The East Carolinian, October 4, 1979






"Were it left to me to decide
whether we should hsve s
government without news-
papers or newspapers without
government, I should not
hesitate a moment to prefer
the latter
-Thomas Jefferson
The East Carolinian
If you neve a story idee, a tip
or a leed please telephone us:
757-6366
757-6367
757-6309
Vol. 54 No.
10 Pages today
Thursday, October 4, 1979
Greenville, N.C.
Circulation 10,000
Stop sign down
Accident reported
By KAREN WENDT
ews Editor
The removal of a Stop
sign was apparently the
cause of a two car collision
at the corner of Ninth and
stop sign, though it is being
investigated by the Green-
ville Police Department.
Barrus Construction
Company had been working
on the parking lot nearby
earlier that day.
Snack bar
successful
By BRENDA VINSON
Staff Writer
The new soda shop
adjoining the Student Sup-
ply Store has been extreme-
ly successful so far, ac-
cording to Joseph 0. Clark,
manager of the Student
Supply Store.
The shop, which opened
at the beginning of this
ear, is actually not new.
Three years ago a soda
shop was located in the
basement of Wright Audi-
torium. It closed when the
book store was remodeled
and took away some of the
area occupied by the soda
shop. Clark said the shop is
a renovation, not an ad-
dition.
Some students feel the
- ia shop is at a more
ivenient location than the
Cretan. Others say that it is
ss crowded. Some student
Nfnments were as follows:
Barbara Anderson �
"I'm very pleased with the
new soda shop. It has lots
of room and is centrally
located. The addition of
-alads to the choices
available was a good idea
Chris Herrmann � "It's
OK. I would rather it be set
up like it used to be before
they shut it down
Renee McCulIen � "It's
really nice. It's more
convenient and less crowded
than the Croatan. I've used
it more
Ulysses Taylor � "It's
convenient for students,
since all the classes are in
the same general area.
There is also a variety of
items
According to Clark, the
Croatan is still profiting
from the renovation, he
said that a lot of people did
not have time to go to the
Croatan between classes
because of the crowds and
the location. Now students
on either side of campus are
served.
Plans are being made to
decorate the soda shop.
Some art work will be
provided by the School of
Art, and plants will be
placed in some areas.
Clark said he is pleased
with the response of the
students, faculty and staff
to the renovated facility.
The accident occured
about 7:30 p.m. on Sept.
28.
Diana Holyfielda N.C.
State student, was driving
south on Cotanche when
she drove through the
intersection at Ninth Street.
Her passenger, Cindy
Caveness, an ECU student,
reportedly shouted, "D�
that was a Stop sign you
just drove through be-
lieving that the stop sign
was up.
About the same time the
vehicle was struck by the
vehicle driven by Douglas
Rodman of Washington,
N.C.
When the 'officer who
investigated the accident
asked Holyfield why she
had failed to see the stop
sign, Holyfield pointed out
that there was no sign up at
the intersection.
The officer, W.R.
Robertson, then went to the
place the sign had stood
and found it on the ground.
Robertson immediately
ordered the sign to be
replaced.
Cause
Robertson felt the sign
being down was the primary
cause of the accident.
Another accident had
occured only moments be-
fore, when a person on a
bicycle was struck by a car,
at the same intersection. It
is believed that the sign
being down could hive been
the contributing factor in
this accident also.
Officer Robertson
pointed out that if Green-
Only man running
Mayoral candidate
Bv BRENDA VINSON
Staff Writer
The only man running for Greenville
mavor, Donald C. McGlohon, believes
Greenville citizens need to fully understand
that government exists to serve them.
(There are also two women in the mayoral
race: Mrs. Elizabeth Savage and Mildred
McGrath.)
McGlohon emphasizes that helpful
government services may be provided only if
people are willing to pay the price for such
services.
On traffic and transportation, McGlohon
feels that Greenville needs a new transit
system. He suggests the possibility of
coordinating the Greenville Area Transit
(GREAT) and the ECU bus services.
McGlohon is also concerned with the Blue
Law issue.
"Blue Laws deal with moral and social
issues which create special problems in
legislation and enforcement the candidate
ville residents or ECU
students had been involved,
they probably would have
known to stop at the
intersection. Since those
involved were from out of
town, they were unaware of
the danger.
Damage
Damage to Rodman's
car was estimated at $550.
The accident resulted in
approximately $1800 worth
of damage to the Holyfield
vehicle.
Upon impact, Holyfield's
car skidded some 60 feet
while Rodman's vehicle slid
about 20 feet.
No one was seriously
injured in the accident and
no charges were filed.
A downed stop sign at 9th Street and Cotanche resulted in
an accident Friday.
Parking violations
strongly enforced
Donald C. McGlohon
said. "This matter must eventually be
resolved by the wishes of the majority of our
citizens he added.
McGlohon, a native of Greenville, feels
the city faces an exciting future.
"Growth is inevitable, and comprehen-
sive planning is an absolute necessity said
McGlohon. "We must use all the resources
available to establish written long-range
plans to provide services needed for the
community
On the subject of recreation, McGlohon
said that recreation has been and will
continue to be an important factor in the
quality of life we all enjoy.
"If recreation facilities are to be used on
a nondiscriminatory basis by all Pitt
Countians, funding should come from both
the city and county
McGlohon described himself as a
professed optimist and flag-waver. He firmly
believes that the attitudes of the citizenry
will eventually cause answers to be found in
areas such as inflation, energy conservation
methods and full employment.
McGlohon is actively interested in both
city and county schools because he graduated
from a county school (Winterville High
School), and his youngest child will graduate
from a city school next spring. His oldest
daughter, Keila, is a junior in accounting at
ECU.
McGlohon enrolled at East Carolina
Teacher's College in 1950 and graduated in
1954 with a bachelor's degree in business
education.
While at ECU, McGlohon was president
of the Circle K Club and Pi Omega Pi
honorary business fraternity. He was in the
Air Force ROTC. After serving three years as
a pilot in the Air Force, McGlohon went to
work for Allstate Insurance Agency. In 1963,
he joined a partnership in operating the
Hines Insurance Agency in Greenville. His
partner retired 10 years ago making
McGlohon the sole owner of the independent
insurance agency for the last several years.
McGlohon has been involved in several
fund raising projects and worked for the
United Fund, the Heart Association, Red
Cross and the Boy's Club. He has been
active in the Greenville Chamber of
Commerce serving as treasurer for two
years.
Presently, McGlohon is president of the
Rose-Aycock Athletic Foundation and chair-
man of the finance committee at Immanuel
Baptist Church where he is a member.
By TERRY GRAY
Assistant News Editor
Due to an ever-increas-
ing parking problem at
ECU, campus traffic officers
are paying closer attention
to improperly parked and
unregistered vehicles in the
days ahead.
According to Joseph H.
Calder, director of security
and traffic, as many as 60
to 70 parking tickets are
being issued daily to
unregistered vehicles. The
majority of these vehicles
are student owned or
operated, Calder said.
In a reminder to stu-
dents, faculty and staff,
Calder has repeated that
only those vehicles regis-
tered with the Traffic and
Security Office are author-
ized to park in designated
areas on campus. He also
said that if violations
continue at the present rate,
regulations provided for the
towing of offending vehicles
will be more stringently
enforced.
ECU campus regulations
state that any vehicle
accumulating more than
three unpaid parking tickets
may be towed.
"In excess of three
parking tickets, the towing
policy will be enforced
Calder said in an ECU
News Bureau release.
Campus officials added
that the towing policy would
only be resorted to as an
ultimate measure and only
after recommendation from
appropriate university
authorities.
However, Vice Chancel-
lor for Student Life Dr.
Elmer E. Meyer said in the
news release that further
deterrent action may be
taken.
"It may be that we will
have no choice but to turn
over to the associate dean
for students the names of
those students who fail to
comply with the university's
regulations, for judicial
action Meyer said.
Also, students who d
not pay parking ticketc or
have a history of repealed
violations may be barred
from re-registering.
Calder said that ho
areas on campus with
"critical" parking prlems
will be more closely
watched for offender
Apathy is
statewide
By MARC BARNES
Editor
Student apathy on campuses across the UNC system is
at an all time high, according to three student editors who
were polled by telephone Monday afternoon.
The three editors who were polled included John
Flesher, editor of the North Carolina State University
student newspaper, The Technician; Tay Criscoe, editor of
the Appalachian State University student newspaper, The
Appalachian; and J. Kraemer, editor of the University of
North Carolina at Greensboro student newspaper. The
Carolinian.
"As far as our paper is concerned, apathy is a big
problem Flesher said. "There are shortages of reporters
in every department, and we also have a shortage of
production workers
"A lot of our department heads have to do a lot of their
own writing Flesher continued, "when they really
shouldn't have to
Because of the shortage of good workers, and because
the staff is concerned with putting out a quality product.
The Technician has problems coming out on time.
according to Flesher.
The problem of apathy among students at large is also
a problem at Appalachian State University, but the editor
there says that this year is better than last year.
"I know it's bad everywhere Criscoe said. "I really
feel like it's better this year than last year, though
Criscoe said he has sensed a "renewed spirit" at
Appalachian. "It seems like it's a younger year because
there are a lot of new people here this year
"There is a lot of apathy here toward the SGA
Criscoe said. "There is also tons of friction between the
paper and the SGA, but I think it is mostly clashing
personalities
"I have been nice, and I have tried to get along with
them Criscoe said. He added that it seemed that
sometimes the only people who cared about what was
going on in student government were the newspaper staff
and student leaders.
Criscoe said that academics were stressed at the
newspaper but admitted that at least with him, his stud
had become secondary. "It probably shouldn't be that
way he said.
J. Kraemer, editor of The Carolinian at the University
of North Carolina at Greensboro wrote an editorial recently
pleading for help from the student body in the form oi
labor for the newspaper staff.
"We have received some help since the editorial tan
Kraemer said. "We had lost three key positions, plu
equipment was breaking down
"Our main problem is student apathy Kraemer said.
"We do not have a journalism department, and students
here have no interest in having bylined articles in the
paper
rnbject at meeting
By KAREN WENDT
News Editor
After heated discussion
concerning the SGA news-
letter, the Media Board
decided that it had "no
jurisdiction over any publi-
cation not directly funded
by the Media Board
This decision came
about after the newsletter
was brought up at the
meeting by SGA president
Brett Melvin.
Police report
By ARAH VENABLE
Staff Writer
In September, six dorm rooms were burglarized and
seven vehicles were robbed in the Freshman parking lot,
according to Lt. Johnny Rose of the campus police.
The rooms that were burglarized were in Clement
(twice), Ay cock (twice), Scott and Jones. Rose said that
miscellaneous articles such as money, wallets and jewelry
were reported missing. In one case, a television was
reported stolen.
Cars in the Freshman parking lots were reportedly
robbed of various items, such as tape players and
speakers.
Linwood Higgins, police investigator, said students
should realize the importance of locking doors even if
stepping out only for a second. He stressed the need of
reporting a crime immediately so that the police can begin
investigating.
Ten sets of wheel covers were also stolen from the
freshman parking lot last month, according to Rose, along f
with three batteries which were taken from cars parked at
Third and Reade Street lots. An alternator was also stolen
from the dirt parking lot south of the library.
The campus police can engrave a license number on
wheel covers if a student brings the car by. Higgins said
most of the wheel covers that were stolen were expensive
ones.
He added that engraving helps in recovering the covers
if stolen.
On September 23 three students were arrested for
possession of stolen property. An officer reportedly
observed them taking down a traffic sign near the men's
dorms. They also reportedly possessed several signs from
the city of Greenville.
A non-student was arrested for breaking into two cars
behind the library on September 14.
The ECU testing center was also burglarized recently,
with an estimated $56 missing from the cashbox. The case
is still under investigation.
The question had been
raised as to whether the
Media Board, as "publisher
of all student-sponsored
Board members ques-
tioned the content of the
newsletter as well as the
budgeting and inquired as
to how it would be
published.
When asked how much
of the SGA budget would be
used to fund the newsletter,
Brett Melvin replied, "Let's
say 10 percent
publications" at ECU was
responsible for the news-
letter.
According to the board's
constitution, "All student
publications funded from
the student activity fee (not ,
to include Student Union
publications, the Photo Lab,
and Radio Station WECU)
shall be administered by the
board
Vice Chancellor of Stu-
dent Life Elmer E. Meyer
said, "I think you're raising
sort of a red flag
"We will not lower
ourselves into the gutter
Melvin later commented.
Melvin stated that the
newsletter would be pri-
marily used to announce
what had been happening in
the various subcommittees
of the SGA and at the
legislature meetings.
The use of non-student
employees on Media Board
publications was also a topic
of debate at the meetings.
Melvin proposed that all
publications be forbidden to
hire anyone who was not a
student for any position.
"I think that if students
are going to put it (a
publication) out, then stu-
dents ought to learn from
it said Melvin.
Meyer proposed an
amendment that people
could not be hired without
approval by the Media
Board. The final proposal
was passed by acclamation.
It reads, "No media shall
hire non-students other than
salaried employees with-
out approval of the Media
Board
The legal fees subcom-
mittee passed a proposal
concerning payment of legal
fees for employees, a topic
of concern at last week-
meeting. The Media Board
decided that it will not he
responsible for any legal
bills unless the board has
approved advice irom
counsel beforehand.
Jim Dale, internal
auditor, reported that all of
the equipment thought
missing from the Photo Lab
inventory that was taken
during the summer has
been accounted for. Ap-
parently, a cabinet had
been counted twice on a
previous inventory when
there was only one in the
lab.
The board also deter-
mined that the proposed
survey concerning student
feeling about the Media
Board would have to be put
off. The students to take the
survey will be unable to do
so until next semester.
As many as 60 to
70 parking tickets are being issued daily on campus, according to
security and traffic director Joseph Calder.





Page 2 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 4 October 1979
Student learns
a
B KENNETH rYNDALL
Staff Writer
-I senior recentl)
trm France after
in the iu pair"
51 iver, a 21 year-
ilmington, spent
a suburb
with ami
Ms. Shaver worked for
the famil) five hours a day,
mostl) baby-sitting. Her
"family1 pro ided free
meals, and Ms. Shaver also
earned a salary.
Some families involved
m the program would take
advantage ol their boarders,
making virtual maids of
them, according to Ms.
Shaver. Fortunately, this
was not the rase with her.
Ms. Shaver's duties in-
I taking the three irls
in the lamih to school and
tg light housework.
vl hen cu gn over
vou tan always
amities (if problems
M Sha er said.
classified
R RENT: Private room
� �nu-priv ate bath close
Phone
in.
752-4006

HKW KP- Offered tor re
light blue cover
� � i Saturday night
m white Corvette beside
rm. It will not tit
please return it.
tions asked. Tripp
Murrav 311-A Brlk. 752-
wnr J$
RT-TIME SM.KS PKR
SON in Retail Sale tor
.� - X earlv afternoon
K ' I.Miire ol Colt.
$ . �� ferred. ('all
p.m.
PAPER fYPED
term
a
iontb
Leigh
Rea-
B SITTER need
rransportation
after
- ULING RACING C.RF.W
wanted. Local Pamilco ra-
'o pay. Ti mv 7;2-
pair

One thing that im-
pressed Ms. Shaver about
France was television.
"When you first see it,
you think, 'this is terrible
but when you come back,
you realize that it was more
intelligently done over
there
Ms. Shaver pointed out
that Paris social life is
different from ours also.
"It's expensive over
there and it's more low
key There are bars, but
you just go there with
friends. 1 don't think people
go to tick up other people1
she said.
Shaver noticed that there
art' a lot of foreign movies
shown in Paris: Italian,
American, etc.
"On TV there's a lot of
American movies, a lot of
westerns. Everyone knows
John Wayne over there
Not only are American
westerns big in France,
American music is also
popular according to Ms.
Shaver.
'They have a lot of
French singers who sing in
English. It's basically the
same thing you hear here
except vou don't hear much
(hard) rock. Disco is real
popular. More than rock,
there was a lot of New
W ave. I saw more New
Wave than rock bands
Ms. Shaver feeds she
learned more about people
while living in France and
wants to return in the
iuture.
"I'd definitely like to go
back after two years r so.
and I would like to live
there � maybe
Joan would like to
emphasize that the "au
pair" program is a good
way for someone who
doesn't have much money
to be able to see another
country. Anyone who would
like more information should
contact either the Foreign
Language Department or
Miss Grace Ellenberg in
Brewster ALL
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Records and
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Kroqef Sav-on has what East Carolina Univer-
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4 October 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 3
Pecple places, arid ���
yaid�ale
invited to a
yard extrava-
Kit I
ccnmuiJcn sin i
Rebel is now
- I'tmg high-quality liter-
submissions. Poetrv,
ays, plays and inter-
iV s, short stories will
(I Ml work must
me, address, and
number o writer.
nanuscripts to The
Mendenhall Student
eenville, N.C.
� H�
East Carolina Gay
it) will hold its
g tonight at
House, at 608
51 We will have a
I heese party and
discussion.
g your choice of
ptr more infor-
758-9286 be-
td 10:00 a.m.
A service of Holy
Communion will be con-
ducted at the Methodist
Center Wednesday, Oct.
3rd. The service will be
celebrated by the Rev. Bill
Hadden, Episcopal Chaplain
of ECU. The service will
begin at 5:30 with supper
following. Cost of the
supper is $1.50.
Bible Study will be
conducted at 1003 West
Fifth St. at 7:00 p.m. The
Eucharist and Bible Study
are open to all students
interested.
II
The Sierra Club will hold
a get-acquainted meeting on
Monday night, October 8, at
8:00 p.m at the First
Presbyterian Church in
Greenville. The informal
program will feature slides
and information about local
spots to hike or canoe in.
Students are welcome to
attend the meeting and to
participate in outings, even
it they are not Sierra Club
members. The First Pres-
byterian Church is located
near campus at the corner
of Elm St. and 14th St.
t,il I III I
basketball
Anyone interested in
trying out for men's basket-
ball must register in the
basketball office by Wed-
nesday, Oct. 10, 1979.
Physical, prelimimaries, etc.
must be completed prior to
practice which begins Oct.
15th.
mu�ic
ii i 1
F ight, a service
sponsored by
Force Reserve
lining Program
holding rush
on Oct.
t Munchies will
the first two
nd dinner will be
ts1 night.
-n ith the service
he organization is j
si le oi fun. Every-
to come find
sides. Rush
1 in the ROTC
upstairs in the
l, besidp the
re. Conic find
��� are.
II III I ll
right
an Cultural
pen daily from 9
Mnday thru
itions wishing to
t-iUer during
� weekends
ii I the director of
Mendenhall
enter.
Recreate at the ECU
Parks, Recreation and Con-
servation Society meeting
on Tues. Oct. 2 at 7:30 p.m.
in the PRC building on
campus. Find out what's
going on. Refreshments will
be served.
The collegiate 4-H club
will meet Monday, Oct. 8 in
the 6th floor social room of
Greene Dorm at 8:30 p.m.
Any person with 4-H
background or interested in
helping others in this
community are welcomed to
attend. For more infor-
mation, please call 758-8826
or 752-9820.
it c 11 hiIi ri
There will be a meeting
of the RHO EPS1LON Real
Estate Fraternity Thursday,
Oct. 4th. at' 4:00 in
Mendenhall Student Center
(room 221). There will be a
guest speaker and all
interest persons as well as
old and new members are
urged to attend.
ECU Air
corps will be
Force
spon-
Blood
10
at
The
ROTC
soring it's annual
Drive October 9 and
Wright Auditorium between
10 a.m. and 4 p.m. This
year's goal has been set at
750 pints. Be a Donor. Give
Blood, Save a Life.
Teresa Watkins, a stu-
dent of Dr. Everett Pittman,
will perform Friday, Oct. 5,
at 8:15 p.m. in the Fletcher
Recital Hall.
A candidate for the
Bachelor of Music degree in
piano performance, Ms.
Watkins has been active as
a rehearsal accompanist for
many ECU musical pro-
ductions.
The recital is free and
open to the public.
You are
gargantuan
ganza by the ECU Navi-
gators. Valuable items of all
descriptions will be offered
for sale. Housewares, fur-
nishings, clothing, and pot-
pourri will entrance your
fancy. Delicate dainties
from local ovens will tempt
your taste buds. Be there
early Sat. Oct. 6, 201
Summit St from 8:30 until
sell-out.
I II
Does your ride embar-
rass you? When you pick up
your date, does she bring
her own dust pan? Has your
car been mistaken lately for
the Gobi Desert? The ECU
Navigators have a solution
to your problem. Saturday
Oct. 6 at Hooker Memorial
Christian Church at car
wash and was will be held.
Come by (corner of Elm St.
and 264 By-pass) or call
758-0077 for an appoint-
ment. Pickup and deliver)
service will be provided.
The dust will begin to fly at
8:30.
Ill I ll
The Friends of East
Carolina University Library
are having a book sale in
the lobby of Joyner Library
on Wed Oct. 10 and
Thurs Oct. 11.








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I
I
I OCTOBER 20, 19791
if
if
if-

rufcci
iilisH
Concerned about the
proliferation of Nuclear
power plants and Nuclear
weapons? Beginning Thurs-
day, Oct. 4 at 8 p.m a
study group on alternatives
to nuclear power and
nuclear disarmament will be
led by Reverend Anderson
at the Methodist Student
Center. Faculty and stu-
dents who are concerned
about these issues are
encouraged to come. Call
the MSC if you are
interested � 758-2030.
Start preparing art work
for The Rebel. It has been
confirmed that there will be
prize money awarded again
this year thanks to The
Attic and Jeffrey's Beer and
Wine for Budweiser. Cate-
gories include painting,
drawing, printmaking, pho-
tography, and mixed media.
If there are questions,
contact Sue Aydelette, art
director.
stfatew
The ECU Strategic
Games Club will meet
Thursday, Oct. 4 at 7:00
p.m. in Room 238 in
Mendenhall. Anyone inter-
ested in playing or learning
to play is invited to drop in.
I III III I
There are -till places
available lor the 'Biginning
Darkroom1 workshop at the
Mendenhall Crafts Center.
The workshop- are offered
on Tuesdays or Thursdays
from 6 p.m. until 9 p.m. All
interested persons must
register at the Crafts Center
a- soon as possible. Hours
are 3 p.m. until 10 p.m
Monday through Friday,
and 12 noon until 5 p.m.
Saturday.
SOUTH SEAS
PET SHOP
GREENVILLE SQUARE
756-9222
Parakeets $9.95
All Bird Cages 10 OFF
rrw Selected Tropical
i6'A FI,h ON SALE
JP ly offer good while
supply lasts
K
M
i m-
n.
PIRATE
SPECIAL
$3.99
� 6ox. Steak
� Baked Potato
�free Salad Bar
JtFree Soft Drink
� Free Jello or Pudding
Offer valid seven days a week (lunch
and dinner) to
COLLEGE STUDENTS & FACULTY
Show your College I.D.
to ordertaker to get the Special!
CALL 75B-eSO&
to reserve Banquet Room for Groups
BSO N. Greenville Blvd. Greenville
tk 4tk � t
FOR HOMECOMING
A
IN CONCERT
Tues. Oct.9 8.00 in Minges Coliseum
students$4.�� puWic$6PO atdoor$6po
Ml
mm





The East Carolinian
Editorials
& Opinions
Gripe, gripe, gripe
It is generally the purpose of editorials
to cry out at inequity, to give the opinion of.
the editorial board on matters of grave
importance, such as the Student Govern-
ment Association or the serious situation
developing in Cuba.
This is not going to be one of those
editorials.
Rather, the editorial board of THE
EAST CAROLINIAN would like to address
a few problems that confront every college
student in the daily life on campus.
College life is fun. Those who are not in
school bemoan the easy life that we college
kids have. Parties. Members of the
opposite sex in ample supply. No work.
Easy life, right?
Wrong.
It's rough. We have to put up with a lot
of pain, suffering and heartache during our
four or five year sojourn in this institution
of higher education. We have to endure
8:00 a.m. classes (which should have been
banned at the Geneva Convention), terrible
food, inhumane roommates and impossible
homework.
This morning, my roommate's clock did
not go off because the electricity was
turned off for what were termed
"important repairs I was late for my
class. My instructor was upset.
When first came to Greenville, I came
vsiHh a Chamber of Commerce newsletter in
hand, which stated that Greenville was a
well-drained city of 35,000 residents. I read
the rest of the handout at the service
station where my car was being dried out,
after going through a four-foot-deep lagoon
at the bottom of the railroad overpass on
Dickinson Avenue.
I am told that showers in Fletcher Dorm
have a mind of their own. (I am told this
because, being male, I haven't had much
occasion to spend time in the showers in
Fletcher.) Girls who live in Fletcher report
that after they are through taking a
shower, the hot water handle inches over
as if by magic. At the worse possible
moment, as the young lady is reaching for
her towel, the hot water blasts out at full
force and usually scalds the posterior of the
young lass.
People in this office are at the least
strange. At this moment, after a quick tour
of the newsroom, the news desk takes the
"Strange Award" for this particular
afternoon. The news editor is presently
ascending to a plane of higher
consciousness, and the assistant news
editor has been looking for the letter "D"
on his typewriter for the last half hour.
"Irregardless they are a great bunch.
There seems to be some kind of early
warning system on this campus with the
administration. The minute one of us calls
the Spilman Building for a quote from a
top administration official, the official "has
just walked out The administration
should tell one of their secrets to the
Strategic Air Command. No Russian
missiles would make it out of their silos if
the SAC knew as much about their
movements as the administration knows
about ours.
College life, children, definitely ain't
easy.
We have had our say, and now we're
happy.
JACK ANDERSON
WEEKLY SPECIAL
Copyright. 1979,
United Feature Syndicate. Inc
Mr. Carter Should Walk, Not Run,
For Re-election in 1980, Maybe?
- When
collapsed
marathon
By Jack Anderson
and Joe Spear
WASHINGTON
Jimmy Carter
during a running
near his Camp David moun-
tain retreat earlier this
month, his White House
image makers began fum-
bling with their political
worry beads. News photo-
graphs of the president
showed him gasping and
groaning with mouth agape
as Secret Service agents
helped him to a limousine to
whisk him back within the
confines of Camp David.
Carter subsequently that
day made a subdued public
appearance at a gathering of
his fellow marathoners and
sought to grin the �vhole epi-
sode off. His personal physi-
cian, Dr. William Lukash,
twice examined the chief
executive and pronounced
him in good health.
Carter aides quickly com-
mented that the former
Naval Academy cross-coun-
try runner did well to last
nearly half the six-mile
endurance trial compared to
other potential presidential
rivals.
Yet the scary episode
demonstrated that health
and physical fitness will be a
factor in the 1980 run for the
White House. Carter, who
becomes 55 years old on
Monday, is believed to be in
generally good physical fet-
tle but the blind staggers he
developed on the Catoctin
Mountain run raised ques-
tions as to his ability to car-
ry the tremendous physical
and emotional strains that
every president undergoes in
office. Some medical
authorities associated his
exhaustion with emotional
Subsequent to the publicly
recorded collapse, we
learned from inside observ-
ers that the jogging presi-
dent still shows signs of
strain. He recently conduct-
ed a briefing on the SALT II
treaty and many of those
who were there reported to
us that he looked "ashen'
and "gray Despite the
importance of the issue, they
said, he appeared preoccu-
pied and had trouble concen-
trating.
Even White House sources
acknowledge he is physical-
ly less bouncy than a year
ago but they insist Carter is
physically fit.
Since the days of robust
big-game hunter Teddy
Roosevelt, .every occupant
of the White House has
engaged in some form of
sports or exercise at his
doctor's urging. Franklin D.
Roosevelt, although crippled
by polio, swam. Harry S.
Truman took brisk morning
walks. Dwight D. Eisenhow-
er, even after his heart
attack, golfed. John F. Ken-
nedy went sailing. Lyndon
Johnson rode horseback
around his ranch. Richard
Nixon went fishing in the
Bahamas with his million-
aire friends. Gerry Ford, an
all-Big Ten football player,
swam, skied and golfed.
Jimmy Carter, however,
may be overdoing it to show
his athletic prowess. Per-
haps he should try walking
instead of jogging for a sec-
ond term in the White
House.
CARTER'S BOOBY-
TRAPS: With Teddy Kenne-
dy looming in the wings and
Carter's popularity sagging,
the president's path to re-
election is currently bes-
trewn with some explosive
political booby-traps involv-
ing his closest confidants -
Bert Lance and Hamilton
Jordan.
Lance, who bowed out
under pressure as the
administration's budget
director, is under indictment
for his slipshod practices
when he was the president s
"friendly banker" back in
Georgia.
Jordan, now Carter's chief
White House honcho, has
been charged with partici-
pating in the cocaine-sniff-
ing scene in New York's
discotheque society and at
Hollywood parties. The
charges against the 35-year-
old presidential protege thus
far have been pretty nebu-
lous but nevertheless the
press and television have
given extensive coverage to
the allegations.
The most potentially rui-
nous scandal may be explod-
ed, however, by a grand jury
which is investigating a pos-
sible White House cover-up
of a Robert Vesco scandal.
Vesco is the unscrupulous
financier who did a moon-
light flit from this country
to escape jail for his fiduci-
ary misdoings.
This column disclosed that
Vesco enlisted the help of
two Georgians early in the
Carter administration to
approach the White House in
the hope of ending extradi-
tion proceedings against
him.
It has been established
that one of the Georgians,
Spencer Lee IV, accepted a
$10,000 downpayment from
Vesco and approached Rich-
ard Harden, a Jordan chum
in the White House chain of
command. With visions of
additional millions dancing
Jn his head, Lee told Harden
of Vesco's approach. The
White House version is that
Harden touted him off any
further efforts on Vesco's
behalf.
Yet when we appeared
before the grand jury at our
request, we discovered that
the panel had had no prior
knowledge of the white
House involvement. The Jus-
tice Department has shuf-
fled three ditierent prosecu-
tors in and out of the
presentation. The conscien-
tious grand jury foreman,
Ralph Ulmer. sought to quit
his post, charging in a letter
to the presiding federal
judge that "coverup activi-
ties are being orchestrated
within the Department of
Justice under the concept
that the Administration
must be protected at all
costs "
WATCH ON WASTE: Lob-
byists for the nation's hospi-
tals have succeeded thus far
in smothering any legisla-
tion to curb their inordinate
profiteering at the expense
of the sick and dying. An
unpublished report prepared
by the Government Account-
ing Office for Sen. Herman
Talmadge shows how the
hospital profession is pursu-
ing a devil-take-the-hind-
most purchasing policy as
long as the customer pays
the bill.
A study of six cities
revealed that hospital pur-
chasing agents pay wide
variations in buying such
basic supplies as bandages
and oxygen units. The GAO
investigators found that
buyers in the same city rare-
ly checked with each other
on commonplace orders.
They found that medical
supply salesmen often
conned hospital purchasing
agents into thinking they
were getting special price
deals. The salesmen urged
that the deal had to be kept
hush-hush. The GAO report-
ed that on most of the deals
the hospitals were being
stung for more than the
going price.
Footnote: Anyone with
knowledge of government
extravagance can write to
JACK ANDERSONS
WATCH ON WAST2, P.O.
Box 2300 Washington, DC,
20013.
Thursday, October 4, 1979, Page 4
Greenville, N.C.
wFto
H
��I
- NO TOVAXNfr -
NORML grows older
By LARRY POPELKA
A few weeks ago a
fellow well into his 40s
invited me to listen to some
of his generation& music.
I've just about had it
with Frank Sinatra, Law-
rence Welk and Geritol
commercials, so I declined.
"What's the matter?"
he said. "Don't you like the
Beach Boys, Jefferson Air-
plane, the Beatles or any of
those other '60s groups?"
I do. But it wasn't until
then that I realized just
what's happened.
The '60s have grown
nearly 20 years old. The
flower children are bus-
inessmen. Richard Nixon is
living in New York. Rolling
Stone is doing articles about
Johnny Carson. And Bob
Dylan is singing about his
born-again religion.
Marijuana has grown
up, too.
In the '60s the act of
lighting up a joint had
meaning. It meant you were
a rebel who hated the war,
hated LBJ and probably
hated your parents who
were part of the establish-
ment.
Today the only thing it
means is that you probably
can't afford cocaine.
Pot is as much a part of
today's establishment as
Hamilton Jordan, Chip Car-
ter and all those other
alleged druggies running
the country.
At last count an esti-
mated 37 million Americans
had lit up at least one joint
and many others who
hadn't, viewed it as a
legitimate form of recrea-
tion, like drinking, bowling
and baseball.
Perhaps the best ex-
ample of how times have
changed, however, is found
at the National Organization
for the Reform of Marijuana
Laws headquarters in Wash-
ington, D.C.
NORML is about as
ordinary as any Washington
lobby group. They've got
an office downtown with
desks, typewriters, station-
ery, copy machines and
several full-time paid em-
ployees.
It's almost like a bus-
iness. There are no mari-
juana plants growing in a
back room or stashes of
dope hidden behind books.
When I walked into their
office a few weeks ago,
Peter Meyers, their chief
legal counsel wasn't fum-
bling with a rolling paper.
He was fumbling with a
carton of Carleton cigar-
ettes.
Meyers, who looks like a
throwback to the '60s with
his long uncombed hair and
unshaven face, has been
with NORML for six years
and seen it change.
"Six years ago we were
just trying to break in and
present a perspective that
wasn't being presented
he remembers. "Nobody
really took us seriously.
"Today we're estab-
lished. We present our-
selves in a straight middle-
class way, and a lot of times
now the press calls us
instead of us calling them.
We're no different than the
National Rifle Association.
Some people � like the
yippies � don't even
support us any more,
because they think we've
gotten too conservative.
Yes, it's true. NORML
has become just another
conservative piece of the
establishment. The long
fight for marijuana legaliza-
tion has mellowed them.
Earlier this year Keith
Stroup, who founded and
led the organization through
its first nine years, left to
seek fame and fortune as a
yVashington criminal law-
yer. He mellowed.
To raise funds, NORML
now sells a complete line of
NORML accessories, such
as match books and leafy-
green T-shirts which are
advertised in national maga-
zines such as Playboy.
Mellow, very mellow.
But last summer
NORML topped itself. In-
stead of leading their
annual Fourth of July
Washington, D.C, smoke-in
� which has become so
established it now ranks
mention in The Washington
Post's listing of Indepen-
dence Day events � the
NORML folks backed out
for fear that it would be too
riotous. Now that's mellow.
"We didn't think the
smoke-in would accomplish
anything says Meyers.
"The yippies are still into
that type of protest, and
they were the only ones
who came
According to Meyers,
the more sensible thing to
do is lobby government
leaders.
So far his group has
talked 11 states into decrim-
inalizing pot, and Meyers
says Washington, Wiscon-
sin, Michigan and the
District of Columbia are
also close to dropping
treaty allows
for meducal
so pot could
criminal penalties tor simple
possession.
One of their biggest
detractors, so far, says
Meyers, has been President
Carter.
"Carter's been ver
good with his words, but
he's had no followup
Meyers says. "His Drug
Enforcement Agency head.
Peter Bensinger, keeps
sabatoging us by putting
out distorted studies on
marijuana's effects. And
Carter's never done a damn
thing to help us out in
Congress
However, Meyers says
NORML has found a few
loopholes.
First, the
legalization
use, he says,
conceivably be sold in drug
stores alongside aspirin.
Second, the treaty says
nothing about THC, the
chemical in marijuana which
makes you high. So,
according to Meyers, syn-
thetic THC could be le-
galized.
Finally, Meyers says.
the treaty specifically in-
cludes nothing about canna-
bis leaves and seeds since
in some countries such as
India they are used in a
popular drink called bhang.
"It's unlikely that the
U.S. will drop out or try to
change the treaty, so
marijuana may never be
sold in grocery stores like
regular cigarettes Meyers
says. "But there are lots of
ways to get around it
Marijuana aspirin? Svn-
thetic THC? Bhang soda?'
Maybe we were better
off in the '60s.
MANAGING EDITOR
Richard Green
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Anita Lancaster
NEWS EDITOR
ASST. NEWS EDITOR
FEATURES EDITOR
ASST. DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
The East Carolinian
EDITOR
Marc Barnes
ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR
DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISINGLeigh Coakley
Robert M. Swaim
BUSINESS MANAGER
Steve O'Geary
Karen Wendt
Terry Gray
Bill Jones
Terry Herndon
SPORTS EDITOR
ASST. SPORTS EDITOR
COPY EDITOR
AD TECH. SUPER.
Charles Chandler
Jimmy DuPree
Jiane Henderson
Paul Lincke
THE EAST CAROLINIAN is the student Publications Center (Old South Building). Our
newspaper of East Carolina University
sponsored by the Media Board of ECU and
is distributed each Tuesday and Thursday
during the academic year (weekly during the
summer).
Offices are located on the second floor of the
mailing address is: Old South Building, ECU,
Greenville, NC 27834.
The phone numbers are: 757-6366, 6367,
6309. Subscriptions are $10 annually, alumni
$6 annually.
v

(.






he East Carolinian
tian �
sports
Thursday, October 4, 1979, Page 5
Greenville, N.C.
Pirates take week off after
disaDPointin;
Freshman quarterback Carlton Nelson
(Photo by Chap Gurley)
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
Following their big 45-10 victory over VMI last
Saturday, the East Carolina Pirates now have a week off
before taking on The Citadel on Oct. 13.
"I'm glad to have this time to work on some rough
edges said ECU head coach Pat Dye. "We still have
some problems on defense that 1 want to work on a lot.
"It's not a matter of effort. We seem to be whipping
people but not controlling the block. We're getting better,
though, and hopefully will get better with the time we'll
have this week
The Pirates ahve the usual number of bumps and
bruises and will use the open date this Saturday to heal
some of them. Having an open date this week gives the
team one less game it must play without injured starters
Joe Godette and Noah Clark, both out with knee injuries.
The coaching staff plans to use the extra time, also, to
refine and improve the games of some younger players
who have potential but few minutes on the collegiate
gridiron.
"With this open date and the one on October 20, we
will try to get some of the younger guys ready for action
further on down the road said Pirate assistant coach
Frank Orgel.
The team will, of course, work on some of the things
that have been problems in the past. "We hope to iron out
some of our past mistakes said Orgel. "We will work a
great deal on fundamentals
The Pirates will spend much of the week working on the
Oct. 13 game with Citadel. Because it is this year's
homecoming game, the East Carolina squad will want to
carry over the momentum started in last Saturday's win to
the Citadel game.
One would wonder if the open date is a negative point
for the team rather than a positive one, since the VMI
game was such a spirited effort by the Pirates.
"We needed badly to win big last week said Orgel,
"but we also need badly to work on some things. It's good
to be able to practice when team enthusiasm is high. Right
now, it is very high after our big win
Orgel feels the extra week of practice will allow the
team to become even more spirited than had a game been
played this week. "We plan to build on the enthusiasm
started last week said Orgel, "but we also need badly to
work on some things. It's good to be able to practice when
team enthusiasm is high. Right now, it is very high after
our big win
Orgel feels the extra week of practice will allow the
team to become even more spirited than had a game been
played this week. "We plan to build on the enthusiasm
started last week he explained. "We should come
together more emotionally this week than usual.
"And, too, we have two weeks to get ready to play a
good Citadel team. They run the I-formation much like
Carolina does, so that should help us even further
Looking ahead to the Oct. 27 meeting with the Tar
Heels, the Pirates have to like the looks of the schedules of
the two teams. East Carolina has this open date, the
Citadel game and then another open date before facing the
16th-ranked Heels.
North Carolina, on the other hand, has a tough road
ahead before facing the Pirates. The Heels have an easy
one at home this week witn Cincinnati but then must host a
tough Wake Forest club before traveling to Raleigh to face
a very physical N.C. State team.
Doubles as campus cop
Karpovich stars for Pirate soccer team
ECU cagers begin workouts
The East Carolinia basketball season is getting near as
evidenced by Tuesday afternoon's Pirate media day.
Numerous reporters and photographers were invited to the
interview and picture session.
One thing that was evident to all onlookers at the
-ession was the heighth that the Pirates have this season.
Coach Dave Odom has any number of prospects for the
front line. t M .
Also evident on this day was who the Pirates' "star' is.
For the past two seasons Oliver Mack has received all the
limelight. This year guard George Maynor is around to
steal the show from the rest of the team.
Mavnor is well thought of because of his heady play
last season and the fact that he was drafted in the fourth
round of last year's National Basketball Association draft.
He, of course, decided to finish his career with ECU rather
than trying to make a go at it with the Chicago Bulls.
Maynor was occupied with a reporter or a photo man
almost'all afternoon. It appears that, if he performs up to
standards, Maynor will be busy in the locker room after
most Pirate contests.
� �
ALSO APPEARING at the basketball media day, which
also included women's basketball, was ECU head football
coach Pat Dye. Dye showed up, on the request of the
Sports Information Office to be photographed with Lady
Pirate superstar Rosie Thompson. Dye recruited Thompson
for the university when the Blounts Creek native was a
senior in high school.
WELL THE BASEBALL PLAYOFFS are underway and
it is time to look to the World Series and pick the eventual
winner there. The pick here is the Baltimore Orioles. The
Orioles finished with the best record in baseball, by far.
The team has the best manager in baseball in Earl
Weaver, the game's best pitching staff headed by Mike
Flanagan and a super combination of established veteran
stars and scrappy youngsters. Outfielder Ken Singleton
had a super year and would seem to be as good a bet as
anyone to win the American League's Most Valuable
Plaver award. Flanagan is the odds-on favorite to capture
the'Cy Young award in the A.L. after winning 23 games for
the Birds. �� , .
BALTIMORE'S OTvnONENT, California, is making its
first appearance ever in the post-season playoffs. Even
though the Orioles are heavily favored, the Angels cannot
be counted out. Not with Don Baylor, Bob Grich Rod
Carew Brian Downing and Willie Aikens around to knock
the cover off of any baseball not thrown perfectly. Baylor
will battle Singleton for MVP honors after leading the
majors in runs batted in, with 139. Nolan Ryan and Frank
Tanana head up a more than respectable Angel pitching
THE LADY PIRATE basketball squad lost an
experienced team member Monday. Lynn Emerson, a
junior, decided to quit the squad after having suffered with
a leg injury for some time. Lady Pirate coach Cathy
Andruzzi noted that the injury and a busy schedule had
made it hard for Emerson to continue playing. We 11 miss
Lynn said Andruzzi, "but I guess she knows what s best
for her . .
TWO PIRATE FOOTBALL starters, both seniors, are
currently sidelined with knee injuries. Offensive tackle Joe
Godette and defensive tackle Noah Clark are both expected
to be out until the Oct. 27 game at North Carolina. Both
sat on the bench last Saturday when the Pirates trounced
VMI 45-10. Both wanted to play badly. An example ot this
came at halftime when Clark was seen by Godette scoping
the student section of the crowd. "You wish you were in
the stands with that girl, don't you? questioned Godette.
"No " answered Clark, "I wish I were in there, said
Clark as he pointed directly to the Pirate dressing room.
"No lie followed Godette, "no lie
Bv ED WILLIAMS
Staff Writer
There's a person on the
East Carolina campus who
is out to assist others in two
totally different ways.
His name is Jeff Kar-
povich and he leads a
'1'iuble life.
On �ne handx he is an
important member of the
ECU soccer squad, assisting
teammates in the pro-
duction of goals.
On the o her hand, he is
also a campus security
policeman who assists
others tn their times r
need.
Karpovich, a senior at
ECU, was born in Ramsey,
New Jersey. He has an
uncle who is the Chief of
Detectives in the City of
New York Police Depart-
ment. He also has two
brothers who are in various
forms of law enforcement.
These people have influ-
enced him in his law
enforcement career.
Karpovich claims his
brothers also helped him to
develop his soccer abilities.
Karpovich, who is from
a large family, was never
able to afford to go to a
soccer camp, but would
instead compete against his
brothers and friends in his
back yard to practice. He
liked to play against older
and bigger competition.
"I got roughed up a bit,
but I learned more he
said.
He first played organ-
ized soccer twelve years
ago. He also played Inter-
scholastic soccer in the
eighth grade. But it wasn't
until his senior year in high
school that "everything
came together
He shattered the school
scoring record of eleven
goals by booting in 27 goals
in 14 games. He was the
captain and most valuable
player of his team and the
count) scoring champion.
He "made just about every
team" for honors, including
all-America.
This led to Karpovich's
being heavily recruited and
he credits his high school
coach, Ed Groh, with
helping him handle this
area.
"He went out of his
way to do you favors he
said.
Coach Groh supplied
information and newspaper
clippings concerning Kar-
povich's accomplishments to
the college recruiters who
had shown interest in the
high scoring forward.
One of the coaches in
the chase was Curtis Fye
who was the soccer coach at
East Carolina at the time.
"He phoned me and
wrote me handwritten let-
ters Karpovich said.
Coach Frye explained to
Karpovich that the ECUsoc-
cer program was growing
and was not as good as
some of the "name"
schools in soccer, such a
Lynchburg College which
Karpovich was considering.
Frye wanted Karpovich to
help him build a successful
program here.
Karpovich narrowed his
choice of schools to Lynch-
burg College and ECU. He
felt that a university would
be able to offer him more
socially and academically
than a college, so he
eventually chose to come to
East Carolina.
His first two years were
illness and injury plagued.
In his freshman year, he
contracted mononucleousis,
and was out of shape when
the season got under way.
When he finally got a
chance to play against Old
Dominion, he was hit in the
leg and suffered internal
contusions that put him out
for the remainder of the
season.
His sophomore year was
not much better. He
suffered through the season
with a virus which put him
out of action for two weeks,
plus a broken hand.
He then quit school for a
vear to "establish in-state
residency" and returned to
school for his junior year.
He continued to have
problems as a junior, but
these were "more mental
than physical
Karpovich "didn't see
things eye to eye" with
second-year coach Brad
Smith and wound up sitting
on the bench.
Even with his limited
playing time, Karpovich
managed to score five
goals, second highest on the
team for the year (which
tied him with Phil Martin).
He also finished tied with
Martin foe second in team
scoring honors.
Karpovich came into his
senior year wanting to "just
play up to my full
potential But illness again
caught up with him in the
form of a fever and swollen
glands. He couldn't practice
for the first two weeks and
then missed the Elon game.
But as the season has
advanced, Karpovich's
physical condition has im-
proved. In a 2-0 win over
Davidson he scored both
goals and "started getting
the respect of the team
back
He was pleased with
that effort because his job a
a forward "is mostVy to
score He has collected
four goals so far this season
to lead the team.
"The morale ot the team
is pretty high he said.
"We all get along pretty
well. We're playing really
well and we're winning
"I live two different
lives. I put on a uniform
and play that role he said
referring to his police work.
"Then I put on a uniform
and play this role he said
motioning out towards the
soccer field.
Hopefully, for the bene-
fit of the ECU soccer team,
Jeff Karpovich will continue
to play at least one of his
roles very well.
Lady Pirate basketball recruits new look
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
After finishing the 1978-79 season with a respectable
18-11 record and losing only two seniors, it would appear
that this year's edition of Lady Pirate basketball would be
filled with experience and destined for glory.
Destined for glory they may be, but experience is one
thing the Lady Bucs will miss.
True; only gouard Gale Kerbaugh and reserve forward
April Ross were lost as seniors, but only four of their
teammates will return to do battle for East Carolina.
"They just weren't able to compete on the Division 1
level of women's basketball explains second-year head
coach Cathy Andruzzi. "They just didn't have the skill
required
,v
This is the year that we want to start
a tradition. We're very young, but very
enthusiastic
Cathy Andruzzi
Of the returnees, NCAIAW scoring champion Rosie
Thompson will again be the catalyst of the fast-break
oriented defense. From there, however, it's an open field
of battle for the remaining slots.
Lanky Marcia Girven returns to fight for her center
position, but others vying for starting roles this year don't
have to look up to the six-foot junior.
With Thompson virtually assured of one forward spot,
three freshmen and two transfers have until the November
17 opener with William and Mary to prove themselves.
Standing 6'1 Mary Denkler would lffnr t) be
equipped to play the post, but her outside shooting touch
makes her far too valuable to hide under the goal.
Donna Brayboy (510") and Donna Moody (5'11") are
the other two freshmen struggling for the top five.
Junior Kathy Riley conies to East Carolina via Middle
Tennessee State University, where she averaged 20 points
per game but chose to leave because of the tougher
schedule the Lady Pirates will face.
Afer two years at Wagner College, Heidi Owen rejoins
her coach after a separation of one year.
"I had played under Coach Andruzzi and I knew what
type of a program she would have at ECU said Owen
'We had a new coach at Wagner last year and she and I
really didn't get along very well. It's been no cultural
shock changing from the north to the south though.
Talent will not be sacrificed at the guard positions, as
season assist record holder Lydia Rountree and speedy
Lillion Barnes have a freshman and junior college transfer
pursueing starting berths.
Fran Hooks from nearby Goldsboro joins the Lady Bucs
this season with the same situation as Barnes a year ago.
Hooks, though a talented shooter and ball handler, boards
the Pirate's ship without benefit of a scholarship.
Peace College transfer Uurie Sikes rounds out the East
Carolina back court experts. Sikes, a native of Marietta,
Georgia, brings an added" dimension lacked by Lady Pirate
teams in the past; a flashy ballhandler with deadly
accuracy from the perimeter.
"From what I've heard, in the past there's usually been
six or seven top girls says the enthusiastic Sikes, "but
here, everybody is about on the same level.
"We wouldn't be here right now if we thought there
was no chance of having a winning season. We want to win
the big games, but I play against every team the same
way
The 'new-look' Lady Pirates have a great deal of raw
talent, but these must be unifird and orchestrated by
Andruzzi afod her assistant, Marcia Richards.
"This year is a year that we want to start a tradition
says Andruzzi. "With the depth that we have, even though
they're freshmen, I'm not going to be scared to look down
the bench. '
"We're very young, but hopefully very enthusiastic,
explains Andruazi. "It takes a lot of time to teach our
system, but I think they'll pick up fast. We have several
potential leaders out there
Barnes, Girven in 1978-79 action
1F�
41





4 October 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 6
The Fearless Football Forecast
CINCINATTI AT NORTH CAROLINA
N.C. STATE AT AUBURN
GEORGIA TECH AT NOTRE DAME
WASHINGTON STATE AT SOUTHERN CAL
NEW MEXICO STATE AT NEBRASKA
MICHIGAN AT MICHIGAN STATE
NORTH TEXAS STATE AT SOUTHERN MISS
TENN-CHATANOOGA AT APPALACHIAN STATE
VIRGINIA AT CLEMSON
PENN STATE AT MARYLAND
OKLAHOMA STATE AT SOUTH CAROLINA
UCLA AT STANFORD
CHARLES CHANDLERTERRY HERNDONJIMMY DuPREEJOHN NOLAN
31-16-130-17-127-20-114-9-1
North CarolinaNorth CarolinaNorth CarolinaNorth Carolina
N.C. StateN.C. StateN.C. StateN.C. State
Notre DameNotre DameNotre DameNotre Dame
Southern CalSouthern CalSouthern CalSouthern Cal
NebraskaNebraskaNebraskaNebraska
MichiganMichiganMichiganMichigan
Southern MissSouthern MissSouthern MissNorth Texas State
Appalachian StateTenn-ChatanoogaAppalachian StateAppalachian State
ClemsonClemsonVirginiaClemson
Penn StateMarylandPenn StateMaryland
South CarolinaSouth CarolinaSouth CarolinaSouth Carolina
UCLAUCLAUCLAUCLA
JOHN EVANS
Durham Morning Herald
North Carolina
N.C. State
Notre Dame
Southern Cal
Nebraska
Michigan
Southern Miss
Tenn-Chatanooga
Clemson
Maryland
Oklahoma State
UCLA
V.
Trojans maintain top ranking
Bv
HERSCHEL NISSENSON
AP Sports Writer
Three of the weekend's
most publicized shootouts
turned out to be little more
than target practice for
Texas, Nebraska and Notre
Dame.
While top-rated South-
ern California and No. 14
Ohio State had to rally for
last-minute triumphs over
No. 20 Louisiana State USC
17-12 and No. 17 UCLA
Ohio State 17-13, the other
matchups between members
The Associated Press Top
Twenty were really mis-
matchups.
Fourth-ranked Texas put
the clamps on Missouri's
offense, holding the fifth-
ranked Tigers to 164 yards
in a 21-0 triumph. Sixth
ranked Nebraska trailed No.
18 Penn State 14-0 after one
period but erupted for a
28-14 halftime bulge and
ted the Nittany Lions
42-17. the most points
against a Joe Paterno team
-ince 1966, his first year as
ad coach.
And No. 15 Notre Dame,
facing its third straight Big
Ten power, crunched se-
enth-ranked Michigan
State 27-3 as Vagas Fer-
- � rushed for 169 vards
and moved past the legend-
ary George Gipp into
second place on the school's
all-time rushing chart.
Meanwhile, runnerup
Alabama walloped Vander-
bilt 66-3, third-ranked Okla-
homa pasted Rice 63-21 �
Oklahoma's offense meets
Texas' defense in two
weeks � No. 8 Houston
trounced West Texas State
49-10 and No. 9 Washington
buried Fresno State 49-14.
The only other Top
Twenty team to have it easy
was No. 13 Arkansas, a 33-8
winner over Tulsa.
Tenth-ranked Purdue
was hard-pressed to turn
back Oregon 13-7, No. 11
Michigan shaded California
14-10, No. 12 Florida State
downed Virginia Tech 1710,
No. 16 North Carolina State
edged Wake Forest 17-14
and No. 19 Southern
Methodist was knocked off
by Tulane 24-17.
Texas rolled to an 18-0
halftime lead over Missouri
on three of John Goodson's
four field goals and a 1-yard
run by Jam Jones, who
finished with 142. Missouri
has been a second-half team
all season, but Texas Coach
Fred Akers explained that
"we're a second-half ball-
club, too, and we pride
ourselves on that fact
Tim Hager, getting his
first start, rallied Nebraska
from a two-touchdown defi-
cit with scoring passes of 11
and 70 yards to Junior
Miller in the second
quarter.
Before the period ended,
Kenny Brown dashed 16
yards to put the Corn-
huskers ahead and Andra
Franklin added a 5-yad
touchdown run.
"We can explode any
time said Miller.
Notre Dame's Ferguson
rushed for 167 yards,
including touchdowns of 24
and 48 yards in the third
period, as the Irish stopped
Michigan State's 10-game
winning streak. His second
TD came on fourth-and-one.
"It was an off-tackle
play and suddenly every-
thing opened up Fer-
guson said. "Tim Foley
took his man out, and when
the linebackers went with
the outside flow I just cut
back in and blew it out. You
don't think big run. You
just stay with the ball and
let it happen
Southern Cal trailed LSU
12-3 with 10 minutes left,
but Charles White, who
rushed for 185 yards,
plunged across from 4 yards
out and the Trojans pulled
it out on Paul McDonald's
to Kevin
32 seconds
8-yard pass
Williams with
left.
Alabama got two touch-
downs apiece from Stead-
man Shealy and Joe Jones
in crushing Vandervilt,
while Oklahoma
while Oklahoma's Billy Sims
rushed for 103 yards and
three touchdowns � all in
the first half � against
Rice.
Backup fullback David
Barett scored three times in
the second period as
Houston drubbed West
Texas State, while Tom
Porras scored one touch-
down and passed for
another and Joe Steele
scored twice in Washing-
ton's rout of Fresno State.
WESTERN
SIZZLIN
Distributed By
Taylor Beverage Co.
Goldsboro
IHIPORTED
Heineken
HOLLAND BEER
THE 1 IMPORTED BEER IN AMERICA.
STEAKHOUSE
8 ox. SIRLOIN $2.99
Complete with Idaho King Baked
Potato, Texas Toast & Margarine.
Offer Good Mon. Oct. 8-Wed. Oet. IO
2903 E. 10th St. 758-2712
Theater Arts
presents:
October 16th and 17th
Hendrix Theater
Tickets are now on Sale
at the
Mendenhall Student Center
Central Ticket Office
STUDENT UNION
EAST CAROUNA UttlVHKITY
i
i
s





�jv-t - V
4 October 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Page,
ECU-VMI touchdown festival action
(Action sequence by Chap Gurley)
Ritcher leads nationally
ranked N.C. State
By DICK BRINSTER
Associated Press Writer
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) �
Jim Ritcher sat there and
smiled as he pondered
another of those All-
America, Outland-Trophy
questions he is forced to
tnswer each time a man
with a microphone or a
pencil comes within earshot.
"Yes. they can come
r me, but I've got two
r guards next to me
ami they can't ignore
them said Ritcher in
some of the credit for
Carolina State's sue-
to teammates Chris
Dieterieh and Chuck Stone.
Ritcher. the returning
All-America center, was
asked to recall a play in the
unbeaten Wolfpack's thrill-
ing 17-14 victory over
previously unblemished
Wake Forest. It involved
one of his many encounters
with the Deacons' out-
standing noseguard James
Parker.
The 6-foot, 210-pound
Parker lined up helmet-to-
helmet with the 6-3, 245-
pound Ritcher. It was a play
neither would soon forget.
"Yes. I remember the
play said Ritcher. "That's
the way I'd like to block all
the time
On that play Parker
moved neither left nor to
right, and the 20-year-old
center from Hinckley, Ohio,
simph muscled him five
yards downfield and de-
posited him in the mud.
Did Parker
get even:
Here was Ritcher's chance
to claim he overwhelmed
the best noseguard in this
part of the country. As the
weekly recipient of the best
grade among N.C. State
lineman, he had an oppor-
tunity to downgrade Par-
ker's performance. Only
those who saw the films
would know for sure.
"He sure did said
Ritcher. "He embarrassed
me a couple of times
Ritcher would qualify as
a shy country boy on the
surface. And what more
could one expect from a
native of a town famous for
the annual return of the
buzzards? As San Juan
Capistrano goes, so goes
Hinckley, Ohio.
The Wolfpack center, a
odds-on first-round pick in
the NFL draft, is just
learning to cope with the
busy schedule of a young
celebrity.
Everywhere he goes he's
asked about his All-America
pick and whether or not he
should win the Outland
Trophy.
He leaves the selections
to those who vote and the
Ritcher legend of impossible
blocks to those who see him
play. They will spread the
word. That is virtual
certainty.
"It was really difficult to
answer questions at first
said Ritcher. "I was always
looking to give the perfect
answer. Now I may not say
the right thing, but I give
all the answers
Captain's Soup
& Salad $1.75
The best cup of clam
chowder south of Boston,
with crisp green salad and
your choice of dressing.
Captain's Soup
& Sandwich $2.25
A steaming cup of Clam
Chowder and a filet of Fish
on a toasted Bun, Tartar
Sauce, and French Fries
11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Daily except Saturday
But Ritcher is not
concerned with repeating as
an All-America or winning
the Outland Trophy at this
point. He looks at N.C.
State's 4-0 record and has a
burning desire to make it
5-0.
"I just want us to put
four good quarters to-
gether he said,
gether he said. "It's a
matter of getting your
assignments straight
Ritcher, according to the
Wolfpack coaching staff, is
the most perfect offensive
lineman they've ever seen.
And no opponent ever has
hinted he's had a bad
game.
At that rate he can't be
missing too many assign-
ments, either on or off the
football field.
Got a real problem ?
Get some REAL help!
Phone:
758HELP
Walk-in
Clinic
1117 Evans St
HEAL CRISIS CENTER
24 hours
Greenville
REVERSABLE "WEATHER BUFFER"
NEEDX-TRA
m . CASH?
Fair prices paid for
gold and silver.
Mixed Media
120 E. 5th St.
758-2127
r1w
THE PARTY BEVERAGE CENTER
Corner of 10th & Evans St.
Open 24 Hours
CALL US FOR ALL YOUR PARTY NEEDS WE
HAVE DELIVERY & CATERING SERVICES
752-6303 or 752-5933
WE SUPPORT THE PIRATES
Stadium length rain slicker reverses from khaki color vinyl to either
navy blue, forest green, or burgundy rayon duck cloth. Hooded.
drawstring throat closure, double snap pockets, and double track
reinforced stitching. 1Q if)
The Clothes Horse
208 E. 5th St.
OCTOBER at THE OPRY HOUSE
SUNDAY
OUTDOOR
CONCERT
PAYCHECK
CROSS
McCLINTON
BROWN
14
21
BILL
CR
LYERLY
28
MONDAY
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
HOT SHANDY
CR
THURSDAY
HOT SHANDY
CR
8 9
In keeping with oik policy of presenting e
variety of quality entertainment, we have
devised the following rating code to assist
you in selecting which nights you wish to
visit the OPRY HOUSE.
CR-Country Rock, Willie, Waylon, Hank Jr.
C&W-Traditional Country & Western
BG-Biue Grass, Doc Watson, Earl Scruggs
SR�Southern Rock, Lynard Skynard,
Molly Hatchet
22
29
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HAT BAND
CR
O
23
30
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Fri. 3-7 for
HAPPY HOUR
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LADIES FREE
10
PETER ROWAN
11
PETER ROWAN
FRIDAY
HUGH BRILEY
C&W
12
WROTE AND
PERFORMED THE SONG
'PANAMA RED"
CR
CR
LADIES FREE
17
SNUFF
LADIES $1.00
18
SNUFF
VIRGINIA'S HOTTEST ROCK BAND
SR SR
LADIES FREE
4 24
GENE WATSON
TENN. HAT BAND
CR
31
BILL LYERLY
$25.00
$60.00 Prizes for
$75.00 Best
Customes
CR
LADIES FREE
TENNESSEE
HAT BAND
CR
25
BILL LYERLY
CR
19
AMBUSH
CR
26
NEW KNOTHOLE
REVUE
CR- C&W
SATURDAY
HUGH BRILEY
C&W
13
BILL
CR
LYERLY
20
AMBUSH
CR
27
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REVUE
CR - C & W
PHONE 758-3943
Located between Hastings Ford and Washington Cutoff on 2S4 By-pass-
Doors Open 8:00
For Nashville Acts Only - Doors Open 7:15





r
The East Carolinian
nian 1 am
features
Thursday, October 4, 1979,Page 8
Greenville, N.C.
Interview
Bandy's life is country music
Woe Bandy stands beside the six foot tall bar stool
rented him by the management of the Carolina Opry
(Photo by Tamara Bryan)
"The Long Run
a must
Eagles fans
By PAT MINGES
Features Writer
Admittedly a lot of junk music is being proliferated in
cording studios. Yet there is also a lot of good music
ing released. Older artists such as the Eagles and The
Who have released excellent new material, and neophyte
ups uch as Wha-Koo and The Sims Brothers Band are
celling also. The unifying characteristic of these albums
- a very pleasant balance of up-tempo and mid-tempo
tunes producing a crowd-pleasing selection.
The Eagles, one of the more influential groups of the
have released The Long Run, and it proves to be one
�heir finer albums. The vocals are as tight as ever, and
Felder. Frey, and Walsh's electric guitars have taken the
forefront of the Eagles sound. Timothy Schmidt has joined
Don Henley to fill out the rhythm section and Dave
Sanborn and Jimmy Buffett make guest appearances on
The Long Run.
The Long Run extends the tradition of the Eagles last
album, being a hard-driving rock sound surrounded by
guitar pyrotechnics. The songs are written by the Eagles,
J.D. Souther and Bob Seger, and Bill Scymczyk handles
production chores. Good music paired with superb
production make The Long Run a must for rock
enthusiasts.
The Who have released the original motion picture
soundtrack from their film Quadrophenia The album
features new recordings of some Quadrophenia selections,
classic R & B, and previously unreleased material featuring
the late Keith Moon. The new material is very good, and
the reworkings of the old tunes provide a cleaner, crisper
sound.
"The Long Run "extends the tradition
of the Eagles last album being a
hard driving rock sound surrounded
by guitar pyrotechnics.
It is hard to imagine The Who being mentioned in the
context of pop albums, but Quadrophenia reveals the
gentler side of The Who. The new music possesses an
almost pop sound. In fact much of Quadrophenia is early
'60s pop music by various artists, and a good deal of
Quadrophenia itself exposes the natural, more mellow
approach Townshend prefers. This album is best for Who
collectors, though not recommended for everyone.
Although Wha-Koo has released two previous albums,
their latest release will bring the group major rock status.
Fragile Line features David Palmer (formerly of Steely
Dan) on lead vocals and as composer and Ron Fransen on
keyboards. The group maintains its vocalkeyboard
orientation and their influences range from classical to folk
and jazz. Fragile Line is a smoothly flowing, cleanly
produced album chock full of breezy poprock hits.
ElektraAsylum has captured an exciting new group call
ElektraAsylum has captured an exciting new group
called The Sims Brothers Band who have just released an
album by the same name. Outstanding vocals, poignant
guitars, and catchy keyboards make The Sims Brothers
Band worthy of special note. Their debut release wields a
progressive approach to pop music and shows much
promise.
The growth of pop music has manifested itself in the
multitude of excellent selections available on the market.
Old favorites are being challenged by new artists, and
competition can only benefit the listener. All we have to do
is sit back, listen, and enjoy.
House last Thursday. The barstool was given to Bandy
while he was singing his country hit song Barstool
Mountain.
By WILLIAM JONES
Features Editor
Wagon wheels, thick rough hewn paneling, and a front
porch overlooking the floor tables which face the stage
provide the Carolina Opry House with an unmistakably
down home atmosphere. It is an air that lends itself very
well to the kind of music that Moe Bandy, who headlined
here last Thursday, performs.
Moe Bandy writes and sings pure, untoward
"honky-tonk His musical style might most readily be
compared to that of George Jones. The songs are simple
and straight forward. They most often deal with life's hard
times.
Bandy is familiar with paying dues in life. He was
raised on the music of Hank Williams and Jimmie Rogers
(his grandfather worked with Rogers on the railroad). Upon
finishing high school, Bandy became a sheet metal worker
by day, and entertainer by night. These long (often 70
work hours a week), hard days eventually paid off.
In 1973, he released Just Started Hating Cheating
Song Today. It did very well on the country charts. The
next 17 singles Bandy has released since then have made it
to the top 15. This includes two singles which have been
no. 1 hits, Bandy the Rodeo Clown, Cheating Situation,
and Good Ole Boys.
Prior to his performance, this reporter, along with Jon
Philips, City Editor of The Washington Daily News, had
the opportunity to speak with Moe Bandy about his music.
(Many thanks to Mr. Buzzledford of the Carolina Opry
house for arranging the interview.)
EC: You have a tour coming up called the "Moe and Joe"
tour, with Joe Stamply.
Bandy: We're currently doing that, we've just split up for a
few days. We just played New York Monday night and
meet in Charleston, West Virginia tomorrow. We'll be
Humor
Hey Guys
Is your roommate beginning to get on your nerves?
Mine most assuredly is. Granted, it takes a lot of
patience to live with another person, but I certainly feel
that I've tried. Why, I've put up with all kinds of things,
and I simply don't know how much more I can take.
For one thing, my roommate is absolutely insane about
beach music and insists upon playing it 25 hours a day.
Now don't get me wrong, I like it all right myself, but let's
face it, there are only so many beach song in existence.
So the same ones play over and over and over. I don't
know if I can stand it another day and, adding insult to
injury, my roommate tends to go berserk when I attempt to
listen to my punk rock favorites.
Another thing � was quite peeved the other day when
I woke up to 75-degree weather only to discover that my
dear roomie had absconded with my odor-ro-no. She may
have done it on purpose. I think she was still mad at me
for finishing off her shampoo on the morning of the last
football game. I thought she'd already washed her hair
since she had a towel wrapped around her head, but she
was actually giving herself a hot oil treatment.
On the flip side, I'll admit that I did make the mistake
.of losing her $18 biology book two days before the test, but
it was an accident and besides, she had gotten drunk the
week before and had thrown up all over my history notes.
We don't see eye to eye about our quarters either. She
can't understand that I have to leave my bike in the room
or someone might steal it, and she hates it when I let dirty
dishes sit. I still think a little green mold never hurt
anything. The other day my roommate got irritated because
I left my cup of ice on her dresser. She put the cup, ice
and all, between the sheets of my bed. I feel I was quite
justified in leaving an uncapped magic marker between her
sheets.
Do you know what else she did? She knocked a full
ashtray into my clothes basket and later got furious
because I did something minor like burn a hole in one of
her dresses. You can hardly even tell it's there, unless you
see it in the sunlight.
My roommate also went crazy when I drew a mustache
and an earring on her boyfriend's picture, but I hardly
think it's my fault. She can't take a joke. The other day,
after I remarked that she tied up the phone for three
hours, she was rude enough to say that I never get phone
calls anyway, so what difference did it make? That hurt.
Just for that, I stole her toothbrush and hairspray. She
can't survive without either of them.
I'm telling you, she's really driving me up a wall.
Yours, 775134
working some next week. Then we start a real long tour
Oct. 25, in Seattle. It will take us all through California,
Arizona and New Mexico.
Philips: Being on the road you must play al kinds o
places. Do you prefer to play the big halls or the smaller
clubs like this?
Bandy: It don't matter. I like a variety. I hate to play one
type place all the time. We play a lot of rodeos, fairs,
nightclubs, concerts, and I like that. That way you don t
know what you're going to run into next � it soui.ds like a
lively place here.
EC: Have you gotten into any funny or rough situati
while performing?
Bandy: Oh, I used to quite a bit. I played in Texas for
about 12 years before I got my first record and used to pla
in some wild places. Everything's been going prt
smoothly for a while. There's always something happen
with the band, we're always cutting up.
Philips: Have you ever been in eastern N.C. before.1'
Bandy: Yeah, I worked a show here four or five years ago
with Dolly Parton and Jack Green and several other people.
Philips: You've had several hits in the past but it see
like lately, with Good Ole Boys, Cheating Situation, and
Barstool Mountin, they've just been piling up one on top oi
the other.
Bandy: Yeah, really. I don't know, something happened.
Our last 17 songs in a row have done real well, and we ve
done 12 albums now. Last year, Cheating Situation went to
no. 1. Barstool Mountain was in the top 5, and Good Ole
Boys was just no. 1.1 don't know what it is. but I hope it
keeps coming. We're putting down seme good songs and
I've got a good producer and record company (Columbia)
and good people working for me.
Philips: When did you decide to grow the Ieard9
Bandy: I grew it during the Christmas holiday- w
ioing a T.V. show and the girl doing the makeup told me it
See Bandy, page 10
Brood album
lacks big
seller touch
Reader blasts Zappa story
Dear Features Editor,
The purpose of this
letter is two-fold: to correct
some of the errors and
misleading statements in
your recent review of Joe's
Garage called "Zappa Cuts
Loose" and to make a plea
for more carefully written
reviews.
First, let me state that I
am not a writer. I don't
have an impressive vocabu-
lary, I don't spell very well,
and I've never studied
journalism. I'm just a guy
who, among other things,
likes to listen to records
especially Frank Zappa
records. I've listened in-
tensely to all his public
releases, six concerts, quite
a few bootlegs and inter-
views � anything I could
get my hands on. This
Albums courtesy of Record Bar, Pitt Plaza & Carolina
East Mall.
Coming
Attractions
HOMECOMING
Beau Thorp and Generation
will provide music at this
year's homecoming dance.
The dance will be held Oct.
13, in Wright Auditorium.
Tickets are $2.00 for
students, $4.00 for the
public.
AMERICA
The Major Attractions
Committee presents Amer-
ica in concert on Tuesday,
October 9, at 8:00 p.m. in
Minges Coliseum.
ART EXHIBITION
Ride on an art exhibition,
will begin October 15 in the
Mendenhall Student Center
gallery.
background and not my
writing experience is what
supports the statements in
this letter.
My first reactions to the
article were surprise and
disappointment. Although a
lot of statements were in-
accurate, they were minor
flaws which I attributed to a
combination of human error
and the writer's not know-
ing any better. Some points
were so misleading, how-
ever, I felt I had to speak
my mind.
The most obvious mis-
take was calling Joe's
Garage the first release on
Zappa Records. The first
was Sheik Yerbouti. Joe's
Garage was the second.
Saying that Joe's Garage
is Zappa's finest work is
like playing God. I'll
certainly go along with
� "one of his finest though.
I rather doubt if "Cath-
� olic Girls" was released to
J "gesture defiantly" at cri-
l tics of "Jewish Princess"
t (Sheik Yerbouti) as "Cath-
l olic Girls" was written
� before the critics ever heard
I "Jewish Princess
� The most disturbing part
of the article to me, though,
was when the authors
suggested that this was the
first time Zappa was able to
speak his mind "without
fear of censorship This is
ridiculous! The only re-
strictions on him were in
the areas of proper distri-
bution and promotion. Ap-
parently the authors heard
news of Zappa's split from
Warner Bros. Records and
assumed that this was the
reason. I don't feel that this
kind of unsupported as-
sumption is fair to the artist
or the reader.
There are more points
that I could touch on, but I
won't. I'm sure many feel
I'm getting too picky as it
is. Perhaps I am, but this is
important to me and other
reviews will deal with
things that are important to
other people. I don't expect
the writers of these reviews
to know everything, but I
think it would be nice if
they gave their opinions
without sticking in things
they have made up because
it sounds good.
People want to believe
what they read. Something
as opinionated as a review,
unless written carefully, can
easily mislead the reader
into believing other things
that simply aren't true. I
enjoy reading other people's
opinions, but I think it is a
writer's responsibility to
know what he's talking
about before he prints it.
I'm tired of confusing
reviews full of big words
that only seek to expose the
swank journalistic technique
of the writer. Parts of the
article were really good, but
other parts were very guilty
of my previous statement. I
hope that a little more time
and thought will go into
future reviews. Thanks.
Sincerely,
Fred Midgett
P.O. Box 663
Maysville, NC 28555
(Editors note: Any al-
bum review with a byline is
an opinion and enjoys the
privilege of fair comment,
and readers should realize
this. However, factual err-
ors are unforgivable yet
inevitable, and we are
always open to corrections.)
By LARRY GRAHAM
Features Writer
Over the past few yeras,
there has been an influx of
musicians from the Nether-
lands. Few of the musicians
are well known here in the
United States with the
exception of Jan Akkerman,
a guitarist whose abilities
rival those of Eric Clapton's.
The Netherlands does not
always export quality,
though, as in the case of
Herman Brood who it trying
to break into the American
market.
Brood is an unusual
musician at best. Brood is
the head of what might be
termed rinky-dink rock.
While the guitar, bass and
"Saturday Night" which -
fair in its own right, the
album went downhill. Brood
seems to have achieved that
wonderful art of cloning
music, i.e every
sounds like the la
One song. 'Hit
sounded very good to me.
musically. Brood's sing
soured it. thoi.
the lyrics: "Y" say she ai
mine, and I'll beat you
jelly It's a hit on the head.
a knock on the knucklt
The last line just mentioned
is repeated ad nauseum.
Brood seems to have
trouble getting the mixing
on this album right; some of
the songs have a bass track
that almost blows the other
Brood seems to have trouble getting the
mixing on this album right; some of the
songs have a bass track that almost blows
the other instruments away
drums are eking out their
miserable tunes, Brood is
hammering away at the
keyboard as if he were
trying to shorten his
fingers. He also sings with
a voice with gritty, non-
musical aspects which rival
and surpass those of Rod
Stewart.
The record on which I
first heard Brood is called
Herman Brood and His
Wild Romance. I put on the
record. For the first thirty
seconds, the album sounded
as if it were another pro-
gressive rock-jazz album.
Then, when Brood began to
sing, the image fell apart.
Brood was nothing more
than another promoter of
cheap rock.
After the first cut,
instruments away, and at
other times, the bass can
hardly be heard. (One never
misses Brood vocals
though.)
The cover of this album
is a grandiose example of
the current trend of pro-
moting records with sex.
Brood could have been
drunk when he agreed to
the design. The record
contains no lyrics sheet
which is not surprising.
What is there that is worth
printing?
All in all, this is an
awful album not worth the
effort of looking at. Mavbe
Brood will come up with
something better next time.
I'll give him one more
chance; everyone has their
bad days, right?
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Records burned
NORTH BELMONT
N.C. (AP) - To get their
point across about the
detriment of rock 'n roll
music to teenagers, parish-
ioners at Goshen Free Will
Baptist Church set ablaze
more than $1,000 worth of
records Saturday night.
Rev. Benny Turner, 41,
asked young people of the
church to bring their rock
records to a fellowship
camp meeting on the church
grounds. Almost 200 per-
sons showed up for the
Poaching, gospel music
and bonfire in which the
records, laced with refer-
ences to sex and drug use,
went up in smoke and
flames.
"We see that rock 'n
roll is very much detrimen-
tal to the lives of young
people' said Turner. "I've
yet to see a Bible Christian
really involved 100 percent
with rock 'n roll. All this is
a menace, really, to the
youth
Rock 'n roll wasn't the
only category to draw
Turner's ire. Country and
western and any recordings
that suggested illicit sex
were added to the flaming
protest.
"It's time the Christian
really stood up and burned
such trash as this Deacon
Henry Scarborough said. "I
hope later we have
burning 10 times as big as
we just had
Turner hopes that in the
next record-burning session,
sex-oriented magazines and
Ouija Boards will go into
the pile. Turner says they
are "Satan-connected
Carter
Spice of Life
4 October 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 9
a
WASHINGTON (AP) -
The president, said Johnny
Cash, was a country boy
who "had a sense of the
propaganda value of songs
Cash was talking about
Abraham Lincoln but his
words could have applied as
well to Jimmy Carter, who
was sitting in the front row
of Ford's Theater soaking
up some friendly television
exposure and reminding
folks that he, too, is a
country boy.
The president served
partly as master of cere-
monies, partly as prop,
partly as "first fan" as
television cameras recorded
a 212-hour benefit perfor-
mance by Cash, Dolly
Parton, Glenn Campbell a d
more than a dozen other
country music stars.
The program was re-
corded Tuesday night for
broadcast by NBC-TV Oct.
16.
It couldn't come at a
better time for Carter, his
political popularity droop-
ing, Sen. Edward Kennedy
nipping at his heels and the
fate his SALT II treaty still
clouded despite his stern
television address Monday
night about those 2,600
Russian troops in Cuba.
This television appear-
ance was all gravy, a golden
chance to say some nice,
non-controversial things to
the nation's growing audi-
ence of country music fans
and to start dusting off his
own log-cabin image for the
1980 campaign.
"When I grew up in
Plains, Ga when we asked
for music, we got country
music Carter said as he
None bright enough forFamilyFeud
By PETER J. BOYER
AP Television Writer
LOS ANGELES (AP) � Los Angeles has run out of
families bright enough to be on "Family Feud
Howard Felscher, who produces "Family Feud" for
dson-Todman Productions, has had to send scouts out
ss the country to find families possessed of enough
reasoning ability and exhuberance to make good
contestants for television's No. 1 game show.
"Our concern says Felscher, "is that we've milked
the LA. area dry
But, "Family Feud" is in no shortage of hopefuls.
Felscher says his staff interviews 300 families every week,
uhich 292 are eliminated. I'm telling you, that's scary.
The show and its host, Richard Dawson, are enormously
ular, both in the regular daytime slot on ABC and in
-vndicated nighttime versions.
Family Feud" has made six visits to prime-time as a
ial, the first game show to venture onto a network's
time schedule since 1962.
A short while ago, "Family Feud" scouts went to
Bostnn. Minneapolis, Kansas City and Atlanta with the
intention of staying a week in each city to screen
tants. "But our first morning turned out to be our
last, because we booked as many as we could in the first
hour says Felscher.
in case you haven't seen "Family Feud I don't want
give the impression that it's television's version of
Mensa quiz. It's not. Two families of five try to match
be responses given in a nationwide poll to questions such
"T
'Name something you might take a bath with The
families give some incredibly stupid answers such as, "My
whip" some bright answers "A rubber duck they win
some money, and Richard Dawson kisses the ladies.
Why the huge success, Mr. Felscher?
"Who knows? Why was 'My Fair Lady' something
special?" No, Lerner and Lowe did not do the music for
"Family Feud But for whatever reasons, probably host
Dawson's refreshing personal involvement with each
contestant, the show has become the king of TV games.
And now comes the topper: The Hatfields vs. The
McCoys. Honest.
"For a year, we'd been prospecting through West
Virginia for some really good Hatfields and some really
good McCoys Felscher says, "and we came up with the
mother lode
Next week, 10 Hatfields and 10 McCoys go at it in a
special edition of "Family Feud There are 1Q on each
side instead of the usual five because the captain of each
team will be allowed to make substitutions, in case any
member of his family proves too dim for the challenge.
baiR,
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introduced the show.
Country music has re-
mained people music he
said. "Today all kinds of
people listen to and love
country music
McCartney-
Quick, who's the most
successful composer of all
time?
Beethoven, perhaps, or
Wagner? Or maybe it's
Irving Berlin or Cole
Porter?
The answer, says Norris
McWhirter, editor of the
Guinness Books of Records,
is Paul McCartney, and he
will be honored as such Oct.
24 in London.
Former Beatle McCart-
ney holds three entries in
the Guinness book: most
successful composer of all
time, with 43 songs written
between 1962 and 1978 that
sold one million copies; a
record number of 60 golden
discs overall; and estimated
record sales of 100 million
singles and 100 million
albums.
Darty round - up
LOUDON, Tenn. (AP) -
All that was missing was a
watchful cowboy astride his
horse with Roy Rogers and
Dale Evans crooning "Hap-
py Trails" somewhere off
stage. The last of the tiny
ARMY-NAVY STORE
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Jackots, Peacoats, Parkas,
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Over 400 Different Gl Items
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?Shoes Repaired To Look
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111 WEST 4TH ST.
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
756-0204
Parking in Front
nd Rgar.
are
being
snail darters
rounded up.
The Tennessee Valley
Authority began its final
push Tuesday to drive the
embattled and endangered
darter out of the Little
Tennessee River Valley
forever. Biologists with fish
nets and snorkels rounded
up 53 of the tiny fish and
have about another 150 to
find in the next four weeks
before the Little Tennessee
is turned into a 16,000-acre
lake.
The rare three-inch fish
that halted the $130 million
Tellico Dam for three years
is being herded to the
Holston River after Presi-
dent Carter signed a bill
last week exempting the
project from protection by
the Endangered Species
Act.
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Now offering FREE MEAL every day for a week
to the first person to give the correct number of
pieces of wood on the inside front wall of the restaurant
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Page 10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 4 October 1979
Reporter poses as migrant worker
for first-person account
BANDY
continued from page 8
MEADOW, N.C. (AP) - "Get up
It was still dark, and the words shattered the
early-morning silence. Within minutes, about 40 migrant
farmworkers crawled from their iron cots and staggered
from wooden shacks. A cool breeze, from a barren-looking
field next to the camp, greeted the workers and passed
through the camp to a large pond on the other side.
Under the fading light of the moon, some of the
workers wiped sleep from their eyes; some sat beneath a
tall oak or on some wooden benches and sharpened knives.
Others sipped leftover moonshine liquor or smoked
cigarettes or marijuana butts. Some thought about the egg
sandwich that they would get as breakfast.
It was the beginning of just another work day. For most
it would be another day of poverty � long hours for little
and no hope for a better way of life.
It would be another day of monotonous labor, followed
b a night of drugged or drunken escape, which often
ended iolently.
This scene of migrant labor-camp activity was reported
m Tuesday by The Fayetteville Times, which sent reporter
Tim Smith to the camp.
S iith posed as a migrant farmworker to see how the
workers lived. Here is his first-person account:
X hat l saw was frightening: Workers bought drugs and
liquor, leaving them little or no money for food on
k nds; workers who wanted a bath often used the same
they urinated in; workers were offered wooden
outhouses and showers occupied by poisonous snakes.
Getting into the camp was not difficult.
On a hot, July morning I was picked up while
litchhiking on N.C. 50, about two miles outside of
M,
dow, by a middle-aged black man who said his brother
rev leader at two nearby camps. He offered me a
but it �a? his brother who eventually hired me.
was told there would be a room and board charge of
I later learned it was $40 a week and that all my
- would be hot and that bedding would be supplied.
The meals often were cold and the utensils and bedding
were not given to me.
As a result of high consumption of alcohol or drugs at
night, the camp's atmosphere changed dramatically.
Usually timid workers became violent, workers who
were good-natured became angry and depressed, and those
who were strong and quick suddenly stumbled into
doorways or fell against the walls.
It was a scene reminiscent of a back alley filled with
drunks.
Sleep for me was difficult. A scratching, crawling thing
in my mattress kept me awake for two nights
Food was a problem for everyone. Workers complained
often, but to no avail. For the $40-a-week charge, workers
were served an egg sandwich for breakfast, a bologna
sandwich for lunch and a plate of beans and rice for
supper. The meat for supper was either a turkey neck or
fish.
But the biggest problem with the meals was on
weekends. Saturday breakfast was the only meal until
Monday.
Little money was left after the workers bought food and
beverages. Those who bought liquor paid $35 a pint.
Some of the money also was used for another form of
escape � sex. One of the workers told me women
sometimes were brought into the camp on Saturday nights.
They received marijuana for their sexual favors, he said.
There also were male prostitutes.
All of this combined to create a weekend atmosphere
that was seamy, violent, noisy and depressing. But it
offered a change for the workers from the dog-days and
nights during the week.
Such an atmosphere did nothing, however, to help my
spirits. Lack of sleep and hunger made me dizzy and
frustrated. And by Saturday night, I could no longer cope.
I broke down and cried. I wanted to leave camp.
The next night I did leave, after being refused any pay
for my work.
("an ton is gormet capital of Orient
take the chief
to predict that
By HUGH A MULLIGAN
AP Special Correspondent
CANTON, China (AP) � It wouldn't
gi sti ator in a fortune cookie factory
. the gourmet capital of the Orient, would have
iacular restaurants.
nothing in the guide books of in the imagination
the greedy gourmet for the total Chinese
overwhelms him at the Restaurant Pan Hsi,
be the largest Chinese restaurant anywhere in
ture, if you can, 8,000 chopsticks clicking away at
h delectable delicacies as quail eggs marinated in
roe. webbed feet of duck dappled with tiny prawns
rice bird- stuffed with liver sausage in a lovely setting
imbling tea houses tucked into bamboo groves around
acid lake.
There is even a floating dining room for those who
-t that their golden carp be freshly plucked from the
r, although real aficionados of Cantonese cook T are
prefer fish billed from the sea by trained
rmoranl -
N � only can the 400 chefs at Pan Hsi whip up 4,000
a time, but on any given day they can and often
rve 10.000 people in the 40 dining rooms.
Thi? i- all the more remarkable when you consider that
urant is only open for dinner, from 5 to 9 p.m
: � � takeout service.
Despite the serving statistics, it is wise to call ahead for
rvation, especially in early April and October when
0 traveling salesmen overrun Canton for the twice
annual trade fair.
It tipping were allowed in the People's Republic � a
adent Western custom that disappeared after the
solution � the head waiter here would make like a
warlord.
At Pan Hsi, which means "by the lake guests are
.mered about the 30 separate buildings according to how
much they want to eat and how much they want to spend.
This may seem an odd way for a classless society to treat
the famished masses, but the Pan Hsi has been in business
for over 100 years.
We were escorted to a private room behind hand carved
teak screens and seated at a lacquered table exquisitely set
with authentic willowware and cooled by an enormous
ding fan.
Following the Cantonese custom, our host had called
ahead from the hotel on the morning of our visit and asked
the chef to prepare a nine-course spread of traditional
delicacies ranging from pigeon, sea slugs and "jade tree"
� artistically presented green vegetables � to the
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unforgettable winter melon soup cooked right inside the
melon.
Since our insensitive Western palates were not yet
adjusted to the subtleties of Cantonese cuisine, our host
eschewed the more exotic dishes like sweet and sour bear
paws, clear broth of boa constrictor with a chrysanthemum
petal, "fragrant meat which is the chefs name for roast
dog and "dragon and tiger a delicate mating of snake
and civet cat.
"Cantonese people very brutal said a Foreign Office
man from Peking. "They eat dogs, cats, rats, baby seals,
shark fins, anything No place to ask for a doggie bag,
unless you like the real thing.
But the piece de resistance which most people manage
to resist is snake bile delivered fresh to your table by the
snake handler. He arrives with a basket and a long thin
knife ready to de-bile the snake you choose. Although the
fainthearted might not agree, snake bile is said to be good
for the heart and the liver. The man with the knife and
wicker basket will also skin a snake at your table and
prepare a sort of serpent glambe before your very eyes.
"They do it right in your face said the man from
Peking, screwing up his otherwise inscrutable face with a
Northerner's disgust for Southern-style cooking.
would make my face look thinner.
Philips: Lately a sort of "Cosmic Cowboy" consciousness
has arisen and I've noticed friends of mine who are into
that going out and buying Moe Bandy albums. Have you
made a conscious effort to appeal to this sort of people?
Bandy: This is something that has just happened, but
we're very glad it has. We're doing what we've always
been doing. We've always wanted to reach the younger
kids, the college level. In fact, next year we're going to
concentrate on working at colleges.
Philips: It looks like there are a lot of college students here
tonight.
Bandy: I've noticed this more and more, and I'm tickled to
death with it. It's good, it's very good that we're able to
reach them with our musicl.
Philips: Is your road band the same people you use for
recording?
Bandy: No, I use studio musicians to record. But, these
boys are good, and they travel everywhere with me. We've
been all over the world.
Philips: Who do you listen to?
Bandy: I listen to a lot of people. I'm a big George Jones
fan. Probably more than anything, my father was a big
influence on me. He played guitar and sang.
EC: Hank Williams' music has seen a resurgence in
popularity in the last few years with the so called "outlaw
movement" in courftry music. Do you feel this has made
honky-tonk music more widely accepted?
Bandy: Yes, I definitely do. Right now we have a lot of
people listening to country music that have never listened
to it before. So, when you bring back Hank Williams'
music, it's new to a lot of folks, (pause) Are ya'll from
around here?
Philips: I'm from the Washington (NC) Daily News.
EC: I write for the ECU student newspaper.
Bandy: Great! I'm glad I said that about the college
students then, (laughs)
Philips; Do you ever get tired of playing the same songs
over and over?
Bandy: No � as long as they're hits, I don't mind a bit.
I'll play them forever. I recorded Just Started Hating
Cheating Songs Today six years ago and I still play it every
show.
EC: What do you like most about being a big star now?
Bandy: Well, it's just a thrill for me. Probably the thing I
like most is just entertaining. It's something I've always
wanted to do. It's great to get paid for something you like
doing. I'd be doing this whether I was a star or not. This
tour that Joe (Stamply) and I have been doing has had
great crowds � standing ovations and everything.
Entertaining people who respond like that is just a
tremendous amount of fun. I'm getting paid for something
I used to do as a hobby.
Twenty minutes later, Moe Bandy launched into a very
professional performance of unadulterated "honky-tonk
Dressed in cream colored, skin-tight pants and silk shirt, a
showy but ungaudy set of duds, Bandy proceded to wow
'em. The audience, mostly middle-aged with a surprising
number (perhaps 30) of college aged folks, unabashedly
voiced their appreciation.
JOKE
What do you get when you
cross Ruta Lee with a bum?
You get a Rutabegger.
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Well into the first set (which lasted over an hour), the
management of The Carolina Opry House surprised Mr.
Bandy with a six foot bar stool. As he entered the last
refrain of his current hit, the bar stool was brought onstage
and Bandy conceeded to Performing another verse from
atop it. He sang the verse grinning, his head brushing the
steel girders of the ropf. . .�.
The Bill Lyerly Band, who had entertained before
Bandy's opening, and the crowd, wound up and on go,
demanded an encore. The Lyerly Band obliged.
On returning again to the stage, Bandy and his band
The Rodeo Cowboys expressed their appreciation of the Bill
Lyerly Band saying they were the best band they had had
the pleasure of working with in some time.
During a shorter second set, Bandy signed autographs
and hugged a few of his less inhibited female fans. I hey,
after appreciative applause, Bandy was off into the night
for a long bus ride to West Virginia.
The Carolina Opry House has done a tremendous job in
bringing to eastern N.C. country performers of the highest
caliber such as Hank Williams Jr. and Ernest Tubb, along
with some of the best country rock bands in the area. 1 his
Sunday the Opry House, along with the ECU Interfraternity
Council, is hosting what for this area is an entertainment
extravaganza. No less than four nationally known
entertainers, Johnny Pavcheck, Delbert McChnton (who
knocked 'em out at the Roxy here last year), Gatemouth
Brown and the most populat home grown in quite a while.
Mike Cross, have been scheduled to appear. The Opry
House is expecting a crowd of some 10,000. We wish the
Opry House (and the IFC) good luck and more power
them.
SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE
CAUTION
Vou may lose money it
you miss the Shot'
Gallery's, bu one pair at
lull price get the second
pair at ' 2 price, COUPON
SALE. You must bring
coupon with you.
1U-6, MonSat.
1st pair must be
at least $10.00
rhe Shot Gal
720 Allantii
DicKuioon Ave.
ABORTIONS UP TO 12TH
WEEK OF PREGNANCY
$175.00 "all inclusive
pregnancy test birth contr
problem pregnancy course ng
further information call 832-053"
free number 800-221-2568 be
9AM-5PM weekdays
Raleigh Women's Health
Organization
917 West Morgan St
Raleigh, N.C. 27603
nun
1890
Seafood
Thurs. Night
Specials
SHRIMP $4.75
OYSTERS $475
FLOUNDER 3.50
TROUT $Z.95
PERCH $295
all you can eat
No take-outs please.
Meal Includes:
French Fries, Cole slaw,
Hushpappies
We are proud to
announce that we
have added
one of the
AREAS FINEST
SALAD BARS
for your
dining pleasure.
OPEN FOR LUNCH
Daily
except Sat.) 11:30 - 13�
HOURS
MON . THURS.
5:00 � IO:00
FRI. & SAT.
f :00 � 10:30
located On Evan Street
4
t
t
I






Title
The East Carolinian, October 4, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 04, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.11
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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