOST: A set of 4 keys. Limited number of seats, so
One has 207 engraved on mafce your reservations
it. Phone 752-3984 if N0Wn Call 752-2476 or
found. A $10.00 reward is 752-8925.
offered.
j pgraoocl(ft)
WANTED: Strong per-
son) with pick-up to help
me move 1027. Will pay
$20 752-9048.
NEED A PAPER TYPED?
Theses, reports, term pa-
The Student Union Films Committee
Presents
Richard
Dreyfus
gFix
Rated PG
"He's so warm, funny and appealing, he again
proves nimself to be the most cuddly toy tnls
side of a teddy bear -Rona Barrett ABC-TV
Oct. 19 & 20 7 & 9 pm.
Admission by I.D. & Activity Card
Hendrix Theatre
m
mm
i
STUDENT UNION
USTCMOUM UWVIV-
Mendenhall Student
Center
iffalo
FEATURED VALUE
ALL YOU
CAN EAT!
roam
OKLAHOMA CITY
P) Gov. George Nigh
ys he has some hot
ads on finding a buffalo
pay off a wager with
lg Gov. William Clem-
ents.
Nigh wagered a buffalo
against a longhorn steer
, ver the annual football
showdown between the
Oklahoma Sooner and the
Texas Longhorns last
ALL YOU CAN EAT
SPECIALS
4 00 8 00 PM
SALAD�50 EXTRA
STUDENT
FLOUNDER
DINNER
INCLUDES
FRENCH FRIES,
TARTAR SAUCE,
HUSHPUPPIES,
COLESLAW
$2.99
1
The Sooners lost, 16-7,
and now Nigh needs a
buffalo � especially since
Clements has promised to
barbecue it for the Texas
players.
"Alter we get one,
we're considering taking
it to the Red River and
turning it loose Nigh
quipped. "We could say,
'Here it is. You catch it
SHONEYS
432 ureenville Blvd.
WITH FRIES & COLESLAW
FRIED $
CHICKEN ON.Y
WITH GARLIC BREAD
ITALIAN
SPAGHETTI
WITH FRIES & COLE SLAW
FRIED -I
FISH . . ��! I
NEED X-TRA
CASH?
Fair prices paid for
gold and silver.
Mixed Media
120 E. 5th St.
758-2127
THE GREAT "X" PERM SALE
Super Perms
Super Prices
permi
now only
Sun" 35
00 CGfftfil
I
The folks at Kroger Sav-on know the
complete student has a party side
too So they have what East Carolina
University students need for any bash
from party platters to disco plat-
ters all in one convenient loca-
tion Don't be incomplete this
year�shop Kroger Sav-on today.
COSMETICS
FRAORAHCiS
JDiSCOUNTED! 8J
UP TO
20
OFF MANUFACTURER S
SUGGESTED RETAIL
REG. OR DIP
COUNTRY OVEN
Potato
Chips
8-Oz. Twin Pak
59
0
LET THE DELI DO IT! Planning a party? Let the
Kroger Sav-on Deli supply the fixin's. Finest
quality meats, delicious cheese, & tasty
salads combine to make our party trays
perfect for entertaining. Just phone ahead to
ace your order!
Records and
Tapes
FIRE BREWED
Stroh's a $gg
HEARTY BURGUNDY, PINK CHABLIS,
ROSE, CHABLIS BLANC OR
Gallo
Rhine
1.5 Liter
Btl.
2
88
30
F i RETAIL
W.THTH.SCOU'J
Mastercharga and vlaa
756-8694
236 Carolina East Mall
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be readily available tor
sale in each Kroger Sav-on Store except as specifically noted in this
ad r? we do run out of an advertised item, we will offer you your choice
of a comparable item, when available, reflecting the same ��"���
ralncheck which will entitle you to purchase the advertised item at the
advertised price within 30 days.
on
NONE SOLD
DEALERS
OPEN 7 AM TO MIDNIGHT
MON
THRU
SAT
FOOD, DRUG, GENERAL
MERCHANDISE STORES
PRICES EFFECTIVE TUES
OCT. 16 THRU SUN OCT. 21, 1979
?p�lu?DY 600 Greenville BlvdGreenville
9AMT09PM
Phone 756-7031





18 October 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN P�o� 3
Feeble places, and
ctiemistry �a
Ulp
knew
lfCvt
May we remind stu-
dents that all annouce-
ments for the People,
Places and column must
be typewritten, double
space, and turned in
before the deadline or they
will not be accepted.
These rules will be strictly
enforced.
We cannot guarantee
that all of the announce-
ments that we receive will
be published, but we will
do our best.
Deadlines are 2:00
p.m. on Tuesday for the
Thurday edition, and 2:00
p.m. Friday for the
Tuesday edition.
All announcments
should be directed to the
news editor only.
The Air Force Officer
Qualifying Test (AFOQT)
will be administered on 20
and 23 October 1979, at
8:30 a.m in Wright
Annex, Room 201. This
test is open to all qualified
individuals desiring to
enter the Air Force ROTC
program during their last
two years at ECU and all
AFROTC GMC cadets.
Those people interested in
taking the AFOQT or who
require more information
about the test of the
AFROTC program should
contact Captain Moyer at
757-65976598 or stop by
Wright Annex, Room 209.
business
Phi Beta Lambda is a
nationwide business ser-
vice fraternity that is open
to all business students.
The only grade point
average requirement is
that you meet those set by
the university for enroll-
ment. Among other things,
we sponsor a symposium
each year that brings in
speakers from various
fields of business. If
you're ready to broaden
your involvement beyond
the classroom them we're
ready for you. Come to our
next meeting to see what
we're about.
tebel
ricsl
faycees
bcrci
Sigma Tau Delta, Eng-
lish Honorary, will hold its
second meeting Wed. Oct.
24 at 7:30 in Mendenhall
Coffeehouse . All inter-
ested faculty and students
are encouraged to attend.
There will be a guest
speaker and refreshments
will be served.
beau aits
The 1979 Beaux Arts
masquerade ball promises
to be better than ever,
with entertainment in-
cluding the ECU Jazz
ensemble and the Drama
Dept. dance group per-
forming. Various booths,
door prizes and 15 kegs of
ice cold beer will also be
available.
Tickets can be pur-
chased in the Art, Drama,
and Music offices in
advance for $2.
Tickets at the door will
be 12.50.
So get your ticket now
for this extravaganza.
i iMi li
The ECU Christian
Ensemble will meet Thurs.
night at 7:30 p.m. at First
Presbyterian Church. This
contemporary choir and
orchestra will be minister-
ing the gospel of Christ to
the students as well as to
area churches and Chris-
tian rallys. Vocalists, in-
strumentalists, and sound
and lighting technicians
are needed. If you would
like to know more about
this exciting ministry, call
Mark Sexton at 752-9612.
The Greenville Jaycees
will be sponsoring a
Haunted House during the
Halloween season. The
dates will be October
20-22 and them resume
October 25th through Hal-
loween night. One-third
proceeds will go towards
assisting in the construc-
tion of the local Boy's
Club. The house will be
located at the Old Fair
grounds on Airport Road
and be open from 7 p.m.
until.
iiby
fceer
The Student Union
Program will meet Thurs-
day, Oct. 18, 1979, at 7:00
p.m. in Room 212 of
Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter. The main topic will be
Beer and Wine Consump-
tion on campus. Please
plan to attend.
Hill
There will be a Family
Child Association meeting
on Tuesday, Oct. 23, at
5:00 in Room 143 in the
Home Economics Building.
All Child Development and
Family Relations majors
and minors are urged to
attend.
The Rebel is now
accepting high-quality lit-
erature submissions. Poet-
ry, essays, plays and
interviews, and short stor-
ies will be accepted. All
work must have name,
address, and phone num-
ber of writer. Address
manuscripts to the Rebel,
Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter, Greenville,N.C. 27834.
artists
flicks
Rugby tournament:
Sat. and Sun. Oct. 20 and
21 from 9:00-4:00. Come
out and support East
Carolina Rugby.
Rugby Party: Sat. Oct.
20 at 8:00. Just go 9 miles
nort of 43 to The Wide
Life Club, follow the signs.
There will be 35 kegs of
beer for your enjoyment.
navy
The Dept. of the Navy
Civiliam Personnel Co-op
recruiter who will be on
campus October 26 is
looking for students to fill
computer science posi-
tions. However, he will
also interview students for
the following job descrip-
tions: Automatic Data
Processing, Statistician,
Supply and Transportation
Managment, Quality and
Reliability Assurance Spe-
cialists, Personnel Man-
agement, Education spe-
cialists, Industrial Spe-
cialists, Logistics, Man-
agement, Housing Man-
ager, Program analysis,
Financial Managment,
Management Analysis,
and Procurement. If there
is enough student interest,
the recruiter may be able
to come to the campus
Thursday afternoon, Oct.
25.
Interested students
should review the CAP-
SON file in 313 Rawl. If an
appointment is desired,
the student should arrange
an interview with a Co-op
coordinator through Mrs.
Harrizene Keyes, Co-op
Secretary. The coordinator
will pro.ide information
concerning forms which
must be completed prior to
the interview with the
CAPSON recruiter.
The Humphrey Bogart-
Katherine Hepburn clas-
sic, "African Queen" will
be this week's present-
ation in the Methodist
Student Center film series.
The Show begins at 8:00
p.m. on Sunday night-re-
freshments will be served.
The MSC is located at
Fifth Street and Holly
across from Garrett Dorm.
Everyone is welcome.
Start preparing art for
The Rebel. It has been
confirmed that there will
be prize money awarded
again this year thanks to
The Attic and Jeffrey's
Beer and Wine for Bud-
weiser. Categories include
painting, drawing, print-
making, photography, and
mixed media. If there are
questions, contact Sue
Aydelette, art director.
The North Carolina
Student Legislature will
hold the second Interim
Council meeting of the
1979-80 year on Sunday,
Oct. 21. Delegations from
21 colleges and universi-
ties will attend this
meeting.
There will be a meet-
ing tonight for the ECU
delegation at the Menden-
hall Student Center Rm.
221, 7:00 p.m. Topics to
be discussed will be the IC
and the budget for the
upcoming year. All mem-
bers are urged to attend.
There is an urgent
need and immediate open-
ings for tutors of Chem-
istry 1120 and 0150.
Applicants may be grad-
uate or undergraduate
students who are profi-
cient in these area.
Contact Dr. Bridwell or
Dr. Hensel in 208 Rags-
dale Hall or call the
Center for Student Oppor-
tunities at 757-6122, 6081,
or 6075.
The will be screenings
for one Dorm Represent-
ative in Ay cock on Oct.
29th, at 4:00 p.m. Anyone
interested may apply at
the SGA office � Roome
228 � Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center.
The Wesley Foundation
is sponsoring a study trip
to Washington, D.C. Oct.
19-21. Fifteen people will
participate in discussions
Religion and the
on
psycb
$MT)ima
Gamma Beta Phi will
meet Thursday, Oct. 18 at
7:00 in Room 244, Men-
denhall
Psychology Majors and
Minors. Psi Chi Honor
Society for Psychology is
accepting applications for
Fall induction. You must
have a minimum psyc
GPA of 3.0, be in the
upper 13 of your class,
and have a minimum of 8
hours in psyc. Last day to
apply is Oct. 24th.
Arts" led by the Rev.
Carol Goehring of Green-
ville. A highlight of the
trip will be a vist to the
National Gallery.
I I I 4 l
The 1979-80 phone-
books are in. If you do not
have one yet, they are
available in the SCA office
located on the second floor
of Mendenhall Room 228.
bewl
Take advantage of
great savings in bowling at
Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter. Monday is 'Discount
Day
wesley
Wesley Center will be
holding a coffeehouse once
a month starting Nov. 1,
1979. There will be various
forms of entertainment
provided. This is open to
everyone with a small fifty
cent admission charge.
Refreshments will be a-
vailable.
TIPPY'S
Mon. thru Thurs. 11:30 a.m.
� 9:30 p.m.
cernlcs
The East Carolina
Comic Book Club will meet
Tuesday Oct. 23 at the
Nostalgia Newstand 919
Dickinson Ave Green-
ville. The meeting will
start at 7 p.m. and is open
to all interested persons.
Topics of discussion will
include the upcoming Dec.
2 convention. For more
information, call 758-6909.
Friday 11:30 a.m. � 10:30 p.m.
Saturday 4:00 p.m. � 10.30 p.m.
756-6737
superb mexican food
Dine In Take Out
�Complete Dinner Menu
Excellent Selection Of
Wine& Beer
Lounge & Bar For Relaxation
SPECIAL Every Monday & Tuesday
50 Off Mexican & Durango Dinners
We serve only U.S.D.A. graded bet and
no imitation cheeses on our dinners.
Coupon
Expires Dec. 31, 1979
GOOD FOR ONE FREE SOFT DRINK
WEDSAT. WITH PURCHASE OF
TIPPY'S TACO HOUSEDINNER
FRIMITS
GOING HOME FOR THE
HOLIDAYS?
Don't delay making airline
reservations. Early booking
necessary for excursion
rates. Our prices are the
same as the airlines. No
service charge for tickets
issued by us . Know your
travel agent-We are
ECU fans.
Quixote Travels, Inc.
3 319 Cotanche St.
Tjl Greenville, NC
" Phone 758-3456
Son. thru Thurs
Fri.Cf Sat. 4&e-lCte0
Friday's Seafood
2311S. Evans St.
Lunch 11:30-2:30
Mon. Ladle's Day-Free trip
to salad bar with
each full meal
Tues. Ladle's Day
Free cup of clam
chowder w it h each
full meal
Wed. Soup n'Sandwich
S2.2S
Thurs. Soup n'Salad
SI.7S
Frl. Fish Fry
all the trout you can
eat for $1.99 with
fries and slaw
Sun. Family Day
� Lunch and Dinner
All you can eat
Shrimp $495
Oysters $475
Flounder $3.50
Trout S2.9S
"Tom, crying in your beer is one thing
but when it's Stroh's youve gone too feer"
For the real beer lover.





The East Carolinian
Editorials
inions
Thursday, October 18, 19179 Page 4
Greenville, N.C.
Pie incident wrong
There is a time and a place for
everything, but the Homecoming
Parade Saturday morning was neither
the time nor the place for the incident.
which involved the throwing of a pie
into the face of Student Government
Association President Brett Melvm.
This childish display should not be
condoned. Obviously, Melvin was
sitting on the Chancellor's reviewing
stand to enjoy himself, and we defend
the right of anyone to enjoy themselves
in peace and quiet, without having an
immature soul come along and push a
cream pie into one's face.
Legally, hitting someone in the face
with a pie constitutes assault and
battery, which is a felony If the
unidentified person who caused Melvin
this indignity is caught, he could find
himself in a lot of trouble.
Controversy has surrounded Mel-
vin' s name since he has taken office,
and there have been charges of
favoritism and poor service during his
tenure. This newspaper has disagreed
with Melvin on occasion, as any
newspaper is apt to do with a
governmental leader. We maintain
however, that such an absurd, childish
act as a way of disagreeing with
someone, reflects badly on the
university, on the homecoming cele-
bration, and finally on the immature
individual who perpetrated it.
There are better ways to disagree
with people. In the case of Brett
Melvin, you can voice your opinions to
him directly, in his office in the
Mendenhall Student Center. You can
write a letter to the editor. You can
complain to the Vice Chancellor for
Student Life. Throwing a pie into
JACK ANDERSON
someone's face is not a good way to
voice disagreement.
This incident is a reflection of the
kind of society we live in today, where
people are too immature to handle
themselves and their emotions.
The person who threw the pie into
Brett Melvin'sface probably ruined his
day and everyone who is a student at
this university has a right to enjoy
themselves at a student sponsored
activity such as a homecoming parade.
Some of us who are more cruel than
others probably had the audacity to
laugh at the sight of the SGA president
with pie filling all over himself, but it is
a sight that when thought about in
human terms, is a tragic one indeed.
Homecoming is the first step in the
many rites of passage of a senior at this
university. First come the festivities
during the fall, and after this, the year
begins the inevitable winding down
towards graduation. Homecoming, then,
is a big event in everyone's life, and to
have it marred in this way detracts from
the whole spirit of the occasion.
To remember your last I homecoming
in college - to remember that someone
threw a pie at you - is an awful
thought indeed.
Music is one of many examples
of industries controlled by men
By G.C. CARTER
In human terms, then, Melvin
should be offered apolegies from the
person or persons responsible for this
serious incident. Fun is fun, but not
when it comes at the expense of
another. We are sorry that it happened,
and we send along the hope that
whoever did it will grow up real soon,
because this unidentified person has no
business being at college, or anywhere
else if there are adults present.
WFFKT.Y SPECIAL
Carter is back on trail
By JACK ANDERSON
WASHINGTON Back in
1924, a little-remembered
Republican president ran
and won on the slogan,
"Keep Cool with Coolidge
Now more than a half-centu-
ry later, a Democratic occu-
pant of the White House is
testing a similar rallying
cry. "Keep Calm with
Carter
Jimmy Carter recently
boasted of his ability to
avoid panicking in a crisis.
He then quickly wrote his
potential presidential rival,
Ted Kennedy, that any allu-
sion to the senator's behav-
ior at Chappaquiddick never
entered his mind. But White
House sources admit that
the backhanded slap . was
intended to remind the vot-
ers of Kennedy's panicky
actions on the night of the
Chappaquiddick drowning
tragedy 10 years ago.
Carter followed up his
image-making ploy with a
show of unflappability in
dealing with the Soviet
troops in Cuba, even though
the issue was of his own
administration's making.
Nonetheless, White House
insiders know that while
their boss may look cool on
the outside, he is often boil-
ing on the inside. They tell
us that behind the smiling
Carter facade, he's inwardly
stewing over the political
polls which show him almost
a certain loser for a second
term. m
The two faces of Jimmy
aren't new to his intimates.
They know that personal set-
backs have always gnawed
at him mentally and psycho-
logically. The Georgian is a
compulsive achiever who
anguishes over any failure
to attain personal goals.
One instance came after
his graduation from the U.S.
Naval Academy. He gained
the finals for selection as a
Rhodes scholar but was
rejected. Friends from that
period recall that he was
badly shaken and upset.
Even worse was the
depression Carter experi-
enced in 1966 when he lost
his first race for the Georgia
governorship. The president
has acknowledged the defeat
caused him to re-evaluate
his life. Several associates
remember that he was
plunged into days of gloomy
introspection. He pulled
himself together and turned
to religion only after a long
talk with his evangelist-
sister, Mrs. Ruth Carter
Stapleton.
Carter is determined to
defy the polls and seek re-
election. Those who know
him well predict he'll fight
for every delegate vote to
the Democratic convention
and every ballot cast in next
year's election if renominat-
ed.
Teddy's Response: Ted
Kennedy is boiling, not at
Carter's oblique Chappa-
quiddick comment, but at
the economic figures his
advisers are bringing him.
The outlook for the economy
is so dire that there's virtu-
ally no doubt in his camp
that he'll challenge the pres
ident directly for the White
House.
The latest report to the
senator showed food prices
skyrocketing at an annual
rate of 21.6 percent at a
time when the Carter
administration is selling
tons of wheat and corn to the
Soviet Union. Consumers are
paying the piper for finished
goods at a rate that is rising
at 16.8 percent.
Energy is costing 81.6 per-
cent more annually. And it
was the cost of heating oil
that drew the most emphatic
response from Kennedy. He
pointed out that refiners are
soaking the users uncons-
cionably and their profit
margin has zoomed up 231
percent since Carter took
office in 1976.
People will freeze to
death because of the exorbi-
tant heating oil price
squeeze this winter, Kenne-
dy grimly told an aide.
His economists have also
told him that half the cur-
rent double-digit inflation
rate can be attributed to
lack of confidence at home
and abroad in Carter's lead-
ership. The high-interest-
rate policy just imposed by
the government is also,
expected to bring heavier
unemployment throughout
the nation and deepen the
recession.
Every economic indicator
brought to his attention
makes it all but certain that
Teddy will run.
Unreliable Information:
There is evidence that Presi-
dent Carter's promise that
there'll be sufficient heating
oil this winter may be based
on misleading information
from his Energy Depart-
ment. The president told his
Cabinet recently "we will
have the necessary fuel to
see us through this winter.
You need not doubt that any
longer . .
But some congressional
experts are less optimistic.
A confidential report pre-
pared for Sen. Max Baucus,
D-Mont is dubious. There's
to obtain the full data to
forecast the supply-and-
demand situation accurate-
ly It stops short of predict-
ing a shortage but points out
that Carter is basing his rosy
premise on unreliable infor-
mation.
Watch on Waste: The fed-
eral government is at long
last giving a hoot about
whistleblowers. When the
Civil Service Commission
was reorganized early this
year, a special counsels off-
ice was established to pro-
tect employees who blow the
whistle on waste and theft of
the taxpayers' money. Until
recently, the office was
understaffed but beginning
this month, funds were pro-
vided to hire 140 staff mem-
bers and set up five new
field offices.
Music is an integral
part of our lives. Every
day we hear music from
many sources � radio,
TV, our home and car
tape-players, our record
collections, in stores �
it's everywhere. Whore
does it come from?
The production and
distribution of music in the
last few decades has come
to be referred to as the
music industry. This is an
accurate enough label
because there is a tremen-
dous amount of technology
and business which go into
the output of the "pro-
duct" � that is, the
music, in marketable form.
Like so many other things
these days, the music
industry affects the major-
ity and is controlled by the
few. Record companies are
often parts of huge con-
glomerates. Their main
concern is to increase their
profits.
This primary interest in
profits is what has caused
the quality of AM radio
music to sink so low; none
of the industry giants are
willing to take a risk with
something new � a new
sound. The formulas have
been perfected over the
last decade, and that's
what we are hearing now
� slightly varied lyrics
and melodies superim-
posed over the same old
patterns.
Like so many large
industries which affect the
general public, yet are
controlled by a minority,
the music industry is
dominated by men. Not
that all the artists and
musicians are men, but
almost all of them are
managed and influenced
by men.
How did it get to be
complex question to be
sure, one which would of
course require the pro-
verbial "volumes" to be
answered in any detail.
Yet the main issue, really,
is the music.
Where does music
come from?
Research can uncover
some very surprising mu-
sical sources which go
back to the dawn of
history as we know it
today.
Cave paintings and ex-
cavated works of art reveal
that in early primitive
accompanied by women's
music.
In many primitive
tribes today, women's
rituals are still performed
in secret. The men also
have their own rites.
Sometimes men and wo-
men combine their cere-
monies for certain re-
ligious occasions.
' Even in the developing
civilizations, women were
for manv generations ac-
corded the esteem and
honor which was due them
as givers and sustainers of
life. In Sumer, Babylonia,
demands. Men began to
shut the women away
when they reached pu-
berty and in the case of
the Chinese, bound their
feet so that they could not
escape.
There are relatively few
professional women in music
compared to the number of men.
Those women who are
sucessful often have to battle
the stigma of being called
lesbian
no way of knowing whether
there'll be enough heating
oil this winter, the report
warns.
The report contended the
Energy Department failed
There's another show-
and-tell horror story out of
the General Services Admin-
istration which is the pur-
chasing agent for federal
departments and bureaus.
Auditors checked into equip-
ment and supplies bought
and stored by the GSA. They
found the agency had
accepted a dump truck with-
out inspecting it on delivery.
Testing showed that when
the dump section was raised,
it slid off the truck onto the
jround. Inspectors also
ound unused paint cans only
partially full, torque
wrenches that didn't torque
and short-count boxes of
plastic bags.
Footnote. Those who are
aware of government
extravagance should write
to JACK ANDERSON'S
WATCH ON WASTE, P.O.
Box 2300, Washington, DC.
20013.
Copyright. 1�7�.
United Feature Syndicate. Inc
this
r
way
This
is
a
societies, many of the
deities were female. The
women, as a general rule,
seemed to have taken the
lead in the development of
religion and ritual and in
making music. Women
were highly revered be-
cause of their ability to
give birth and because of
their talents in agriculture
and artistry. Clues have
been found which indicate
the development of elabor-
ate rituals for various
social functions. These
ceremonies were con-
ducted by women and
India, China, and Greece,
to name only a few, there
were many goddesses and
many female musicians.
The Chinese believe
that civilization began
when men, rejecting the
naturally occurring state of
matriarchy, demanded to
know which children were
their own. This could have
been a wonderful step
forward for civilization m
terms of increased close-
ness within blood lines,
but, as it turned out, the
men became very brutal
and callous with their
Women, who had once
been honored and re-
spected, gradually became
objects of shame and
degradation in the various
"civilizations Their ri-
tuals were taken over by
men, and they were no
longer allowed to make
music except under the
direction of men. Their
spontaneity and creativity
were stifled generation
after generation, religion
after religion, until the
absurd notion that women
inherently lack artistic
creativity became a believ-
able and consequently a
self-fulfilling death knell
for women's music.
The few great female
musicians down through
the centuries have per-
formed music written by
men and have rarely
created their own. Even in
this day of liberation,
there are relatively few
professional women in
music compared to the
number of men. Those
women who are successful
often have to battle the
stigma of being called
lesbian (a modern term
which is a mistaken
reference to an ancient
Greek artists' and mu-
sicians' colony which in-
cluded both men and
women).
Until they have re-
gained their lost self-
esteem and respect within
society, women will con-
tinue to mime men's
music and function as
artistic puppets.
The East Carolinian
e
MANAGING EDITOR
Richard Green
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Anita Lancaster
NEWS EDITOR
ASST. NEWS EDITOR
FEATURES EDITOR
ASST. FEATURES EDITOR
EDITOR
Marc Barnes
DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
Robert M. Swaim
ASST. DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
Terry Herndon
ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR
Leigh Coakley
BUSINESS MANAGER
Steve O Geary
Karen Wendt
Terry Gray
Bill Jones
John Ross
SPORTS EDITOR
ASST. SPORTS EDITOR
COPY EDITOR
AD TECH. SUPER.
Charles Chandler
Jimmy Dupree
Diane Henderson
Paul Lincke
THE EAST CAROLINIAN is the student
newspaper of East Carolina University
sponsored by the Media Board of ECU
and is distributed each Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic year
weekly during the summer.
Offices are located on the second floor of
the Publications Center (OM South
Building. Our mailing address Is: Old
South Building, ECU, Greenville, NC
27834.
The phone numbers are: 757-6366, 6367,
6308. Subscriptions are $10 annually,
alumni $6 "
&mm





The East Carol
je
d
iv
1�
le
t
b
le
In




ft

.
V
inian M
sports
Thursday, October 18, 19(79 Page 5
Pittsburgh
captures
Series
By GARY MIHOCES
Associated Press Writer
BALTIMORE (AP) -
Dave Parker, whose wob-
bly-legged catch secured a
World Series champion-
ship for the Pittsburgh
Pirates, planted both feet
firmly when he stepped
into the winner's locker
room.
'We are the best
comeback team in baseball
history! And they said it
couldn't be done the
massive right-fielder ex-
ulted after the 4-1 Pit-
tsburgh victory over Balti-
more in Game seven
Wednesday night.
Parker's grin was as
broad as the gap in
right-center field, which
was where Eddie Murray
lashed a drive with the
bases full int he Baltimore
eighth and Pittsburgh
ahead 2-1.
'The moment I broke,
I kicked up a big clump of
turf and almost fell
down said Parker. "And
I kept slipping and kicking
up turf while I was
running. I was scared
Second baseman Phil
Garner watched Parker in
shaky pursuit of the ball.
"I was running full speed
myself said Garner. "I
was really scared Dave
was going to fall down.
But if he had, I might
See PIRATES page 6
Greenville, N.C.
Pirates look
to Chapel Hill
ECU fullback Marvin Cobb celebrates after TD against The Citadel last Saturday
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
Just because the East Carolina football
team does not have a footbajl game this
weekend does not mean the team has a
full week "off As a matter of fact, head
coach Pat Dye says the team will be
plenty busy.
"The first thing we're going to try to
do said Dye, "is improve our schemes.
We will also try to work a lot of young
people. Many of them are getting better,
and we want to give them the opportunity
to do something
But the main thing the Pirates will do
this week, and next week, is prepare for
their upcoming game, on Oct. 27, against
nationally-ranked North Carolina.
If Dye and company are in gear in
Chapel Hill a week from Saturday, the Tar
Heels could have their hands full. The
ECU offense ranks third nationally in
rushing offense with an average of 328
yards per game, sixth in the nation in
total offense with an average of 436.2 and
15th in scoring offense, averaging 29.8
points per contest.
"You have to like our offense said
Dye. "I'd say we've been pretty
successTul so far
Especially successful has been half-
back Anthony Collins. The Penn Yan,
N.Y. junior has gained 589 yards on just
67 carries in the six Pirate games. That
translates to an average of 8.8 yards per
carry, tops in the entire nation among the
top 50 rushers. The nation's leading
rusher, Charles White of Southern
California, ranks fifth in the yards per
carry department. White's 7.4 average is
more than a yard less than Collins' figure.
So Dye has a lot going for him going
into the Carolina game. What would he
and the Pirates have going for them
should they win in Chapel Hill.
"If we won this one noted Dye,
"we'd have to be a suspect to get back
into the bowl picture At the start of the
year, the Pirates were very much in the
"bowl picture" but fell greatly after tnree
straight early-season losses. "I certainly
haven't given up on a bowl the Pirate
mentor said.
The Tar Heels are slated to face N.C.
State in a big Atlantic Coast Conference
confrontation this Saturday and Dye
doesn't especially want to see the boys
from Chapel Hill win. "I thi-k Carolina
will be more difficult for us to beat if they
win this week said Dye. "It never helps
you to lose. A win could only help them
against us. And Lord knows, they don't
need any help. They're good enough
already
So it appears the North Carolina game
will be a crucial one for the Pirates.
Assuming they win the rest of their games
after the Tar Heel contest, a win over the
Heels would leave the Pirates at 8 3. "If
we finish 8-3, and that doesn't mean that
I'm taking our late-season games for
granted, we should be attractive to
somebody (some bowl committee)
After the North Carolina game, the
Pirates will face Appalachian State,
winless Richmond, North Texas State and
William and Mary.
A positive note concerning the North
Carolina game is the return of offensive
tackle Joe Godette. The big senior has
been out for more than a month with a
knee injury.
Defensive tackle Noah Clark is still
ailing and will probably miss the game.
Tyson ineligible until requirements met
The East Carolina basketball team began practice
this week and absent was 6'11" center AI Tyson. The
Winterville sophomore has been declared ineligible by
Pirate coach Davd Odom.
Though Tyson meets NCAA and ECU academic
requirements, he will not be allowed to play until he
gets up to the standards set by the first-year Pirate head
man.
"This year we established certain academic
standards for all our players said Odom, "and the
basketball staff has monitored closely each player's
progress.
"Our progress team-wise has been most responsive
and we are proud of them he continued. "Although Al
has made definite improvement, we feel that he should
spend more of his time working toward meeting the
academic expectations of the basketball program and the
university
Odom went on to say that he felt that Tyson was
better off spending the two hours or so of daily practice
time studying rather than concerning himself with
basketball, at least for now. �
"We will continue to work closely with Al and when
he reaches the agreed level of progress he will be
welcome to begin workouts with the team said Odom.
"Whenever I feel he is in the right routine as far as
ULJ2
what should someday be a winning basketball program
at East Carolina. Odom will do it his way, the way he's
always done it. And that's the best way for ECU
because Odom has never known anything but winning.
�������
could be two weeks or it could be quite a while
What does Tyson himself say about the whole
ordeal? "I think this is a good idea said Tyson. "I
really need to take a little while off and just study. This
way when I come back I'll have everything together. I'll
be back soon
Tyson's confidence in Odom's decision is an example
of the turnabout in attitude in the Pirate camp this year vvith the condition of the players at this stage
Odom and the Pirates are about to finish their first
week of practice. The week has been mainly a week of
narrowing the club down. On Monday the squad had 19
members including walk-ons. By Wednesday, the
number was down to 17.
"We will narrow that number some more said
Odom. "We'll keep one, maybe two, of the walk-ons
Other than pa ring the club down, the Pirate
coaching staff will spend the remainder of this week and
next putting in the basic practice drills and working the �
players hard on conditioning and the fast break attack.
"By this weekend we will begin putting in specific
offensive and defensive plays Odom said.
The rookie Pirate coach said he was quite pleased
I think
as compared to last, when then head coach Larry
Gillman developed more than his share of enemies, both
on the team and off.
"Everybody's got a different attitude this year said
academics are concerned, he'll be back. We just want Tyson. "We know Coach Odom knows what he's doing,
him to be a full-time student He talks the truth
So how long will it take for Tyson to get into the Odom's "truth" and strictness are quite a contrast
"routine" specified by Odom? "There's no way to tell with Gillman's way of coaching. What the ex-Wake
Odom said. "Of course, we hope that it will be soon. It Forest assistant is doing now is laying the foundation for Maryland, Old Dominion andTSou7nCaroHna
the pre-season conditioning workouts helped said
Odom. "We're doing far better now than what I'd
thought. The weight of most of the players is close to
what we want
The Pirates open their season on Nov. 30 when they
travel to Richmond, Va. for The Spider Classic.
The Pirate schedule appears tough as the team must
travel to Duke, N.C. State, Oral Roberts, Detroit,
Oliver Mack makes it
The ex-East Carolina basketball star is
now an official member of the Los
Angeles Lakers of the NBA. Mack is now
on the Lakers' injured list due to a back
ailment. During the exhibition season,
Mack appeared in six games and averaged
1.8 points per contest.
One-time running back
Holley likes 'hitting' and 'contact
Cornerback Willie Holley
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
After having played on the nationally second ranked
Pirate defense of 1978, it would be understandable for a
young returning cornerback to be overly confident or
self-satisfied.
Understandable, but for ECU junior Willie Holley
unforgivable.
Holley came to East Carolina as a running back, but
the Pirate coaches decided during the spring practice
that he was better equipped for the defensive backfield.
"It seemed kind of easy for me said Holley. "I had
to have a lot of help from the coaches, but I really enjoy
playing defense better.
"I like hitting and I like contact. I really enjoy
causing turnovers. I want to make something happen on
defense for us
In Saturday's 49-7 romp over the Citadel, Holley had
one interception and one fumble recovery, which lead to
a Pirate touchdown.
It was no surprise that Holley should choose East
Carolina over many other institutions in the state. With
advice from high school teammates Zack Valentine (now
with the Pittsburg Steelers) and Gerald Hall (volunteer
assistant), Holley was easily sold on the Pirates'
program.
"They told me about the team and the system Coach
Dye had established, and that made my decision pretty
easy Holley said. '
Holley's first taste of combat in the purple and gold
could be considered a gridder's nightmare: the Wolfpack
of N.C. State at Carter Stadium.
"I was kind of nervous he quips, "but after a
while it all seemed so natural. They were just another
team �
"Willie became a very fine cornerback about the
middle of last season said ECU defensive back coach
Bobby Wallace. "Willie is quiet on the field, but he
leads by his actions. You never see him on the ground
The 1978 'swarm' defense was the pride of East
Carolina University, but this season, the Bucs have
taken their licks from three of the Big Four rivals.
"Last year we had a lot of seniors on defense
explained Holley. "It's kind of hard to replace people
like Zack and Gerald and Fred Chavis (defensive end)
Perhaps the worst beating in recent years came at
the hands of Jay Venuto and the Demon Deacons of
Wake Forest. Venuto, who leads the Atlantic Coast
Conference in total offense, stung ECU for 334 yards in
the air.
who was red-shirted in 1978, Venuto
28 out of 33 tosses, establishing a new
A senior
connected on
ACC record.
"Most of his passes were to backs coming out of the
backfield said Holley. "We didn't put pressure on the
quarterback like we should have, and we had some
breakdowns in coverage
Wallace agreed with Holley, but added that Holley
"probably graded higher than any other defensive
i
player in the contest.
"Pass defense does not settle down to the secondary
unit said Wallace. "Pass defense depends on 11
people working together and carrying out their
assignments. Willie played well, I'm sure.
"Willie is a good technician. He tackles high and
hard, just the way we want them to. Willie has good
speed, but not great speed. He lias to play smart
football, and that's what he does
Even with his coach's praise, Holley still reserves
doubt that he has met his full potential.
"I've played the last three games hurt says
Holley, displaying a bandaged right shoulder and left
wrist.
"I've got to concentrate more and I like to be able to
get everybody hustling on defense.
"We want to finish up real strong and maybe earn
another shot at a bowl bid
Holley gets to display his running talents as the
Pirates' punt return specialist. Thus far, he has returned
only six kicks for a 6.8 average.
"Willie is the type of player who gives 100 percent
on the field at all times said Wallace. "With another
year of experience, Willie has a chance to play football
after college.
"He's the kind of kid we want in our program. He
has a lot of character and a lot of pride.
"He's just a fine individual
��� i
� i
� � ��
�:S I
L5SJ
4MM40M4V 'fc4- ��-��





Page 6 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 18 October 1979
The Fearless Football Forecast
NORTH CAROLINA AT N.C. STATE
TENNESSEE AT ALABAMA
GEORGIA TECH AT AUBURN
M ARYLAND AT WAKE FOREST
PURDUE AT MICHIGAN STATE
SOUTHERN CAL AT NOTRE DAME
PITTSBURG AT WASHINGTON
TEXAS AT ARKANSAS
VIRGINIA AT NAVY
CITADEL AT VMI
MISSISSIPPI AT SOUTH CAROLINA
PENN STATE AT SYRACUSE
CHARLES CHANDLER
47-24-1
North Carolina
Alabama
Auburn
Wake Forest
Michigan State
Southern Cal
Washington
Texas
Navy
VMI
South Carolina
Penn State
TERRY HERNDON
45-26-1
N.C. State
Alabama
Auburn
Wake Forest
Purdue
Notre Dame
Washington
Texas
Virginia
VMI
South Carolina
Penn State
JOHN NOLAN
28-19-1
North Carolina
Alabama
Auburn
Wake Forest
Purdue
Notre Dame
Pittsburg
Texas
Virginia
VMI
South Carolina
Penn State
JIMMY DuPREE
42-29-1
N.C. State
Alabama
Auburn
Wake Forest
Michigan State
Notre Dame
Washington
Texas
Navy
VMI
South Carolina
Penn State
PAT DYE
ECU Head Football Coach
North Carolina
Alabama
Auburn
Wake Forest
Purdue
Southern Cal
Washington
Texas
Virginia
VMI
South Carolina
Penn State
Lawrence success vital to Heels
By DICK BRINSTER
Associated Press Writer
CHAPEL HILL, N.C.
(AP) � The first time
Amos Lawrence touches
the football Saturday a
sellout crowd of nearly
50,000 fans at Carter-
Finley Stadium in Raleigh
will lean forward for a
closer look.
And in homes through-
out the Atlantic Coast
Conference hundreds of
thousands more will zero
in through the magic of
television.
For Famous Amos the
moment of truth may come
early in 19th-ranked North
Carolina's showdown with
arch-rival North Carolina
State. After being limited
to 34 yards rushing in the
Tar Heels' 24-19 upset by
Wake Forest, Lawrence's
contribution is vital against
15th-ranked N.C. State.
Whether or not the Tar
Heels can win with
another subpar perfor-
mance by the nation's
ninth-leading rusher re-
mains to be seen, but
North Carolina Coach Dick
Crum is at least trying to
relieve some of the
pressure.
"Some people figure if
he doesn't get a lot of
yardage he had a bad
day Crum said Tuesday.
"His blocking on pass
protection was done prett)
well
That may be true,
especially when one con-
Pirates win
siders that quarterback
Matt Kupec, who com-
pleted 24 of 41 passes for
267 yards and two touch-
downs, bore the entire
burden of moving the
North Carolina offense.
Should it be necessary to
repeat that feat the Tar
Heels evidently would be
doing so in a catch-up
effort.
"If people are going to
give us the pass we're
going to take it Crum
said. "They - Wake Forest
- not only geared them-
selves to stop Amos, but
they did a pretty good job
on fullback Doug Paschal,
too
That is debatable, how-
ever. And perhaps it is
further evidence that Crum
is trying to maintain a low
profile on the subject of
Lawrence. Paschal gained
a respectable 65 yards on
14 carries against the
Deacons.
What Wake Forest did
was close the inside lanes
with a variety of stunts
and that enabled nose-
guard James Parker to fire
at will into the North
Carolina backfield. Fre-
quently he met Lawrence
before Amos could reach
the line of scrimmage.
N.C. State may not
approach the Lawrence
problem in the same
fashion, however. The
Wolfpack is still recovering
from, injuries to key
defensive people, and
games are not played as
easily with larger, slower
and less-experienced de-
fenders.
Crum will not pretend
he knows how Bo Rein's
Wolfpack will come after
his offense.
"I know anybody can
win the football game,
though he said. That
makes him no smarter at
this point than anyone
else, including the odds-
makersand they have
made his team a one-point
favorite.
OVER 50 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Chanelo's
Italian Foods
Support the
Pirates!
Cont'd from pg. 5
have run that ball down
myself
Relief pitcher Kent
Tekulve said he was
confident on the mound as
he watched the drive sail
into the night. "I was
waiting for Dave to stop
stumbling and make the
catch Tekulve said.
Parker made the catch
'Then I breathed one
great big sigh of relief
Parker said.
"Me too said Gar-
ner.
"He had it all the
way Tekulve said with a
wry grin.
Down three games to
one after losing Saturday
in Pittsburgh, the Pirates
managed a comeback
equalled by only three
other teams in the history
of a best-of-seven Series.
And, of course, they
did it once again on the
shoulders of Willie Star-
gell who took home the
series Most Valuable
Player after rapping four
hits in Game Seven �
including a two-run homer
that put Pittsburgh ahead
to stay.
"Popps What can
you say but phenomenal?"
said parker.
"Tonight was typical
Willie Stargell, typical
Pittsburgh Pirates said
left fielder Bill Robinson,
who signed off Orioles
starter Scott McGregor
before Stargell's blast in
the sixth.
As the Pirates doused
one another with cham-
oagne, Stargell and Man-
ager Chuck Tanner took
their bows on national
television while standing
atop the locker room
platform.
President Carter ar-
rived in the clubhouse for
the presentation of the
glistening World Series
trophy.
"There it is! there it
is yelled Parker, spot-
ting the trophy.
"I can't explain how I
feel. How can you explain
happiness?" said Grant
Jackson, who preceded
Tekulve with a solid relief
effort.
"I just want to give all
the praise and honor and
glory to the Lord said
shortstop Tim Foli. "If you
don't believe in miracles
� believe
Tanner already was
looking ahead.
"It's a great feeling
he told the press. "All we
can do is try to be back
here next year to meet you
ladies and gentlemen
again
Patronize
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� �
18 October 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 7
fETT
What really is wrong with Penn State?
By
HERSCHEL NISSENSON
AP Sports Writer
The question Joe Pa-
terno has heard most often
this fall is, "What's wrong
with Penn State?"
That's what happens
when you win more than
80 percent of your games
bui start a season by
losing two of your first
three. After beating Rut-
gers, the Nittany Lions
were trounced by Texas
A&M 27-14 and man-
handled by Nebraska 42-
17.
"The only thing wrong
is that we're not a very
good football team Pa-
terno says. "We started
the season with a com-
pletely inexperienced se-
condary and then we had
some injuries there. We
also had an inexperienced
kicking game, inexperience
at quarterback and only
one returning wide re-
ceiver.
"The defensive down
linemen and a couple of
linebackers were the only
thing we had going for us.
Too many people had to
play themselves into being
players
Since that dismal start,
though, Penn State has
defeated Maryland 27-7
and Army 24-3. Nothing
sensational, but possibly
the start of something
good.
"We're getting a little
better each week Pa-
terno says. "We're a
better football team right
now than at any time this
��
year.
Paterno made a key
move two weeks when he
switched Ail-American de-
fensive tackle Bruce Clark
to nose guard alongside
Matt Millen, the Lions'
other star tackle. Op-
ponents can't waste four
Lady Pirate volleyball tourney set
people trying to double-
team both of them.
"It gives people some
blocking problems and it's
made us a better team
says Paterno. The coach
also sheds his customary
low-key attitude where
Clark is concerned.
"Clark is a super
player, and you can
underline that six times
he says. "He's the best
football player, the most
dominant player we've
ever had. We've never
had a player who was so
much better than anyone
else. The only one close
would be Lenny Moore.
��
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
The second annual
ist Carolina Invitational
Volleyball Tournament be-
gins Friday at Minges
Coliseum, and Coach Alita
Dillon states "we have a
stronger field in the
irnament this year than
we had last year
The Lady Pirates cap-
tured the tourney in 1978,
but graduation of several
key players has hindered
the team throughout the
turrent campaign.
All-tournament perfor-
mer Rosie Thompson com-
pleted her eligibility, as
did spiker Becky Beau-
champ.
Sharon Perry has es-
tablished herself as the
leading and strongest spi-
ker, while senior Joy
Forbes and junior Yvette
Lewis have been consistant
on defense.
ECU competed in Divi-
sion I NCAIAW in 1978,
but this year shifted to
Division II.
Most of the teams par-
ticipating in the weekend
event will be Division II
teams, including Winthrop
College, Longwood, Ken-
tucky State and North
Carolina Central.
"We built up a strong
early schedule in order to
give us tough competi-
tion said Dillon. "The
team we play this weekend
are weaker than those we
have played thus far, so I
guess we'll see how well
our preparation pays off
The Lady Pirates cap-
tured first place last year
when the tourney was first
held.
"We're just starting to
progress says team cap-
tain LaVonda Duncan.
"We've had a lot of
problems and we've got a
long way to go.
"Overall we're a very
short team and you have
to make up for that
disadvantage. We've had
to do a lot of adjusting
First round action be-
gins at 4 p.m. Friday, with
the consolation game to be
played at 2 p.m. Saturday
and the championship at 3
p.m.
Syracuse Coach Frank
Maloney, who must find a
way to neutralize Clark,
calls Clark and Millen
"the best two defensive
linemen I've ever seen on
one team. It's ridiculous to
let the Football Writers
Association vote on the
Outland Trophy this year.
Just lock Clark and Millen
in a room and whoever
comes out will be the
winner
Then, Maloney casts a
vote for Clark.
"He's the finest defen-
sive lineman I've seen
since I've been coaching
west Conference cham-
pionship and a berth in
the Cotton Bowl.
"They've still got to
play Arkansas, Southern
Methodist, Texas Tech,
Houston, Texas Christian,
Baylor and Texas A&M
he points out, adding,
"I'm very high on Hou-
ston
Yale's Carm Cozza,
immediate past president
of the American Football
Coaches Association, says
the AFCA's Ethics Com-
mittee will investigate
Arizona State's firing of
Frank Kush at its annual
convention in January.
"First, we have to find
out all the details Cozza
says. "If the incident
happened a year ago, why
was the suit filed now?"
Saturday's Division III
contest between Pace and
Hofstra is being billed as
"The Battle of the Train-
ing Camps The New
York Giants hold their
preseason camp at Pace
University in Pleasantville,
N.Y while the New York
Jets have their year-round
practice field and head-
quarters at Hofstra Uni-
versity in Hempstead,
N.Y.
Vagas Ferguson should
become Notre Dame's all-
time rushing king this
weekend against Southern
Cal. He needs only 21
vards to break Jerome
Heavens' mark of 2,682
after gaining 84 against
Air Force last Saturday.
"I took him out at the
half because I didn't want
to run up the score said
Coach Dan Devine. "He
might have gained 400
yards the way he was
running
Ferguson wasn't upset,
since he now figures to
break the record at home.
"I'm glad to see the other
guys get some playing
time he said. "The
record will come
"Our initial game plan
was to defend Wilson and
not pressure him. In the
past, defending him seem-
ed to bother him That's
how Utah State Coach
Bruce Snyder described
his defensive strategy
against Brigham Young.
This is THE BIG ONE
&jCLJfLJp)
Richard
Dreyfuss
in
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After THE BIG FIX
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Snyder guessed wrong.
Marc Wilson completed 19
of 35 passes for 372 yards
and two touchdowns in
BYU's 48-24 victory.
The Louisville-Tulsa
game was marred by
seven lost fumbles, in-
cluding this three-minute
comedy of errors in the
second period:
It began when Louis-
ville's Ricky Skiles re-
covered a fumble by
Tulsa's Bill Blankenship.
Tulsa got the ball back two
plays later when Bob Laird
recovered a fumble by
Greg Hickman. On the
next play, Blankenship
fumbled again and David
Drachman recovered for
Louisville.
On Louisville's third
play, quarterback Stu
Stram yes, he's Hank's
son, fumbled and Tulsa's
Eugene Williams recov-
ered. Three plays later,
Louisville got the ball back
when Ray Payton inter-
cepted a Blankenshippass.
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The East Carolinian
nian 1 m
features
Thursday, October 18, 1979 Paged
Greenville, N.C.
World famous American pianist
Slenczynska to perform here
ECU NEWS BUREAU
GREENVILLE -
World-famed American pi-
anist Ruth Slenczynska,
former child prodigy who
has matured into one of
the greatest living key-
board artists, will perform
at East Carolina University
Thursday, Oct. 25, in
Wright Auditorium at 8
p.m.
Her ECU visit will also
include a Chopin master
class Tuesday, Oct. 23,
from 1 to 5 p.m also in
Wright. The class is open
to the public.
The Slenczynska per-
formance is sponsored by
Friends of the ECU
Library. Tickets to the
Thursday concert are avail-
able at $3 each from
members of the Friends or
at the offices of Joyner
Library and the campus
Music Library.
Included on the pro-
gram are Liszt's Etude
after Paganini, No. 1 in G
Minor; Beethoven's Sonata
in F Major, Opus 54;
several Rachmaninoff Pre-
ludes from Opus 23 and
the Etude-Tableau in D
Major, Opus 39, No. 1;
Reinagle's Variations of
Lee Rigg; and four Chopin
Ballades.
At the age of four,
Ruth Slenzynska was
playing Bach inventions
and practicing eight hours
a day; at 12 she had
performed before thou-
sands in Europe and the
U.S. Unlike many child
prodigies, she had fulfilled
her early promise and has
won worldwide acclaim for
her performances in con-
cert and on recordings.
Her honors include the
Polish Cross of Merit, a
fellowship in the Inter-
national Academy, of Arts
and Letters at Geneva and
two awards from the
National Music Teachers
Association.
Some of Slenczynska's
interpretations of 19th
century Romantic music
have been released on
more than 100 Decca and
Musical Heritage Society
recordings. The story of
her early years as a child
genius relentlessly and
rigorously trained by a
demanding father was
recounted in the best-
selling book, FORBIDDEN
CHILDHOOD.
ECU writing teacher has
first novel published
At the invitation of The Friends of ECU
Library, world renowned pianist Ruth
Slenczynska will be featured in a recital
on Thursday, Oct. 25,
Wright Auditorium.
at 8:00 p.m. in
Comic Books reflect our
unusual Pop Culture
By DIANE HENDERSON
Copy Editor
"I'm trying to reach
people who aren't terribly
sophisticated in their lit-
erary tastes, the people
who aren't particularly
laded in their views of life.
I'd like to reach people
who are capable of believ-
ing that reading does not
have to be difficult, that it
can be pleasurable, that it
can amuse them, maybe
present to them a certain
view of life for their
consideration
Terry Davis, an ECU
writing teacher, believes
Visi
1962 when Marvel Comics introduced the �
Fantastic Four, a team of superheroes J
Bv S. MAURICE JONES
Features Writer
One of pop cultures most unusual, yet
amazing productions is the comic book. In
comics, as in other media, there are
special organizations devoted to promoting
interest in the genre. This interest has not who actually had hangups and problems. �
been overlooked at East Carolina This was contrary to many of the other;
University. According to Club President perfect, goody-two-shoes heroes presented J
Charles Lawrence, the East Carolina at that time. �
Comic Book Club was founded two years
ago when Carol Strickland began
attending ECU. She had started a similar
group at Chapel Hill previously.
friends back home in
Spokane, Washington, for
whom he wrote the book.
He feels his audience will
consist of those who
"pretty much believe that
there is hope
Vision Quest is about a
high school wrestler nam-
ed Louden Swain who
faces his last big challenge
before graduating and
going on to another stage
in his life.
"He's a two-time state
champion who is dropping
down a weight to wrestle
another state champion
from his town at a lower
weight He's the kind of
guy who wants to leave
that period in his life
having faced all chal-
lenges Davis said.
Although the novel is
Newstand on 919 Dickinson Ave. Club
activities include collection obscure, non-
superhero titles and researching the
artists and authors of different comics.
One club member has a fairly large
, . . his first novel, vision
concern heroes, but a majority of the older QuesU released this month
comics seem to utilize this theme. by Viking Press, will
appeal to people who
Comics used to be on the cliche side, enjoy life? people like his
predictable, but much of that changed in ������ �� about a wrestler and is
� very much concerned with
� sports and physical capa-
� bilities, Davis feels it is
J not just for the avid sports
! fan or athlete. He does
� say, however, that Vision
� Quest would probably
� appeal more to the reader
t of Sports Illustrated than,
an art � sav' �nS Stone.
. exhibition about cycling, is 2 m T use ��
i Philip . ' �' � Illustrated as an example
�i Tk ! on display in the Menden- �, . i u
el Ine . � J" J � because the people who
1 hall Student Center Gal- I . �, u �� maanc
Z read it are by no means
� just people who all know
Coming
Attractions
in
Most comics have heavy roots
science fiction and fantasy. The superhero
concept originated in science fiction, butj
was transmuted to comics. It was Philip �
The group meets at the Nostalgia Wylie's 1930 science fiction nov
RIDE ON!
Ride On
Gladiator that inspired Jerry Siegel and I .
t c u � u � � c lery, now through Novem-
Joe Schuster in their creation of � , . &
Superman.
ber 1,
how many bases Maury
Willis stole in '66 in the
triple A How many
people in this country run?
How many people work
out in one way or another,
and they're also literate;
they're also educated; the-
also care about the life oi
the mind. These are the
people I'm talking about
� people who are con-
cerned with physicality,
people who are engaged in
life � they're not letting
life do them
Davis' novel obviously
did not appeal much to
Rolling Stone reviewer
Greil Marcus. His review
described Vision Quest as
"Davis' lollipop saying,
"What we have here is a
case of terminal niceness.
Everyone acts from the
purest of motives
Davis feels that his
characters do accurately
describe real people.
"I could take Greil
Marcus back to Spokane
and introduce him to all
those people. Of course,
he probably wouldn't be-
lieve they were real even
if he met them I may
not have been successful
with all of them, but I
know those people.
"They might be real
and too nice. John Den-
Terry Davis, an ECU
writing teacher, has had
his first novel, Vision
ver's real, but I'm sure
John Denver's 'terminally
nice Davis added with a
laugh.
John Irving, author of
The World According to
Garp, has compared Vision
Quest to J.C. Salinger's
Catcher in the Rye. While
Davis feels that having his
work compared to Sal-
inger's is a great compli-
ment, Louden Swain and
Holden Culfield, the main
characters of the two
books, are concerned with
different problems in dif-
ferent times, and the two
works do not share the
same attitudes towards
life.
"Louden was a guy
growing up; Holden was a
guy growing up, but
Louden Swain is based on
kids I taught in 1972
They've had problems as
Quest, published by Vi-
king Press.
ill adolescents do, but
they just seem to be trying
so hard, making a con-
scious effort to solve them
and making a conscious
effort to get themselves
ready for the new stage in
life, which in this case was
going to college. Holden
had a tougher time
"Holden was concer-
ned with the loss of
innocence. He wanted to
be the guy who catches
the little kids, running
through the field of rye;
he wanted to catch them
before they go over the
cliff of experience. Now
believe me, I don't like it
when they go over the cliff
of experience, but Louden
knew he had to go off it,
and he wanted to be just
as prepared as he could.
See NOVEL, page 9
Recently,
decline in
conventional
favor
"Underground comics
like 'National Lampoon9 Undergro�
� oriented,
have adult oriented
materials for erotic
reading
FRANK
there has been a slow
the popularity of the
superhero type comic in
of other forms of comic media,
round comics, frequently adult-
have risen drastically in
demand. New wave humor magazines like
Heavy Metal and National Lampoon often � 8:00 p.m
use the comic concept in their delivery.
Like the underground comics, these
magazines have adult-oriented material
and use titles like "Hot Sex Porno J ROXY
Comics" for provocative and erotic
I Bicycle and foot race Sunday
Claude Frank, a world- I
famous concert pianist, �
will perform on October �
30, in Hendrix Theatre at I
By KIP SLOAN
Staff Writer
�in
Some of the best racers
several states will
�compete here Sunday, Oct.
�21, in the Greenville
SCriterium and Foot Race.
JSix separate events will be
Jheld during the day,
collection of old, original comic art.
Several members are involved in the
publication of fanzines, specian amateur
fan magazines.
appeal. � The Roxy Music Arts including a race for novice
� and Crafts Center will host Jriders, and for fraternities.
Despite the rise in other forms oft their 5th annual Halloween � A 3-mile foot race will
the
bike
same
racers
In addition, the ECU Comic Book Club
has sponsored five miniature comic-book
conventions. Dealers and collectors have
come from as far away as Maryland to
comics, the conventional standards are 2 Masquerade Ball on Wed- .be held on
!�� , , , , � nesday, Oct. 31, at Twin �course as the
being given a tremendous boost by thej Rinksyo'n 14thSt' I m use. Events wiU start
visual media. Television output has been! ;at 10:00, with the women,
incredible with Superman, Batman, � Jjunior, and veteran class.
Wonder Woiman, Spiderman, the Hulk, I IThe main and last event of
will
the
feature
racers,
the
the
and Buck Rogers all having had successful ���������������������������� the day
tenures. In addition, the Saturday best of
buy, sell or trade comics, paperbacks, old morning imeup has for a long time faeen
magazines and original .rt The average dominated by comic book 8Uperheroes too 1 ARNIN& At&ST COU TH� HW AM
attendance has been around 100, and the numerou8 t0 mention. " ' ww
next convention is set for December 2 in
the Phoenix Room at the Attic. Movies provide occasional manifesta-
tions for comics. One of the biggest recent
The average comic book features a movies was "Superman The largest
costumed superhero with a protected Rising motion picture of all time, "Star
secret identity and a large supporting cast Wars J8 essentially a comic-book type
consisting of friends, relatives, employers ory Marvel Comics so strongly believed
and bad guys. The superhero usually got ��� that they made a Star War8 comic
his power by being accidentally endowed ���t winch is one of their biggest monthly
with a strange mixture of chemicals or Pu lcat,ons-
radiation. Some superheroes have no The next meeting of the ECU Comic
special physical power but achieve this Book Club will be Tuesday, October 23 at
status by means of advanced technology, -j.qq pm at the Nostalgia Newstand. All
This is by no means an accurate members and interested people are urged
description of all comics; some don t even . attend
senior land 2 class, racing
40 miles on a 12 mile
circuit (80 laps).
Bicycle racing is not an
event which the United
States has won inter-
national acclaim to as a
nation, but individuals
have made names for
themselves.
A United States team
member, George Mount,
finished 6th in the 1976
Olympic road race, an
event over 100 miles long.
The same year, Mike Neel
of the U.S.A. finished 10th
in the World Professional
Road Championships, and
Sheila Young of speed-
skating fame won the gold
medal for the match sprint
(track racing). Certainly
the talent exists in the
states, but the organiza-
tion and motivation for
national efforts has been
lacking.
Much changed in 1977.
That year, the amateur
athletic committees and
the United States Cycling
Federation changed the
amateur rules to allow
racers to win cash outright
for amateur races, up to
certain limits. A racer can
win up to $200 in a single
race and keep it.
Although in many races
the first place finish may
be more, the prize over
H Pav
$200 goes to the racer's
club, which will be used to
cover his expenses.
The change in the rules
had an almost drastic
effect on the level of
competition, and within
two years racing took on a
"professional" and organ-
ized air.
The attraction of money
and fame always brings
newcomers into the pic-
ture. The most notable
new face in cycling is that
of John Patterson, of
Salisbury, N.C.
In two years of racing,
John has finished 2nd and
3rd to the National Road
See BIKE RACE, page 9
to Nomis
m iiiii � ��� � i.�W�.ii Up"
mmtfmmnm winmUmdWW"
v � - �� �





Princess Margaret calls the Irish bike race
'pigs offends Chicago mayor
18 October 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 9
continued from page 8
By SUSAN J. SMITH
Associated Press Writer
CHICAGO (AP) � Princess Margaret referred to the
Irish as "pigs" during a dinner party conversation with
Chicago Mayor Jane Byrne, who is of Irish descent, a
Chicago Sun-Times columnist reports.
Irv Kupcinet said Tuesday the two women were
sitting at the same table when Mrs. Byrne remarked
that she had attended the funeral of Margaret's cousin,
Lord Louis Mountebatten in London. Mountebatten was
killed last month by a bomb planted by Irish Republican
Army assassins.
'The Irish Princess Margaret was quoted as
saying, "they're pigs
Then, she told the mayor, "Oh, oh, you're Irish
Kupcinet reported. Mrs. Byrne left the party as soon as
possible, he wrote. "She � the mayor � was very
incensed Kupcinet said late Tuesday night. "She's
very, very Irish, you know
"I didn't want to cause an international feud said
the columnist. But since the column's publication,
Kupcinet said, he has been overwhelmed with media
inquiries from around the world, including London,
Dublin and Australian newspapers.
"I've gotten 20 calls from the British press alone
he said.
"They are playing it on page one in London
He said a member of Princess Margaret's staff had
called to deny the alleged statement.
"Lord somebody called to say Princess Margaret
denies it and the mayor was cordial when they left.
Well, of course she was he said.
Kupcinet acknowledged he was not at the party, but
said he got the story from someone "who was seated
right next to the mayor He would not reveal the
source's name.
The columnist also said he checked out the story
with someone else who was at the Saturday party, which
was being held in Margaret's honor. The princess is on
an American tour to raise money for London's Royal
Opera House.
Mayor Byrne would not comment on the story to
him, Kupcinet said, but he said his sources told him she
"kept her anger under control
"She left the party early, giving the excuse that the
president Carter was coming on Monday night and she
had to work on that he said.
Princess Margaret could not be reached for
comment.
Michael Sneed, a spokeswoman for the mayor, said
Tuesday night, "I haven't been able to talk to the mayor
about it (the report) yet. I don't think that it was
anything anybody heard. I think it was between the
princess and the mayor
NOVEL
continued from page 8
"I don't think young
people today are terribly
concerned with innocence.
We can see things on TV
today that you used to
have to wait 'til you were
25 to experience. So,
Holden is definitely a
character of his time, and
I tried to create a
character of a different
time Davis explained.
Davis also thinks that
the differences between
the two parts of the
country he and Salinger
represent are important.
Salinger speaks with the
voice of the Easterner,
particularly the New York-
er. Davis' Northwest set-
ting is both important to
his main character and to
him personally.
"I probably romanti-
cise the We.st Coast way
too much, but there is
definitely a difference. My
God, all you have to do is
go there to find out. But,
:ne land is a very big
concern to my main
character. He's just trying
to think of something to
believe in One of the
things I wrote the book
about was him looking
back and trying to find
something he'd like to
identify with, and he finds
it in his part of the
country� The setting
means a lot to the book
Davis went back to his
parents' home in the
Northwest to do the last
revision of his novel which
had been written while he
was in Brazil and Europe,
among other places. It was
important for him to
recapture the feeling he
began the novel with, and
Among Davis' plans for
the future are finishing the
novel he is currently
working on and writing a
love story.
Explaining the theme
of the second novel, Davis
said, "It's about a Job-like
character who writes a
journal. This journal is
found by a young man of
incomplete maturityFor
pretty much self-centered
reasons � he wants to
a the land is a very big
concern to my main character.
He's just trying to think of
something to believe in
returning to the setting
helped him do so. Davis
says he would like to make
the Northwest his home
base, even though he still
wants to travel more.
Vision Quest is also
being released in France
and the United Kingdom,
and it is now available in
bookstores in the United
States.
become important in pop-
ular culture in literature,
and he thinks this journal,
and it is senational, can
elevate him up to that
status, make him some
kind of folk hero � he
wants to publish the
journal.
"It's the story of how
the journal affects an
awful lo.t of people's
lives
Davis hopes to reveal a
more serious literary atti-
tude in this second work.
"I felt like I had to
write a more traditionally
serious book. I felt also
like I had to grow; I had to
push myself a little bit
The second novel has
already been sold, and
Davis is under a con-
tractual agreement to have
it finished by December,
1981.
Davis says he is happy
and gratified by how well
his writing career is going
and advises beginning
writers to be patient and
not get discouraged.
"You can't get bitter
when you're defeated. You
have to bounce back, and
if you have enough
patience, you'll make it
Davis explained that he
has worked "very, very,
very hard" and has done
his share of bouncing
back. Like the characters
in Vision Quest, he has
hope for the future and
enjoys life immensely.
Terry Davis may very well
have captured the spirit of
youth, and hopefully, he
will continue to express it
for all of us who are still
growing up.
Support
East Carolinian
Advertisers
i
SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE
CAUTION
You may lose money if
you miss the Shoe
Gallery's, buy one pair at
lull price get the second
pair at l2 price, COUPON
SALE. You must bring
coupon with you.
10-6, MonSat. The Shoe Gallery
1st pair must be 720 Atlantic at
at least $10.00 Dickinson Ave.
SAAD'S SHOE
REPAIR
113 Grande Ave.
758-1228
Quality Shoe Repair
WESTERN
SIXZLIN
PART
TIME
JOB
Looking for a part-time
job with flexible hours
and real business
experience? Nortnweaf
Mutual Life Ins. Co.
nas openings for college
igents. Call before noon
ror appointments!
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111 WEST4TH ST.
DOWNTOWN OBfSMVIU
Parking in Fiont
and Rear.
RMY-NAVY biORE
Backpacks.
ar�n
STEARIIOISE
THURSDAY STIGHT
ECU SPECIAL
No. 1 8oz. Sirloin $3.19
Complete with
Idaho King Baked Potato,
Texas Toast & Margarine.
�903 E. loth St. 7B8-ft71ft
The Greenville Criterium
and Foot Race will be held
Presley kin
write about
on Sunday, Oct. 21.
Champion, and this sum-
mer won the Junior
National 25-mile Cham-
pionship. The event is a
contest of pure speed and
endurance, with each racer
riding 12V& miles in one
direction on a flat course,
turning around, and riding
back.
There is no drafting
allowed in this event, each
rider fights the wind by
themselves. John ride the
25 miles in just over 56
minutes, placing him the
first Junior (age 17), or
the fifth fastest rider in
the nation, including se-
niors.
At the tender age of
17, John has nowhere to
go but up.
The race course con-
sists of First, Reade,
Second, and Washington
Streets, next to the Town
Commons and the Tar
River. Spectators will have
an excellent view of the
entire course, and are
welcome to come out and
see an exciting event.
For more information,
contact either of the
downtown bike shops, or
Kip Sloan at 758-2737.
4?
nSJWOOD j
FEATURING V
ATCO RECORDING ARTISTS
hi drug use B t 4 C K F 0 0 f
NEW YORK (AP) -
Hours before he died, a
deeply depressed and
drug-addicted Elvis Pres-
ley begged God to "help
me have insight, and
forgive me my sins
according to a new book
by his stepmother and
three stepbrothers.
"Dear God, please
help me to get back when
I feel down like this, and
to always strive for good
in the world Presley is
quoted as saying in the
book, entitled, "Elvis, We
Love You Tender by Dee
Presley, and David, Billy
and Rick Stanley.
An excerpt of the book
in the November issue of
Ladies Home Journal al-
leges that Presley, who
disapproved of substances
like marijuana, thought
use of prescribed drugs
was OK.
See PRESLEY, page 10
WITH
ffiftv MOTHERS
HUGO OUTDOOR
THEATRE
(Off Hwy 11. net' Qrifton
20MDeaS. from Qreenvffle)
SUNDAY
OCTOBER 21
1:00 - 8:00
GATES OPEN AT 11:00
Portraits
will be
taken:





Page 10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 18 October 1979
Jagger
Divorce
SAN FRANCISCO (AP)
� Bianca Jagger says her
estranged husband Mick
Jagger lived "out of a
suitcase in his nomadic
journey in his quest to
avoid income taxes" and
has asked the California
Supreme Court to settle on
Los Angeles as the site for
the couple's divorce ac-
tion.
In documents filed
Monday, Mrs. Jagger
asked the court to overturn
a state Court of Appeal
ruling that Los Angeles
was not a proper forum for
her divorce action against
the international rock star.
The Jaggers were mar-
ried in France in 1971 and
separated in 1977.
After a divorce suit she
filed in England was
delayed by legal maneu-
vering, she filed for
dissolution of the marriage
Feb. 5 in Los Angeles
Superior Court.
Jagger, a native of
England, contends Califor-
nia courts are not a
convenient forum. If suc-
cessful, he mav be able to
keep some of his millions
which would become hers
under California's com-
munity property laws.
Baryshnikov
NEW YORK (AP) �
Former Soviet ballet star
Mikhail Baryshnikov, ci-
ting severe injuries in-
cluding tendonitis, has un-
expectedly resigned from
the New York City Ballet.
Baryshnikov, 31, had
-aid he planned to remain
with the ballet company
for another year before
becoming artistic director
of the American Ballet
Theater on Sept. 1.
But Baryshnikov said
Monday that his doctor
had advised him to take a
PRESLEY
continued from page 8
He first used drugs
while in the Army in 1959
and returned home with
"two trunks full of Dexe-
drine the book says.
On the day Presley
died, Rick Stanley said he
had refilled a prescription
for Dilaudid capsules and
returned to hear Presley
praying. Stanley said the
singer asked not to be
disturbed until 4 p.m.
because he needed 'plen-
ty of rest for the tour
He was found uncon-
scious on a bathroom floor
of his home at 2:30 p.m.
and pronounced dead an
hour later.
"I've never seen any-
body who could take it like
that said Stanley. "You
just don't do dope like he
did and live through it
David Stanley said he
had found Presley un-
conscious on the bathroom
floor before and thought
Elvis had suffered an
overdose of the drugs he
took that morning.
Presley's narcotics and
amphetamines were legally
prescribed by a number of
doctors who cared only
about "cars and other
gifts he gave them Rick
Stanley said.
Dr. George Nicho-
poulous, who has since
been charged with in-
discriminate prescription
writing, often went to
Presley's medicine cabinet
and replaced drugs with
vitamins, the excerpt says.
However, it says, the
singer was always able to
get drugs from other
sources. The writers also
say that Presley was
hospitalized three times to
"dry out" from drug use
while the public was told
he needed rest.
few months' rest, and that
he was looking forward to
"at least three or four
months without any obli-
gation or commitment to
dance with any company
Baryshnikov, who spent
15 months with the City
Ballet, denied he had been
unhappy with the com-
pany. He said he dis-
agreed with those critics
who said he had not
adapted to the City Ballet
style.
"I was very happy with
City Ballet and it is a
painful decision for me
he said.
Profundity
LONDON (AP) - The
Financial Times reported a
13-year-old boy at Eton,
one of Britain's most
prestigious prep schools,
wrote the following lines
about poverty as part of a
class assignment: "There
was once a very poor
family. The father was
poor, the mother was
poor, the children were
poor. Even the butler was
poor
Test Tube
LONDON (AP) - The
parents of Louise Brown
say they are tired of
hearing their daughter
being referred to as a
"test tube baby
"She was never in a
test tube Lesley Brown,
Louise's mother, told Wo-
man magazine, a British
publication. "The egg was
fertilized in a shallow
glass dish. And then she
was implanted back into
me and I carried her for
nine months, just as with
any other baby.
Born July 2 978,
Louise was cone I out-
side he mother's , jmb in
a British laboratory be-
cause Mrs. Brown could
not conceive normallv.
Spice of life
The Beast
KINGS MILLS, Ohio
(AP) � Carl Eichelman
certainly had his ups and
downs this summer.
In fact, he rode up and
down on "The Beast the
new roller coaster at Kings
Island 530 times.
The 38-year-old compu-
ter operator for the
Internal Revenue Service
estimated that he waited
in line for a total of about
260 hours to ride The
Beast.
Once he got on,
Eichelman, who often
came early in the morning
to avoid the crowds,
estimates that he went up,
down and around for a
total of about 795 miles.
"I'm sure my body is
completely rearranged
now Eicheman said.
German
propeller
BEAUFORT, N.C. (AP)
� The 800-pound propel-
ler from a German sub-
marine that sank in the
Atlantic 37 years ago has
been retrieved by an
amateur skindiver.
Dave Bluett devised a
wheel pulley operated with
air-powered winches to
hoist the propeller from
the U-352 submarine.
The submarine, a pop-
ular site for divers, rests
in 115 feet of water, 32
miles south of Beaufort
Inlet. It sank there May 9,
1942, after being hit by
depth charges from the
U.S. Coast Guard cutter
Icarus.
Bluett, a computer pro-
grammer from Vienna,
VA worked periodically
for more than a year
before removing the prop.
The bronze propeller is
the largest item retrieved
from the submarine. Bluett
has not decided what to do
with it, but expects it will
be shown at a Beaufort
dive shop for a year.
Live ammunition has
been found in the wreck-
age of the submarine, and
the Navy is considering
whether to blow up the
explosives or try to remove
them. A torpedo is jammed
in one of the submarine's
torpedo tubes.
Honored
ATLANTA (AP) -
Rosa Parks, whose refusal
to give up a seat on a city
bus started a year-long
bus boycott almost 25
years ago in Montgomery,
Ala has been honored at
a rally in Atlanta.
About 1,000 spectators
� mostly young people
and downtown office wor-
kers on lunch break �
attended the rally Tuesday
in a park.
Mrs. Parks is now a
resident of Detroit. Her
refusal in 1955 to yield her
seat to a white person on
a Montgomery city bus led
to the boycott which is
remembered as the start
of the civil rights move-
ment led by the late Dr.
Martin Luther King Jr.
Actress Jane Fonda,
who attended the rally
with her husband Tom
Hayden, presented Mrs.
Parks a $5,000 check. The
money will be used for the
Rosa Parks Scholarship
and awarded to "a high
school student who has
shown concern about social
and human issues
Buffalo taps
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) -
"Sounds like a herd of
buffalo said one specta-
tor.
"Nah, it sounds more
like a herd of buffalo
wearing tap shoes said
the observer's friend.
All Bongs, Pipes,
and Powerhitters
Vx Price
The Mushroom and
Good Things for Gentle People
318 Evans Mall
East Carolina Playhouse
presents
THE STREETS OF
NEW YORK
The rollicking musical based
on the famous old-time
melodrama
directed by
Del Lewis
October 17-20
October 22-27
8:15 p.m.
Studio Theatre
Tickets are $3.50 ECU Students $2.50
For reservations and information
call 757-6390
between 10 and 4 Monday through Friday
SAVE MONEY!
Season coupon, for .11 six shows this year are only
aii.uu. To order your season tickets call the
Playhouse Box Office.
Buy now, SAVE 25!
And it looked even
stranger than it sounded.
About 1,800 tap dancers
hoofed, tapped and stum-
bled their way down
Hennepin Avenue Monday
to celebrate the opening of
Hennepin Center for the
Arts, a former Masonic
Temple.
Most of the dancers
were children whose dance
teachers got their classes
motivated by saying they
were going to tap their
way into the Guinness
Book of World Records.
Others were grandmothers
and professional dancers
and people who never
before had tied on a pair
of tap shoes.
The result, of course,
was chaos. Organizers had
allocated 30 minutes to get
the dancers lined up. It
took twice as long. Almost
every child clung to the
hand of the next youngster
� their instincts told them
that getting lost in this
crowd would be disastrous.
Almost every cop gave up
at crowd control.
The event itself was
rather anticlimactic.
Most of the dancers
found a little spot on the
avenue, the Minneapolis
Police Band played "Yan-
kee Doodle Dandy and
the dancers tapped for a
few minutes, maybe three.
Emcee Charlie Boone,
a local radio personality,
then announced they had
set a new world record
and Mayor Al Hofstede
said kind things about a
city that would turn out
1,800 tap dancers to help
dedicate a new arts
building.
Betty Ford
WASHINGTON (AP) -
Former first lady Betty
Ford says her family led
her to face her drug and
alcohol addiction and seek
treatment.
"It was my family, my
husband and my daughter
and three sons, who were
candid and courageous
she said Tuesday in a
speech to the National
Forum on Women and
Alcohol and Alcohol-Rela-
ted Problems.
"They were the ones
who sought the expert and
professional help for me,
and they were the ones
who faced me with my
illness Mrs. Ford an-
nounced in April 1978 that
she was addicted to
prescription drugs and
alcohol. She spent four
weeks at an alcoholism
treatment center at the
Long Beach Naval Hospital
in California.
Have you heard about
the country entertainer
who does perfect imi-
tations of other country
entertainers?
Her name is Patsy
Clone.
CATERING SERVICE
SPECIALIZING
IN PIG PICKINS
FAMILY STYLE-
ALL YOU CAN EAT
INCLUDING: Bar-B-Q
Fried Chicken Chicken Pastry
Stew, Potatoes, and Slaw
BUILDING A REPUTATION
NOT DEPENDING ON ONE
710 Greene St. Just Across
The River Bridge 752-0090
During
McGraw-Hill Health
Professions Bookstore Week
October 22-26
you'll find discounts up to 50
on McGraw-Hill medical and nursing
bestsellers plus
a sweepstakes drawing for
the new 2 volume edition of
Harrison's Principles
of Internal Medicine. �.
a $55.00 value
Take advantage of these great buys and
register for the sweepstakes by visiting
Students Supply Store
East Carolina University
Wright Building
Greenville, N.C. 27834
tel. (919) 757-6731
B
mP�
m.9





Title
The East Carolinian, October 18, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 18, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.15
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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