The East Carolinian, October 16, 1979






"Were it left to me to decide
whether we should have a
government without news-
papers or newspapers without
government, I should not
hesitate a moment to prefer
the latter
�Thomas Jefferson
le East Carolinian
Vol. 54 No.yW 14 pages today Tuesday, October 16,1979 Greenville, N.C. Circulation 10,000
If you have a story idea, a
tip, or a lead, please
telephone us:
757-6366
757-6367
757-6309
Circulation 10,000
Bus accident
Driver claims brake failure;
witnesses charge driver error
Despite attempts
headaches.
to upgrade maintenance and driver competence, the transit system is still beset with
(Photo by Steve Romero)
SGA hosts speaker
By CHRISTINE CAGLE
Staff Writer
"Students at ECU spend
85 percent of their time
outside the classroom
commented Dr. Elmer
Meyer, vice-chancellor for
student life, in hie address
Monday to SGA legislature
members. He spoke to the
SGA regarding an increased
student input into various
aspects of college life that
greatly affect ECU students.
Dr. Meyer also highlighted
some tips that the faculty
received in a department
meeting about working with
students.
"life blood"
"Students are the most
important people in our
work; students are not an
interruption in work but the
purpose of it; students are
part of our reason for being
here, not outsiders. Stu-
dents are not names, faces
or numbers but individuals.
Students bring us their
wants, and our job is to
fulfill them. Students de-
serve the most courteous
and attentive attention, and
students are the life blood
of our work said Dr.
Meyer.
Dorothy Homer, pro-
spective secretary of aca-
demic affairs, reported to
the legislature about her
work this year with the
Faculty Senate. According
to Ms. Horner, the senate is
divided into committees
which meet once a month
and discuss faculty findings,
and students are able to
provide input into the
finding? and what is
needed. She encouraged all
SGA members that would
like to get involved to come
to a meeting on October 25.
The resolution to re-
negotiate the 1979-80 SGA
Mendenhall Student Center
Office Lease Agreement
was passed at the meeting.
The current lease assign-
ment is signed by the SGA
president who makes office
assignments to other con-
stitutionally elected officers.
The SGA president has the
master key that allows him
access to all SGA offices
including those of the
elected officers. Legislature
members desired that the
current lease agreement be
re-negotiated so that each
officer will be responsible
for his or her assigned
office and that there be only
one master key which will
remain with the SGA
executive secretary.
The resolution was
brought up due to the fact
that at present, the SGA
president has keys to all of
the offices and thus has
almost unlimited access to
those offices.
SGA members felt that
the resolution did not
question the integrity of the
SGA president or violate his
honor. It was solely due to
privacy considerations for
the officers.
New bill
The legislature also
passed the Consolidation of
Appropriations Bill. Ac-
cording to Doug White,
co-chairperson of the ap-
propriations committee,
"We have a very limited
budget this year, and we do
not have a clear picture of
how much to spend. The
committee would rather
take all bills in a lump sum
and see how much each
organization wants and how
much money there is to
appropriate
White added, "We want
to make sure each organi-
zation gets a fair share and
attempt to fund organiza-
tions more equitably
White also said that all
requests for appropriations
must be introduced to the
legislature on or before
November 5, and then the
committee will have a given
packet of all requests for
appropriations.
White commented that
about 140,000 is left to
appropriate after the transit
system receives up to their
amount of 181,000 set by
the Board of Trustees. The
appropriations committee
has adopted a policy not to
set aside any organization
money for travel, such as
transportation, hotel, etc.
By TERRY GRAY
Assistant News Editor
At least two ECU students suffered minor injuries
Monday when the no. 4 transit system bus smashed into a
tree near the intersection of Fifth and Jarvis Streets after a
reported brake failure.
Cheryl Boehm, a junior Spanish major, was treated at
Memorial Hospital for a nose injury caused when the
impact of the crash threw her against the seat in front of
her. Another female student reportedly hurt in the accident
remains unidentified.
According to bus driver Mark Folsom, the accident
occured when a failure in the brake system forced him to
swerve into the tree to avoid hitting a car. Folsom said that
the car had stopped on Fifth Street, waiting for oncoming
traffic to pass so that it could turn left on Jarvis.
witnesses9 view
Anita Lancaster, a student who was on the bus during
the accident, said Folsom was following the car too closely.
"He started pumping the brakes about ten yards
behind a beige-colored car that was stopped in the street,
but the bus was going too fast. He couldn't turn left
because of the traffic, so he turned right into the tree.
Every time I ride that bus, he always drives too fast and
follows too close Lancaster said.
A reliable source confirmed Lancaster's account of the
accident, adding that the car had given confusing turn
signals. When it became clear that the car was not going to
turn off Fifth Street, the bus driver had to veer to the right
to avoid hitting the car, the source said.
"I was trying to slow the bus down when the pedal just
went to the floor. I couldn't turn to the left because of the
oncoming traffic, so I had to choose between hitting the car
ahead or hitting the tree. I chose the tree Folsom said.
Folsom said also that he had noticed a weakening in the
brakes only minutes before as he was leaving Mendenhall
Student Center.
Cheryl Boehm, who was hurt in the accident, said she
did not blame the driver for what happened. "Of all the
bus drivers we have, I think he is the best, and what
happened today was just a freak accident
According to Transit System Manager Chubby Abshire,
faulty brakes have been a major problem in the operation
of student buses. Abshire added that the mishap may have
been the result of low air pressure in the brake lines,
caused by the slight decrease in pressure which occurs
each time the brakes are pumped and then released before
the system has a chance to rebuild pressure.
Abshire also noted that an engineering oversight may
be the source of braking problems. According to him, the
main braking power in the International buses is applied to
the four rear wheels, but the weight of the bus is
concentrated at the front, where the engine is located. As a
result, braking may be inadequate in full-stop situations,
said Abshire.
Abshire said that he had received a letter from the bus
manufacturers last Friday, in which a suggestion for
remedying the problem was put forth.
Cause undetermined
The bus was towed to Hastings Ford, but service
personnel there have not yet determined whether or not
the brakes failed.
The bus, a 1975 International, was on its way to begin
the purple route when the accident happened, and there
were only eleven riders on at the time.
Damage to the bus was confined to the front and the
right front side. Both windshields were shattered on
impact, and the entrance door at the front of the bus was
crushed in.
Police and fire department vehicles arrived within
minutes after the crash, and a Greenville fireman climbed
the tree to remove a broken limb which was threatening to
fall onto the sidewalk below.
According to A. L. Colcough, director of the ECU
Department of Occupational Health and Safety, repairs to
the bus must be paid for from SGA funds, since the bus
does not carry collision insurance.
Supreme Court
shuns bias case
By RICHARD CARELLI
Associated Press Writer
WASHINGTON (AP) -
The Supreme Court today
refused to become involved
in one of the largest and
potentially most expensive
sex discrimination lawsuits
ever filed.
The justices left intact
an order forcing Western
Electric Co a wholly
owned subsidiary of Amer-
ican Telephone & Telegraph
Co to pay virtually all
costs in what may be more
than 2,000 separate trials to
determine damages.
Vice-Chancellor of Student Life Meyer
Innovations planned
By ARAH VENABLE
Staff Writer
Dr. Elmer E. Meyer
became the vice chancellor
for student life at ECU July
1, 1979. He was vice
president for student affairs
and dean of students at
Cornell University.
Dr. Meyer will have
administrative responsibility
over the offices of Resi-
dence Life, the Dean for
Student Activities, the ECU
Financial Aid Office, the
Counseling Center, Career
Planning and Placement
Office, Housing, Food Ser-
vices, Security, Student
Health Services and Intra-
mural activities.
Meyer said he plans to
make some changes in
He would like to
that all in his
best serve the
policies,
plan so
division can
students.
The vice chancellor said
there will be a consolidation
of the residence life pro-
grams. This means doing
away with the positions of
deans of men and women.
One reason for making
changes in the Residence
Mendenhall sponsors ECU
students in tournament
The top men and women
in the events of back-
gammon, bowling, billiards,
chess, and table tennis will
be determined through cam-
pus level qualifying tourna-
ments to be held during
Fall Semester. Sponsored
by Mendenhall Student
Center, the tournaments are
some of several hundred
being held at colleges and
universities around the na-
tion in the qualifying round
for intercollegiate cham-
pionships conducted by the
Association of College Un-
ions � International.
The all-campus winners
in each event will represent
ECU in the Region 5
tournament with the cham-
pions from approximately
thirty other schools from the
states of Kentucky, Vir-
ginia, South Carolina, Ten-
nessee, and North Carolina,
the ACU-I Region 5 Recrea-
tion Tournament will be
held February 14, 15, and
16, 1980 at the University of
Korth Carolina � Charlotte.
The all-expense paid trip
to the regional competition
for the ECU representatives
will be sponsored by
Mendenhall Student Center.
Qualifying tournaments
are being conducted in each
men's residence hall to
determine dorm winners
and at Mendenhall to
determine day-student win-
ners who will participate in
the All-Campus events.
Participants for the BOWL-
ING event will be selected
from the MSCINTRA-
mural - Recreational Sports
sponsored program held in
November.
day-student qualifiers, to be
decided on Monday, Octo-
ber 22, and the three
qualifiers from each dorm
will meet in this double
elimination tournament. The
first and second place
finishers will participate in
the regionals.
The All-Campus Chess
tournament got underway
October 8 with participants
completing the initial rounds
pf the round-robin competi-
tion. The person winning
the most games overall will
Any full-time student of represent ECU at Charlotte.
Scheduled for Tuesday,
November 6 is the All-
Campus Table Tennis Tour-
nament. Four day student
winners and approximately
eight dorm winners will
compete for the men's title.
One winner will also be
chosen in the women's
division to compete in
Charlotte. The double elim-
ination tournaments will get
underway at 6:00 p.m. in
the Multi-Purpose Room at
Mendenhall.
The All-Campus Bowling
Tournament will begin on
See TOURNEY, page 3
ECU is eligible to par-
ticipate in any of the events
but every participant must
register at the Bowling or
Billiards Centers at Men-
denhall. Bowling partici-
pants may register at the
Intramural Office in Mem-
orial Gym.
The All-Campus Bil-
liards Tournament is sche-
duled for Monday, Novem-
ber 12 at 6:00 p.m. in
Mendenhall with the semi-
finals and finals scheduled
for the following day if time
does not allow completioin
on Monday. The top four
I Homecoming Queen Lisa Zack
see page 7
Life Program is to identify
people rather than their
sex, Meyer said. He added
that the MRC is talking
about changing it's name to
College Hill Residence
Council so that it will
include Tyler dorm.
According to Meyer, the
Cc iseling Center and the
Career and Placement Cen-
ter are beginning to work
together this year. The plan
is to begin helping students
earlier than their senior
year through counseling and
workshops.
One of our biggest
problems is parking. The
new vice chancellor for
student life attributes part
of the difficulty to the fact
that there is no director of
parking, but he said the
university is bringing in
consultants to look at the
problem.
Also, the campus police
are trying to warn students
before towing their cars this
year. Meyer said this has
not been done previously.
The Intramural and Re-
creational Sports Depart-
ment will be looking for a
director and an advisory
committee with student
membership. The commit-
tee's purpose is to help
serve the students better.
In the Food Services
Department, Meyer said he
is trying to arrange a
faculty and staff luncheon
buffet at Mendenhall in the
coffee house. This would
bring faculty into the
building where students are
and help to foster student-
teacher relationships.
See MEYER, page 3
A federal trial judge
ruled last year that Western
Electric has systematically
discriminated against wo-
men at its Kearny, N.J
plant.
The original lawsuit was
filed in 1973 by Cleo
Kyriazi, now 47, who
worked from 1965 to 1971
as an industrial engineer at
the Kearny plant.
Her suit was lattr
certified as a "class ac-
tion and more than 2,000
other women have joined
her to charge Western
Electric with illegal sex
bias. It is possible more
women � those discrimin-
ated against in their jobs or
those refused employment
at the Kearny plant � also
will join the suit.
The issue of damages �
how much Western Electric
must pay Ms. Kyriazi and
other women who prove
they were hurt by sex bias
� still awaits trial. Western
has announced its intention
to contest each woman's
damage claims on a case-
by-case basis.
Stern has ordered the
company to pav Ms.
Kyriazi's attorney?" fees for
the first trial, at least
$280,000; the salaries of
four "special masters"
appointed to preside over
the damage trials, amounts
that could total hundreds of
thousands of dollars; at-
torneys' fees incurred by
the women during the
damage trials; and numer-
ous other costs involved in
the second round of litiga-
tion.
The 3rd U.S. Circuit
Court of Appeals last April
25 turned down Western
Electric's special request for
relief from Stern's order.
Inside Today
Field day
seepage 3
Jack Kerouac see page 4
Homecoming see page 7
Stepchildren see page 9
'Scrap metal5
see page 5






Page 2 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 16 October 1979
People, places and
ltd
M I I I H II ��ClI
cfficii�
The organizational meet-
ing of the Greenville
Officials Association will be
held xm Wed Oct. 17,
1979, at 5:30 p.m. The
meeting will take place at
the Elm Street Gymnasium,
upstairs in the meeting
room. All those interested
in officiating Junior High,
9th Grade, and recreational
basketball are invited to
attend. For further informa-
tion call 752-5214.
teer
The Student Union Pro-
gram will meet Thursday,
October 18, 1979, at 7:00
p.m. in Room 212 of
Mendenhall Student Center.
The main topic will be Beer
& Wine Consumption on
Campus. Please plan to
attend.
business
bcwl
ciicle I
wesley
Phi Beta Lambda is a
nationwide business service
fraternity that is open to all
business students. The only
grade point average require-
ment is that you meet those
set by the university for
enrollment. Among other
things, we sponsor a
symposium each year that
brings in speakers from
various fields of business. If
you're ready to broaden
your involvement beyond
the classroom then we're
ready for you. Come to our
next meeting to see what
we're about.
titiU
billiards
The deadline for regis-
tering for the ACU�I Day
Student BILLIARDS Tour-
nament is Friday, Oct. 19.
All full-time day-students
who wish to participate
must register at the Bil-
liards Center at Menden-
hall. The tournament will
begin Monday, Oct. 22 at
6:00 p.m. at Mendenhall
Student Center.
This tournament will
determine the top four
dav-student contenders who
will face the twelve dorm
winners in the ACU-I
All-Campus Billiards Tour-
nament to be held Monday,
Nov. 12 at 6:00 p.m. The
first anad second place
finishers of the All-Campus
Tournament will represent
ECU at the regional ACU-I
Recreation Tournament in
Charlotte, N.C. in February.
The all-expense paid trip for
the delegates will be
sponsored by Mendenhall
Student Center.
lit
John Ranere wiU present
a fine art reproductions sale
beginning October 15 in the
MSC Multi-Purpose room.
Start preparing art for
The Rebel. It has been
confirmed that there will be
prize money awarded again
this year thanks to The
Attic and Jeffrey's Beer and
Wine for Budweiser. Cate-
gories painting, drawing,
printmaking, photography,
and mixed media. If there
are questions,contact Sue
Aydelette, art director.
peis
The ECU Department of
Physical Education, Recre-
ation and Safety is offering
two skiing trips during the
winter and spring breaks.
January 1-6 students can
go to Snowshoe, West
Virginia, for five nights on
the slopes.
Snowshoe will also be
the goal of students March
9-14.
Costs will be $170.23 in
January and $150.20
March.
For
contact
Memorial Gym, 757-6000.
in
more information,
Jo Saunders at
Take advantage of great
savings in bowling at
Mendenhall Student Center.
Monday is 'Discount Day
From 2:00 p.m. until 6:00
p.m. bowling is 13 off the
regular price. Also, on
Saturdays from 1200 Noon
to 6:00 p.m. you can
'Rent-A-Lane' for $3.00 for
one hour. Bring a friend
and catch the savings.
Ricky Lowe, a Senior
political science major, has
been selected as a partici-
pant in a week-long confer-
ence on the New Economic
Order of Third World
Countries. The trip is
sponsored by the Board of
Church and society of the
United Methodist Church.
On this trip, Ricky will meet
with prominent United Na-
tions officials in New York
City as well as congression-
al leaders in Washington,
D.C. The trip will begin
October 13.
meimcrs
Air student members of
the Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter DAy Saints
(Mormons) are urged to
attend Institute class held
every Wednesday 6:00 p.m.
in the Brewster Bldg. room
B201. Randy Bott, an
outstanding teacher from
Raleigh, is director of the
Institute.
All other students inter-
ested in knowing something
about Mormon history and
doctrine are welcome.
Around the East Caro-
lina campus students aften
have a misconception that
Circle K is a dude ranch, a
fraternity, or a religious
organization. These concep-
tions are not totally true.
Circle K is a co-ed
organization that focuses on
serving the community and
the university. Through
various projects such as
rock-a-thons, skating and
halloween parties for men-
tally retarded children, and
bar-be-cue chicken dinners,
the club helps many people.
This year the club has
planned projects such as as
disco dance to buy a fetal
heart monitor for the
hospital, parties for under-
privileged children, and a
continued playground
clean-up project.
Circle K is good times,
rewarding experiences, and
lifetime friendships. We
invite anyone who is
interested to come to our
meetings. We meet every
Tuesday night in Menden-
hall Student Center from
7:00 until 8:00. Hope to see
you there.
psycb
Psychology Majors and
Minors. Psi Chi Honor
Society for Psychology is
accepting applications for
Fall induction. You must
have a minimum psyc gpa
of 3.0, be in the upper 13
of your class, and have a
minimum of 8 hours in
psyc. Last to apply is Oct.
24.
lefcel
cbess
bsc
The Homecoming Steer-
ing Committee will meet
Wednesday, October 17,
1979, at 3.00 p.m in Room
212 of Mendenhall Student
Center. Please plan to
attend.
and
will
The ECU Chess
Backgammon Clubs
meet each Tuesday Evening
at 7:00 p.m. in the MSC
Coffeehouse. All players
interested in getting to-
gether on a weekly basis for
some friendly competition
are invited to drop by and
join in.
Student Union
Travel Committee
Nov. 21 -25
$80.00
Central Ticket Office
Mendenhall Student Center
Deadline Nov. 1st
Thanksgiving in
NEW
YOR K11
STUDENT UNION
EAST CAItOUK UNIVERSITY
The Rebel is now
accepting high-quality liter-
ature submissions. Poetry,
essays, plays and inter-
views, and short stories will
be accepted. All work must
have name, address, and
phone number of writer.
Address manuscripts to the
Rebel, Mendenhall Student
Center, Greenville, N.C.
27834.
Wesley Center will be
holding a coffeehouse once
a month starting Nov. 1,
1979. There will be various
.forms of entertainment pro-
vided. This is open to
everyone with a small fifty
cent admission charge. Re-
freshments will be avail-
able.
ccminurlcr
An Episcopal service of
Holy Communion will be
celebrated Wednesday eve-
ning (Oct. 17th) in the
chapel of the Methodist
Student Center (5th Street
across from Garrett Dorm).
The service will be at 5:30
p.m. with the Episcopal
Chaplain, The Rev. Bill
Hadden, celebrating. Sup-
per will be served at 6:00
p.m. following the service.
A Bible Study at 7:00 p.m
led by the chaplain, will be
held at the home of Eleanor
Coleman, 1003 E. 5th St.
(across from main gate).
II ss II
Russian is for ordinary
people who are eager to try
something different but not
difficult, challenging but not
overwhelming. Little chil-
dren in Russia learn to read
and write in a few weeks,
so can an E.C.U. student.
Russian 1001-1004 satis-
fies the language require-
ment and gives the student
an edge when applying for
a job with the government,
in business, and the mili-
tary.
Russian 1001 will be
offered Spring semester
MWF at 9:00.
Modern Russian and
Soviet Literature taught in
English (Russ 2221), a
Humanities course and an
interesting elective will be
offered MWF at 12:00. No
knowledge of Russian is
needed.
The second meeting of
the College Republicans will
be held on Oct. 17 at 7:30
p.m. in BB-104. All mem-
bers and interested persons
are invited to attend. There
will be a discussion on the
functions of the club and
the election of new officers
for the 1979-80 year will be
held. Refreshments will be
served after the meeting.
The East Carolina Comic
Book Club will meet Tues-
day Oct. 23 at the Nostalgia
Newstand 919 Dickinson
Ave, Greenville. The meet-
ing will start at 7 p.m. and
is open to all interested
persons. Topics of discus-
sion will include the up-
coming December 2 con-
vention. For more informa-
tion call 758-6909.
A pre-registration social
will be held by the ECU
Sociology-Anthropology club
on Wednesday, Oct. All
persons majoring or minor-
ing in Sociology or Anthro-
pology and those in these
social sciences are invited to
attend. Refreshments will
be furnished at the affair
which will be held at 6:30 in
BD302.
PHI KAPPA TAU
Little Sister
RUSH
$KT Fraternity would like to
xtend an open invitation to all
Interested young ladies, and
encourage you to attend.
Tues. Oct. 16 8:30
Golden Sunshine with
the Phi Taus
at the Elbo Room
Wed, Oct. 17
8:30 OKT House
(409 Elizabeth St.)

Portraits
will be
taken:
t





Creek news
16 October 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 3
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Field day coming
classified
By RICKI GUARMIS
Staff Writer
Lambda Chi Alpha Field
Day will be held this
Saturday at the intramural
field at the bottom of
College Hill Drive.
The first event will
begin promptly at 10:30
a.m. If there are any
questions, call 752-5325.
According to the Lambda
Chi's, this should be the
best field day ever!
The Lambda Chi's are
also having their annual
Spaghetti Supper. The sup-
per will be held Thursday,
Oct. 18, from 5 p.m. until 7
p.m. The supper will be
"all you can eat" and all
orority and fraternitv mem-
bers are invited to come.
The price of the meal will
be $2.50.
The associate members
of Lambda Chi Alpha are
sponsoring a Beer Blast at
the Chapter X this Tuesday,
Oct. 16. The party will
egin at 9 p.m. Tickets are
only 25 cents and can be
purchased from any associ-
ate member.
The Phi Kappa Tau's
had a very successful
homecoming weekend. The
Phi Tau's held an Alumni
Dinner and afterwards,
guests were entertained by
"Talk of the Town
�The Phi Tau's would like
to extend an open invitation
to all young women to
attend Little Sister Rush.
Rush will begin tonight at
the Elbo Room with a
Happy Hour which is being
sponsored by the Little
Sisters.
On Wednesday night,
rush will be held at the Phi
Tau house at 8:30.
The Alpha Phi Sorority
is proud to announce the
addition of 31 men to the
Alpha Phi Big Brother
organization. The success of
the rush is credited to
Martha McCoss, big brother
advisor, and Ed Walters,
big brother president. Wel-
come new Big Brothers!
The Alpha Phi's hope
that everyone had a good
homecoming. The Phi's
would like to thank the
Sigma Tau Gammas for
working with the Phi's to
build a beautiful float.
The Sigmas would like
to congratulate Cary Rich-
ardson for finishing first in
the Intramural Archery
competition. The Sigmas
are proud of all their
participants as they had six
finishers in the top ten.
The Tri Sigs had a very
successful Homecoming
weekend. Many parents,
alumni, and friends at-
tended the brunch which
was held before the game.
The guests also watched the
parade from the Sigma
House.
Iterate
3

TOURNEY
(cont. from pg.
1)
Monday, November 5 with
the Team Captains' Meeting
at 4:00 p.m. in MSC Room
244. The Mendenhall and
Intramural - Recreational
Sports co-sponsored event
will be a team competition
but the ECU representatives
to go to Charlotte will be
decided by the top five
singles scores overall in the
men's and women's divi-
sions.
Scheduled for Monday,
October 29 is the All-
Campus Backgammon Tour-
nament to be held in the
Multi-Purpose Room at
Mendenhall at 6:00 p.m.
The tournament met with
great success last year and
this year should prove to be
even better.
MEYER
(cont. from pg. 1)
Meyer stated that he
would like to see more
activities on campus which
are cultural and intellectual.
"Things that make students
think, things about the
world, community, future
Students at Cornell work
harder at studying, accord-
ing to Meyer, but the
students at ECU are more
involved in the student
government, which, he
added, is very important.
Student-faculty relation-
ships are very important,
said Meyers. He encourages
faculty members to be
advisors, help with student
organizations and work with
the faculty and advisory-
committee
"I am delighted to be
FRIDAY'S
1890
Seafood
Tuesday Night
Specials
TROUT $2.95
PERCH $295
all you can eat
No take-outs please.
Meal Includes:
French Fries, Cole slaw,
Huthpupples.
We are proud to
announce that we
have added
one of the
AREAS FINEST
SALAD BARS
for your
dining pleasure.
OPEN FOR LUNCH
Daily
(except Sat.) 11:30 - 230
HOURS
MON - THURS.
fSOO � lOlOO
FRI. 8 SAT.
5:00 - 10:3S
Located On Evans Straat
here Meyer said, adding
that he welcomes seeing
students and talking with
people in different depart-
ments. "We wouldn't be
here if it wasn't for the
students. Our purpose is to
work with them for educa-
tional purposes
Meyer welcomes student
opinions.
YARD SALE: Saturday,
Oct. 20 in front of PRC
building, corner of Cotanche
and Ninth. Furniture, cloth-
ing, knick-knacks, time: 8
a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
FOR SALE: Classical Yama-
ha Guitar (6-65). 1978
model excellent condition.
$125.00 contact Debbie:
758-0269.
PHOENIX SAVAGE KAY-
AK: Excellent condition;
Norse paddle, spray skirt,
float bags, helmet, cartop
mounts. $350. 758-3710.
FOR SALE: Hohner 6 string
guitar with case and fine
leather strap. Mother of
pearl in lay. Excellent
condition. Call 752-6391.
MARANTZ 2285 RECEIVER
Bose 301's Technics Turn-
table. Will sell separate.
102-C Cherry Ct. Drive after
6 p.m.
TURNTABLE: Toshiba SL-
32 Single Play; belt driven,
still new (less than 6 mos.
old). $150.00 756-7996.
FOR SALE: 150 gallon oil
tank with stand $40.
758-0596 after 6 p.m.
FOR SALE: Royal Medallion
II Typewriter. 76 model,
excellent condition. Price
negotiable. Call 946-9485.
1974 MUSTANG II: 2 dr.
hardtop, 4 speed, AC.
Good condition. $1500
best offer. Call 758-4809
or
BEACH LOVERS! Part-time
student sales representa-
tive position available for
Spring Semester. Job in-
volves promoting high qual-
ity sun trips on campus for
commission and free travel.
Individual must be self-
starter and highly moti-
vated. Call or write for an
application. Summit Travel,
Inc Parkade Plaza, Suite
11, Columbia, Missouri
PARTY HEARTY at the 65201.(800)325-0439.
ECtJ-Carolina game And NEED A PAPER TYPED?
let us do the driving! A Theses, reports, term pa-
chartered bus will take you pers, etc. Call Leigh
from Greenville to the gates Coakley at 752-8027. Rea-
of Keanan Stadium and sonable rates.
back, again all for $6.00.
Limited number of seats, so
make vour reservations
NOW Call 7522476 or
752-8925.
pareond(J)
WANTED: Apartment and
female roommate beginning
Spring, 1980. Prefer a
graduate student, but will
consider a senior. Call
Cathy Mills. Day: toll free
1-800-662-7300 (say it's
personal). After 6: (919)
772-0667.
ROOM FOR RENT: Males
only; graduate student pre-
ferred. Phone 753-4530.
WANTED: Male roommate,
3 bedroom house w
fireplace. $92 month plus
13 utilities. 752-7416. 2-5
afternoons. After 9:00 at
night.
THREE FEMALE ROOM-
MATES needed to share
apt. at Riverbluff. Rent is
$52.50 per month, plus
utilities and phone. Call
758-5823.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
needed to share two bed-
room apartment at East-
brook. Pay half of rent and
utilities. Call Cathy at
752-7505.
WANTED: Advanced Span-
ish student to translate
simple Spanish play. Good
pay, 752-1897 after 5.
DANCE � Sunshine Studios
will be offering the follow-
ing at a discount rate to
ECU students: Ballet, Jazz,
Yoga Arabic (Belly Dance)
and Partner Disco Dance.
Classes are within walking
distance of campus, be-
ginning Oct. 29 & 31. Call
Sunshine at 756-7235, or
758-0736.
LOST: A set of 4 keys. One
has 207 engraved on it.
Phone 752-3984 if found. A
$10.00 reward is offered.
WANTED: Strong person(s)
with pick-up to help me
move 1027. Will pay $20.
752-9048.
tocwrf g)
campus division
Society for Advancement
of Management
FEMALE ROOMMATE
wanted to share two bed-
room duplex three blocks
from ECU campus. 12
rent, utilities, phone. Call
757-6334 between 8:00 and
5:00; 758-5910 after 5:00.
Film & Lecture
-on-
Interviewing & Resumes
with
Linda Gaddis of the ecu
Career Planning
& Placement Office
Wed. Oct. 17th 4:00
221 Mendenhall
p.m.
ALL YOU CAN EAT
SPECIALS
4 00-8:00 PM
SALAD�50 EXTRA
ASST. VAR. t
PIZZA. .wr
WITH FRIES & COLESLAW
FRIED e
CHICKEN ?�y
WITH GARLIC BREAD
ITALIAN t h
SPAGHETTIoTlI
WITH FRIES & COLE SLAW
FRIED
FISH. .
WED.

99
THUR.
STUDENT
The folks at Kroger Sav-on know the
complete student has a party side,
too. So they have what East Carolina
University students need for any bash
from party platters to disco plat-
ters all in one convenient loca-
tion. Don't be incomplete this
year�shop Kroger Sav-on today.
TIMEX
WATCHES

COSMETICS
AMP
moMNcesr
UP TO
Sugg
Retail
REG. OR DIP
COUNTRY OVEN
Potato
Chips
8-Oz Twin Pak
OFF MANUFACTURERS
SUGGESTEO RETAIL
LET THE DELI DO IT! Planning a party? Let the
Kroger Sav-on Deli supply the fixin's. Finest
quality meats, delicious cheese, & tasty
salads combine to make our party trays
perfect for entertaining. Just phone ahead to
place your order!
FIRE BREWED
Stroh's 6
Records and
Tapes
jmsESmfBl
12 02.
cans
HEARTY BURGUNDY, PINK CHABLIS,
ROSE, CHABLIS BLANC OR
Gallo
Rhine
Copyright 1979
Kroger Siv-on
Quantity Rights Reserved
None Sold To Dealers
1.5 Liter
Btl.
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be readily available for
sal in each Kroger Sav-on Store except es specifically noted in this
ad. If we do run out of an advertised item, we will offer you your choice
of e comparable Kern, when available, reflecting the same savings or a
raincheck which will entitle you to purchase the advertised Item at the
advertised price within 30 days.

NONE SOLD
j
DEALERS
)
OPEN 7 AM TO MIDNIGHT
MON
THRU
SAT
OPEN SUNDAY
9AMT09PM
FOOD, DRUG, GENERAL
MERCHANDISE STORES
PRICES EFFECTIVE TUES
OCT. 16 THRU SUN OCT. 21, 1979
600 Greenville BlvdGreenville
Phone 756-7031
u
I
j- m �� � -� r rv�� ��$ m-xr �r ��"� �&���' �"�'&� L





The East Carolinian
Editorials
�Opinions

Tuesday, October 16, 1979 Page 4
Greenville, N.C.
A design flaw ?
So now we hear that it is an
engineering fault that has been causing
all those bus brake pedals to stick to the
floor, and therefore, all those buses to go
careening into trees, Volkswagens and
the like.
The manufacturer is clearly at fault if
the problem is indeed a design flaw in
the buses. The SGA can and must act
immediately to see that the buses are
corrected before anyone is seriously hurt.
We fail to see why the problem was
not found a long time ago. It seems a
little attention could have saved the SGA
a lot of pain and anxiety. If it had only
noticed that the same occurrence �
brake failure � kept showing up time
and time again. A call should have gone
out to the manufacturer after a couple of
these incidents.
This latest accident also points out
the need for all of the buses to carry
collision insurance to make sure that
damages will be promptly taken care of.
According to an eyewitness account of
the accident, the bus was bent sideways
from its undercarriage up. Anyone who
has ever had any experience with bent
frames on a wrecked automobile can tell
you that fixing them is almost worthless
because of damage to the wheel
alignment � damage which will last for
as long as the bus is driven.
Finally, there is some question as to
who will pick up the tab if it is
determined that liability insurance will
not carry the cost of the accident. Will
the SGA immediately have to pay the
bill, or will the Board of Trustees have to
dig deep deciding where they can spare
the money?
Another point which must be
considered is the absence of the bus
itself. If the insurance company does
pay, it may declare the bus a total loss.
The school would then have to order a
new bus, which takes time. In the
meantime, where do we get a spare bus
to bring students to school and carry
them safely home?
Several things need to be done right
away. First, the manufacturer should be
held accountable if there is an
engineering error. The SGA or
Chancellor's Office needs to look into
this as soon as possible. If it is found
that the design flaw exists on all buses
made by this particular factory, the N.C.
Department of Transportation or some
other authority must be notified in order
to prevent further injuries from this
problem.
Secondly, a clearer definition of
liability should be written. Exactly what
kind of insurance to be carried on the
buses should be determined and
coverage must be held for whatever kind
is decided upon.
Finally and obviously, the brakes on
buses that have had problems in the past
should be checked two or three times
more often than usual to help insure
against future accidents.
There is no substitute for safety when
it comes to the students of East Carolina
University. If the problem is mechanical
rather than administrative, it must be
repaired. It seems that in this case, the
SGA Transit System is not at fault.
t-
5r
(zi -duf)
� ifk i

ECU STUDENT TRANSIT
. r
�'�(
American Journal
No stamp for Kerouac
Pop's People
The way it was meant to be
By LARRY POPELKA
Rock V Roll was meant
to be played on a jukebox.
Sure that Led Zeppelin
tune on your Crown DC-
300A amplifier with 200
watts of power shattering
every window in sight
sounds good. It should. It's
got the power to destroy
every eardrum within a
three mile radius.
But is this any way to
impress your friends � by
blowing them away with
your sonic weaponry?
Rock V roll was meant
to be loud, but it wasn't
meant to be blasted out of a
pair of speakers like a
couple of cannon balls.
It was meant to be
played on a jukebox.
Back in the '50s when
Bruce Springsteen was still
a frustrated school kid in
New Jersey and no one
knew who The Who were,
people like Buddy Holly and
Elvis were burning up the
music business � on
jukeboxes.
You didn't have to own
a set of Electro-Voice
Century III horn speakers
with a 15-inch woofer.
Back then such stereo-
phonic weapons were still a
thing of the future. You
didn't need your own sound
arsenal to defend your turn
from Donnie and Marie
fanatics.
Everybody just kind of
drifted down to the local
malt shop or saloon and fed
nickles to the jukebox.
Listening to music was not
a war, but a party. As the
colored jukebox lit up and
i
Buddy started pounding out
refrains of "Peggy Sue
people would swarm to the
floor, dancing, clapping and
singing along.
But then the high-
powered stereo came along.
So did acid rock. And a war
in Vietnam.
People stopped partying
and started thinking about
blowing everyone else a-
way. And jukeboxes ended
up in the garbage dump.
Don Muller, manager of
a rock radio station in
Phoenix, was lamenting this
sad fact a few years ago
when he ran across an old
1954 AMI jukebox in an
antique store.
Not one for passing up
good outdated music equip-
ment, Muller bought the
machine for $75, filled it
with 45s and put it in his
home.
One night Muller had a
party at his house and
eventually everyone got
around to talking about the
jukebox, admiring it and
asking to play it.
"Our parties before had
been pretty dull Muller
says. "I had a good stereo,
but people never dance to
that. They just screw
around with your records.
We usually ended up sitting
around drinking until about
1:30 when somebody would
get drunk and everyone
decided to go home.
"But when I got that
jukebox and started playing
it, people would get up and
start dancing right in front
of the box. It became the
center of attention. The
atmosphere was electric.
"Now my parties run to
three or four in the
morning, and I have to tell
everyone to go home. Then
afterward we have to sit
down and decide who to
invite to the next one. Our
house accomodates about 35
or 40 people, but it's gotten
so there's a waiting list for
people we want to invite
Muller decided that to
ease the crowds and spread
the fun around he should
find srae more old juke-
boxes and sell them to
people for their homes.
So Muller bought a
bunch of old boxes from
local jukebox operators and
ran an ad on TV.
"Our commercial went
on at 12:05 a.m. on a
Saturday night after a lousy
movie on an independent
station. It gave them my
home number to call if they
wanted a jukebox. We were
offering them for $125
delivered with a one-year
guarantee. I didn't expect
much response
But just like the Knack,
Elvis Costello and other
new wave acts that have
found success by reverting
to the roots of rock, the
people who saw Muller's ad
seemed to find nirvana in
the thought of owning a
jukebox to play rock V roll
the way it was in its early
years.
"The phone started
ringing after the ad and
didn't stop until 5 a.m
says Muller. "We sold 50 to
60 boxes that one night
Muller has since left the
radio business and opened
his own store, Jukeboxes
Unlimited, in West Los
Angeles, which has 10
employees who sell more
than 300 reconditioned
jukeboxes a year.
"I see no end to this
says Muller. "Our sales
have doubled in the last
year. People want juke-
boxes. If this keeps up,
we'll have stores in 30
.cities
Some of the rarer
models have sold for as
much as $10,000 to $15,000.
And an average box from
the '40s or '50s now costs
better than $1,000.
Because of this sudden
demand Muller and others
have been scouring the
country looking for old
boxes stashed away in
warehouses in small towns.
"The price keeps going
up because every one of
these we sell means there's
one less on the market
says Muller. "I've com-
pletely eliminated the old
machines in four states
myself. Now I've got to
travel across the country
just to get the stuff
Muller says most bars
and diners have already
gotten rid of their old
jukeboxes and replaced
them with new models that
pack more power but are
much less amusing to look
at or to dance to.
"I don't know why
says Muller, "but jukebox
companies just don't make
them the way they used
to
Maybe they've never
heard rock V roll the way
it was meant to be played.
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
Jack Kerouac, writer
and wanderer, melancholy
king of the beatniks, died
ten years ago this month.
There is no postage stamp
devoted to this influencial
yet underrated writer, no
"day" declared in the
nation's libraries, no official
observance, as far as I
know, in his hometown of
Lowell, Massachusetts.
Kerouac's place in
America's unofficial history,
however, seems assured.
With his spontaneous bop
prose he foreshadowed the
sixties sensibility, and with
his fitful wanderlust in-
spired a legion of back-
packers and hitchhikers.
Echoes of Kerouac's voice
can also be heard in a
number of popular artists:
Bob Dylan, Neil Young and
Patti Smith, to -name a few.
Yet it is doubtful whether
anyone really knew Jack
Kerouac when he was alive.
The writer who moved
so many people was a
solitary figure, glimpsed
fleetingly in these pictures
of the gone world: Jack
alone as a child in grimy,
redbrick Lowell; Jack alone
together with his friends as
an adult; Jack alone at the
typewriter, cutting along on
benzedrine and tokay wine,
drinking deeply of imagina-
tion and sometimes losing
consciousness in the sweet-
ness and excitement �
waking up at full speed to
write it all down with the
kind of energy that enabled
him to finish The Sub-
terraneans in three days.
"This stream of fanta-
sies, visions, myths
made up his life write his
biographer, Ann Charters.
"They were the legend that
he felt his life became. And
they were more than this.
In the intensity of the vision
he had of his confused life,
he caught the dreams of a
generation; the feeling that
at some point something
had been together, that
there was a special vision
they all shared, a romantic
ideal that called on the road
just ahead
Kerouac envisioned his
books � there are 18 of
them, including many stor-
ies, essays and poems �
coming together to create
one grand design, one
legend, through which he
would explain himself. He
literally created himself in
print and in order to do that
convincingly, he needed a
style of writing distinctly his
own.
Kerouac found his style
by joining the confessional
qualities of his friend Neal
Cassady's speed-rap with
the blunt narrative of
William Burroughs. Then
he laid the whole thing out
to the sounds of the new
jazz of the early fifties.
Miles and Bird, Monk and
Mulligan, comedian Lord
Buckley with his improvised
monologues, Kerouac with
his books � they were all
players in the New Reality
Jam Session.
Kerouac regarded music
as a mythic source, and said
his writing was based on
"jazz and bop, in the sense
of a, say, tenor man
drawing a breath, and when
he does, his sentencehis
statement's- been made
that's how I therefore
separate sentences, as
breath separations of the
mindThen there's the
raciness and freedom and
humor of jazz instead of ail
that dreary analysis
The first book Kerouac
wrote in his new style was
On the Road, an account of
his mad dashes across the
spine of the continent with
Cassady. He had worked
two years on it in the late
forties and given up. In his
renewed attempt in 1951,
he wrote it in a three-week
blaze of benzedrine energy.
When he finished the book,
he was convinced he had
found his writing soul at
last. He hadn't a due of the
notoriety On the Road
would bring him when he
finally succeeded in selling
it six long, hard years later.
The journeys mapped in
Kerouac's most popular
novel embody the mindless
exhilaration of travel, of
pure motion, of rolling
through the warm, starry
American night in a smooth-
wheeling car, windows
rolled down, engine hum-
ming, a song beaming in on
the radio. It was a modern
version of the myth of
Huckleberry Finn.
Kerouac's finely tuned
sense of place enabled him
to convey, with an almost
uncanny accuracy, the "is-
ness" of his locale: the sea-
sounds of the Pacific
crashing on stone near Big
Sur; the peeled, yellow bus
terminal Johns and cafeter-
ias of Manhattan; the
foggy-bottom water gaps of
the Susquehanna rier, the
"desperate, end-of-the-con-
tinent characters" that
haunt San Francisco's Mar-
ket Street.
By ail accounts, Kerouac
never developed as an
integrated person. Charters
says he was sexually un-
settled and never wholly
independent of his mother.
He married three times, but
was wed primarily to what
Charters calls his "clenched
determination" to be a
great writer.
That determination took
him down some haH roads.
Years of failure and strug-
gle, of trying to prove
himself, left Kerouac bitter
and confused. When a
measure of fame finally
came, he was incapable of
handling it.
Kerouac, his vision blur-
red, his energy draineJ,
had discovered the price of
American life: "the redbrick
behind the neon, waiting
Suffering from a monstrous
sense of betrayal, he
retreated to a Florida
bungalow with his third
wife and his mother, where
he disowned everyone and
everything connected with
the beat scene. There, as a
recluse among his bottles
and books, his decline was
swift. He died in St.
Petersburg, the retreat for
old folks, on Oct. 21, 1969.
He was 47.
(copyright)
The East Carolinian
(copyright)
MANAGING EDITOm
Richard Green
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Anita Lancaster
NEWS EDITOR
ASST. NEWS EDITOR
FEATURES EDITOR
ASST. DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
EDITOR
Marc Barnes
DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
Robert M. Swaim
ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR
Leigh Coakley
BUSINESS MANAGER
Steve O Geary
Karen Wendt
Terry Gray
Bill Jones
Terry Herndon
SPORTS EDITOR
ASST. SPORTS EDITOR
COPY EDITOR
AD TECH. SUPER.
CharM Chandler
Jimmy DuPrw
thane Henderson
Paul Linck.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN is the student
newspaper of East Carolina University
sponsored by the Media Board of ECU and
is distributed each Tuesday and Thursday
during the academic year (weekly during the
summer).
Offices are located on the second floor of the
Publications Center (Old South Building) Our
mailing address ,s: Old South Building ECU
Greenville, NC 27834.
The phone numbers are: 7S7-6366 63�7
6309. Subscription, are $10 annually , j
$6 annually. '
r
�t �� jt �� 9? 4feV Of





The East Carolin
inian 1 �
features
Tuesday, October 16, 1979 Page 5
Greenville, N.C.
New dean wants changes
By WILLIAM JONES
Features Editor
'The pieces of 'scrap
metal' you see at various
places around campus can
be considered art because
the artist is using them as a
medium to communicate a
concept or feeling Dr.
Richard Laing, the new
dean of ECU's School of
Art, paused.
Dr. Laing explained
further that most people see
Michaelangelo's "David"
simply as an extremely
accurate reproduction of a
well-developed male phy-
sique, or, at most, as
representing the "spirit" of
vouth. But, with David,
Michaelangelo was trying to
capture the "energy" of
Florence, a very progres-
sive, alive city at that time.
He thought this vigor best
represented through the
innocent vitality of youth.
Dr. Laing feels that perhaps
these "scrap metal" artists
are trying to tell us
something about the techno-
logical society in which we
live through their pieces of
steel girder and bolts.
Dr. Laing assumed his
duties as dean on July 1.
He had been chairperson of
the art department of
Edinboro State College in
Pennsylvania since 1972.
From 1968 until 1972, he
headed the art department
at Indiana's Ball State
University. �
Dr. Laing says ECU
probably has the best
all-around art school within
a five-state area and that it
is one of the few art schools
he has seen which has no
"prima donnas totally
self-concerned instructors
with inflated egos.
Dr. Laing would like to
see increased communica-
tion between the art school
and the University. He put
this desire into effect earlier
this fall when he held a
mandatory meeting for all
art students. At the meet-
ing, Dr. Laing introduced
himself and the faculty and
student leaders spoke of the
goals he would like to see
the art school meet and
provided students with the
opportunity to ask ques-
tions.
Other things which Dr.
Laing says may change in
the near future are:
1) Strengthening the
foundation courses by link-
ing the subject areas
together rather than a
foundation of "parts and
pieces
2) Preparing the student
with problem-solving infor-
mation and a strong artistic
bearing before entering the
upper levels.
3) The addition and fa-
cilitation of our Product
Design program which will
be aimed at developing the
post-industrial designer, the
designercraftsman with
emphasis on design. Thfs
designer will not only nefj
to learn the necessary tech-
nology of industrial design
but be able to move on the
problems of furniture with a
good feeling and back-
ground in jewelry, metal,
wood, ceramics, fabric de-
sign, interior design and
communication arts, as well
as sociology and human and
business management � an
architecture for living and
making if you will.
4) Some changes in the
Art School alignment of
departments.
5) New emphasis on the
W.B. Gray Gallery with a
combination of the on-going
contemporary scene and
also special study exhibits
as a beginning on the
influences of the museum
concept.

6) New faculty members,
perhaps to include Harry
Baxley, an architect for
interior design from Auburn
University; Randy Osman, a
gallery director from the
West Coast (Oregon); Mi-
chael Davis, an art history
teacher from the University
of Michigan and Donna
Sadler-Davis, from the Uni-
versity of Indiana's art
history department.
Dr. Richard Laing is the
new Dean of the ECU
School of Art. Dr. Laing
says the Art School here is
he best in a five state area.
(Photo by Hugh Johnson)
The Theatre Arts Committee is pre- matinee at 1:00 p.m the Oct. 17
senting The Pocket Mime Theatre on October performance is an evening performance at
16 and 17 in Hendrix Theater in Mendenhall 8:00p.m.
Student Center. The Oct. 16 performance is a
Chapin's latest is delightful
By PAT MINGES
Features Writer
Legends Of The Lost
And Found � Harry
Chapin. The master story-
teller has just released this
live double album billed the
"New Greatest Stories
Live Few artists can
match Harry Chapin in his
sheer verbal proficiency,
but this album is also a
musical pleasure for it
captures Chapin on his last
concert tour with a five-
piece backup group. Superb
lyrics, excellent vocal har-
monies and fine music make
this album, but the addition
of Ken Scholes on cello
proves to be the piece de
resistance. Chapin may be
"one of the luckiest men
alive but it is we who are
lucky to be on the receiving
end of this delightful
album.
Tusk � Fleetwood Mac.
This really is a disappoint-
ing album and should be a
shock to many longtime
Fleetwood Mac fans. To
produce a double album of
enduring quality is a test of
all except the truly gifted,
and the tragic thing about
Tusk is that there is hardly
enough good material for
one album much less two.
The critics and the con-
sumers may prove this one
wrong, but there is not
much that is impressive
about this latest album
except for it's elaborate
production. There are a few
nice Christine McVie tunes
on the album, but they
hardly manage to carry this
lackluster production.
Please, give us back our
penguin, and release him
from this bondage.
Kid Blue � Louse
as Russ Kunkel, Lee Sklar,
Carole King, Dave Paich,
Mike Porcaro, Waddy
Wachtel, J.D. Souther, and
Don Henley. At times
sounding like a more
relevant Patti Smith, Louise
Goffin showcases her fine
young talent in Kid Blue
and should carry on a
family tradition of good
music.
I'm The Man � Joe
Jackson. Although this al-
"Forget that this is Carole King's
daughterand just enjoy the power
of Coffin's music and vocal style
Goffin. Hey � This ain't no
kid, and she surely don't
seem blue. Forget that this
is Carole King's daughter
(as she probably has after
Saturday's Saturday Night
Live) and just enjoy the
power of Goffin's music and
vocal style. Produced by
Danny Korchmar, and fea-
turing Kootsch on guitar,
this album also contains
other studio musicians such
bum is really pleasant, it
would be nice if Jackson
quit trying to emulate Elvis
Costello in his music and
struck out into a more
creative vein. If you find
Costello a bit too caustic,
then perhaps you'll like Joe
Jackson for his is a more
middle of the road New
Wave. I'm The Man is a
superior endeavor to last
year's Look Sharp and
should give Jackson more
pop appeal.
In The Nick Of Time -
Nicolette Larson. Larson is
the epidomy of a commer-
cial female vocalist of the
'70s. Though she has a
strong voice and surrounds
herself with excellent mu-
sicians, Larson cannot seem
to escape the pop music
web she has woven for
herself. It is tragic to see a
remarkable talent unable to
find a vibrant release for
her voice. In The Nick Of
Time is nice, should contain
a few FM hits and if you
get the album, you will
probably like it but not me.
A Taste For Passion �
Jean Luc Ponty. Formerly a
phenomenal jazz violinist,
Ponty has severed his ties
with jazz almost completely
and is attempting to forge a
career in rock. Ponty's new
album still maintains that
romantic, often ethereal,
quality but does not contain
the speed and dynamism of
his earlier endeavors. Iron-
ically, it seems that Ponty
has lost the passion that
this flying frenchman be-
came famous for but still is
one of the more progressive
men in rock.
Eve � Alan Parsons
Project. This is one of the
fastest rising albums in rock
music and is arguably one
of Alan Parsons' finer
albums. Sophisticated or-
chestral and synthesizer
magic have been Parsons'
claim to fame, and Eve
continues this tradition.
Parsons still weaves intri-
cate textures and manages
mood manifestations
through his complex mu-
sical and engineering tal-
ents.
Rust Never Sleeps �
Neil Young and Crazy
Horse. This album has been
out far too long not to have
merited attention until now.
Rust never sleeps, but by
the manner in which Neil
Young continues to move
and grow, it would be
impossible for him to get
rusty. This album is one of
the significant releases of
the year for few artists have
been at it so long and
maintained such a fresh
approach to their music.
Side one is acoustic music
in the vein of Comes A
Time, and side two exposes
Crazy Horse at their rocking
best. Be sure not to miss
this one.
Albums courtesy of Re-
cord Bar, Carolina East
Mall and Pitt Plaza.
Disco puts station on top
Real witch attends ECU
By JOHN WALDEN
Features Writer
Have you ever seen a
real witch? One may hi
gone past you on the ECU
campus without your ever
having noticed her. Her
name is Andrea, and she
looks just like any other
student. Yet, she is a
practicing member of Wicca.
In an interview with The
East Carolinian, Andrea,
who did not wish to have
her last name disclosed,
told us what it was like to
be a real witch and how
witchcraft has been formed
down through the ages.
When asked why she
became a witch, Andrea
replied, "Because I was
upset with Christianity and
the hypocrisy of the Christ-
ians I had contact with and
also because I am into
archeology and the religion
of Celts
Andrea says she has
been a witch since she was
12 years old. She, like other
witches, has had to work for
her right to practice witch-
craft. People wishing to
become witches must first
start out as students of
Wicra. They gradually work
(
up to the level of initiation.
From there, they go on to
become full-fledged witches.
Andrea says that the
highest level any witch can
obtain is the Flameness or
the high priestess of the
witches' chapter.
According to Andrea,
the origins of witchcraft, or
Wicca, which means the
craft of the wise, date back
several thousand years. It
started with an inter-
European tribe known as
the Celtics. This Celtic tribe
built a huge empire in
Europe that reached it's
peak around the year 500
B.C. The Celtics, however,
were eventually broken up
by internal strife and by
wars with both the Germans
and the Romans. The
remnants of this tribe fled
to Wales, England where to
this day one of the largest
witch populations in the
world exists.
Witches are not confined
to just England. Andrea
estimates that the United
States has at least 2000 true
witches in it. In New Bern,
North Carolina alone, there
is a chapter of some 500
w'tches. There is also a
mail order school of Wicca
for people around the
country interested in the art
of witchcraft. Andrea her-
self plans to be spending
the upcoming Halloween
festivities with other
witches.
One thing Andrea wants
to emphasize about her
witchcraft is that it is not
satanism. She says that
witches do not worship the
devil in any form. According
to Andrea, witches do not
take part in human sacri-
fices or wild orgies either,
as rumours would have it.
Instead, witches worship
naturalistic deities such as
gods of rivers, of fertility
and warrior gods. Witches
do, however, like to hold
their meetings in Oak
groves because the trees
represent strength to them.
Andrea also says that
witches prefer the magic of
nature to any other type of
magic.
Finally she says that the
main function of her witch-
craft is to help develop her
mental powers such as ESP
and astral projection fully.
To Andrea, this is basically
what the art of witchcraft is
all about.
By MICHAEL COLLINS
Associated Press Writer
NEW YORK (AP) - a
radio station that was sold
for $7,500 in 1951 today is
New York City's top-rated
WKTU, which jumped from
No. 20 to No. 1 after
switching to a format of
all-disco music.
The station has a
30-year history of changes
and innovation, but only the
last revamping, the change
to all-disco format, brought
success.
The station broadcasts
on 92.3 FM.
Not satisfied with being
No. 20 in New York City,
WKTU introduced its all-
disco format, without fan-
fare or announcements, in
the summer of 1978.
In just one rating period,
the FM station jumped from
20th to the No. 1 spot in
Arbitron's rating book for
last SeptemberOctober.
WKTU, leading all sta-
tions in both AM and FM,
thus became the first music
station to beat the long-
dominant WABC in more
than a decade.
The station went on the
air on Christmas Day in
1948 as WMCA-FM and,
like most other FM stations
then, it duplicated the
programs of its AM sister,
WMCA 570.
The FM station was sold
for $7,500 in 1951 after
Nathan Straus, who then
was WMCA's president,
determined that almost no
one was listening.
At the time, he said that
to gauge its audience, his
FM station had signed off
the air at night in the
middle of baseball games
for several summer weeks.
He said this had provoked
only two complaining tele-
phone calls.
Straus sold the station to
WHOMAM, an ethnic sta-
tion, which decided to
introduce innovative pro-
gramming on its new FM
station, whoch became
WHOM-FM.
Instead of duplication
the AM programs as other
FM stations did, WHOM-
FM introduced an all-
Chinese format and distri-
buted FM radios in public
gathering places in Man-
hattan's Chinatown.
But this was before the
golden era of FM radio, and
the idea did not succeed.




Coming
attractions
?RIDE ON!
.ART SALE
John
Ranere is di-
recting a sale of art
reproductions of works by
classical and modern artists
in Mendenhall's Multi-Pur-�
pose Room. The show and,
sale will begin at 9 a.m.
and run until 6 p.m. each
day now through October
19.
? Ride On an art
�r-exhibition dealing with bi-
? cycles, is on display now
� through November 1.

? PIANIST
?
� Friends of ECU Library
? will sponsor a recital by
? internationally renowned OCTUBAFEST '79
�pianist Ruth Slenczynska on
$Oct. 25, at 8:00 p.m. in The ECU School
?Wright Auditorium. Pro- Music will present Octuba-
?ceeds from the recital will fest '79 at A.J. Fletcher .
go to support the Friends Recital Hall on Friday, Oct.
Jand the library. 19 at 7:30 p.m.






oil
See RADIO STATION, page 10 ����
Learning Abour Cou.fGr.THf Wwp tViy
Bf David Nomis
fUM-Of LK� TB05C
H0fCCOlliO& V0EE�A)DS
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HOrtCOVEA Af�0, it's
TUf 50AV f HAD ft f�AL
THf 64Mf ?
T
X





Page 6 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 16 October 1979
The Little River Band
has song writing depth
By MARY CAMPBELL
IP ewsfeatures Writer
The Little River Band, from Australia, in the middle ol
ol America, has the pleasure ol seeing its
'Lonesome Loser No. 7 and climbing on the
. harts .i- October begins.
st David Bnggs wrote the song, the only
Drummer Derek Pellicci and guitarist and
im Goble are pleased about the song-writing
aid. "I don't know of another act in the
that has four individual song writers each
ible says.
i Ivantage. It you rely on one writer and he
: id period, where are you? Even now
. t songs. If we had to go in the studio
mid probabh put together a good album
made an album.
arieU of songs out of our situation. It we
si rigs would have a similar flavor.
Shorrock wrote "Help Is on Its Way
Diamantina Cocktail" album. Goble
m personal experience and observation,
ger Beeb Birtles wrote "Happ
ther hit single from "Diamantina
avs he writes a variety of kind- oi songs
ills "musician No. 1 who dabbles in
mainly fictional things Goble says, lb'
two biggest hits. He says,
� � No. 3 in the United State 'Lady1
it sold 100,000 more copies than
- mt Loser' is still climbing. It's our
tirplay
pop-music figures one thinks ol are
n Barry, Maurice and Robin Gtbb, the
the Little River Band's current
� � Wire on Capitol Records. Goble
� broken out internationally as the
It's No. 10 on the best-selling
"1 believe we've been building steadily
mproving. In 1977 we toured with
filling 5,000-seat halls, a little bit
w. Then they made 'Breakfast in
�� seaters. It can happen that
the besl cuts from those two were released in America as
"Diamantina Cocktail Then there was a "greatest hits"
album in ustralia only. Then came "Sleeper Catcher
which like "Diamantina Cocktail" is gold in America, then
the new one. That makes six in Australia and four in
Amcrit a
live album made with the Adelaide Symphony will be
released in Australia before Christmas. The last 12
performances of the current tour will be recorded and may
be added so that a live album released in the U.S. will be
double. The Little River Band is now performing songs on
stage they haven't previously recorded.
The group has not broken through in England. When
they first went there, in 1976, punk rock was all the rage.
"People were walking down Kings Road with safety
pins -tuck through their lips Pellicci says, "I went to
check it out, to hear Tom Robinson's band. It was a good,
exciting band but all the followers were spitting. 1 couldn t
�"I think a lot of the New Wave is an excuse for a lot of
musicians who never found success with anything else
Coble adds. "You don't need a whole lot of musical
expertise to play, some of the music. The proof of the whole
thing will be the longevity of it. If it doesn't last, that
prove- it wasn't so good
The second biggest trauma in the group's life has been
two lineup changes. Just before the first American tour in
N7t. lead guitarist Rick Formosa decided to leave. Goble
says "We weren't 100 percent happy with the bass player
so we took the opportunity to replace him, too. Lead
guitarist David Briggs and George McArdle came in. Then
George left after the Januarv tour this year and Barry
Sullivan came in. For this tour, we've added a seventh
person. Mai Logan, on keyboards.
I
Pianist Ruth Slenczynska receives Poland's
tinguished decoration, the Golden Cross of Merit, from His
Excellency, the Honorable Edward Drozniak, Ambassador
from the Polish People's Republic to the United States, for
'role in bringing Chopin's music closer to the people
0fth�slenczynska, who has In collet
h
� �
keyboard artist since Mozart by th New
appear in a recital sponsored byFriends o HI
Set 25 at 8:00 p.m. in Wright A ud.
ier
Keep the Red
Cross Ready
SUdtn, Center PRESENTS AN
EXHIBITION AND SALE
OF
- the right album. But Glenn says it'
gradually � you can't add pluses
i a 12-week tour of America
.use bass guitarist George
but honored his committment to
d the radio was advising people not
w and we were trying to get them out
through the roof. It's easily the most
ng we've done. I know some acts aren t
- year but we haven't been affected
imed for a river and a town 32 miles
fhe -aw the turnoff sign on the freeway
k ng for a name. Thev're all from
licci and Shorrock moved to Australia
Birtles moved from Holland, all as
families. All now live in Australia.
bum, "Little River Band came out in
ilbums were released in Australia ami
FINE ART PRINTS
FEATURING 22 X 28
REPRODUCTIONS OF
MASTER ARTISTS
VAN GOGH ESCHER
RENOIR PICASSO
REMBRANDT MONET
DALI WYETH
BRUEGHEL CHAGALL
OVER 150 ARTISTS
LOW STUDENT PRICES
1
Mon. Oct. 15 thru
DATE Fri. Oct. 19
TIME 9-6
PLACE Mendenhall
Stud. Center
Multi- Purpose Room
m
mm
STUDENT UNION
.fpy.
PART
TIME
JOB
king r - uart-time
�h flexible hours
reai business
Nortnwest
Ins. Co.
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Call before noon
lintments
752080
Visit the Art Carved Representative
This Week
� Buy Now and Save on Selected
Traditional and Contemporary
Rings.
� See our Wide Variety of New
Styles.
Men's Contemporary
Women's Fashion
symbolizing
your ability
to achieve
Save money, trade in
your high school ring
Oct. 16, 17, 18
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE LOBBY
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
I Supplier for the 1980
United States Olympic Team
Deposit required MasterCharge or Visa accepted
i





cH
oYn�.aom
1Q79
Lncj

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Ihotos h
Chap Gurley
an
Kip Sloan





Page 8 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 16 October 1979


. �:�
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C7fc Student Hlnlon ?i�mi. Committee. (ixeienU
"The best film of the year
-Molly Haskell, New York
logical as a theorem, as mysterious as a dream,
and as funny as a vaudeville gag
-Vincent Canby, New York Times
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jvx:&&��k
Luis
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Object
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Released by First Artists
Produced by Serge Silberman
Directed by Luis Bunuel
Starring Fernando Rey, Carole Bouquet, Angela Molina
Color R
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STUDENT UNION
UST CMOUN UWVmiTY





16 October 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 9
Step families have special relationships
By KAY BARTLETT
AP eivs Features Writer
BR0NXV1LLE, N.Y. (AP) - Kit was 23 and Bill was 37
when they met and fell in love. He was divorced and had
custody of his three children, aged 9, 8 and 5. That didn't
bother a starry-eyed Kit at all.
"I vas going to make Bill terrifically happy Kit now
recounts, 12 years and many heartaches later. "1 was
tiling in as the great crusader. I was going to make
veryone happy. The children would adore me and Bill
would love me. Together, we would erase all the unhappy
experiences the children had
The night of the wedding, the three little ones were
packed into a limousine when the bride and groom came
out lo say goodnight. The eldest, 9-year-old Debbie, looked
up and asked: "Now can we call you Mommy?"
"I was ecstatic says Kit. "It helped solidify the
myth Researchers estimate that some 25 million adults
are tepparents and that one out of every sixth child is a
stepchild. As divorce and remarriage rates climb, these
figures art apt to go even higher.
ch a family has its special problems, problems that
� ; is just starting to deal with. They are compounded
a- individuals and even mental health professionals try to
impose solutions that work for the "intact" or traditional
family, but may not work for a family with a different set
o relationships, a different history.
Kit and Bill Moseley made perhaps the most common
mistake stepparents make when they remarry. They set up
false expectations. At first, the idyll survived.
The children would race home from school to see who
could get to me first. And 1 remember after the first week,
sitting at the dinner table thinking that I had fed this
family, kept it alive for one week Kit says.
Then came trouble.
The daughter took to stealing household items and
selling them. The elder of the two boys became withdrawn
tnd passive, reacting neither to punishment nor reward;
the younger, a hyperactive child to start with, broke all the
toys before Christmas Day was over. Things got so serious
that for nine-and-a-half years of their 12-year marriage, at
least one member of the family was in analysis or therapy.
Like many children in a step-family, the Moseley
youngsters consciously or unconsciously wished they could
go back to the way they were, before the divorce. They
seemed to feel that if it weren't for Kit, that would
happen.
When Kit and Bill had their first child nine years ago,
there was the predictable jealousy as well as a new threat
of stability for this family.
Kit and Bill decided to divorce. But as a last resort,
they went to a marriage counselor. "For two years, it was
nip-and-tuck says Bill. Kit adds: "We finally realized we
had a completely child-centered relationship. We had no
relationship for ourselves. We had to grow up and let go of
the problems of the kids
Dr. Emily Visher, a clinical psychologist in Palo Alto,
Calif and her psychiatrist husband, Dr. John Visher,
recently published their book: "Step-Families: A Guide to
Working with Stepparents & Stepchildren They wrote
from their clinical experience as well as their personal
vantage point. They were both divorced, and the parents ot
four children each when they married 20 years ago.
Their book is filled with practical advice, case histories
and statistics.
Emily Visher is also president of the Stepfamily
Foundation of California, an organization of some 200
families. Self-help groups, survival courses, crisis hot lines
and professional workshops are among the services the
group provides. Dr. Visher is also setting up a national
organization, Stepfamily Association of America.
People think a second marriage is going to be the same
as the first. "There are obvious differences that tend to get
overlooked says Dr. Visher. "One is that the parent-
child relationship is the older, better-established one
That, she says, can be potentially dangerous. "In most
relationships, the couple relationships must be the primary
one if the step-family is to succeed
The parents must remain united despite childrens'
efforts to separate them. Says Jeanette Lofas: "A kid's
full-time occupation is working over the parents
Alan Williams, father of an 8-year-old daughter, and his
new wife, Helayne, mother of boys aged 11 and 7, fell
right into that trap as the kids predictably got into fights.
"I would rush right in and not be aware of it says
Alan, a school teacher in San Jose, Calif. "I wasn't aware
how defensive I would become. Helayne would sit back,
but we would both take sides and argue about it later. The
kids were using it, of course
They signed up for a survival course sponsored by Dr.
Visher's group and they were first relieved when they
found others were having the same problem.
Williams says his second great relief came when he was
told he didn't have to love his stepsons.
Ms. Lofas believes in giving out
assignments to those who come to her.
very practical
Stepmothers whose children won't get close might plan
to be in the kitchen alone for one hour every night before
dinner. That way, the stepchildren know where she is when
they want to start closeness.
Dr. Visher also gives practical advice.
Some samples: Move into a new house, even if it seems
impossible. The old house is already territorially claimed, it
has its histories and memories of something that no longer
is.
If you are the stepparent who sees the children on
visitations or weekends, make sure the child has some
space of his very own, even if it's only a drawer.
Don't expect or demand instant love, loyalty and
affection. Give it time.
"All of these warnings sound as though a step-family
points to nothing but gloom says Dr. Visher. "Please let
me emphasize that is not true. There are wonderful
advantages in the interaction. The children now have more
role models to choose from.
"A stepfamily is and can be a wonderful experience
Writers
Needed
Wl?�9
3005
�. 10th St.
����.� ii i. nr�-ni:iim ��!�� JaBBO T-rr L
FcsiinftiBy
)H
awn
758-8550
Got a sfory
idea,
lead
orfip?
Mitchell's Hair Styling
Plazi Shopping Cenffi
North Carolina VHH
KNOW!
Call 757-6366
pip
STUDENT SPECIAL
Any style permanent
or Body Wave
(including style & cut)
Reg. $33.50
SALE PRICE $19.95
For More Information Call: 756-2950
PITT PLAZA GREENVILLE
Month of October Specials
MondayOId fa8hi�nndcph;tburger $1.39
Tuesday Soup ftnd 8alad $1.69
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
Sirloin tips,
baked potato
and toast
Salad and potato
old fashion Cheeseburger
and soup
Clam Chowder
and Salad
6oz. Sirloin, potato
and toast
SUN.THUR.
ll:OOa.m. 10:00p.m.
SpWe'wO
$1.79
$1.39
$1.89
FRI 8P SAT.
11:00a.m. ll:00p.m
THE POCKET MIME THEATRE
Tues Oct. 16 1:00 pm
Wed Oct. 17, 8:00pm
Hendrix Theatre
Mendenhall Student Center
Matinee:
Students $1.00
Facility & Staff $2.00
Public $3.00
Evening
Facility & Staff $3
Public $4.00
RIDE ON!
October 15 - November 1
� A wordless
magical evening
remarkable. 55
(Christian Science Monitor)
STUDENT UNION
l�$7 C��0O� UlltVIKVTY
� � Astonishing in their ease and
familiarity with their medium, they
avoid both the saccharine sweetness
of conventional mime and the freneticism
of other progressive' companies, 5 j
(Harvard University Independent)
� � The Pocket Mime Theatre is wonderful I
In no time at all, they had the audience in their 'pocket
We loved them! J J (Texas Wesley an College)
� � Perfection? Yes. Audiences must feel they have entered a new
world of mime. It's rich and dazzling and I dare you not to
be hooked. 5 5 (len Krisak, The Boston Phoenix)
TICKETS NOW ON SALE!
Whether for pleasure, exercise
or transportation, the bicycle
has filled the bill. Ever since
1876 when Americans saw their
first "ordinary" bicycle (one
large front wheel, one small
rear wheel) at the Philadelphia
Centennial Exposition, its
popularity and use has grown.
The exhibition was researched
and organized by SITES staff
member Andrea Stevens under
a grant provided by the Charles
E. Merrill Trust and through
color and black and white pho-
tographs with text, chronicles
the social and technological his-
tory of the bicycle. It traces the
evolution of the bicycle from
celerifere to safety and presents
the bicycle as a serious trans-
portation alternative today.
Oct. 15 - Nov. 1
Mendenhall Student Center Art Gallery
Traffic officer to register bicycles Oct. 24
Sponsored by Art Exhibition Committee
STUDENT UNION
IAST CAROUMA UNIVERSITY
)
I





Pa
Page 10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 16 October 1979
Square rigger Young
America trains youth
By PETER MATTIACE
Associated Press Writer
ABOARD THE YOUNG
AMERICA (AP) - The
onshore breeze is cool and
the blue-gren sea is
strangely silent aboard the
wide, open deck of this
sailing vessel just a few
miles off the boardwalk of
Atlantic City, N.J.
"Stand by to raise the
mainsail barks First Mate
Lou Buck from the foredeck
as his young crew scurries
among the 66 wide-eyed
tourists sitting amidships.
"Raise the mainsail
Buck commands, and the
weathered canvas slowly
unfurls in the breeze.
The mainsail, and the
other sails, of this 130-foot
brigantine are set twice
daily on weekdays and three
times daily on weekends for
landlubbers who seek a
three-hour taste of what it
was like to sail the sea by
the wind.
The Young America, the
largest American-built
square-rigger still sailing,
as its crew proudly boasts,
is a modern replica of an
old-time sailing ship work-
ing the Atlantic for $10 a
passenger off the New
Jersey gambling resort.
And although she is
only 4 years old, not 100,
and her hull is reinforced
concrete, not wood, the
Young America plies the
sea in the tradition of the
great sailing ships of old.
"When you get out here
and you shut the engine
down, it's just peaceful and
quiet says Buck, 27, in an
easy moment near the
wheel. "It's as quiet as you
can get. You're just moving
along with the wind.
"There's no other place
you can take a ride like
this he said. "We're not
out here with a microphone
and stuff like that
The 96-ton brigantine
was built in 1975 in Port
Jefferson, N.Y by a
contractor who dreamed of
running charters around
Long Island Sound.
Last year the contractor,
foiled by bankruptcy, sold
the ship, then called The
Enchantress, for $417,000 to
the Oceanic Society's Mid-
Atlantic Region and Historic
Gardner's Basin maritime
park in Atlantic City, the
vessel's home port.
Her crew of a half-dozen
young men and women
sleeps and eats aboard the
ship. It's not unusual to
smell the appealing scent of
the crew's dinner, perhaps
clams and mariana sauce,
mixed in with the salt air on
an afternoon cruise.
Twice as long as Colum-
bus' Snta Maria and about
the size of the old New
Bedford whaling ships, the
Young America spends her
falls in Long Island, hop-
ping from port to port with
maritime exhibits. She tra-
vels to Miami in the winter,
sailing Atlantic and Carib-
bean waters as a trainer for
young scouts.
Although its charm is in
the sails and the silence,
the brigantine uses a
250-horsepower diesel en-
gine to keep her moving on
windless nights and in
ticklish ports.
"I mean, she's an old
sailing vessel to a point
says chief engineer Mike
Murphy, 26, whose machin-
ery is one of the ship's few
concessions to the 20th
century. "It would be pretty
miserable on this ship
without electricity
Renowned pianist
Claude Frank will perform a
selection of Beethoven's
Pianist to
ECU NEWS BUREAU
GREENVILLE - Noted
pianist Claude Frank will
perform works by Bee-
thoven at East Carolina
University Tuesday, Oct. 30
at 8 p.m.
Frank's performance,
part of ECU's Artists
Series, is scheduled for
Hendrix Theatre in Men-
denhall Student Center.
Since his debut with
Leonard Bernstein and the
New York Philharmonic,
there is hardly an or-
chestra, festival, university
music club or community
concert series which has not
invited Claude Frank to
perform.
He has frequently ap-
compositions on
Oct. 30, at 8:00 p.m.
Hendrix Theater.
in
perform
peared with the Berlin Phil-
harmonic, the New York
Philharmonic, the Chicago
Symphony, the Boston Sym-
phony and the Royal Phil-
harmonic of London. His
chamber appearances in-
clude performances with the
Guarneri Quartet, the Juil-
liard Quartet and others.
During his recent fifth
tour of Latin America, a Sao
Paulo music reviewer term-
ed him "one of the greatest
Beethoven players of inter-
national calibre
Tickets for the Oct. 30
concert are available from
the campus Central Ticket
Office at $5 each. Tickets
will also be sold at the door.
Further information and
ticket reservations are avail-
able by telephone at
757-6611.
Radio Station
In the mid-1950s the
station introduced a so-
called "Storecast" format,
broadcasting tunes that
served as background music
for supermarkets.
Then in 1959, the station
introduced its "Heritage"
format of classical music.
There were many other
classical music stations on
the dial then, and most of
them were -not making
money.
So, starting in 1962 and
continuing through the early
1970s, WHOM-FM began
duplicating the all-Spanish
format of its AM station. In
doing this, the station was
again being different, since
it was during this period
that most other FM stations
owned by AM stations
stopped the duplicating
practice and began offering
separate programming.
In 1971, the station
began offering a program of
background Latin music
known as "The Continental
Sound but again the
station failed to attract a
significant audience.
continued from page 5
In 1975, WHOM was
sold. The AM call letters
became WJIT and the
broadcasting remained all-
Spanish.
But the FM station
became WKTU and intro-
duced a new format of
music on the New York dial,
soft rock, or mellow music.
The mellow music for-
mat attracted a very loyal
audience among young peo-
ple, but the station seldom
rose above No. 20 in the
ratings.
UN FiftUT Inflation Ni&Mt
25 AtM OTH6R SP�CIM-S
u�� imm�S night
LAOlCS FfttE. ADMISSION
BRING NICKELS
s. - dance. Contest
"02 csn -first P�ixe-

CLIFF'S
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
WMtt.noton Highway (N.C. M Ext.) GfWtwMt. North Crln
Phow 752 3172
AIX YOU
ssa.75 CAN EAT
MONDAY-THURSDAY
TROUT, FLOUNDER,
CRABCAKES
TEA is included with meal
CMFF'S SUPER
SPECIAL
WEDNESDAY
CRAB CAKE SPECIAL
2 Golden Fried Crab Cakes
French Fries, Slaw, and
Hnshpnppies. QQ
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of th �J2J2JJ"Z"A iVo;
quired to bo roodlly avalloblo foe � ai or
S?lc?tho vottljodprtco jy-ft� J
Store oxcopt at apocWIclly notod in ww�
ad. y
PRICES OCOO THRU SAT OCT. 20, AT A&P
dilimill
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MILK
$1.77
GALLON JUG
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Scant
$2.09
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'f '





The Easl Carolinian
sports
Tuesday, October 16, 1979 Poge 11
Greenville, N.C.
ECU rolls past stunned
Bulldo
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
East Carolina exploded for three first-quarter
touchdowns and rolled to an easy 49-7 homecoming victory
over The Citadel Saturday before a Ficklen Stadium crowd
t 28,751.
Though the 49 points were the fourth highest one-game
total in Pirate history, and the most points scored by an
ECU team since 1976, Citadel coach Art Baker felt his
team came out of the contest with only a mild whipping.
'Thanks Ba ker said to ECU head coach Pat Dye
after the game, "it could've been 100-0
Baker was not far off. With 6:33 still to play in the first
period, the Pirates were already ahead 21-0.
"I had no earthly idea it would be that eas said Dye.
"I don't think they're nearly that bad. Our quick start just
took the wind out of their sails
Another factor in the Pirate victory was the play of the
jefenSe � an area that has been of major concern to Dye
.ughout the season.
Dye has repeatedly said that the defensive unit has not
been "making things happen Against The Citadel, the
ECU defenders forced six turnovers, all of which gave the
offense the ball in good field position. Cornerback Willie
Holley led the defense with an interception and fumble
"I definitely think the defense played better today than
in the past said Dve. "We simplified some things this
week and that helped. We tried to do too many things
(earner in the season) that we were not capable of. Today
we used just three basic defenses. We were a lot more
iCtive and confident because of it
There is no doubt that the Pirate offense, ranked ninth
nationally in total offense going into the game, was in
gearThey steamrolled the Bulldogs for 447 yards rushing
and another 100 through the air �
"It's hard to say that our offense is that good said
Dye "It came so easy. But a lot of times that's the way
our offense looks when we're executing well.
Quarterback Leander Green directed the Pi rates
excellently, compiling 192 yards total offense, 13dthem
on the ground, despite the fact that he saw limited duty
because of the romp Green also scored three touchdowns
on Tuns of 11, 12 and 40 yards. Afterwards, Green said the
Pirates were confident and ready going into the game
"They didn't show us anything we didn t expect, ne
said. "Whey they tried to close up one thing on us, we
opened up something else ��
Reserve fullback Martin Cobb enjoyed a stellar
afternoon, running for 104 yards on just six carries, lhe
burlv sophomore scored the game's first touchdown on a
M-yard run. He also broke loose for a 38-yarder later in
The'pirate victory left both teams with ai 3-3 record, but
there was little doubt in Baker's mind that ECU is the
TheTly difference between me and General Custer
said Baker, "is that I have to go home and look at fitas.
The impressive win has the Pirates looking forward to
their next contest, an October 27 date with
nationally-ranked North Carolina. That game should be a
real thriller now that the Pirate defense seems to be
Plarwlrr ready said offensive guard Matt
Mulholland. "We've got a good offense and our line is
great We're starting to get our mess together now. lne
oneness we need on offense is coming. I'm really looking
forward to it
(Photo by Kid Sloan)
Jeffrey Warren, Doug Smith and Tim Swords 'swarm' Traeey Shrader
How ard's right, for once
H. ward Cosell says they'll remember this one. For once
the ABC-TV sportscaster may just be right.
sell was speaking of the 1979 World Series, which is
presently in progress. After five games, the Baltimore
s lead the Pirates of Pittsburgh three games to two.
series has had everything thus far. There has been
hitting, great pitching at times, big comebacks, big
and big innings. There has also been plenty of
se. Drama describes perfectly the atmosphere that
n present from the very beginning.
Both teams have displayed the never-say-die attitude
that a world champion must have. In Game 4 the Orioles
re down 6-3 late in the contest when the Pirates brought
in their top reliever, Kent Tekulve, to steal the victory. All
the Orioles did was jump on Tekulve and score six runs in
that eighth inning and go on to win the game 9-6, taking a
3-1 series lead.
In Game 5 it was the Pirates' turn to show their
character. Down 1-0 after five innings, the Pirates went on
an awesome tear and went on to win 7-1 and send the
series back to Baltimore for a sixth game. The Pirates
plaved as well as they possibly can in the late innings of
Game 5. Clutch hitting, great defense and excellent
pitching were all in evidence.
On the other hand, the Orioles seemed a little
nonchalant about things in the fifth game. But one can be
-are the Birds will be ready for the sixth game come
Tuesday night. Manager Earl Weaver will start ace Jim
Palmer; which makes it apparent that he does not have any
-ire to go to a seventh and deciding game.
But do not be surprised to see the series come down to
that last game. For as Howard said, it has been a great
er.es. It would certainly be great to see these two.fine
clubs battle it out in a real squeaker for the world
hampionship.
One thing that has made the series such a "���
far has beetf.he superb play of several 'uP.ra
i i PKil T.arner an ex-Oakland v, na&
second baseman Phil earner, � crucial
j ii Uoil nf Famer since committing a cruuim
performed like a Hall ot tamers
error in the first inning of Game l wne
exploded for five runs. Since; then Ga n r has beena
hitting a fielding whiz and will surely get
,ries MVP award should the Pirates wm.
Willie Staraell, Bill Madlock and Dave Parker have an
, � r !i! R Starizell has two homers while
played well for the Bucs. rgeii
Madlock and Parker have been terrors at tne pia
pitchers.
�,�- sure ap�SS5
well as has catcher Rick Dempsey t
baserunners have g Jk�Stop has also excelled
Dempsey's great arm. The for MVP
at the plate and may be a darwiorse
honors.
Citadel coach "grateful
for final margin
�?
pt iij�'��mu'V)n
Cobb turns upfield
(Photo by Chap Gurley)
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
"The only difference in me and General Custer is that I
have to go back and vateh the films maligned Citadel
Coach Art Baker after the Pirates of ECU embarassed his
Bulldogs, 49-7.
It became apparent early into the Homecoming contest
that the Bulldogs were in for a long afternoon as ECU s
Marvin Cobb put the Pirates on the board with less than
two minutes elapsed. .
Ruffin McNeill fell on a Citadel fumDie on the ECU M
with 10:33 to play in the first quarter, silencing the premier
drive of the visitors. Fullback Theodore Sutton converted
on a first and goal from the four and the Dogs trailed by
two touchdowns. ,
Again quarterback Tim Russell attempted to take his
Bulldog offense to the end zone, and again (this time on
their first play from scrimmage), his backfield mates
niayed hot potato into the hands of defensive tackle Nate
Wigfall. , ,
"Pat (Dye) was really good to us, because they could
have beaten us worse than they did praised Baker.
"They are a good football team and did everything a good
football team should do to win. They completely dominated
the line of scrimmage
None of the 28,751 who attended the massacre would
The Pirates rolled up 547 yards total offense compared
to the Citadel's 214.
Quarterback Leander Green led the Bucs with 113 yards
rushing and 79 yards passing, followed by reserve Cobb
with 104 and Sutton and Anthony Collins with 66.
"When they tried to close up one thing on us, we
opened something else said the elusive Green. "We got
some points on the board early and moved the ball well.
They didn't show us anything we didn't expect
Some would say the Bulldogs didn't show anything,
'didn't see anything good about our Romance
today " groaned Baker. "We played poor defense, we
executed'poorly, we blocked poorly, and passed poorly.
The five turnovers set the tone of the game.
"Against a team like East Carolina you can t turn the
ball over at all and hope to win. We have a much better
football team than we played today.
"Our offense gave them momentum early. I don t think
we could play that badly again if we tried, Baker
"leutach Pat Dye n-ed L his
team's overall play and lauded the defense for
improvement over previous outings.
P"I had no idea it would be that easy said Dye I
thought the defense played better today (Saturday). They
made some things happen. 0ffensive
"I don't think that they have that bad an otlensve
football team Dye said. "What happened early took the
wind out of their sails. , ,
"At Baker told me after the game it could have been
DO-0 and that he was grateful I'm sorry it turned out that
vay. Art is an excellent football coach and has done a
great job with them.
"We had all the momentum. It was a non-conference
game for them and with it our Homecoming, that added to
it explained Dye. "I'm sure the Citadel will bounce
back
East Carolina has established over the years a
reputation as a team centered around walk-ons, and
Saturday Pirate fans got to see the spirited reserves m
action. .
"I'm tickled that everyone got to play at
Homecoming stated Dye. "I tried to get everyone into
the game
Lady Pirate rally
falls short, 3-2
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
"We had more shots on the goal than
they had says ECU Assistant Coach Anne
Holmes. "We just weren't able to capitalize
After falling to a 2-0 deficit early in the on T"m plagued with their
Numbed to High Point College 3-2 ���� on us this year
Sa,Thea Udy Pirates' defense allowed two said Coach Uurie Arrants "four have not
goJsb, right inner Cheryl Egner and been on break-aways. This is where the
f ppearJ to be ou, of the game early but �SSrtl get buroed on
the spirit of Homecommg came through tn WhestaTuS � and backing
the second penod. i �� j
After 13 minutes had elapsed, K� ��. ,hat the overall 8peed �f
dSSWcMS fe .earn fa. not been a factor in any of the
r�. i t� � j ,�.� losses thus tar.
High Point edge to one. "Nobodv we've faced is as fast as Sue
3E� "tier and the, B,u? have gone to - goahe "We'reoldmg: teams d-fa-jjfc but
.ZtZZXSZS ;otTliVato,faHdneaabU,rraerT "dfreSe. ' . .
U Ummg oiT �pU� Egt who had "I Uke to play aggressive, ack-onented
earlier suffered a nose injury, Parkinson defense.
client bullpen at toe �e�. -jjj- reftl da8sic h
The 1979 World Series is shaping p .
may end up being compared witn i
the Boston Red Sox an - t0 deserve t0
are very similar in that neu�
lose. h wiu be two winners in
As was the case in �� In no ,osers for either the
the 1979 fall classic. For there are no
Orioles or the Pirates.
n
delivered the crushing blow with nine
"I'm not too discouraged, though
1-4 as time ran out on their hopes of victory, they re tne most mwure
tf 4
(Photo bv John Grogan)
U





Pac
Page 12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 16 October 1979
Flag football playoffs
highlight IM calender
Bv RICKI GLIARMIS
Staff Writer
FLAG FOOTBALL
Flag Football play-offs
were held last week to
determine the divisional
champions. The division
champions are for Sorority
Division, Alpha Xi Delta;
Kappa Alpah "A Frater-
nity Division; Tvler Heart-
breakers, Dorm-Indepen-
dent Women Division; Ani-
mals, Independent Men's
"A Jones Raiders, Dorm
Men "A and Aycock
Sidewinders, Dorm Men
"B
The finals for the All-
Campus championships will
match up Animals against
Belk Bandits for the all-
campus men's title, and
Tyler Termites against Tyler
Heartbreakers for the wo-
men's title.
TENNIS RESULTS
In Men's "A" Division
of Intramural tennis, B.
Shi piev defeated M. Davis,
10-7. Men's "B" division
winner was A. Newby as he
defeated D. Evans, 10-6. E.
Kutteh was Women's Divi-
sion champion after de-
feating B. Freeman, 10-6.
CO-REC TENNIS
Tennis mixed doubles
entries are now being taken
in the Intramural Office.
Teams will consist of one
man and one woman.
Entries will be accepted
from Oct. 8 until Oct. 18 at
5 p.m. Play begins Oct. 22,
so grab a partner, a couple
of rackets, and hit the
courts. If you can't find a
partner, come by the office
and check the rosters for
the tennis singles that have
just been played.
CO-REC FLAG FOOTBALL
Having extended the
deadline for Co-Rec Foot-
ball, the number of teams
participating has increased.
Scheduling has been com-
pleted and will be available
at the team captain's
meeting to be held tonight,
Tuesday, Oct. 16, in
Brewster B-102, at 7 p.m.
CROSS CAMPUS RUN
RESULTS
The fourth Annual Cross
Campus Run was held
Saturday with two events,
the two and a half mile and
the five mile run.
John Russ captured the
two and a half mile run with
a time of 13:49. Debbie
Renz was the top female
runner, completing the
course in 24:04. William
White cruised to victory in
the five mile run with a
time of 27:34. The top
female performer in this
event was Linda Mason
with a finishing time of
34:14.
Lieutenant Governor
Jimmy Green presented
awards to the top runners
from each race.
SOCCER
Soccer play begins to-
day. This year, a record
number of teams signed up
for this sport. The matches
are being played on the IM
fields from 4 p.m. until 10
p.m.
TEAM HANDBALL
OFFICIALS' CLINIC
The Team Handball
Official's Clinic will be held
Wednesday, Oct. 24 in
Memorial 104. All inter-
ested persons should attend.
VOLLEYBALL AND
RACQUETBALL
Co-Rec Volleyball and
Racquetball Singles entries
are now being accepted in
Memorial Gym, Room 204.
SPORTS CLUBS
Sports Clubs in Skiing,
Racquetball, and Fencing
have been formed. All
interested persons are in-
vited to join these clubs and
if interested should contact
the IM-Rec Office in 204
Memorial Gym.
FEATURED VALUE
ALL YOU
CAN EAT!
FLOUNDER
DINNER
INCLUDES
FRENCH FRIES,
TARTAR SAUCE,
HUSHPUPPIES,
COLESLAW
$2.55
SHONEYS
Tyson to join
pirate cagers later
Al Tyson, the 6-11 center who last season quit the
Pirate basketball team at the end of the stormy tenure of
ex-coach Larry Gillman and subsequently decided to
remain at ECU, was absent Monday as the Dave Odom
directed Bucs began pre-season drills.
Tyson is reportedly eligible by NCAA academic
standards, but falls short of those established by Odom.
Tyson, a native of Winterville and all-Conference
performer at D.H. Conley High School, will rejoin the team
later in the semester, according to the source.
FRIMTC
1890
Seafood
East Carolina Playhouse
presents
THE STREETS OF
NEW YORK
The rollicking musical based
on the famous old-time
melodrama
directed by
Del Lewis
October 17-20
October 22-27
8:15 p.m.
Studio Theatre
Tickets are $3.50 ECU Students $2.50
For reservations and information
call 757-6390
between 10 and 4 Monday through Friday
SAVE MONEY!
Season coupons for all six shows this year are only
$12.00. To order your season tickets call the
Playhouse Box Office.
Buy now, SAVE 25!
I
Sun. thru Thurs. 430-900
Frl. & Sat. 4:3O-l0rOO
Friday's Seafood
2311S. Evans St.
Lunch 11:30-2:30
Mon. Ladle's Day-Free trip
to salad bar w it h
each full meal
Tues. Ladie's Day
Free cup of clam
chowderwith each
full meal
Wed. Soup iTSandwich
S2.2S
Thurs. Soup n' Salad
$1.75
Fri. Fish Fry
all the trout you can
eat for $1.99 with
fries and slaw
Sun. Family Day
� Lunch and Dinner
All you can eat
Shrimp $495
Oysters $4.75
Flounder $3-50
Trout$2.95
KIOOMK
200 ct Facial Tissue 251.00
WHOLE WESTERN
BEEF RIBEYES
9 - 121b avg
Cut into steaks free
$2.99lb
Family Pak
Rib Eye
$3.89lb
Steaks
J. F. G.
Salad Dressing
qt size
limit one please
TOWELS
I
Jumbo Rolls
Gallon 2 Lowftt Country Froth
Milk
$1.59
Dinner Boll
all moat FRANKS
12oz pkg
99
Jamestown
Sliced BACON
Carolina Dairies
6- pak ice Cream
Sandwiches
buy 1 gat 1 free
Light n' Lively
YOGURT
3I00
8oz. cups-all flavors
Joy Dishwashing Liquid
e
22oz 13 off label
11b pkg
16oz.
COCA-COLA
8-pak
plus deposit
99
carton
r
i
1NMNM
. W�W� ��.�.
17 'Tmmmmm mmmm





Cotton Bowl possibilities
Texas, Alabama to meet?
By
HERSCHEL N1SSENS0N
AP Sports Writer
Would you believe Ala-
bama and Texas shooting it
out for college football's
national championship on
New Year's Day in Dallas?
It could happen, and in
the same arena � the
Cotton Bowl � where
fourth-ranked Texas con-
vincingly upended No. 3
Oklahoma 16-7 Saturday
what Alabama does. And
Georgia will go even if it
loses non-league games to
Virginia and Georgia Tech
and finishes 6-5.
What the second-ranked
Crimson Tide did Saturday
was manhandle Florida 40-0
while top-rated Southern
California was held to a
21-21 tie by Stanford,
throwing the top spot in
The Associated Press rat-
ings up for grabs.
Alabama, therefore,
Those moans and groans could wind up 11-0 with a
and gnashing of teeth you 20-game winning streak and
hear are coming from the not represent the SEC in
Sugar Bowl, which boasted New Orleans. And if Texas
last season's national also is 11-0 interesting,
championship match but isn't it?
-ces another one easily However, all the intn-
slipping away. guing possibilities and all of
For example, if Georgia, Saturday's fireworks were
2-3 overall but 2-0 in overshadowed by the start-
Southeastern Conference ling development in Tempe,
play after Saturday's 21-14 Arix where Arizona State
triumph over 13th-ranked Coach Frank Kush was
removed as coach after 23
years.
Kush says he was fired
because his boss didn't
believe him when he denied
Louisiana State, wins its
remaining SEC games a-
gainst Vanderbilt and Au-
burn, the Bulldogs will go
to the Sugar Bowl no matter
shine
in Chapel Hill win
By DICK BRINSTER
Associated Press Writer
There may remain a
number of nonbelievers, but
it would be a safe bet to
assume few possess ad-
dresses which end
27514. That is the U.S.
Posval Service's zip code for
Chapel Hill, N.C.
They've heard of John
Mackovic, Jay Venuto,
James Parker and associ-
s. The events of Satur-
day have left those names
permanently inscribed in
the minds of football fans in
the bustling college town
that houses the University
: North Carolina.
Lawrence rushed tor i$4
yards because Parker and
his defensive cohorts
"squeezed him
The scouts, from the
Orange and Peach bowls,
decided to drop by after-
with ward to say hello to
Mackovic.
"Sure, we could be an
attractive bowl team he
said Sunday. "When you
put out money to see a
game you'd like to see an
interesting one
With Venuto, who is
among the nation's leaders
in total offense, passing the
ball up and down the field
each week, it's a virtual
certainty no one will expire
that he hit a player last
year. Dr. Fred Miller, the
ASU athletic director, says
Kush was suspended
"pending further review of
the matter
Kush, whose record rose
to 176-54-1 when he coach-
ed an emotional Sun Devil
team to a 12-7 upset of
sixth-ranked Washington �
the dismissal was effective
Sunday, with defensive
coordinator Bob Owens
taking over � is being sued
for $1 million by former
ASU punter Kevin Rut-
ledge, who accused the
coach of punching him in
the face after a poor kick
last season.
Kush was given a
roaring welcome by more
than 70,000 fans, many of
whom carried banners sup-
porting him. After the
game, the players carried
him off the field.
Elsewhere, fifth-ranked
Nebraska whipped Kansas
42-0, No. 7 Houston nipped
Texas A&M 17-14, No. 8
Ohio State trimmed Indiana
47-6, No. 9 Florida State
downed Mississippi State
17-6 and No. 10 Notre
Dame trounced Air Force
38-13.
In the Second Ten, No.
14 North Carolina lost to
Wake Forest 24-19, No. 15
Missouri was edged by
Oklahoma State 14-13 and
No. 19 Michigan State
bowed to Wisconsin 38-29.
However, No. 11 Michi-
gan beat Minnesota 31-21,
No. 12 Arkansas defeated
Texas Tech 20-6, No. 16
Brigham Young outlasted
Utah State 48-24, No. 17
North Carolina State nosed
out Maryland 7-0, No. 18
Auburn trumped Vanderbilt
52-35 and No. 20 Purdue
beat Illinois 28-14.
Meanwhile, Stanford's
Turk Schonert threw touch-
down passes of 19 yards to
Mike Doterer and 9 yards to
Ken Margerum and ran 10 Jimmy Jordan's passes to
yards for the final score as Jackie Flowers
the Cardinals wiped out
Southern Cal's 21-0 halftime
deficit.
Alabama's fearsome de-
fense held Florida to 66
yards in total offense �
only 6 in the second half �
while second-string quar-
terback Don Jacobs set up
one touchdown with a
24-yard run after a fake
punt alignment and scored
on a 73-yard gallop.
Texas also unleashed a
ferocious defense that held
Oklahoma to 158 yards and
ended Heisman Trophy
winner Billy Sims' string of
100-yard games at 13. Sims
rushed for 73 on 20 carries,
the longest a 16-yarder.
Meanwhile, Texas' Steve
Hall caught a 2-yard toss
from Donnie Little late in
the first half while John
Goodson booted field goals
of 37, 23 and 38 yards,
giving him 14 in four
games.
"That
is
one great
defensive unit said Okla-
homa Coach Barry Switzer.
"That was the factor in the
game. Our offense just
couldn't move
"Our defense is one of
the most experienced in the
country echoed Texas'
Fred Akers.
Alabama and Texas
might get a No. 1 argument
from Nebraska. Tim Hager
threw two touchdown pass-
es and Craig Johnson ran
for a couple to lead the
Cornhuskers past Kansas.
Meanwhile, sub quarterback
Terry Elston rallied Houston
over Texas A&M by hitting
on two passes for 55 yards
in the final minute and
scoring on a 5-yard keeper
with only 15 seconds left.
' Paul Campbell scored
twice while Art Schlichter
ran for one score and
passed for another as Ohio
State mauled Indiana.
for one TD and set up
another as Florida State
turned back Mississippi
State. Vagas Ferguson
scored twice and Rusty
Lisch passed for two
touchdowns in Notre
Dame's walloping of the Air
Force.
Butch Woolfolk scored,
on runs of 58 and 41 yards!
to lead Michigan over
Minnesota while Arkansas
used Gary Anderson's 57-
yard punt return and a
76-yard pass play from
Kevin Scanlon to Bobby
Duckworth in topping Texas
Tech.
Georgia got third-period
touchdowns on Matt Sim-
on's 11-yard run and Buck
Belue's 11-yard pass to
Carmon Prince in turning
back LSU. James Mc-
Dougald scored twice on
short runs and Jay Venuto
hit Albert Kirby on a
60-yard pass play to lead
Wake Forest past North
Carolina.
16 Ortotw 1879 T�f m rHOUNIAN PM013
Dioime Warwick
says: "Get your
blood into
circulation
Call Red Cross n
for a blood donor
appointment.
Sub quarterback John
Doerner threw touchdown
passes of 15 yards to Ron
Ingram and 10 to Mel
Campbell in the second half
as Oklahoma State rallied
from a 13-0 halftime deficit
to beat Missouri. Marc
Wilson passed for 372 yards
and two touchdowns while
Eric Lane scored five times
on short runs as BYU
flattened Utah State.
Dwight Sullivan's 14:yard
run in the third quarter
enabled N.C. State to beat
Maryland.
CATERING SERVICE
SPECIALIZING
IN PIG PICKINS
FAMILY STYLE-
ALL YOU CAN EAT
INCLUDING: Bar-B-Q
Fried Chicken Chicken Pastry
Stew, Potatoes, and Slaw
BUILDING A REPUTATION
NOT DEPENDING ON ONE
710 Greene St. Just Across
The River Bridge 752-0090
For il was on thai day from boredom at a Wake
at Coach Mackovic Forest game.
��-m�"WWWWWPWWW
brought his Wake Forest
Meatballs to town to do
battle with Dick Crum's
undefeated and 14th-ranked
Tar Heels.
Despite Wake Forest's
4-1 record, the Demon
Deacons were a two-touch-
down underdog against
North Carolina. They went
home to Wrinston-Salem
with a 24-19 victory, a 5-1
record that includes three
upsets (all on the road) and
a piece of second place in
the Atlantic Coast Con-
ference.
"Maybe said Mack-
ovic when asked Sunday if
the Deacons would be
favored in Saturday's game
with Maryland.
The Terrapins, a peren-
nial ACC power, dropped a
7-0 decision to league
leader North Carolina State.
It was their third straight
defeat.
Being an underdog each
week is making each Wake
Forest victory that much
more newsworthy. The
Deacons, led by the passing
of quarterback Venuto and
the tackling of noseguard
Parker, have been raising
eyebrows all season.
They were dubbed
"Mackovic's Meatballs" in
a Georgia newspaper the
second week of the season
when they ventured to
Athens to play Vince
Dooley's Bulldogs. Mack-
ovic was furious with the
label.
A week later the Dea-
cons slipped by talented
East Carolina and Mackovic
said something about a
player being lost for the
remainder of the "regular
season He was thinking
about a bowl bid.
That drew its fair share
of laughs. They're not
laughing anymore.
You see, there were
bowl scouts at Kenan
Stadium Saturday. They
were there primarily to
watch North Carolina, and
Famous Amos Lawrence.
it
And there seems to be
one additional guarantee.
The games will be close.
"I didn't know how it
was going to go scorewise
said Crum. "But I knew it
would be close one way or
another.
To date the Deacons
have won by seven, one,
three, five and five points.
Their only loss was a 17-14
heartbreaker in the rain to
N.C. State.
But they can get that
one back because the
Wolfpack, despite its un-
beaten 3-0 league mark, has
been devastated by injuries.
And its opponent Saturday
is North Carolina, an angry
4-1 football team.
"There are upsets to be
had Mackovic said last
week.
He should know about
such things.
Coach Bo Rein's Wolf-
pack didn't need an upset
to beat Maryland.
"We decided that it
didn't make any sense to
get fancy against what is
usually the best defense in
the conference
Class Rings
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I






Page 14 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 16 October 1979
Pirates dominate Homecoming contest
LEFT: Vern
Davenport snares
pass
(Photo by Chap Gurley'
RIGHT: Leander
Green rolls right
for part of his 113
yards
(Photo by Kip Sloane)
ore
� LEFT: Theod
1 o
Sutton takes
handoff
(Photo by Kip Sloane)
RIGHT: George
Crump, Doug
Smith sack QB
Tim Russell
(Photo by Chap Gurley)
STUDENT UNION
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
ABORTIONS UP TO 12TH
WEEK OF PREGNANCY
$175.00 "all inclusive'
pregnancy test, birth control and
problem pregnancy counseling For
further information call 832-0535 (toll-
free number 800-221-2568) between
9 A M -5 P M weekdays
Raleigh Women's Health
Organization
917 West Morgan St.
Raleigh, N.C. 27603
SAAD'S SHOE
REPAIR
113 Grande Ave.
758-1228
Quality Shoe Repair
ARMY-NAVY STORE!
Backpacks, B-15, Bomber"
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 16, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 16, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.14
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/57223
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