The East Carolinian, October 9, 1979






"Were it left to me to decide
whether we should have a
government without news-
papers or newspapers without
government, I should not
hesitate a moment to prefer
the latter
��Thomas Jefferson
Ihe Last Carolinian
If you have a story idea, a
tip, or a lead, plaaaa
telephone us:
757-6366
757-6367
757-6309
f3
Vd. 54 No. ?
12 pages today
Tuesday, October 9,1979
Greenville, N.C.
Circulation 10,000
Phone strike
to continue
TARBORO, N.C. (AP)
Union insistence on an
matic cost-of-living
e adjustment and com-
refusal to consider one
the issue that precipi-
I a strike last Monday
50 to 75 percent of
ilina Telephone and
graph Co. workers.
aders of the Commu-
as Workers of Amer-
local union have indi-
te v will not return to
bargaining table unless
cost-of-living clause is
uded in the contract.
believe if we can
'� at one hurdle, a cost
provision, there
other issues that
ironed out easily
bert Gordon, union
lg chief.
the company is
no
But
adamant in its refusal to
consider the cost-of-living
adjustment.
"We believe the cost-
of-living adjustment is un-
wise fundamentally said
CT&T Vice President T. P.
Williamson. "It is not in the
interest of the company or
its subscribers to be tied to
a national figure
So, there is no apparent
end in sight for the strike,
which has been marked by
heckling, vandalism and
minor assaults which have
resulted in arrests being
made on both sides.
Sources say the company
has offered the workers a
package that would mean
$15 million in wage and
benefit raises during the
three-year-life of the pro-
posed contract. The package
indudes:
Anti-nukes jailed
BR00K, N.H. (AP)
pite two days of
n the fences at the
k nuclear power
protestors who bat-
police dogs, high-
re water hoses and
still found them-
on the outside
strongest show of
in five years of
ibrook demonstra-
te troopers and
n Guardsmen re-
the attempts Satur-
unuay by as many
,500 demonstrators with
tear gas, water hoses, riot
.tnd police dogs.
ver, only 20 per-
;re arrested, com-
to 1,414 during a
I in 1977.
t-ral hundred demon-
- returned to camp-
he woods near the
hed plant late Sun-
to decide whether to
more action today.
The protestors suc-
ceeded in dismantling small
tions of the fence
ounding the plant's 140-
acre construction site, but
none entered the construc-
tion zone.
Medics for the Coalition
for Direct Action at Sea-
brook, sponsor of the
action, were busy treating
dozens of demonstrators
who had been sprayed in
the eyes with Mace.
On Sunday, hundreds of
activists massed at the
plant's main gate, blocking
busy U.S. 1, the major road
through the small ocean-
front community of Sea-
brook. Officials tried unsuc-
cessfully to drive them away
with two water hoses, but
the demonstrators left vol-
untarily later in the after-
noon to plan for further
action.
Protesters said it was a
disappointing weekend for
them because they had
failed to attract the thou-
sands they had expected to
charge the fences.
But the action was a
success for authorities,
whose preparation and tac-
tics kept the charging
demonstrators from their
goal.
Demonstrators tried re-
peatedly to cut holes in
fences or pull them down
with ropes and chains, but
each time they were met
with riot-equipped police. It
was a marked escalation
from the level of violence at
other anti-Seabrook demon-
strations, which have been
generally peaceful.
�A 10 percent wage
hike the first year and 9
percent boosts the following
two years.
�An additional holiday
� George Washington's
birthday � that would
bring the number of paid
holidays to 11.
�A dental plan, begin-
ning the second year of the
contract, in which the
company would pay 60
percent of the cost.
�An improved hospital
and sickness plan under
which the company's parti-
cipation would increase
from 70 to 80 percent the
first year, to 85 percent the
second year and to 90
percent the third year.
�A $2,000 increase in
the amount of company-paid
life insurance.
�An increase in the
mileage allowance from 14
cents -to 18 cents the first
year and 20 cents the third
year.
� Shortened eligibility
time for a third week of
vacation.
Gordon said the pro-
posed package was accept-
able providing the cost-of-
living adjustment, based on
a formula proposed by the
union, was included to
begin the second year of the
contract.
Strike
of sit
rsview

CT&T strikers will hold, out until their demand for a cost-of-living increase is met.
(Photo by Kip Sloan)
By KAREN WENDT
News Editor
"We're prepared to stay out there were the words of
Elaine Curry, a service assistant with Carolina Telephone
and Telegraph, and the group vice president of traffic
(operators) in the Union.
According to Ms. Curry, CT&T is the only telephone
utility that does not have a cost of living allowance in their
contracts.
The Union had asked for a cost-of-living clause in the
past but had not received it. This time they voted to go on
strike rather than give in to the company.
The last strike lasted a month, but Curry said "I would
hope the company would give us the cost-of-living clause.
Due to a city ordinance, the strikers cannot picket the
company, located on Fifth Street, except between the hours
of 6:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
As far as Curry knows there were only three operators
who passed the picket lines.
"They say it's not practical said Curry, referring to
the management's opinion of the clause.
Offers have been made, but the strikers plan to hold
out for the cost-of-living increase even though the
management claims, according to Curry, that the clause
would be a hardship on the company, as well as the
customers.
ECU College Bowl planned
By RICHARD GREEN
Managing Editor
Applications for 1979
College Bowl competition
must be turned in by 5:00
p.m October 12, at room
204 in Mendenhall Student
Center. The only require-
men' is that the person be a
full-time student at ECU.
The ECU team ranked
third of fourteen teams last
year, with Davidson first
and UNC at Chapel Hill
second. N.C. State finished
last.
use
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP)
� A college sophomore
charged with killing two
students and wounding five
at a weekend fraternity
party was upset over being
denied a refund of $2 he
had paid to attend another
party off-campus two weeks
earlier, his roommate said
Monday.
But Donald C. Rivers,
roommate of the alleged
gunman, Mark A. Houston,
19, at the University of
South Carolina said that
Houston had not tried to
join the Kappa Alpha Psi
fraternity, and had not
mentioned disliking any of
its members. Rivers is a
member of the non-resi-
dential fraternity.
Houston allegedly ap-
peared at the party, drew
a pistol and began firing
into the crowd.
Prosecutor Richard Har-
pootlian said the party two
weeks ago was shut down
by police because too many
people were present. He
said Houston apparently
believed the fraternity spon-
sored it when in fact it was
held by a single member.
Correction
Due to a production
error, an article was in-
correct in the Oct. 4 issue of
The East Carolinian. The
article, headlined "Newslet-
ter subject at meeting"
concerned the Media Board
meeting held Oct. 3. The
column which appeared
incorrectly is rerun here in
its proper order. We regret
the error.
Johnny Paycheck headlined the bW unih Mike Cross and
Delbert McClinton at an outdoor concert m Greenville
Sunday, (see page 9) (P��to by Richard Green)
The question had been
raised as to whether the
Media Board as "publisher
of all student sponsored
publications" at ECU was
responsible for the News-
letter.
According to the Boards
constitution, "All student
publications funded from
the student activity fee (not
to include Student Union
publications), the Photo
Lab, and Radio station
WECU shall be admin-
istered by the board
Board members ques-
tioned the content of the
newsletter, as well as the
budgeting and inquired as
to how it would be pub-
lished.
When asked how much
of the SGA budget would be
used to fund the newsletter
Brett Melvin replied, "Let's
say 10 percent
Vice Chancellor of Stu-
dent life, Elmet E. Meyer
said "I think you're raising
sert of a red flag
"fe will not lower
ourselves inio the gutter
Melvin later commented.
Rivers described Hou-
ston as a "tough personality
uncompromising" but a
"real nice guy Rivers said
he had no idea what might
have led to the shooting.
He said Houston bought
a .32-caliber pistol about a
month ago and kept it
under his mattress. Houston
did not tell him why he.
acquired the weapon, Rivers
said.
Police said the pistol
was stolen from a Columbia
house last year but they did
not know how Houston
obtained it.
Houston, a Columbia
resident, appeared in court
briefly Monday and told
Circuit Judge Walter A.
Cox he could not afford to
hire a lawyer. Houston was
ordered to remain in jail
without bond after Cox
named a public defender to
represent him.
Houston is accused of
slaying Terrell G. Johnson,
21, a St. Matthews senior,
at the party early Saturday
in a dormitory and fresh-
man Patrick McGinty, 19, of
Wilmington, Del on a
nearby walkway.
He is also charged with
assault and battery with
intent to kill in the
wounding of five other
students. One, Allen Uni-
versity student John L.
Aiken, 20, of Sumter,
remained in serious con-
dition in a Columbia
hospital Monday. He was
hit while on the walkway.
Hospitalized in stable
condition were Randy Mc
Cray, 18, of Columbia and
David L. Simmons, 17, of
Charleston.
Michael Lawyer, 18, of
Moncks Corner was re-
leased from a hospital
Monday. Released earlier
was William Terry Lang-
ston, 22, of Easley.
Police investigator Ray
Chandler said no one
noticed the gunman at the
party until he began firing.
"When people realized
there were bullets flying
around the room, there was
general hysteria. Some
people hit the floor and
others ran out the door
said Ronald Dray ton, one of
the party goers. "Then he
ran up the ramp shooting
people
The team members were
Rob Sample (Medical),
Stacy Worthington (Political
science), Bill Canuette
(AFROTC), Ray Davis
(English), and Doug Queen
(English).
Competition this year
will be limited to the first
sixteen teams that apply,
according to Wanda Yuhas,
assistant program director.
Teams may be departmental
or individually organized,
and plans are being made
for a match with adminis-
trators.
"The department staffs
are not enthusiastic about
it. The students are the
ones who do it Yuhas
said.
Questions in the
matches come from the
Readeis' Digest Almanac,
and topics include all
academic subjects, current
events, sports, popular mu-
sic and others.
Intramural competition
is planned for October
20-21, with finals on Oct.
22.
First place prize for
intramural competition is
$25 for each member and
$10 each for the second
place team. The English
Department won last year.
The competition was
once known as the General
Electric College Bowl and
matches were teltvised.
CBS will be picking up the
competition sometime in
January with much of the
funding coming from Read-
ers ' Digest.
Prises for national com-
petition include a $3,500
scholarship and a scholar-
ship fund for the college or
university.
Inside Today
SGA and Media
Board meetings,
see page 5
A star freshman
football player
seepage 6
Concert coverage
and photos
see page 9
Bo Thorpe for
Homecoming
seepage 10
There are still
questions,
seepage 4
'America9 tonight
By RICHARD GREEN
Managing Editor
Only about 600 tickets to the America
concert have been sold as of Monday at
noon, according to Charles Sune, president
of the Student Union. The student
organization needs to sell 3,500 tickets to
break even.
"There is a real possibility that if this
concert fails, there will be no more concerts
this year Sune said.
The turnout for yesterday's outdoor
concert at the Carolina Opry House was
somewhat less than many people expected.
"Concerts are not
Haines said, but he
Tom Haines, manager of the Attic, said
he lost about $20,000 on a recent concert that
was rained out, but he sold almost $16,000
worth of advanced tickets to people standing
in the rain.
easy to put on
is trying to reschedule
Atlanta Rhythm Section, Super Grit, Mothers
Finest and Jesse Bolt for a future date at the
Hugo Outdoor Theatre, 20 miles south of
Greenville.
Haines said that if he cannot put the
concert together, all tickets will be refunded.
Tickets for America will be on sale at the
Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall until 4
p.m. Tuesday. Tickets cost $4 in advance for
students and $6 at the door.
By SUSAN WES
Staff Writer
The Red Cross, in
cooperation with the AF-
ROTC. is sponsoring a
blood drive October 9 and
10 between 10 a.m. and 4
p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
This year's goal is 750
pints of blood, but Diane
Snodgrass of the AFROTC"
feels that "we could easily
get 1000 pints with good
publicity Last year, the
Red Cross had a goal of 700
pints and collected 776.
According to Ms. Snod-
grass, the process takes
today
under 10 minutes and is not
painful. The Red Cross
visits ECU twice a year.
"They can always de-
pend on ECU for a record
turn out said Ms. Snod-
grass.
Those who give blood
aren't the only ones helping
out. Local businesses have
been contributing coupons
to be distributed to the
donors. Krispy Kreme is
donating donuts, and the
sororities are engaged in
sandwich-making competi-
tion, the outcome of which
will fortify those who give
blood.
America comas to ECU's Minges Coliseum Tuesday for the B





�age 2 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 9 October 1979
Birth control service offered
classified
By LEIGH COAKLEY
Assistant to the Editor
Information on birth
�ontrol methods and veneral
lisease may be obtained
from the Student Health
Service at ECU.
The Student Health Ser-
&t ECU provides a
o taped film on contra-
eption and venereal di-
ise on the second floor of
Infirmary on Monday
md Wednesday afternoons
rom 3:00 to 4:00 and on the
Tuesday of each month
00 to 8:00 p.m.
I. niversity physicians are
,i liable for question and
sessions following
im. This session gives
nts an opportunity to
ome acquainted with
iversity physicians and
' iures in the Infirmary.
lance of this session
aired before a student
be administered the
h control pill.
In an interview with Dr.
. Infirmary staff
in, she expressed
to encourage spouses
yfriends of interested
its to attend these
"At ihis point,
anticipation has been
itely successful. They
ite greatly to the
ssions. The sessions
handled in a non-
mental and unembar-
g manner said Woo-
i student has had
opportunity of viewing
tape and discussing
various methods of contra-
ception with the physician,
the student may, by ap-
pointment only, go through
a strict screening process
prior to administration of
the birth control pill or
alternative method of con-
traception. These screenings
are handled on designated
davs and they include an
internal examination, pap
smear, and a conference
concerning the student's
medical history. There is a
$5 fee for this examination.
Personal conferences
may be set up on a one-to-
one basis. All a student
needs to do is to mark the
information sheet "Per-
sonal" when signing in at
the front desk of the
Infirmary.
These screenings are not
only for those students
wanting to start a method of
contraception, but also for
those wanting routine
checkups and for problem
patients.
The Student Health Ser-
vice handles 98 of all
gynocological problems,
while only 2 are referred
to outside patients. Patients
wanting a IUD and abor-
tions fall into the 2
category.
"The use of the pill is
on the decline but is
relatively safe if the patient
is well screened for possible
complicating factors and
provided that the patient
has had a thorough breast
and pelvic examination, pap
smear, blood pressure read-
Professor charged
RALEIGH. N.C. (AP) -
charged a North
ia State Univer
professor with
Sunday night after his
a as gutted by fire.
Magdi Mohammed El-
ash, 38, a native of
Said, Egypt, was also
with two counts of
isault with a deadly
on, police said.
The fire took place after
nily dispute in which
mm ash fired a pistol
wife, Gloria, and one
ir two children.
ling to police.
injuries were re-
Si 10,000. and El-Kammash
was being held in the Wake
County Jail.
The value of the house
was put at $80,000 to
$100,000 by Mrs. El-
Kammash. She declined to
discuss the fire.
;id was set
at
L
CAROLINA K-9
Is now offering Special
Boarding Rates
for all ECU students
50 OFF
10th St. Extension
752-1170
(across from PuttPutt)
J
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EFFECTIVE HAIR REMOVAL
80 of women Lave this problem
Needle or painless Tweezer Method
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ing, and urine analysis
stated Wooten.
Dr. Wooten continued
by saying that "medically,
the diaphram is the most
acceptable method of con-
traception with a failure
rate of 3 to 5. This failure
rate often influences a
patient's decision to use the
birth control pill, which for
all practical purposes, has a
zero failure rate. They
feel they cannot afford any
� i "
risk.
"Wooten said, "Appar-
ently, we are beginning to
see a decline in the ever
present problem of un-
planned pregnancies and
these are on par with other
universities. This decline is
attributed to the observation
that students are more
knowledgeable and are ta-
king advantage of the
facilities and information
offered to them. Students
seem more mature and
responsible now than in the
past.
The Student Health Ser-
vice has noted that adver-
tising of over-the-counter
contraceptives are very
misleading and should not
be relied on without medical
advice.
Questions concerning the
confidentiality of such mat-
ters as pregnancy and
veneral diseases often arise.
All information of this
nature is held strictly con-
fidential between physician
and student.
No professor or any
other authority has access
to any information in a
student's medical record. In
the event that a professor
calls for verification of a
student's absence, the In-
firmary may inform the
professor that the student is
ill.
Other sources of infor-
mation concerning contra-
ception, pregnancies, and
venereal disease can be
obtained from courses of-
fered on campus such as
Health 1000 or Sociology
1025, "Courtship and Mar-
riage Several residence
halls have seminars fea-
turing local physicians to
come in and speak on these
topics.
Members of the Student
Health Service are inter-
ested in organizing a
Student Health Advisory
Committee. The board
would consist of student
representatives, faculty ad-
visors and professionals.
The purpose of this board
would be to encourage
feedback from the students
of ECU and to inject new
ideas into the Service.
persona (X)
BEACH LOVERS! Part-time
student sales representative
position available for Spring
Semester. Job involves pro-
moting high quality sun
trips on campus for com-
mission and free travel.
Individual must be self-
starter and highly moti-
vated. Call or write for an
application. Summit Travel,
Inc Parkade Plaza, Suite
11, Columbia, Missouri
65201. (800) 325-0439.
PARTY HEARTY at the
ECU-Carolina Game And
let US do the driving! A
chartered bus will take you
from Greenville to the gates
of Keanan Stadium and
back again all for $6.00.
Limited number of seats, so
make vour reservations
NOW! Call 752-2476 or 752-
8925.
SAILINGRACING CREW
wanted. Local Pamlico ra-
ces. No pav. Tonv: 752-
7278.
REWARD: Offered for re-
turn of light blue cover
removed Saturday night
from white Corvette beside
Tyler dorm. It will not fit
your car so please return it.
NO questions asked. Tripp
Murray 311-A Belk. 752-
8816. '
WANTED: Persons playing
homemade instruments es-
pecially washboard and
spoons players to play in
ECU Folk Festival Nov. 3rd.
Contact Lin: 758-9368 or Dr.
Paul Dowell: 756-1036.
LOST: at Cultural Center. A
beige tote bag and pocket-
book. If found, contact
Melinda Richardson, 758-
8471.
NEED A PAPER TYPED?
Theses, reports, term pa-
pers, etc. Call Leigh
Coakley at 752-8027. Rea-
sonable rates.
TYPING done: Term pa-
pers, Resumes, Thesis, etc.
Reasonable. Call: Jane Pol-
lock at 752-9719.
LOST: A set of 4 keys. One
has 207 engraved on it.
Phone 752-3984 if found. A
$10.00 reward is offered.
EMPLOYEES NEEDED:
Part time work. Apply in
person at Buccaneer movies.
Itorsde @
FOR SALE: European Brand
-tereo (turn table, AM-FM.
8-Track). Excellent condi-
tion. (Unique design.) Call
Bill at 758-3530 after 6:30
p.m.
FOR SALE. Fine leather
sport Coat. Purchased from
Coffman's less than a year
ago. Worn twice. Size 40.
$100 firm. Call anytime at
757-6815.
FOR SALE: Nikon FM
Body, chrome, excellent
condition. Without lens.
$180.00. Call Kip at 758-
2737 anytime.
THREE FEMALE ROOM
MATES needed to share
apt. at Riverhluff. Rent
$52.50 per month, y
utilities and phone Call
758-5823.
FEMALE ROOM MA
needed to share house m
two other girls. Call
5198 after 3: p
5198 after 3:30 p.m.
FURNISHED ROOM I
i � in htm-� N
Charles Si Rent.
Phone: 758-7010.
CLASSIFIED l
Carolinia
ed. F r
'0 p.m. and
Thur. i �
1:30 p.m.
. .� yhi 1 979
- kj��i Sa� On
' i, Riqht�, Reserved
� oid lo Dealers or Wholesalers
FOOD.DRUG.GENERAL
MERCHANDISE STORES
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be
readily available for sale in each Kroger Sav-on Store
except as specifically noted In this ad If we do run
out of an advertised Item, we will offer you your
choice of a comparable item, when available, reflect
ing the same savings or a raincheck which will en-
title you to purchase the advertised item at the
advertised price within 30 days.
PRICES EFFECTIVE TUES
OCT. 9 THRU SUN OCT. 14, 1979
Records and
Tapes
Everyday I
3zines and
Paperback
Books
COUNTRY CLUB
Ice
Cream
V2-Gal. Ctn.
REG. OR DIP
COUNTRY OVEN
Potato
Chips
8-Oz. Twin Pak
From snacks to paperbacks to back packs
Kroger Sav-on has what East Carolina Univer
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-Beer & Wine-
FIRE BREWED
iron's 262 $-99
Lite cins. I
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ROSE, CHABLIS BLANC OR
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$988
2
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Leibfraumilch
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from more than 14 Kinds of party trays for
every need and budget An uncommonly
wide array of lunch meats and imported or
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9 AM TO 9 PM Phone 756-7031





Pecple places. �� !�
wke
A member of the Wake
Forest Law School admis-
sions staff will be on the
ECU campus October 15
and 16 to speak with
prospective applicants. Ten-
tative plans call for an
evening group meeting on
the 15th for all interested
students and individual
meetings with juniors and
seniors on the morning of
the 16th. Contact Lynn
Calder at 758-8914 or
757-6611 (ext. 218) or
Professor Warren in the
English Department.
ccmlcs
The ECU Comic Book
Club will meet Tuesday,
October 9 at 7-9 p.m. The
Meeting will be held at the
Nostalgia Newstand 919
Dickinson Ave. All inter-
ested persons are invited to
attend. Topics of discus-
sion will include the up-
coming December 2 comic
convention. For more infor-
mation call 758-6909.
tcrcr
The Phi Sigma Iota
Foreign Language Honor
Society will meet Thursday,
October 11, 1979, 8:00
p.m in the Coffeehouse at
Mendenhall Student Center.
Dr. and Mrs. Hill will
show slides of their trip to
China and Hong Kong. The
public is cordially invited to
attend.
Following the slide pre-
sentation we will welcome
new members and elect
officers and a faculty
advisor.
There will be a meeting
of the Student National
Environmental Health Asso-
ciation (SNEHA), Wednes-
day, October 10 at 7:00
p.m. in the School of Allied
Health and Social Pro-
fessions, Room 101-A. All
members should be present
and any other interested
persons are welcome.
tebel
Start preparing art for
The Rebel. It has been
confirmed that there will be
prize money awarded again
this year thanks to The
Attic and Jeffrey's Beer and
Wine for Budweiser. Cate-
gories include painting,
drawing, printmaking,
photography, and mixed
media. If there are ques-
tions, contact Sue Ayde-
lette, art director.
cctie
There will be a work-
shop of all COHE majors on
Thurs Oct. 11, at 7:00
p.m. in Brewster 303B. The
workshop will be a signifi-
cant aid in guiding the
major through the program.
The workshop is mandatory
for all first year and
incoming majors. Refresh-
ments will be served.
tjKe He c i I rte
The ECU Air Force
ROTC corps will be spon-
soring its annual Blood
Drive Oct. 9 and 10 at
Wright Auditorium between
10 a.m. and 4 p.m. This
year's goal has been set at
750 pints. Be a Donor. Give
Blood, Save a Life.
bdird
The Rebel is now
accepting high-quality liter-
ature submissions. Poetry,
essays, plays and inter-
views, and short stories will
be accepted. All work must
have name, address, and
phone number of writer.
Address manuscripts to the
Rebel, Mendenhall Student
Center, Greenville, N.C.
27834.
fencing
Dr. George Weigand,
advisor and instructor for
the ECU Fencing Club,
invites all interested stu-
dents to participate in the
club's weekly instructional
sessions. The club meets
each Wednesday from 4-6
p.m. in Memorial Gym 108.
The MRC presents the
Jubal Band from Indianap-
olis, Indiana, Thurs Oct.
15 on the hill from 7:00-
10:00 p.m. Admission is
free. MRC will also sponsor
a pig-pickin' in the base-
ment of Aycock Dorm on
the same day from 5:30-7:30
p.m. Tickets are available
through Men's and
Women's Residence Coun-
cils.
Ihcincf
Phi Eta Sigma Honor
Fraternity will hold a
meeting on Thurs Oct. 11
at 5:00 in room C-102
Brewster. All new and old
members are invited to
attend.
meetlrif
sfel
lit I H
The Friends of East
Carolina University Library
are having a book sale in
the lobby of Joyner Library
on Wed Oct. 10 and
Thurs Oct. 11.
There will be an organi-
zational meeting for the
Snow Skiing Club on Wed
Oct. 10 at 7:30 p.m. in
Memorial Gym 104. All
interested skiers should
attend so that planning can
begin for the winter season.
ruby
Mlkl
cccfccut
Women interested in
forming a women's rugby
team, there will be a
meeting Monday, Oct. 15 at
7:00 p.m. in Memorial Gym
104. No experience is
necessary. This is a great
way to have fun, get some
exercise and get rid of your
frustrations. For more in-
formation call 758-8482.
Hillel is having its fall
cookout at 2 p.m. this
Sunday at Elm Street Park,
shelter 2. There will be
plenty of food and fun for
everyone, so come on out
and have a good time. For
more information, contact
Mike Freelander 752-9473
or Mark Cohen 758-7198.
The Eta Chi Chapter of
Kappa Delta Pi will hold its
first meeting Wed Oct. 10
at 6:30 p.m. in the Three
Steers Restaurant.
Our guest speaker will
be Mrs. Nancy Middleton of
the Pitt County Mental
Health Center. Her topic
will be "Coping with
Stress
Kadelpians should con-
tact Mrs. Ellen Cheng,
Speight 134, for reser-
vations.
arcicbicil�m
The organizational
meeting of the ECU-Green-
ville branch of the Society
for Creative Anachronism
will be held Wed Oct. 10,
1979, at 7:00 p.m. in Room
248 Mendenhall. A nation-
wide medieval interest
group, the SCA is for those
who enjoy recreating the
authentic arts, sciences, and
pastimes (dancing, music,
calligraphy, ceremony and
courtesy, combat and ar-
moring, costuming, needle-
work and feasting, e.g.) of
the Middle Ages.
r tttt -ill
Anyone interested in
trying out for men's basket-
ball must register in the
basketball office by Wed
Oct. 10, 1979. Physical,
preliminaries, etc must be
completed prior to practice
which begins Oct. 15th.
cultural
center
Ledonia Wright Cultural
Center Advisory Board will
meet on Wednesday, Oct.
10, 1979 at 4:00 p.m. at the
Ledonia Wright Cultural
Center.
spcrts
The October meeting of
the Intramural-Recreational
Sports Council will be held
Thurs Oct. 11 in Brewster
C-103. All intramural repre-
sentatives and interested
students should attend.
idquetbcill
An organizational meet-
ing for the Racquetball Club
will be held Wed Oct. 17
at 6:30 p.m. in Memorial
Gym 104. All interested
players should attend.
service
Fowl
play
CUERO, Texas (AP) �
A strutting Minnesota tur-
key named Paycheck trotted
to any easy second-heat
victory in the Great Gobbler
Gallop here. But Ruby
Begonia � the poultry
pacing pride of Cuero �
captured the Traveling Tur-
key Trophy of Tumultuous
Triumph.
The fleet-footed Worth-
ington, Minn bird scram-
bled through the course in
1:39 Sunday, defeating
Ruby Begonia by 40 sec-
onds. However, Ruby Be-
gonia won by a minute and
a half during the running of
the first heat at the King
Turkey Day Celebration last
month in Worthington.
The Minnesota margin
of victory was enough to
send the traveling trophy
back to Cuero for the first
time since 1975.
�fl
9 October 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 3
6o 4loal S4mc One m. I
PHONE 738-2183
1
We Now Have TWO
Locations to To Servo You I
I HOMECOMING CORSAGES
117 W. 4th St. 402 Evans St.
Greenville, N.C. 27834 Greenville, N.C.
Open 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Downtown on the Mall
Open 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
N.C. No. 3 1 Nightclub
HOMECOMING
AllTlC CONCERT
Thursday
Capricorn Recording
Artists
fcS With
Dixie Road Ducks
An Episcopal service of
Holy Communion will be
celebrated Wednesday eve-
ning (Oct. 10) in the chapel
of the Methodist Student
Center (5th Street across
from Garrett Dorm). The
service will be at 5:30 p.m.
with the Episcopal Chap-
lain, the Rev. Bill Hadden,
celebrating. Supper will be
served at 6:00 p.m. fol-
lowing the service. A Bible
Study at 7:00 p.m led by
the chaplain, will be held at
the home of Eleanor
Coleman, 1003 E. 5th St.
(across from main gate.)
it's Miller time
vE5
Leathar Bella
$6 to $19
Leather Handbags
$10 to 125
Shoes Repaired To Look
Like New
Riggon Shoe Repair
ft Leather Shop
111 WEST 4TH ST.
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
754294
Parking in Front
and ftear.
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7�NC
Students Supply Store
East Carolina University
Wright Building
Greenville, N.C. 27834
Sale Begin October 8,1979, End October 12,1979
i
4
iMS'UlMli �����" ll �(

'
�-� Wrii rr m'im tt nr if
t5te!tpA,





The East Carolinian
nianl � � 1
n.ditorials
S?Op
mions
Tuesday, October 9, 1979, Page 4
Greenville, NX.
uestions remain
Someone should be asking some
probing questions about the SGA
newsletter and its economic and ethical
merits. The Media Board has washed its
hands of the whole mess, and now it is up
to the legislature and the student body to
examine the matter.
Why is there any question of how the
newsletter was paid for? The SGA financial
advisor knew nothing about the publica-
tion, and the SGA vice president said the
newsletter is not funded by the student
government. SGA President Brett Melvin
said the summer legislature approved the
printing of the letter, yet no purchase order
was issued to pay for it. Someone is not
doing their job.
The SGA newsletter is supposedly paid
for by the students, but many students say
that they have not even seen the letter. For
the amount of student fees said to be spent
for this publication, it would seem that the
SGA could at least distribute the letter
effectively.
How much of the SGA budget will be
spent on the letter this year? According to
Brett Melvin, "Let's just say 10 percent
Over $10,000 will be spent on a newsletter
which disseminates information that could
just as easily be printed by the campus
newspaper.
If the motives of the newspaper are
questioned, it is due to the pkst record of
the publication and not the present status.
Hesitancy to speak with the media breeds
suspicion in the student body. THE EAST
CAROLINIAN wants to present both sides
of every issue when possible, but "no
comment" hardly tells the opposing view.
At a time when money is in short
supply in most areas of campus services, it
is wasteful to spend where no spending is
warranted. This year many worthwhile
organizations could suffer because a
possible $10,000 in appropriations will be
unavailable. A good example of a possible
loser is the Real Crisis Intervention Center.
Organized in the '60s as a service to
ECU and the community, REAL has not
recently received funding from the SGA as
it did in the past. About 70 percent of the
people counseled at the all-volunteer center
are students. This year REAL will ask for
renewed SGA funding, and they deserve it
for the services provided. This is only one
of the many worthy organizations that
could lose.
Think of the advantages of printing and
distributing only "happy news" about
SGA. The only advantage goes to members
of the government, whom the students will
come to believe can do no wrong. Don't
you want to know when your representative
body is going against your wishes? Then
don't expect that information from the SGA
newsletter.
Among journalists the newsletter is an
atrocity, but to students it is an outright
waste of precious funds. Leaders of campus
organizations should determine their needs
and demand that the money be spent on
worthwhile student services. The new
legislature needs to re-examine the
supposed appropriation of last summer and
stop the wasteful and unethical publication
of the SGA newsletter.
Junk mail is a pleasure
By LARRY POPELKA
One of the many simple
pleasures of life is reading
junk mail.
Few things are as
entertaining as reading
about the free expense-paid
vacation to Hawaii you
won't win or the latest
propaganda from the na-
tional gun nut association.
But a few weeks ago I
received my most . eye-
opening piece of junk mail
yet.
It came in an unmarked
envelope and was typed on
a sheet of light blue
stationery with various
hearts and flowers drawn on
the sides.
"I'm writing you the
letter began, "because I
want you � or rather � we
want you to become a
member of an exclusive
private society; an organi-
zation that was started by a
group of fun-loving young
ladies who are dedicated to
the proposition that men
and women were put on this
earth for one reason � to
enjoy each other
"I used to cruise around
the discos and the singles'
bars, wasting most of my
time trying to weed out the
decent men from the losers,
and far too often getting
involved with, well let's
i'ust say 'the wrong people
"he sad fact is, that the
most exciting nights I spent
were when I stayed home
and fantasized about meet-
ing someone exciting
someone like you
Gagging on my coffee, I
continued to read about how
I was specifically chosen by
some unidentified female to
be a member of this
swinging club called "The
Glo-Worm Society
"I'm sure you'd like to
know why we're called the
'Glo-Worm Society the
letter said. "Well, you'll
find out as soon as you get
in � and you're going to
love it!
"We have something
that you want, and you have
something that we need
Can you guess what that
something is?"
Well, to start with they
"needed" $20. Or accord-
to Karen M the
ing
woman
letter, I
who signed
could send
!f
the
in $30
and become an "executive
member
"You're finally gonna
get your money's worth
Karen promised.
But I wasn't so sure.
Twenty dollars is a lot of
cash to throw away on some
screwball broads.
And what if they were
just out to use me?
Some women these days
will take you to bed once
and then toss you aside like
a piece of used scrap metal.
A guy can never be too
careful.
So I decided to write a
letter back to Karen M
explaining my problem.
"Dear Karen I wrote.
"You and your friends
sound like very nice ladies,
but I was kind of wondering
what sort of interests you
have.
"Do you go to concerts?
Ballets? Woody Allen mov-
ies? You say you used to
cruise discos. Does that
mean you like disco music?
I hope not! I've just about
had my fill of Donna
Summer and the Bee Gees.
"And what are your
hobbies? Do you play
tennis? Ski? Go jogging?
Collect barb wire?
"I was never much for
barb wire myself, but I once
knew a fellow who had 200
different kinds and said it
was a lot of fun.
"Anyway, I hope you
don't think I'm prying. I'd
just like to get to know you
and your friends before we
go romping in the hay. Or
don't you like hay? Maybe
we'll go romping in the
mud instead. Whatever.
Just tell me a little bit
about yourself, and I'll send
in my $20
Well, maybe Karen M.
and her buddies couldn't
think of any hobbies. Or
maybe they hated barb
wire. I've never been able
to figure out women. But
Karen sure got upset about
something. A week later
she sent me a crushing
second letter.
"I've just heard from
the girls in the back room
that you haven't accepted
our invitation yet. Where
did we go wrong?" Karen
demanded.
"You know, I worked
awfully hard on that letter I
wrote to you. I wanted you
to want us just as much as
we want you. I wanted to
make you an offer you
couldn't refuse, and now I
want to deliver the goods!
"It's hard to believe that
we didn't move you even a
little bit What more
could you possibly need to
know? Please I don't
want to be alone. Help
me
Karen signed it with a
felt tip pen and put a big
red lipstick mark in the
corner. On the bottom she
also printed the Glo-Worm
slogan: "Closing the com-
munication gap between
consenting adults
But I was still a little
leery. I didn't want to get
the poor girl upset, but
heck, I had to protect
myself. There are a lot of
shady women running
around out there.
"Dear Karen I wrote
back. "Gee, I didn't mean
to hurt your feelings or
anything.
"I can see from your
Apple Blossom lipstick that
you're a woman who's
deeply concerned about her
members. But I really did
want to know if you were
into Woody Allen.
I was curious, though,
since it's not every day that
I get propositioned by mail.
So the other day I dug out
Karen's old letters and
found there was a "Honey
Line" phone number
printed on the top of the
stationery.
Nervously, I dialed the
number.
"Hi a seductive voice
answered. I knew it had to
be Karen or one of her flaky
friends. Nobody else could
possibly salivate that loud
into a telephone.
"I'm tied up with so
many members coming
by the voice on the other
end purred. "I just love to
handle new members I'm
really glad you called.
Would you leave me a little
message? Just a little
something to keep me
going, until your letter
comes into my box
There was a loud beep,
and then silence.
Karen M. was speaking
from a tape recording.
"Hi Karen I said on
the tape. "It's me, Larry.
You know, the guy who
likes Woody Allen. Look, I
was just wondering when
you and the girls were
going to write me back. I
sort of got a kick out of your
first two letters. But I'm
still a little curious about
this Glo-Worm thing.
MY 6RMMNG POLICY?
weu, I'D GIVE G00 AN A,
JESUS CKR3T 8, MYSELF
A C; THAT DOESN'T LEAVE
A WHOLE LOT FOR YOU
Guys, D0E,S ,T ?
American Journal
Ed Clark for president ?
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
It's November, 1980.
You're in the voting booth
and your eyes run down the
roster of presidential candi-
dates: Ted Kennedy, Ron-
ald Reagan, Ed Clark
Ed who?
Ed Clark. Lawyer. Age
49. Lives in Los Angeles.
He's the presidential candi-
date of what Eugene
McCarthy called "the most
viable third force chal-
lenge" in America, the
Libertarian Party. You may
not have heard of him yet,
but time and megabucks
permitting, you will.
Founded in 1971 as a
vehicle for a shrewd amal-
gam of conservative eco-
nomic theories and liberal
social ideas, the Libertarian
Party has come a long way,
fast. The party's 1976
presidential standard bear-
er, Roger MacBride, polled
only 200,000 votes nation-
wide. But last year, Ed
Clark, stumping for gov-
ernor of California, pulled
twice that many. Clark's
400,000 votes were five
percent of the state total,
and that'8 plenty for a
little-known third party
candidate.
There are always third
parties chomping at the bit,
eager to. knock the mighty
Democrats and Republicans
from their perches, of
course. A pro-ecology Citi-
zens Party has just formed,
there is talk of a labor party
for 1980 and New York state
has a new anti-abortion
party that's flexing some
muscle. Then there are the
hardy perennials: the Vege-
tarians, Prohibitionists,
Trotskyists, etc who . are
always running for one
thing or another.
Of all those groups only
the Libertarians look like
contenders in the near
future. The Libertarian
Party platform, ratified at
the party's convention in
Los Angeles in September,
calls for the abolition of
income taxes and all
government regulation of
business. The party favors
the legalization of marijuana
and prostitution, and
staunchly opposes CIA and
FBI spying and the return
of the draft.
It is their audacious
hybrid quality that gives the
Libertarians their appeal.
They have mated some rJew
Left demands of the 1960s
with the neo-conservatism
of the 1970s and come up
with something that at first
fiance seems new. In the
est tradition of the parties
they seek to replace, the
Libertarians claim to have
something for everybody.
At bottom, however,
what they offer the elect-
orate is simply old wine in
new bottles. Libertarian
economics are essentially
19th century laissez-faire
capitalism. That is a system
that worked quite well for a
few people, but caused
intolerable suffering for a
good many more. That's
why it has been progres-
sively modified in this
century. The Libertarians
are promoting a fnture
we've already had.
Nostalgic futurists like
the Libertarians like to point
to the failures of govern-
ment to solve society's ills,
and those failures are
many, to be sure. What
they forget � or neglect to
mention � is that the
functions of government
have multiplied primarily
because private enterprise
was unable to carry them
out, or no longer cared to
try- m
Rail passenger service,
for example, was aban-
doned by the powerful
corporations that own the
railroads because they were
losing money on it, not
because the government
callously shoved them
aside. Now, when Amtrak.
with its modest budget ana
the antiquated equipment
bequeathed by big busi-
ness, fails to meet ex-
penses, it is cited as
evidence that public man-
agement is not as efficient
as business.
Or take the War on
Poverty. The classic boon-
doggle, right? Perhaps. Yet
the War on Poverty was
made necessary in the first
place because private en-
terprise, in its rush to
compound profit, created a
desperate underclass of
people without jobs, edu-
cation, decent housing or
food.
Ed Clark is acquainted
with profit. Clark does his
lawyering, not in the service
of civil liberties, but for the
Atlantic-Richfield Corp
whose rights have not been
noticably trammeled lately.
His vice presidential run-
ning mate, David Koch, is
the brother of Charles
Koch, who has poured a
reported $10 million into
Libertarian projects. Charles
is big in cattle and oil.
Not surprisingly, the
Libertarians have drawn
their greatest early re-
sponse from among the
'naves" of American so-
ciety, who are loathe to give
up their post-positions in
the race for the good life.
Clark drew up to u) percent
of the vote in affluent areas
in California, such as
moneyed Marin County, last
year � double his statewide
average.
The Libertarian philos-
ophy is perhaps best
summed up by Roger
MacBride: 'Taint yourself
into the picture of an
emerging Libertarian so-
ciety in the late 80s � with
no inflation, taxes slashed
able to educate your
children, support charities
as you would like to,
subscribe to the opera �
and, if you wish, have that
mountain chalet in Switzer-
land
The Libertarian Party is
a- ParU for the 80s, all
right. The 1880s.
Letters
Letlers to the editor
are welcome, however,
they raut contain the
name, address, "and 1.0.
number. No letters will
be printed if- they are
not sighdl in 'ink hy the
person vf itirtg the
fetter.
Lettecs must be re-
ceived by noon Mon-
days ' artd Wednesdays,
at the .newspaper office
on the econ� floor of
the �Publications . Build-
ing, which is directly
across from Joyner Lib-
rary
Letters wilj be edited
for ' brevity libel or
obscenity.
The East Carolinian
MANAGING EDITOR
Richard Green
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Anita Lancaster
NEWS EDITOR
ASST. NEWS EDITOR
FEATURES EDITOR
ASST. DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
EDITOR
Marc Barnes
DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
Robert M. Swaim
ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR
Leigh Coakley
BUSINESS MANAGER
Steve O'Geary
Karen Wendt
Tarry Gray
Bill Jones
Tarry Herndon
SPORTS EDITOR
ASST. SPORTS EDITOR
COPY EDITOR
AD TECH. SUPER.
Charles Chandlar
Jimmy DuPree
Diana Henderson
Paul Lincka
THE EAST CAROLINIAN is the student
newspaper of East Carolina University
sponsored by the Media Board of ECU and
is distributed each Tuesday and Thursday
during the academic year (weekly during the
summer).
Offices are located on the second floor of the
Publications Center (Old South Building). Our
mailing address is: Old South Building ECU
Greenville, NC 27834.
The phone numbers are: 757-6366 6367
6309. Subscriptions are S10 annuallyalumni
$6 annually.
i

I
V
-





Jones aids WECU
Congressman Walter B.
Jones has joined the fight to
get radio station WECU on
the air.
"I am taking the
liberty of requesting that
you personally intercede in
this matter and instruct the
appropriate office to grant
the permit to WECU as
soon a possible. While 1 do
not wish to intercede with
the functions of the FCC, I
am requesting this conces-
sion only because I honestly
feel there is no reason to
hold it up any longer
This is part of a letter
sent to Charles D. Ferris,
chairman of the Federal
Communications Commis-
11, bj Jonesr
Jones, at the request of
John Jeter, station manager
ol VI ECU. has been trying
to help WECU get its
permit granted so that
construction can begin on
the tower.
In the letter, Jones also
cites, "On September 7, a
member of my staff was
advised by an attorney in
the Legal Division of the
FCC that it was expected
that the permit would be
granted in about two
weeks
WECU has still not
received the permit.
According to sources at
the FCC offices, the permit
has been held up because of
a new policy which is being
considered by the FCC. The
policy concerns a change in
the Commission's general
position on educational
radio stations.
Jones also stated that he
will look forward to hearing
from Ferris with a positive
response in the near future.
Brewer speaks to SGA
Board trims budgets
By CHRISTINE CAGLE
Staff Writer
"It is more important to
get on with the business of
working together in the best
interest of ECU and look
back over the year's accom-
plishments with pride and
quit beating dead horses
remarked Chancellor
Brewer to SGA legislature
members regarding the
personal letter between
SGA President Brett Melvin
and Tim Sullivan.
Dr. Brewer was guest
speaker at Monday's SGA
legislature meeting.
Members of the legis-
lature directed several
questions to Dr. Brewer
concerning the short library
hours, the Media Board and
the letter between Melvin
and Sullivan.
When asked about his
reaction to the letter printed
regarding Tim Sullivan and
Brett Melvin and the three
trustees' comments, Dr.
Brewer stated that he "was
not happy about the fact
that the letter was obtained
by robbery and that after
he saw the letter, he found
nothing in it worthwhile.
According to Dr.
Brewer, "Any kind of new
organization such as the
Media Board takes time to
smooth out its edges He
also stated that you cannot
expect a new structure to
function smoothly in the
first, second or third year.
Brewer added, "There are
problems with the Media
Board and any new organi-
zation. Yes, things need to
be worked out and hopefully
in future years things will
be straightened out
Dr. Brewer stated that
he was not aware of the
library hours, but he will
look into them and see if
something can be done
about an extension.
Brett Melvin, SGA pres-
ident, addressed the legis-
lature members regarding
SGA summer accomplish-
ments, its goals of the
upcoming year and the
responsibilities
poses of SGA.
and
pur-
The goals of the coming
year for SGA, stated
Melvin, are "to increase
student awareness and faith
in SGA, more publications
by SGA and continued
improvement of SGA transit
system by expanding routes
to the hospital and the
malls
Melvin further explained
the purposes and respon-
sibilities of the SGA, "To
represent the needs of
students, faculty and ad-
ministration, to provide
necessary service to stu-
dents through the transit
system, refrigerator rentals
and emergency loans and to
recognize student organi-
zations and funding
According to Melvin, for
important communication
between student body and
faculty, this year adminis-
trators will come and speak
tothe legislature.
B TERRY GRAY
h- ews Editor
The Media Board solved
. roblem of ,a $16,500
ficit in their proposed
Monday by
trimming the budgets of
various campus media.
1 he deficit was caused
part b a
�r r u n for
Flu

�u lating
S3.500 cost
the 1979
� rest of the
to a mistake
funds that
e
av;
ailal
�Je
this
th
return
ard. T;
Elmer Mover, vice
or for tudent life
Vie lia Board mem-
id that the miscal-
urred last year
yearbook staff
13,000 to the
nmnev was the
the funds from
of the ill-fated
which was
- hed. The monev
tended i be used for
- 197Q edi-
iia Board in-
the money as a part
oi the genera) budget,
rever, and approved the
: vidual budgets of the
media on that
make up the
. campus media or-
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ganizations trimmed off
some of the money alloted
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budgets.
Six thousand dollars was
taken from The East
Carolinian s budget, and
$5,000 from WECU. Most
of the remainder of the sum
was made up from the 1980
Buccaneer funds.
Among other business,
the Board discussed the
future of the Ebony Herald.
Since it appeared that all
Media Board funds were
exhausted, the board
passed a motion to form a
sub-committee which will
investigate the feasibility of
publishing the black-ori-
ented newspaper this year.
The board also clarified
a former decision relating to
the employment of non-
students on student media
staffs. Board member
Rudolph Alexander explain-
ed that while students
would be given priority
when applying for a job,
non-students would not be
excluded from considera-
tion.
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ober 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 5
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to
be readily available for sale at or below the
advertised price in each A&P Store, except as
specifically noted in this ad.
PRICES ATURDAY, OCT. 13 AT ASP IN GrOOnVJIIfl
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The East Carolinian
tian m
sports
Tusdy, October 9, 1979, Page 6
Greenville, N.C.
Frosh NG Doug Smith
could be big star of future
By JIMMY DuPREfc
Assistant Sports Editor
Following the graduation of veteran nose guard 0iver
Felton, a large question mark remained in the center of the
ECU Pirates' defensive line.
Most observers expected Felton's replacement would be
last year's Outstanding Freshman Award winner, John
Hallow. For the first few games of the season, that is
exactly what happened.
But a young freshman named Doug Smith had otner
1 eSmith, an imposing figure at 6'5 225, started in the
Bucs' 45-10 romp over the Keydets of VMI, and though he
only managed two unassisted tackles on the night, the
Pirate coaches were impressed.
"Doug Smith has as much talent as any lineman we
have says defensive line coach Wayne Hall. "He s not
the best lineman we have but by the time he is a senior, he
could be e . ,
The missing ingredient for the bullish bmitn is
experience; raw talent exists but must be refined through
hard work and practice.
"He's just like any other high school football player
with a Uttle talent said Hall. "He really never had to
push himself to be better than his opposition.
"He's just beginning to learn the proper techniques;
getting low on Mockers and working on his initial
quickness . ,
It would be understandable for a young player who has
moved into a starting role on the defensive unit that was
ranked number two in the nation in 1978 to become
complacent; to be satisfied with his present
&&�
ECU's Doug Smith (92) in hot pursuit of VMI quarterback
(Photo by Hugh Johnson)
got
every day in practice.
'What you learn in technique from the coaches makes
the game a lot easier physically. You don't rely on just
shoulder tackles
Hall stated that although Smith moved into the tirst
string, "no one has a starting position sewn up
"This year we've had Tim Swords move in and start
instead of Vance Tingler. It all depends on how they grade
t out in each game.

��Doub could be and I think will be a great football
player fo?uapr�aed Hall. "You can only push a k.d so
fort �� that he is capable of being, then he s go.ng
,0h"Dougr"es� defensive lineman ability-wise ,�
come out of eastern North Carolina in a long tune. I think
tip can be as good as he wants to be
lull compares Smith to North Carolina State's Bubba
Green and Simon Gupton, as well as North Carolina �
Donnell Thompson.
"Those are all outstanding defensive football players
explains Hall, "but they all got there through hard work.
"For his size, he's the fastest lineman I have. His
initial quickness is not where it could be. In high school, he
was fast enough that he could hesitate for a second when
the ball was snapped and still make the play. But now, you
have to be the first one off the ball
Playing collegiate football is a dream come true for the
Bayboro native.
"In high school, I dreamt about playing against team-
like State, Duke, Wake Forest and all the big name
schools reflects Smith, "but when you're on the field
with them, it's just another team.
"I saw Ritcher (Wolfpack all-American center Jim) as
just another player, just like in practice
Doug Smith has come a long way in just a few months
in the Pirate camp, but as he explains, it has been a
constant learning process.
"It was up to me as to how hard I wanted to work and
how much I wanted to improve he said. "I had to have a
lot of help. The coaches naturally helped, but John Hallow
has helped me out a lot. I guess we both help each other in
practice and cheering for each other during games
Smith says that the early losses suffered by the Pirates
could be blamed on a lack of unity.
"Everybody is getting to know each other; the oneness
is there, now
ECU's Melvin Orioles, Pirates set for Series rematch
among
ECU Sports Information
As if opponents weren't
worried enough about him,
East Carolina sprinter Otis
Melvin mav have found
another event while he was
running in the World
University Games in Mexico
City last month.
The slender 200-meter
all-America performer from
Fayetteville turned onthe
afterburners in a pre-Games
meet and won the 400-
meters over an impressive
is a fine sprinter.
"I really feel like I can
run with anybody now he
said with a smile. "I really
get fired up when I'm
running against great com-
petition. That's when I
know I'll be at my best
Bill Carson, Melvin's
coach at East Carolina,
knows the abilities of his
senior well, considering him
one of those athletes who
refuses to lose.
"Otis is the type of
person you like to have on
"He only sees one thing when he runs
and that is the finish line'
ECU track coach Bill Carson
field, which brought him to
the obvious conclusion.
"I think that I can run
either one this year said
the senior blur. "I'll
probably run a lot of 400s to
get in shape to run the 200
meters anyway, so now that
I know what I can do, I may
run the longer race some,
��
too.
Before this past season
Melvin could sneak up on
the other competitors in his
race and sometimes even
win with virtual anonymity.
But, that all ended when he
made the NCAA final in the
200 meters last June.
"It used to be that if I
performed well I was always
a surprise performer to the
others he said. "I can't
surprise them as much any
more.
"I really feel I'm just as
good as any of the other top
splinters in the country and
on any given day, any one
of us can win. It's a good
thing we don't all look at
this as a life or death
matter because a different
person wins almost every
race.
The World University
Games afforded Melvin his
first exposure to inter-
national competition and
whetted his appetite for
more. He worked with six
different coaches, trained
daily with the finest athletes
in toe world and proved to
himself and the rest of the
track world that Otis Melvin

��

��
i ��

-

-t
the end of a relay, for
example Carson said.
"He only sees one thing
when he runs and that's the
finish line. He'll fight and
strain to be the first one
there every time, too
He's been the first one
there many times. He won
three straight meets prior to
the last NCAA outdoor meet
and was named the out-
standing runner in the Pitt
Invitational after winning
the 100 meters and the 200
meters.
Melvin's summer in-
cluded training in Arizona,
the National Sports Festival
in Colorado Springs, Colo
more training and the
World University Games, so
he's quite ready for a rest.
In Mexico City Melvin
won his trial heat of the 200
meters going away, took
second in the semifinal heat
and was the only American
in the final. He was running
for a medal when he pulled
a muscle in his leg with
about 30 yards to go.
"I need the rest for my
leg, too he said. "I'll
start back in about the
middle of October and work
toward preparing myself for
the indoor and outdoor
national meets and, hope-
fully, a spot on the Olympic
team
But, in which event,
Otis?
He responds with only a
puzzled look and then a big
confident smile.
It is that time of the year again when the leaves on
trees begin to turn, the air gets colder and living rooms get
more crowded. It is the time of year that television sets are
watched with intense concentration by millions of
Americans. ,
Why all the excitement? Because it is World Series
time, of course.
The excitement should really be apparent this season
with a seemingly great matchup set. The American
League's Baltimore Orioles and the National's Pittsburgh
Pirates seem destined to play a close series that should go
down to the seventh and final game.
The Orioles, considered by most the favorites, have it
all. The excellence of the Baltimore defense was evident in
the final game of their playoff series with California. Each
time the Angels threatened, it seemed the Bird's defense
came up with a crucial double play.
The Orioles can score runs, too. The offense is
spearheaded by MVP candidate Ken Singleton, Baltimore's
Mr. Steady all season long. First baseman Eddie Murray is
an awesome cleanup hitter and has plenty backup help at
the plate in third baseman Doug DeCinces, outfielder Gary
Roenicke, centerfielder Al Bumbry and oltimer Lee May.
Utility man John Lowenstein proved the quality of the
Oriole bench play when he slammed a pinch-hit homer in
the bottom of the tenth inning to give the Orioles a victory
in Game One of the A.L. Championship Series with
California.
Though the orioles are a well-balanced team, the bright
spot of the club has to be their pitching. One veteran
broadcast announcer called the Bird pitching "perfect
Heading the hurlers is Cy Young candidate Mike

Flanagan, a 23-game winner this season. The other starters
include future Hall of Famer Jim Palmer, Dennis Martinez,
Scott McGregor and Steve Stone. All four are capable of
putting the stops on any team in the major leagues,
including the awesome Pirates. ,
And awesome is just how one would describe the'
Pirates. Power and speed are the main elements of what,
at times, is a devastating run-scoring machine.
Leading the way for the Bucs is the dynamic duo of
Willie Stargell and Davd Parker. Parker, the N.L. MVP last
season, may have to stand aside the season and surrender
the award to the 38-year old Stargell.
Manager Chuck Tanner says Stargell is like wine
because he seems to get better with age. The most
valuable player in the playoff series with Cincinnati last
week, Stargell smacked a surprising 32 home runs during
the regular season.
Though Parker and Stargell get most of the media
attention, there are other Pirates deserving of i.
Outfielders Bill Robinson and John Milner both swing a bi
bat, asUoes third baseman Bill Madlock, who has a couple
of batting championships to his credit.
The Pirate defense is steady, as is the pitching. Starters
Bruce Kison, Bert Blyleven and John Candelaria all are
capable of having a super series. The bullpen is anchorea
by Kent Tekulve, who appeared in more than 90 games
this past season.
Both the Orioles and the Pirates are led by superb
managers. Baltimore's Earl Weaver is the best in the
business. His cleverness has enabled the Orioles to stay
near the top of the baseball world throughout the 70's,
despite having at times what many considered little talent.
Weaver should someday have a place in baseball's Hall of
Fame, as he has led the Orioles to the playoffs many
times.
Tanner, on the other hand, is making his first playoff
appearance. Yet he has always been considered one of the
best in the business. His work in making the Chicago �
White Sox a contender in the early 70's is still considered a
miracle.
This series has all the elements of a great one. Not to
mention all the strengths that both teams possess, this
series is a rematch of the one played in 1971. That series
was won by the Pirates in seven games, thanks to the
excellent play of the late Roberto Clemente.
The 1971 World Series is considered one of the greatest
series ever played. This one has the potential to be just as
good.
There should be one big difference this time though. J
The Orioles should win in seven this time around.



-�
fieadinc tne nuners is vjy iouhk �hiu�u�ic ���c o�o� o� � . �
:���a�TM�aM.a�.n
In S,C. tourney
Lady
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
Disappointment seems to be underscored thus far in the
1979 campaign of the Lady Pirate volleyball team.
In the South Carolina Invitational Tournament held this
weekend, the Lady Bucs wee eliminated in their first day of
competition, with the deciding blow being dealt by the
University of Georgia, 15-11, 15-6.
The Lady Pirates began their trek with an opening
round loss to the University of Kentucky, 15-6, 15-12.
From there it appeared that the luck of the East
Carolina lasses would improve.
In front of a noisy partisan crowd, the Lady Bucs upset
the tournament hosts, the University of South Carolina.
The victory came in a grueling three game marathon,
17-15, 10-15, 18-16.
"We beat a very strong South Carolina team praised
Coach Alita Dillon. "Our defense looked a whole lot better
and our offense was under control for the first time this
season.
"We were attacking more effectively and serving more
consistently
ECU's second loss of the day came in an upsetting
15-9, 10-15, 15-7 squeeker for N.C. State University.
"We split with State, but I still think there were some
things we should have done and we would have beaten
them. Overall, though, I was really impressed.
"Oddly enough, South Carolina lost four in a row and
went out early also
The Tar Heels of North Carolina walked away with first
place honors, nipping the Kentucky Wildcats in the finals.
The Wildcats earlier eliminated State to earn a berth in
the finals.
North Carolina was the only undefeated team in their
pool.
Dillon cited Mitzi Davis and Ginny Rodgers for their
improved defensive play in the tourney.
"We're starting to look more like a team said Dillon.
Senior spiker LaVonda Duncan feels that a lack of the
personnel that the 1978 squad possessed is the reason for
the sluggish start.
"WeTre really just starting to progress explains
Duncan. "This weekend is the first time we've played
together as a team and not as six individuals out on the
court.
"We've had a lot of problems
Duncan says that the loss of stars Rosie Thompson and
Becky Beauchamp have hurt the team, as they provided
much of the offensive punch and the defensive flexibility.
"It's hurt us a great deal Duncan relates. "Overall
we're a very short team.
"We've got Sharon Perry and she's pretty tall, but
beyond that we have no height.
"Another thing, I guess, is that Rosie was so
aggressive. We miss that.
"The game (tonight) with N.C. State is very important
to this team.
"We've had to do s lot of adjusting said Duncan,
"and we've got a long way to go. But we're definitely
coming around
ECU volleyball action
i





9 October 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 7
Series pits 'Mr. Sunshine 9 vs. 'Mr. Computer
Anthony Collins scores for the Pirates
UNC-Wake Forest matchup
is crucial to ACC race
By DICK BRINSTER
Associated Press Writer
North Carolina has not
von its first five football
games in any season since
148, but the man most
responsible for bettering the
Tar Heels' 4-0 mark says he
isn't concerned about that.
It's not that Coach Dick
Crum is figuring all the
LSih-ranked Tar Heels must
do is show up Saturday to
beat Wake Forest in their
N79 Atlantic Coast Con-
ference debut. In fact, that
would be a ridiculous notion
in view of the Demon
Deacons' 4-1 record.
'We'll probably mention
that to the players Crum
said Sunday, "but that's
really not important to us
jusl the ball game Crum
is long on theory and short
on pomp and circumstance,
and his theory at this point
is that the Tar Heels must
contain Wake Forest quar-
terback Jay Venuto. They
had their share of practice
Saturday when Cincinnati
quarterback Tony Kapetanis
completed 14 of 26 passes
for 227 yards in the
Bearcats' 35-14 loss to the
Tar Heels.
"I think Cincinnati was
good for us in that regard
said Crum. "That's going to
be the big question in the
ball game he said when
asked if North Carolina
couid keep Wake Forest's
aerial circus from stealing
the show.
The Deacons had a
tough time for much of their
contest against Virginia
Tech, but Venuto hit on key
passes in the fourth period
as Wake Forest overcame a
14-7 deficit to come away as
a 19-14 winner.
While Crum will be
concerned with stopping
Venuto, Wake Forest Coach
John Mackovic has a major
problem of his own �
Famous Amos Lawrence,
the nation's leading rusher.
"I remember Amos
Lawrence said Mackovic.
"Once you see him you
don't forget him
Tailback Lawrence
maintained his 140-yard per
game average against Cin-
cinnati with a 143-yard,
performance. And if that
did not present a big
enough problem for Mac-
kovic, the Tar Heels showed
him fullback Doug Paschal,
generally Lawrence's block-
er and quarterback Matt
Kupec's short-yardage re-
ceiver. Paschal gained a
career-high 111 yards a-
gainst Cincinnati.
"I think we'll have to
play our best defensive
game of the year Mac-
kovic explained. "They
certainly run the ball as
well as anyone
Those were the precise
thoughts of Clemson Coach
Danny Ford prior to the
Tigers' 17-7 victory over
Virginia. On Saturday the
Tigers will face a lesser
threat in the form of
Virginia Tech's runners.
By WILL GRIMSLEY
AP Special Correspondent
Baseball's 1979 World
Series boils down to this: it
is "Mr. Computer" match-
ing strategies with "Mr.
Sunshine the close-to-the
-vest gang going against the
free-wheeling Happiness
Boys.
The Birds and the Bucs
� one of the most
intriguing matchups in
years.
When you think of the
Baltimore Orioles, the A-
merican League champions
who ran off and hid from
the favored Yankees and
Red Sox, you conjure up a
huge green chessboard
presided over by a little
puckish guy with silver hair.
But 'Earl Weaver, the
Orioles manager, is base-
ball's Bobby Fischer � a
mind like a steel trap, a
plotter, a man of a thousand
moves who leaves nothing
to chance.
With Earl Weaver, the
buck stops at his cluttered
desk. "How important is a
manager's role?" he re-
peats an oft-asked, loaded
question. "It's everything. I
pick the 25 men who play
for me. I say when they
play. I say what they do. I
am responsible
When you think of the
Pittsburgh Pirates, the Na-
tional League champions,
you visualize a gang rumble
� ear-puncturing noise,
raucous banter, heavy bats,
a lot of muscle, friendly
pushing and shoving.
From the wings, a
benign-looking man watched
the tumult not with distaste
but with obvious amuse-
ment.
"Aren't they great?
says Chuck Tanner, the
skipper. "They have a lot of
fun. No jealousies. No
brooders. No fatheads. This
is their style. Everything is
loose
Tanner is called "Mr.
Sunshine" because of his
amicible disposition and
perpetual optimism. He
looks upon his protegees as
adults. He lets each do his
own thing. He maintains
discipline with a padded
glove.
Weaver, winner of six
division titles and four AL
pennants in his 12 years as
Baltimore boss, is quieter
and appears more serious
though he possesses a wry
sense of humor. Many rate
him the best manager in
baseball.
This year he took a team
without any big-salaried
superstar and nursed them
to 102 victories � the
fourth time his teams have
won more than 100 games.
He won out in the toughest
division in either league. He
didn't do it with mirrors.
He didn't do it with soft
talk or iron discipline. He
did it with cold logic. He
complied an exhaustive
"book" on rival teams and
set up a detailed card
system on comparative
strengths and weaknesses.
He developed what he
called "deep depth" �
plenty of strong arms in the
bullpen and bats on the
bench. He moved them
around like pieces on a
chess board. His moves
were amazing.
"I've got good pitching
and good defense he
says. "Sure I make the
wrong move sometimes, but
nobody's going to get many
runs off us
Big Dave Parker and
Willie Stargell may offer a
dissenting opinion.
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3005
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8 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 9 Ortrtwr iqtq
Intramural info
By RICKI GUARMIS
Staff Writer
FENCING CLUB
Dr. George Weigand,
advisor and instructor for
the ECU Fencing Club,
Fencing club meets this Wednesday
invites all interested stu-
dents to participate in the
club's weekly instructional
sessions. The club meets
each Wednesday, from 4
p.m. until 6 p.m in
Memorial Gym, Room 108.
Gaither sparks
Florida A &M
By HERSCHELNISSENSON
AP Sports Writer
Let's forget about the
Southern Cals and the
Amabamas and the Okla-
homas and the rest of the
Top Twenty for awhile and
devote a few paragraphs to
the Rattlers of Florida
A&M.
That's the predominantly
black school from Talla-
hassee which the legendary
Coach Jake Gaither put on
the football map. And that's
rA' as in agile, 'M' as in
mobile and, as Gaither liked
to say, the Rattlers were
quite hostile Saturday in
defeating Miami of Florida
16-13.
On the surface, it seems
like just a game between
two intrastate rivals. But it
goes deeper than that.
Florida A&M won the
NCAA Division I-AA nation-
al championship last vear
while the University of
Miami is classified as
Division I-A.
The Southern Cals and
Alabamas and Oklahomas,
of course, reside in Division
I-A with Miami. Besides
Florida A&M, Division I-AA
includes the likes of the
Ohio Valley, Big Sky and
Yankee Conferences, among
others.
While Florida A&M was
embarrassing Miami, the
top five teams in The
Associated Press ratings all
rolled to relatively easy
victories. Top-rated South-
ern California blasted Wash-
ington State 50-21, runner
up Alabama blanked Wichi-
ta State 38-0, No. 3
Oklahoma crushed Colorado
and former Sooner coach
Chuck Fairbanks 49-24,
fourth-ranked Texas de-
feated Rice 26-9 and No. 5
Nebraska swamped New
Mexico State 57-0.
Elsewhere, sixth-ranked
Houston nipped Baylor 13-
10, No. 7 Washington
whipped Oregon State 41-0,
No. 8 Ohio State shaded
Northwestern 16-7, No. 9
Florida State drubbed Lou-
isville 27-0 and No. 10
Notre Dame held off
Georgia Tech. 21-13.
In the Second Ten, No.
11 Michigan knocked off
No. 16 Michigan State 21-7,
Minnesota upset No. 12
Purdue 31-14
SKI CLUB
There will be an organi-
zational meeting for the
Snow Skiing Club on Wed-
nesday, Oct. 10, at 7:30
p.m. in Memorial Gym,
Room 104. All interested
skiers should attend so that
planning can begin for the
winter season.
RACQUETBALL CLUB
An organizational meet-
ing for the Racquetball Club
will be held on Wednes-
day, Oct. 17, at 6:30 p.m. in
Memorial Gym, Room 104.
All interested players should
attend.
Intramural-Recreational
SPORTS COUNCIL
The October meeting of
the Intramural-Recreational
Sports Council will be held
on Thursday, Oct. 11, in
Brewster C-103. All intra-
mural representatives and
interested students should
attend!
SOCCER
The Soccer entry dead-
line is Thursday, Oct. 11. A
Captain's Meeting will be
held on Monday, Oct. 15, at
7 p.m. in Brewster B-102.
ALMOST ANYTHING GOES
The top eight finishers
(not listed in order) in last
week's Almost Anything
Goes were Village Green
Villians, On Your Backs,
The Cloudy Grads, Easy
U's, Invincables, Who Done
It, Kelley's Heroes, and
Power Hitters.
These eight teams, along
with 14 others, were
competitors last Wednesday
afternoon in crazy activities
like the silly centipede and
the dance balloon -a- thon.
Prizes were awarded by
local merchants for the top
eight finishers, with the
intramural department also
awarding T-shirts to the
first place Power Hitters. A
special award went to Patty
Brown and her New Com-
munity "A" team for a nip
and tuck last place fiuish.
FLAG FOOTBALL
Flag Football play-offs
begin this week. Divisional
finals will be played on
Thursday at 5 p.m. All-
Campus play-offs will begin
Sunday at 5:30 p.m.
DEADLINES
Cross Campus Run entry
dates are scheduled from
Oct. 5-12. The last day to
sign up for Soccer is Oct. 11
and the last day for team
handball is Oct. 25.
Two-on-Two Basketball
and Co-Rec Flag Football
participants have until Oct.
11 to sign up.
11 to sign up. Tennis
Doubles sign-up will last
until Oct. 18.
TENNIS RESULTS
Round 4 � Women's
JONES CAFETERIA
YOU CAN EAT DINNER
$3.25
:30 Meal plans accepted
SERVOMATION CORPORATION
South Central Dining Services
East Carolina University
919-758-2424
Division:
E. Kutteh df.
M. Pemberton 10-1
B. Freeman df.
A. Northington
Round 4 � Men's "A"
Division:
M. Davis df.
S. Woodie 10-1
B. Shipley df.
D. McPhail 6-0, 6-2
B"
Round 4 � Men's
Division:
D. Evans df.
S. Rogers
A. Newby df.
W. Dixon 7-6, 6-1
Finals are being played
today at 5 p.m. at College
nill lennis Courts.
PREDICTIONS
Ginn's Guesses:
Women
1. Tyler Heartbreakers
2. IBAC
3. Tyler Termites
4. Fleming Hall
5. Alpha Xi Delta
Men
1. Sadaharu Oh's
2. Belk Bandits
3. Bronx Zoo
4. Animals
5. Phi Epsilon Kappa
6. Scott SSS
7. Lambda Chi Alpha
8. Belk Running Rogues
9. Scott Stooges
10. Village Green Meanies
Fox's Forecast:
Women
1. Tyler Heartbreakers
2. IBAC
3. Alpha Xi Delta
4. Tri Sigma
5. Greene Giants
Men
1. Lambda Chi Alpha
2. Dough Boys
3. Sadaharu Oh's
4. Belk Bandits
5. Kappa Alpha "A"
6. Belk Running Rogues
7. Scott Stooges
8. Phi Epsilon Kappa
9. Ay cock Sidewinders
10. Village Green Meanies
Red Cross Blood Center
Hwy43W
758-1140
Keep Red Cross ready.
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you savor sizzlin' sausage, have a hankerin' for country
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Good at all participating Hardee's. Please present
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combination with any other offers. i"BJ
CouponexpiresOctober22,l97W MllWwraMP. �
Cards, Gifts,
Books
The Gazebo
Leather n Wood
Lynn's Hallmark
Shop
Walden Books
Food Services
Baskin-Robbins (ice cream)
Big-Top Deli
Chic-Fil-A
General Nutrition Center
(health foods)
Hot Sam (subs & sandwiches)
Morrow's Nuts
(nuts, candies)
Orange Julius
Second Cup (coffee, tea,
spices)
Swiss
Colony
(package
cheesewine)
Tiffany Bakery (cookies)
Jewelry
Henebry's
The Jewel Box
Rings G Things
Time Square (time & repair)
Zales Jewelers
Junior Dept. Store
Blount-Harvey
10a.m. to 9 p.m.
MonSat.
Men's Apparel
Chess King
Coffman's Men's Wear
Fine's
The Junction
Just Pants
The Pro Shop
Steinbeck's
T-Shirts
Topps & Trowsers
Music, Records, and Radio
Lowrey Organ Center
Radio Shack
The Record Bar
Restaurants
Castel Carini Restaurant &
Pizza, Inc.
S & S Cafeteria
Athletic Attic
Butler's Shoes
Connie Shoes
Father & Son
Jack and
Jill
Kinney Shoe
Red Cross
Thorn Mc An
Department Stores
Belk-Tyler
Sears
Specialty Apparel
Dottie Lou's (children's)
Motherhood Maternity
Specialty G Services
Aladdin's Castle
(amusementgames)
Women's Ready To Wear
Charles Shop
College Shop
DAKS
Foxmoor
Lerner Shops
Sidney's
16
Stuart's
Virginia Crabtree
Planter's Nad'Bank
Circus World (toys)
Docktor Pet (pets)
Rowers by
Roselind (florist)
Great Expectations
(men G women's
hair styling)
Merle Norman Cosmetics
Pearle Vision Center
t- i'optometrist)
Tinder Box (tobacco)
GREENVILLE
264 By-Pass
on Highway t1
IlilHMWIHIIII�H





The East Carolinian
features
Tuesday, October 9, 1979, Page 9
Greenville, N.C,
Paycheck and Cross
headline outdoor concert
Clarence "Gatemouth" Brown
Leah Ferree and parents
(Concert photos by Richard Green)
By WILLIAM JONES
Features Editor
A brilliant Carolina sun shown down through the
cloudless azure of last Sunday's laid-back afternoon. The
crowd gathering to attend the open-air concert jointly
promoted by Outdoor Opry Productions (the same folks
who run the Carolina Opry House) and the CU
Interfraternity Council, couldn't have asked for a finer day
on which to enjoy live music in the out of doors.
Throughout the afternoon and early evening performances
of Mike Cross, Delbert McClinton, Clarence "Gatemouth"
Brown, and Johnny Paycheck, a blustery western breeze
proved to be the only inconvenience the audience and
musicians had to deal with.
The concert was a fine example of a first-class
entertainment production. The grounds had been prepared
to accomodate up to 20,000 people. There was no problem
with space or facilities for the approximately 5,000 which
attended. The Greenville Jaycees provided refreshments
(soft drinks and hot dogs). The Greenville and Winterville
rescue squads were available in case of emergencies (one
traffic accident did occur from which 3 people were taken
to Pitt Memorial Hospital). Security men in red T-shirts
with large stars and the word "security" emblazoned in
white across the front patrolled the grounds on foot and
horseback.
At 2:00, Mike Cross began the opening act. Cross
prefers being the lead act on multi-performance bills. He
says he likes to set the mood.
Mike Cross' music is not immediately classifiable. He
refers to himself as a "hippie folksinger One of his major
influences has been the blues "pickers" of the '20s and
'30s such as Ledbelly. The other is Celtic folk songs.
Cross dropped out of law school with only one semester
to complete before receiving a diploma. When asked how
his wife felt about him leaving law school for the uncertain
fate of an individual performer, Cross replied, "She was
the one who encouraged me to do itI met her when I
was playing in a little pizza parlor. My wife was going to
school at Duke, and she came in there one night and really
liked some of the blues I was playing and that's how we
got to know each other. So, she's always assumed I was a
musician primarily. When I went to law school she was
slightly disappointedI told her, 'Laurie, I want to do
something a little more secure than music 'cause I feel
responsible to you and to any children we have�' She
said 'Mikeif you're in law school for me, you're not
doing what I want you to do If you were going to die in
a couple of years, what would you do?' So, I said OK
When asked how his son was doing, Cross said, "He's
doing great, he's a fine little fella' If he can overcome the
genetic difficulties he's going to have being my son, I think
he'll work out OK
Joyner offers new service
By JEFFREY JOSEPH
Staff Writer
A new service is being
offered by the ECU libra-
ries. Jo Ann Bell, Director
of the Health Sciences
Library and Eugene Bru-
nelle, Director of Joyner
Library have announced
that the two libraries are
cooperating to provide a
journal delivery service for
faculty and students.
Under the new system,
faculty and student users
may request that journals
located permanently at the
Health Sciences Library,
Joyner Library, or the
Music Branch Library be
delivered to another of
these libraries for their use.
The service is designed to
aid those lacking transporta-
tion to or from one of the
libraries, and will be
available Monday through
Friday of each week be-
ginning Oct. 1st.
To request a journal, the
complete title, the volume
number and the publication
date must be given. The
page number to be con-
sulted should also be cited.
Faculty members should
give their name, the name
of their department and
their office telephone num-
ber. Students must provide
their name and major, as
well as their telephone
number. Also indicate the
library to which the journal
will be delivered.
The delivery schedule
includes four time periods.
Requests received by 11:00
a.m. will be delivered to the
specified location by 1:30
p.m. If a request comes in
between 11:00 a.m. and
2:00 p.m delivery will be
made by 5:00 that evening.
Requests received between
2:00 and 4:00 p.m. will be
delivered by 9:00 the
following morning. Calls
after 4:00 p.m. will result in
delivery by 1:30 the next
day.
About his having "gone national Cross says, If
the question is, 'Are you working on reaching people in
other parts of the country?' the answer is yes. We're
doing that by having me travel and perform and try to get
records out. At this point in time, however, there are only
isolated sections of the United States where people have
even heard of me, much less whether they like me or not
When asked if he had anything to say to the students of
ECU, Cross replied, "Yes. I'd like to say that college is a
serious business. Don't be fooled into going down that
primrose path where you have fun. You've got to suffer to
learn. And I'd like to say that my tongue is deeply
imbedded in my cheek as I say these words
The same Puckish, cracker-barrel humor that makes
Mike Cross one of North Carolina's most popular
performers remains when Cross leaves the stage.
After a few minutes changing equipment, Delbert
McClinton and band came on stage. The most recent
edition of Playboy states that McClinton may be the
best white rhythm and blues rock n roller in the world
His performance Sunday bore this out.
When asked what he thought of the Playboy article,
McClinton replied, "Well, they butchered it up some. But
any kind of deal like that is good. Lots of people see it
Although he prefers to play small clubs (because that's
where you make it sound right), McClinton was satisfied
with his set, except for the effect of the breeze.
"That wind's a killer he said. The wind blows it
(the music) around like a bad radio station. It fades in, and
it fades out
The wind was a problem for "Gatemouth" Brown also,
who said he felt like he was eating his words, getting them
blown back in his face. Brown refuses to have his music
classified. It runs the gamut from rock 'n' roll to blues to
country.
Brown has only recently begun to attract a lot of
national attention though he's been playing music for over
20 years. A few months ago he cut an album with Roy
Clark, having returned from an international tour of Africa,
Europe and the Soviet Union.
After Brown and the Gatemouth Express's perfor-
mance, The West Texas Music Company, Johnny
Paycheck's band, came on stage and began to warm up the
crowd for the country star.
Simply dressed in overalls, orange T-shirt and with a
blue bandana holding back his long hair, the country
spokesman for the working man proceeded to entertain.
After an assortment of numbers including his 1971 hit
"Don't Take Her She's All I Got Paycheck closed the
show with his former number one song, "Take This Job
and Shove It
Security men hustled Paycheck off into the cool
evening. After a full but all too short day of entertainment,
the crowd dispersed and headed for home.
Foreign Service
Mike Cross
Delbert McClinton
(Concert photos by Richard Green)
Exciting careers available after graduation
"College PaPers�publtehed j c
by "Rolling Stone"
� AMERICA
By JAY STONE
Features Writer
College Papers is a new
tabloid magazine published
by Rolling Stone Press. Its
style is even reminiscent of
Rolling Stone, and it shares
some of its staff with the
larger magazine. To dwell
upon the similarities of the
two publications, however,
would be to obscure their
differences. In order to
properly appreciate the
College Papers approach to
politics and popular culture
one must understand the
motives behind its con-
ception.
Issue number one of
College Papers is at local
news stands now. In its
introduction Kate Wenner
writes: "When Rolling
Stone published its first
issue in 1967, it launched a
new kind of journalism.
Rock V roll, drugs, the
protest against the war, and
the sexual revolution were
all issues of the times.
Rolling Stone reported on
them from the inside, ss a
participant in what was
i,
happening, while the rest of
the prtds looked on from
the outside, unable to
appreciate the profound
changes that were going
on.
i
Indeed, College Papers
bills itself as a publication
for college students not
about them. College Papers
will regularly run a section
entitled "Notebook which
will be a continuing forum
where college students can
publish their work. Fiction,
journalism, poetry, photo-
graphy, cartoons, essays,
illustrations and reviews are
all eligible.
College Papers is a
quarterly publication; there-
fore, the next issue is not
due out until January 2,
1980. That should give
students just enough time
to accumulate some quality
work.
In its first issue College
Papers examines the anti-
nuclear movement, new
legislation to reinstate the
draft, rising tuition costs,
and a new law that would
allow college students and
the public to receive copies
of aptitude tests for admis-
sion to college and graduate
school. There are feature
articles on Bruce Spring-
steen, Gilda Radner, and
William Borroughs. Also
included is an article on
beer which includes the
results of a poll taken on
several campuses in order
to determine what the 20
most popular brands are.
These topics maintain an
unmistakably college pos-
ture. It may be hoped that
ultimately a magazine ap-
proaching news and culture
form this angle will serve to
inspire a degree of self-
consciousness among the
college community. It is a
credit to the .foresight of
Rolling Stone Press that
college students finally have
a national forum and,
subsequently, a common
denominator. We shall have
to allow events to create the
present and the future to
chart its own course,
however, before it will be
possible to measure its
impact.
J The Major Attractions
I Committee presents Amer-
J ica in concert TONIGHT!
� The show begins at 8:00
� p.m. in Minges Coliseum.
i HOMECOMING
A homecoming dance fea-
turing Beau Thorp and
Generation II will be held
on Oct. 13, in Wright
Auditorium.
By MICHAEL F. GEORGE
Staff Writer
Are you interested in
traveling abroad? Do you
look forward to an exciting
career after graduation?
Well, it just may be that the
Foreign Service is for you!
The first step in a
Foreign Service career is
the Foreign Service exam,
which will be given in
Raleigh on Saturday, Dec.
1, 1979. The deadline for
registration is Oct. 19.
Over 130 countries are
served by the Foreign
Service, the State Depart-
ment's diplomatic, consular
and overseas cultural and
information service. There
are four specialized fields:
administrative, consular,
economiccommercial and
political affairs.
The administrative field
is the management division
of the foreign service. In
administration, a great ima-
gination is needed to come
up with ideas to keep the
system working, and this
field involves great respon-
sibility. The administrator
would be involved in budget
planning, maintenance of
property, procurement of
supplies, contracts and tra-
vel arrangements and
labor-management negotia-
tions.
In the consular field, one
would work primarily with
the local people of the
particular country.
"They must combine the
skills of the diplomat, social
worker, lawyer and judge
is how the Foreign Service
con-
Handbook describes a
suiar officer. This
requires fluency
native language
in
of
job
the
the
country because of the close
association with local offi-
cials and the public in
general.
Trade, investment, and
monetary matters and en-
ergy are some concerns in
the economic field. An
individual working in this
field reports on any eco-
nomic trends that would
affect U.S. interests. Again,
local officials would be
consulted. "In addition to
knowing economics, they
must be politically and
culturally perceptive, skillful
in drafting, and flexible
the Foreign Service Hand-
book says of personnel in
this field.
The fourth field of
specialty in the Foreign
Service is political affairs.
Foreign language is a
definite requirement here.
Political officers present the
U.S. government's views on
all political issues and
report on anything political
or involving U.S. interests.
Knowledge of the history,
culture, language and poli-
tics of the particular country
is essential.
The entrance examina-
tion must be passed before
entering the Foreign Ser-
vice. Last year 12,200 took
the test and 2,800 passed.
A wide range of knowledge
� from foreign and domes-
tic affairs to U.S. history,
government and culture �
is needed to complete the
exam successfully. Appli-
cants must also be fluent in
English grammar skills. The
minimum age requierd to
apply is 20.
Even after passing the
exam, applicants are not
admitted to the Service
permanently. Depending
upon test scores, each
individual is placed in one
of eight classes. At the end
of a four-year trial probation
period, employees are
either promoted or fired,
according to the caliber of
their work.
Employees who are kept
on can look forward to a
30-year career � 15 years
in overseas work with
relocation every two to four
years. Promotions come
every 18 months, depending
on performance.
The pay scale for Class 8
is from $13,014-15,618 per
year. For Class 7 the pay is
$15,222-18,264. Everything
depends on your perform-
ance, experience, and
qualifications.
Anyone interested in the
exam should see Dr.
Griffith in Brewster A-123,
who will be able to explain
the Foreign Service.
LtMHlNb AWOT COLL�� THf HU Vfol
SI Dtmo Norris
THIS Oj�CTJUrJ I c U - sorr
6Am� IS LOTM FUri- ANP,
A SfllPITWfl5
I
.
V






Page 10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 9 October 1979
Bo Thorpe to perform in
Wright Auditorium
A new musical pheno-
menon will come to ECU on
Saturday, Oct. 13, when Bo
Thorpe and Generation II
perform in Wright Auditor-
ium. . c
Rocky Mount native Bo
Thorpe has put together a
big band � but not just
another big band. Genera-
tion II combines the best of
the traditional big band
sound with today's modern
electronic sound. The re-
sults may be described as
orchestrated disco.
The Student Union Spe-
cial Attraction's Committee
sponsors this appearance
which climaxes the Home-
coming festivities.
According to Thorpe the
idea for the band was
conceived while attending a
collegiate football game.
During the half-time show
he noticed that the band
was playing big band
music, the cheerleaders
were jitterbugging, and the
people in the stands were
going wild.
Convinced this idea
would work, Thorpe went to
New York and contacted
Dan Rather, a friend from
Vietnam days. Rather put
him in touch with noted
composer Sid Cooper who
had worked with such
luminaries as Tommy Dor-
sey, and Frank Sinatra .
Thorpe and Cooper star-
ted by substituting the
electronic sounds of today
for the acoustic instruments
that were long associated
with big bands. They also
re-arranged many of the old
favorites giving them a
harder disco beat.
The band debuted last
March at Regine's, one of
New York's ultra-chic d's-
cos. This appearance by the
band at Regine's marked
the first ever for a live band
at the club. The event was
given national coverage on
ABC evening news.
In the first six months of
its existence the band
appeared on a national
television special with Dan-
ny Thomas, Eartha Kitt,
and Bob Hope, played a
two-week stand at the
Riverboat Room, performed
the concert dance for the
Belmont Stakes, and played
at a reception for President
Carter.
Tickets for the dance are
on sale at the Central Ticket
office and are priced at $2
for ECU students and $4 for
the public. All tickets sold
at the door will be $4.
Real Crisis Center
Got a real problem?
Get some REAL help!
758-HELP
24-hour walk-in clinic
1117 Evans Street Greenville, N. C. 2 7834
REAL CRISIS CENTER
Portraits
will be
taken:
OVERTON
Located on corner 3rd and Jarvis St.
Grade "A" Whole Fryers
34'lb.
Aurora Toilet Tissue
2 roll pkg. 2$1.00
Coca-Cola
2 liter plastic btl. 78'
Bounty Paper Towels
Giant Roll 58'
Morton's Frozen Chicken Pot Pies
8ozpkg. 4$1.00
Golden Ripe Bananas
4 lbs. $1.00
Carolina Dairies All Flavors Sherbet
Qt. pkg. 2$1.00
Expires Oct. 13. Please have coupons clipped.
Dawn detergent
Giant btl. 68' with this
coupon and $7.50 food
order excluding
specials.Limlt one Per
customer, without coupon 68.
Crisco Oil
24 oz. btl.78' with this
coupon and $7.50 food
order excluding
specials. Limit �ne pr
customer, without coupon 98.
Duncan Hines Yellow or
Butter Golden Cake Mix
17 oz. box 58' with this coupon
and $7.50 food order excluding
specials. Llmlt �ne per customer,
without coupon 78.
ECU Pirate
Coupon
5 discount on
$10.00 or more food
purchase
expires Oct. 13
name
ID number
Kraft Orange Juice
12 Gal. Jug 98'with
this coupon and $7.50
food order excluding
Specials. Llmit one per
customer, without coupon $1.18
Coca-Colas
16 oz ctn. of 8 88' plus
deposit with this coupon
and $7.50 food order
excluding specials. Limit
one per customer, without
coupon $1.08.
I







Stormwatch
9 October 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 11
18
TulVs latest
By PAT MINCES
Features Writer
To consistently produce music of high caliber
throughout an entire career in rock is a task wnkh
overcomes all except those gifted with true genius. Living
legends such as Frank Zappa, Stevie Wonder and The Who
have been able to withstand the strain of time and release
music that shows artistic growth and enduring creativity.
Jethro Tull is also one of those anomalies, and the
bands new album Stormwatch is a testament to the
strength of its long career. Ian Anderson's compositional
and arrangement skills and TulTs musical proficiency are
unfaltering m their devotion to the highest standards of
quality. Despite personnel changes, Jethro Tull has proven
to be one of the most articulate spokesman of a musical
generation spanning ten years.
Stormwatch is a most impressive album and should
prove to be one of the finer releases of the year. Tull
confirms that musical integrity can be achieved within the
confines of a rock production by using the combination of
beauty and complexity that is uniquely Jethro Tull. The
theme behind Stormwatch predicts a foreboding future
when the energy is depleted and the earth succumbs to a
creeping chill. Stormwatch is a devastating album, a
reaffirmation of the strength of one of the most prominent
groups in rock history.
A relatively new band, yet one which has shown
consistent growth, is Blondie. With the release of Eat To
The Beat, Blondie should become one of the definitive
groups of the '70s. Eat To The Beat has a strong '60s
orientation, but the power and drive of Deborah Harry's
voice and the band's newly gelled wall of sound should
propel Blondie to superstar status. This is perhaps the
most significant release in Blondie's career and should
prove to be a milestone in the acceptance of New Wave.
The theme behind 'stormwatch'
predicts a foreboding future when the
energy is depleted and the earth
succumbs to a creeping chill.
Tom Johnston, one of the founding Doobies, recently
left the Doobie Brothers (perhaps because of Michael
McDonald's takeover) to engage in a solo career. His first
release Everything You've Heard Is True is superb,
recapturing the beauty of the Doobies' music before
McDonald arrived. Outstanding personnel, inspired
performances, and lovely pop melodies make Johnston's
album a marvelous endeavor and show that the goodtime
Doobie spirit is not dead.
Kennv Loggins and Jim Messina have released their
new abums. Both show continued growth since they- split
several years ago. Loggins' Keep The Fire is much in the
vein of last year's Celebrate Me Home, featuring elaborate
productions, complex arrangements and that sweet, mellow
Kenny Loggins sound that has been the hallmark of his
career.
Messina's album, Oasis, seems to be a change of
direction for the artist, who has been in the mainstream of
pop music since Buffalo Springfield. The Messina flair is
definitely present, but a strong Columbia Jazz influence
takes presidence in Oasis � his first solo effort. This
album offers a nice blend of jazz and pop influences.
Any discussion of jazz-pop would not be inclusive
without the mention of the godfather of jazz-pop Van
Morrison and the release of his new album Into The Music.
This album is nice and does possess moments of brilliance
but is not generally recommended for anyone except
Morrison fans.
Disappointingly enough, Santana's current release is no
better than last year's Inner Secrets. The group seems to
be locked into the same dismal discorock realm and
cannot escape the lure of that commercial dollar. If you
liked Inner Secrets, you will love Marathon, but traditional
Santana fans may think the band has been running a bit
too long.
Tonight, we will be granted a special pleasure to
witness America in concert at Minges Coliseum. America is
one of the foundations of pop music, releasing hits since
the beginning of the decade, and their new album Silent
Letter (minus Dan Peek) is no exception. Those present at
the coliseum shall be treated to a real delight � Dewey
Bunnell and Gerry Beckley with a pleasant backup band. It
should be a night to remember.
Albums courtesy of Record Bar: Pitt Plaza and Carolina
Carolina East Mall.
UK iiiuiray Trotn
r Fare saves you a super 25 (Fri. thru Sun.)
or 35 (Mon. thru Thurs.) roundtrip if you make your reser-
vations and ticket purchase 30 days before departure, and
stay at least 7 days. mmmt . .
IsssRsiitl Excursion Fmf means a 30 roundtrip dis-
count if you leave Saturday and return any day except Sun-
day (12:01 pm until midnight)or Friday.
For complete information, including time and reservation
requirements and fare availability, see your travel agent or
call Piedmont Airlines. Discount fares subject to change
without notice.
I joined Chain-Smokers Anonymous
79:NP-2
By STEVE COOPER
Features Writer
"My name is Steve and I am � "At this point I broke
into sobs. I couldn't spit out the words. It was so unreal,
like a dream. I never though it could happen to me, but it
had. I was addicted, I knew it, and I wanted to quit. So I
sought out help, and there I was at the Chain-Smokers
Anonymous meeting. Encouraged by the other nico-freaks
that were there, I managed to get through the first barrier.
"My name is Steve and I smoke
The meeting was helpful. It made me realize that I
wasn't alone. There are many, many smokers. When I
looked around, I saw John T. He'd been chain smoking
since he was 6 years old. His kid sister got him started on
the habit. Then I met Lydia H an explosives technologist,
now unemployed because she wasn't allowed to smoke on
the job. There was Sister Magnolia, the smoking nun,
"Bacco-Breath Sam the brown-toothed hobo, and me,
Steve C, the smoking sophomore. After listening to the
others tell their sad stories, it was my turn.
"I still can't believe it happened to me. Why me? I
never smoked as a child. My parents didn't smoke. In
school I always took the long way to class just so I wouldn't
have to walk past the sleazy people in the smoking area. I
avoided discotheques because they always had such poor
ventilation, and my eyes watered. So, why me? Why me?
Why? Why? Why?"
Once again I broke into tears.
"Calm down, Steve Lydia H. tried to settle me down.
"We know where you're coming from John T. added.
"Tell us when you first started smoking Sister
Magnolia requested. "But first, pass the ash tray
"I think it was in Wilmington last summer. Yes, it was
there. I'd started working on a show about a week after the
spring semester. My roommate, Tony, was directing it.
Tony smoked. God, did he smoke! He sometimes had three
cigarettes going at once. I was doing imitations at the cast
party. When it came time to imitate Tony, I had to have a
cigarette to do it, don't you see? I had to have it
"You're blocking Bacco-Breath told me. "Tell us
when you really started
"I'm getting there! I'm getting there! Just give me a
chance Anyway, a few weeks later Tony was playing the
part of Snoopy in "You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown
During the rehearsal, Tony was singing. 'It's suppertime!
Yeah! It's �' Then he stopped and clutched his heart and
fell off the doghouse
"Did he die?" Sister Magnolia, who at times at
ghoulish inclinations, asked.
"No. He didn't die. It was nothing serious. Just
pneumonia
"What's this have to do with you?"
"I'm getting there! Anyway, because Tony had
pneumonia he was supposed to quit smoking, but he
didn't. He'd say, 'Lord help me! I can't direct without a
cigarette! Anybody got a menthol?' And then he'd smoke.
"I wanted to help him. Call it stupid, call it asinine, call
it what you want. But, I thought that I was helping
"What did you do?"
"I figured that if every time Tony lit up a cigarette and
smoked it, if I lit up one and smoked it, he'd feel guilty
about messing up my virgin lungs or something, and then
he'd quit
"Oh no
"Oh yes. That's what started it. Tony didn't quit. He
only got worse. And I, I started. From that one little
cigarette I went to two, then to a pack a day, then to three
packs a day, then to cartons. It was awful. I had to have
cigarettes to live. I went from brand to brand. I didn't
care. Cigarettes became part of my new image. I had to
have them at work, at rehearsal, every time I entered a
restaurant � constantly.
"Then it started to get really bad. My white teeth that I
had gotten compliments on since sixth grade started
turning ivory, then they changed to a pale biege. My
clothes began to smell like K-Mart fire sale discounts. My
dorm room began to smell like tobacco warehouses. And I,
I too began to smell like a Salem Light 100. Oh, God! Is
there no hope for me?"
Once again I sobbed hysterically.
"Settle down John T. shouted. "It's all right
"Of course you can quit Lydia H. informed me. "It'p
easy to quit. I've done it several times
"And you've come to the right place for help Bacco-
Breath added
"Yes, you're in good hands here Sister Magnolia told
me. "We'll get you through this. Can I borrow your
lighter?"
And so I had begun my campaign to quit smoking. No
more will those little paper bastards have me at their
mercy. I'll either quit smoking or die!
ABORTIONS UP TO 12TH
WEEK OF PREGNANCY
$175.00 "all inclusive'
pregnancy test, birth control and
problem pregnancy counseling For
further information call 832-0535 (to
free number 800-221-2568) between
9AM-5PM weekdays
Raleigh Women's Health
Organization
917 West Morgan St
Raleigh, N.C. 27603
Writers
Needed
call
or
come by
The East Carolinian
Old South Bldg.
Pizza inn
AMERICA'S FAVORITE PIZZA
PIZZA BUFFET
ALL THE PIZZA AND
SALAD YOU CAN EAT
$2.39
MonFri. 11:30-2:00
Mon. & Tues. 6:00-8:00
Evening buffet 0Z.B9
758 6266 Hwy 264 bypass Greenville , If. C.
WED SPECIAL 4-7
LADIES NITE 9-?
WED -THURS BUFORD T
Wednesday night 7 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre
Also TREASURE OF SIERRA MADRE at 9 p.m. ggf
Sponsored by the Student Union Films Committee U(fJ
FRIDAY'S
1890
Seafood
Tuesday Night
Specials
TROUT $2.95
PERCH $2.95
all you can eat
No take-outs please.
Meal Includes:
French Fries, Cole slaw,
Hushpnppies.
We are proud to
announce that we
have added
one of the
AREAS FINEST
SALAD BARS
for your
dining pleasure.
OPEN FOR LUNCH
Dally
(except Sat.) 11:30 - 1:30
HOURS
MON � THURS.
f too � IOtOO
FRI. 8 SAT.
stoo � 10130
5






� age 12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 9 October 1979
)ouble Bogey at Hendrix Theater
i hi- Wednesday night,
I 10, the Student Union
- uimittee will spon-
Humphre Bogart
ature as part of
i lal Film Series.
Falcon will be
p.m. and
Sierra Madre at
th films will be
in Mendenhall's
Theater. Admission
Student ID and
ird or Faculty and
Maltese Falcon,
I, was director
ii - first feature
One usually
ri mentation
debut
:it also might
to be sacri-
shy camera
interferes with
here
ts us to the
nstant inter-
bile camera.
ves along at a
t viewer
h 's been
tor 100
s (Bogart)
with the
(Sydne)
i classic
a Huston
- attention
and creates
his char-
the
an's bulk
oting from a
itseli
a I read
ed its
' version
. that
here W ed-
is produced
3 in 1941.
I filming of
It's novel of
. The first
I in 1931
Bi : � Daniels
Cortez. It was
R v Del Ruth,
id sion was
. adv and
1936. It
Davis and
blance to
n .
- por-
Spade in this
Bogart
I himself
I star of the
Stage
I r enstreet,
his screen
- film. He was
61 years old and was
nominated for an Academy
Award for his performance.
A quick reading of the
novel reveals some interest-
ing points about the film.
For one thing, Huston, who
also wrote the screenplay,
saw fit to eliminate at least
one character: In the novel
Gutman had a daughter.
The film censors much of
Hammett's original intent.
The blame for this most
certainly rests with film
industry heads who allowed
themselves to be intimi-
dated by government and
religious censors. We can
see a recurrence of this
mentality cropping up again
today.
Nevertheless, in
Hammett's book, Cairo
(Peter Lorre) is quite
obviously taken with Wil-
mer (Elisha Cook, Jr.). This
is hardly hinted at in the
film. Also in the book,
Spade completely strips
Brigid (Mary Astor) in
search of the thousand
dollars palmed by Gutman,
but not here. And Spade's
relationships with Brigid
and his secretary can only
be left to our imagination
which, fortunately, cannot
be censored.
Another difference i
that at the end of the novel
we learn that Gutman was
killed by Wilmer. Thi is
clearly not the case in the
film. Warner Bros. had
originally envisioned a se-
quel to The Maltese Falcon
but. alas, it never materi-
alized. Too bad, it could
have been tun.
'Treasure of
Sierra Madre
The following review,
run in its entirety, was
written by former ea York
Times film critic Bosley
Crowther and published on
January 24, 1948. shortly
after this film's release:
"Greed. a despicable
passion out of which other
bae ferments may spawn.
is seldom treated in the
movies with the frank and
ironic contempt that i
vividlv manifested toward it
in 'Treasure of Sierra
Madre And certainly the
big tar of the movies are
rarely exposed in such cruel
light as that which is
thrown on Humphrey
Bogart in this new picture
at the Strand. But the fact
that this steel-springed
outdoor drama transgresses
1
Distributed By
Taylor Beverage Co
Goldsboro
IMPORTED
p�

Heinekeii
HOLLAND BEER
HIE 1 IMPORTED BEER IN AMERICA
convention in both respects
is a token of the originality
and maturity that you can
expect of it.
"Also, the fact that John
Huston, who wrote and
directed it from a novel by
B. Traven, has resolutely
applied the same sort of
ruthless realism that was
evident in his documen-
taries of war is further
assurance of the trenchant
and fascinating nature of
the job.
"Taking a story of three
vagrants on 'the beach' in
Mexico who pool their
scratchv resources and go
hunting for gold in the
desolate hills. Mr. Huston
has shaped a searching
drama of the collision ol
civilization's vicious greeds
with the instinct for self-
preservation in an environ-
ment where all the barriers
are down. And, bv charting
the moods of his prospect-
or- alter they have hit a
vein of gold, he has done a
superb illumination ot basic
characteristics in men. One
might almost reckon that he
has filmed an intentional
comment here upon the
irony of avarice in indivi-
dual- and in nations today.
"But don't let this note
of intelligence distract your
attention from the fact that
Mr. Huston i putting it
over in a most vivid and
exciting action display .
Even the least perceptive
patron should find this a
swell adventure film. For
the details are fast and
electric from the moment
the three prospectors start
into the Mexican moun-
tains, infested with bandits
and beasts, until two of
them come down empty-
handed and the third one,
the mean one, comes down
dead. There are vicious
disputes among them, a
suspenseful interlude when
a fourth man tries to horn
in and some running fights
with the banditi that will
make your hair stand on
end. And since the outdoor
action was filmed in Mexico
with all the style of a
documentary camera, it has
integrity in appearance, too.
-hitl
eons wree
fe'
"Most shocking to one-
tracked moviegoers, how-
ever, will likely be the job
that Mr. Bogart doe as the
prospector who succombs to
the knawing of greed.
Physically, morally and
mentally, this character
goes to pot before our eye
dissolving from a t airly
decent hobo under the
corroding chemistry oi gold
into a hideous wreck of
humanity t - � ssed with
onlv one passion � to save
his 'stuff.1 And the final
appearance of him, before a
Captain's Soup
& Salad $1.75
The best cup off clam
chowder south off Boston,
with crisp green salad and
your choice off dressing.
Captain's Soup
& Sandwich $2.25
A steaming cup of Clam
Chowder and a filet of Fish
on a toasted Bun, Tartar
Sauce, and French r
11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Daily except Saturday
STUDENT
SPECIAL
4:00a.m. to 11 s90a.ni.
F ttnAujSgfni
Two pancakes, two eggs,
choice off bacon, sausage, or ham,
and cup of coffee $1.50 pill tax
4:00a.m. to �p. ��� 80
Kiscuits- Sausage, Ham, or Egg and Cheese
�08 E. lOth St. open �4 HOURS
758-M46
Bob Hope
says,
" Help keep
Red Cross
ready
couple of roving bandits
knock him off in a manner
of supreme cynicism, is one
to which few actors would
lend themselves. Mr.
Bogart's compensation
should be the knowledge
that his performance in this
film is perhaps the best and
most substantial that he has
ever done.
"Equally, if not more,
important to the cohesion of
the whole is the job done by
Walter Huston, father of
Joh, as a wise old
sourdough. For he is the
symbol of substance, of
philosophy and fatalism, in
the film, as well as an
unrelenting image of per-
sonality and strength. And
Mr. Huston plays this
ancient with such humor
and cosmic gusto that he
richly suffuses the picture
with human vitality and
warmth. In the limited,
somewhat negative role of
the third prospector, Tim
Holt is quietly appealing,
while Bruce Bennett is
intense as a prospecting
lone wolf and Alfonso
Bedoya is both colorful and
revealing as an animalistic
bandit chief.
"To the honor of Mr.
Huston's integrity, it should
be finally remarked that
women have small place in
this picture, which is just
one more reason why it is
good
Bogart to Mary Astor: 'Dor
silly. You're taking the fall.
MEN'S RESIDENCE COUNC
PRESENTS
THE JUBAL
BAND
from Indianapolis, Indiana
Thursday Oct. 15th

on the Hill 7:00-10:00 p.m.
ADMISSION IS FREE
MRC will also sponsor a pig-pickin
in the baserment of Aycock Dorm
on the same day from 5:30-7:00 p.m
TICKETS AVAILABLE
THROUGH MRC AND WRC

i





Title
The East Carolinian, October 9, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 09, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.13
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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