The East Carolinian, September 27, 1979






Were it left to me to
decide whether we should
havegovernment without
newspapers or newspapers
without government, I should
not hesitate a moment to
prefer theatter
-Thomas Jefferson
The East Carolinian
If you have a story idea, a
tip or a lead please
telephone us:
757-6366
757-6367
757-6309
Vol. 54 No. 10
14 pages today
Thursday, September 27, 1979
Greenville, N.C.
Circulation 10,000

Sullivan's letter to Melvin is leaked
s Vole: 1 his story is part of an ongoing investigation
hast Carolinian. A three-man investigative team
n at work for the past two weeks, and numerous
trustees and administrators have been
t viewed for the story. Before releasing the stories
story as well as the story of Sept. 25), the team
d journalism professors here at ECU, one city
spaper editor and (he attorney for the North Carolina
ss Issoi -uitton.
From STAFF REPORTS
During late Julv or early August, SGA President Brett
Km received a letter from former SGA President Tim
van instructing Melvin to spend 10 of the
I
1 it �� u in bant SGA President Brett Melvin
Trustees critical of 'performance'
approximate $125,000 SGA budget on "propaganda" and
to insert the words "students first" on the SGA emblem.
Sullivan also referred lo his testimony on Melvin's behalf
at the trustee trial last May as a "performance
Xeroxed copies mailed
Four weeks ago a packet was mailed anonymously to
various high-ranking administrators, members of the ECU
Board of Trustees and The East Carolinian.
flic packet contained a xeroxed copy of the original
handwritten letter from Sullivan to Melvin and a
transcribed typewritten copy of the letter. Also enclosed
was a letter from the anonymous sender outlining why the
Melvin letter was being mass mailed, criticizing Melvin for
collaborating" with Sullivan, for engaging in "deceptive
obbviug" of various administrators, and putting on a
"performance lo deceive the board of trustees
W hen questioned by The East Carolinian, Melvin had
no comment
Leak infuriated Melvin
Confidential and reliable sources staled thai Melvin was
aware of the mass mailing of his letter from Sullivan
shortl) alter il was mailed, and that Col. Dick Blake,
assislanl lo the chancellor, telephoned Melvin upon
receiving a copv and turned it over lo him.
Melvin, upon learning thai his letter from Sullivan had
been made public, ordered acting SG.v Attorney General
Hand) Ingram to investigate the copying and distribution of
ihe Idler. Ingram was appointed by Melvin shortly after
Melv in took office.
One source close to Melvin slated that Melvin was
furious" when he learned thai the letter from Sullivan
liad been leaked.
In Ins letter lo Melvin, Sullivan said, "This letter will
precede b) about 1 week a packet of stuff I've jotted
down ll of il falls under Ellen's Ellen Fishburne, SGA
secretary of communications! domain � outline of a
registration day pamphlet on SGA; a special newsletter on
aG k
1 he SG. newsletter appeared on Sept. 26, with
Students first" on the Emblem.
In another reference to the "packet" about the SGA
newsletter, Sullivan said, "1 will just send it to SGA,
without a return address so Charlie Charlie Sherrod, SGA
vice-president won't see it, and you give il to Ellen
"No students first
flie letter also contained instructions for Melvin to put
itie words "students lirst" on all SG.v stationery and
literature. Students first" was Sullivan's campaign slogan
when lie ran lor SG v president in 1976.
1 saw the stationery . No students first, which you
should have put on if you were going to change it at all.
ou need lo follow ihru on the logo (thru Ellen) by getting
a stamp made and put il on all newsletters, posters, etc. It
is worth spending up lo 10 of SG.Vs budget on
propaganda � or else there will be no SG.v to spend the
oiuci 'M'm, said Sullivan.
trustee �shlev B. Fulrell, editor and publisher of The
d asitmgiun Daily .Yews, commented that he did not feel
tiiai the expenditure ol public money, such as student fees,
I'M propaganda purposes was a legitimate expense.
a
59
something unwholesome.
I in opposed lo using public money for propaganda
-aid Fulrell. It is not a standard practice and it is my
opinion thai il is illegal
Fulrell said lhal he viewed Sullivan's lelter to Melvin as
a blueprint for something unwholesome
Both Fulrell and Trustee William Stanley, a Rocky
Mount attorney, were "greatly disturbed" with one
paragraph ol ihe letter in which Sullivan referred to his
icslunuii) before the trustees at Melvin's trial last Spring
u.i a performance
Stantc) said lhal there was definite)) some testimony
horn Sullivan lhal disturbed the trustees.
Il there were some shenanigans involved, then thai
troubles me, il troubles me greatly1 said Stanley.
The inference was that there was a charade. If there
tws a calculated attempt to make a farce of the hearing.
itien 1 resent lhal.
With reference lo Sullivan's testimony and admitted
pei onmaiiee , Fulrell said, "h was difficult to separate
n truth Ironi the untruths
I had a Icudctic) lo look on Sullivan's leslimon) with
i autioit, said Fulrell.
Former SGA President Tim Sullivan
Two women
seek office
B DONNA PADGETT
Staff Writer
ar-old grandmother, Mrs. Elizabeth Savagt
'make the best man" for the office of mayor.
woman ever elected to cij.y council, 55-year-old
McGrath, hopes to win her fourth election � this
uavor. Greenville is in for an interesting race.
Don McGlohon, a Pitt County native, who is
i Flie Hines Agenc) in Greenville, is also in the
d race.)
1
Mrs. Elizabeth Savage gives the following reasons for
caudidac) in the mayoral race, her first try for public
m old and experienced. 1 know Greenville. I've been
longer than any of them the other mayoral
5 y
lll'l I
� i i
Mrs.
sj. I've got the time and energy.
vigorousl) talkative woman, Mrs. Savage
islraled some of the energy which must have been
i man) years as an elementary school teacher,
aduatiug from East Carolina Teachers' Training
i in 1918, Mrs. Savage became a teacher and
ilie old Evans Street School and was the first
ahl-Coales School when it opened in 1928.
Savage -aid she gave up being principal because
s, the responsibilities and reports. Most of the
laught third grade, and she spoke of 38 years in
ussroom.
Mis. Savage received a bachelor's degree in elementary
ion in 1921 and a master's in psychology in 1933; in
s, ihe was in the first classes to receive the
, ,pceti degrees from what is now East Carolina
t iiiver.sil).
I in right behind the university all the way in every
� aage said, characterizing it as "the biggest
uiduslrv Gleenv die has.
aid lhal the university has "taken over that side of
and mentioned crime and parking as two problems
. b) the univ ersily.
In regard lo the area around the university, she said
Dial she would like lo see "people who live there have
their own parking places and said that there is a need to
find more spaces or limit" student parking. She
-mggcslcd two- and three-level parking decks on campus as
a possible solution.
Mrs. Savage told The East Carolinian that she lived at
the corner of fth Street and Rotary Avenue for 26 years,
from 1923 to 1949, and felt safe walking to campus for
classes ai night. "Now 1 wouldn't dare she commented,
Correction
In the headline on
itie article concerning the
L C student bod) presi-
dent. Francis DeLuca, it
Maud ilmi DeLuca had
been impeached. However,
impeachment occurs only
aiier a person has been
removed from office, which
DeLuca had not been. We
regret the error.
�l�o, in an article which
was released by the News
Bureau, it was slated that
Wet Willie would be
appearing as part of the
Homecoming festivities.
Wet Willie will not be
appearing. � replacement
will he named later.
Savage
McGrath
attributing what she perceives as a change in safety "not
necessarily lo the student population" but to the fact that
there are man) apartments in the area and few families.
Where the students are, that's where the muggers are
most prevalent
vs mayor, Mrs. Savage said she would listen to the
people and tr) lo represent everybody.
timing her comments:
"Men don't think. They'll pave a beautiful street and
six mouths later dig it up and put in a sewer or a gas
line she explained.
Senior citizens are "forgotten people but they are still
paving taxes and voting. Mrs. Savage specified recreation
as a need of the elderly, a need she would like to see
provided for by coordination between the city and county.
Mrs. Savage is a member of the Pitt County Council on
�ging and Pitt County Senior Citizens.
In connection with the needs of children in the area,
Mrs. Savage said, "What's best for the children is what
we need, uol what's economical Mrs. Savage feels the
possibilil) of a merger between city and county schools
needs lo be studied. Mrs. Savage said that she would have
students, especially those in elementary school, go to
schools closest lo their homes.
Having worked with menially retarded children in the
cit) schools, Mrs. Savage felt she "learned from them,
and lhal ihey are "responsive, appreciative, have a lot to
offerthey're wonderful Although Mrs. Savage believes
the retarded can fit into society, she said she did not think
the) could "ever be really self-supporting or
self-sufficient" and fell they should not be "allowed to
produce other children
Mrs. Savage is president of the Greenville Womens
Club and a member of the Pitt County Humane Society.
She has been president of the Salvation Army Auxiliary,
and was on the board of the Greenville Boys Club when it
was first organized. She is a member of the First
Presbyterian Church.
Mildred McGr; th, an educational administrator who
feels she "identifies" wilh the university more than most
persons her age, is running for mayor after eight years on
the city council.
Sec M.vYOK'S K.vCE, pa�e 3
Preliminary tally only
SGA election results
The preliminary results of the SG.v elections were
released at � a.m. Thursday morning. Voler turnout was
estimated to have been about the same as in the last
election or possibly a little higher.
Freshmen seemed to be the most interested in the
elections with an estimated lurnoul of 375 students. White
Dormitory seemed lo have the lowest lurnoul, with only 19
votes being cast for iheir representative.
These are not the final tallies, but only the
preliminaries.
Several people were elected lo multiple offices, and it is
unknown at this lime which positions they will accept.
Class Officers
Freshman President
lU W illiain Waters
J.I Eric Henderson
ol Lylia Ciaire Thomas
J.J Scott Dedrick
In simian I we-President
Jo I John Quinn
Sophomore President
(�" Daniel Brown
iou kirk Little
II Bill Hill.aid
Sophomore 1 tie President
oo Howard Brown
toil Pegg) Davison
Juutoi Class President
o.) Debra Zumbach
�� l Patrick
� Cherv I Boehin
Juuioi I we-President
lo.) Carlton Williams
.c iuoi Class President
)o Libb) Lefler
II9 Graham Settle
Id Doug While
.iuoi Class I tee-President
tiJ Michael Gibson
ill Pat Quoin
liaduate Class President
10 .Nick) Francis
Day Student Legislators
219Donna Ross220Cheryl Boehin
257Kegina Lynn Patterson223Judy Allen
231Carlton Williams271Mike vdkins
229Bill Hilliard'227Marianne Edwards
277B B Ingram221John Gibbs
259Debi Gooder200Sarah Simpson
211Greg Sea well211Lynn Bell
202Brett Henselbecker25 fJeff Triplet!
202Mark Zumbach211Catherine Vollmer
202Hope MacMillan198Larry Zicherraan
202Doug White217Leanne Teague
200Pal Quinn255Lisa v. Baleman
208Peggy Davison210Koger Kammerer
298Kim Doby
Dorm Legislators
Ctiilen Dot
in
.t m i i tu
i in
1) Lvdia Claire Thomas
li' Santa Chopliti
Sm Doim
1, Nancv Collins
, Sam Mann
(,ai nit Doim
oo leleena Lester
L instead Doim
11 Cameron Stanforlh
lo W iinain L. Seaboli
to Kusscll Overman
III lk Dm ill
Jo Howard Brow n
.�, A Pan it k
)� .aui Bernstein
Jiiili S Uol III
o Da id Buckingham
u I Li ic Hcndersu
.io kcuii) Hooper
Oi -lie If
I v u . Do i
in
10 John Quinn
Clement Doim
li Jack) Bovs
J9 Linda Bishop
ttetehei Dorm
lo 5usau Marshall
12 Judv Hunt
37 Jill Baleman
a m
o.i Dasha Lin d
11 Bea dbright
iei Doi
m
.il Cherv I Fclbuiger
lo Ldi Johnson
U title Dotm
) Barbara Llistroitl
') Less he nn
I .llrcda W light
Inside today
Waste and fraud in government
see Editorials and Opinions,
page 4
VMI vs. ECU this weekend,
see sports page 7
Gene Cotton plays to a dissapointing
crowd, see Features page 10
Want a little Spice' in your life?
see page 11
mmmmmm
j
i:
����. �4.4tA��44ti4fc44'l��( i i t 4 4. 4
? �.�?��
1 t i i

4 4 �� -4 � .





Page 2 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 27 September 1979
��ecplef places, arid
ternlixlei
yum I i 111
ii n Is
rucleai
11 m It I
it Iti i il
certei
uigci Flight, a service Concerned about the pro- Hie Rebel is now accepting a,v t)pcd duublespace and
;aniation sponsored b the liieralioii i�l Nuclear power iugh-qualil literature sub- The Ledonia Wright Afro- turned in before the deadline:
uui and Nuclear weapons? iiuniib. Poetry, essays, vinerican Cultural Center is No exceptions will be made.
Il you are interested in
VV u wish to remind all dinner and a ride lo services
students and faculty that we lo celebrate um Kippur on
will not accept any announce- Sunday Livening, Sept. 30 call
ftienls lor the People, Places Mike rivelander 752-9473 or
column unless they L)r, 1J. Kesnik 756-5610;
a in
beginning I hui .
. in . a -i,nl
tilii iiiit i es in nuclear powei
iree Reserve Officers
ig Program (vFROTC),
g rush Irom 6:00 to
in. Kii Oct. 1. 2. and L.
he served the auo uiur.ii disarmament will
i�egoi. I i -1 a i� will be led
i�) lu . inlerson at the
Uetlioo, ant Center,
irganization is a racuity and students who are
lun. Everyone concerned about these issues
iji-6232.
ighls and dinner
Ld the last tiight.
�ith the cr ice
Oct. I at 8 plays and interviews, and open daily Irom 9 a.m. to 5 Hie deadlines are 2:00 Friday
roup on -Unit stories will be accepted, p.m. Monda thru Friday. lor the tuesday edition and
u work must have name, Organizations wishing lo 2:09 I uesday lor the Thurs-
iddiesa, ami phone number u�e the center during eve- day edition. We reserve the dales in Wednesday � SC.
u wiilcr. .vddress manu- nings and on weekends are to ghi to edil lor brevity. We elections may
contact the director ol cannot guarantee that every-
serviees of Mendenhall Stu- unug turned in will appear in
dent Center.
cnpis to The Rebel, Men-
leuUall Student Center,
uvimlli VC. 27831.
Persons wishing to ex-
amine platforms ol Candi-
da;
Jo so in
Mendenhall Room 228.
Screening lor the Student
. iline iimi oui
i -Mrs, Come luul
i are!
.ue encouraged lo come. Call
iiie Mm ii hu are interested
- Joo.
�1 liU
$icel
lecieatlcri
i in h I
W ho flu
non-credit course m ttccreation and Parks Depart
hups are now
Crafts Center w� lesiameiil (reek is mem.
ni-iiig oilered t? n the Wesley Whai
t .nindaiioii al the Methodist t'logram lor men
M udi in Cenlei .H K. 5lh St.
I lie Last Carolina Circle
k Club meets lues, nights at
. p.m. in Mendenhall Stu
Greenville dent Center (Room 221).
i,ei sone is welcome to
come.
rJW
Beginning
an.
l.u i aiue. Pollerv
Class, Quilting
Loom Classes will begin n Moil
Phvsical Fitness
r iiH11"
inning Jewelry, Oct. I and will continue every
Christmas
mi Christmas
workshops
line students,
i e n d e u I s, and
If, and I heir
. tin are lN.
e eligible in
Lveryone must
shops al the
no later than
eptember 29.
hours are 3
, .in Mondav
louday and 1 hursday Irom
. . u in ') p.m. lor 10 weeks.
tins i- an introductory course
aii.l no pnoi loreign language
-i nils is i equu ed. 1 he course
� .in ol be nl particular
.iiicrcsi in tiuise persons who
i.HHijialc attending graduate
u iii religion, lo those
v on are now in oU ed in
av lung Bible classes in
nui dies, and in those w ho
,��uiil like in study a classical
auguagc tu enable lurtlier
11.ua-1ii exploration. mo-
il 12 Noon i� late course lee will
tai tied. Il mil ha e
lift
ia .
I'll It tic kS-
l d i n g their
this fall
I, al 7:00 in
ing is in
nutrition
leetuig which
lie! i (.�shincnts
ase join us.
DC
a
, iou.s uitei esl in learning to
ad .in New I cslament in
u hi igmal language and are
epaicd in spend some
.hi siuil v nig nulside ill class
acii, i ,ui . 58-2030 and
.t.i in name, or come lo
i- londa, Oct. I.
St I Is
41 I
In -iniiiilei"s
Nail
II l
Sigma
i ordially
Rush "ii
Monde n-
. �0 p.in.
t I I H
Ll I
CHtSS Four-
.i by Men-
. held Monday,
7:00 p.m. in the
Room. � 11
- who wish
isl register at
Center by 5:00
iy . October I.
i .1 illation. iOe
i ,n 11 will ne an important
� il Hie Society "I
Li in i a i Students
�.y)A .L.S.J I nui Sept. 2 ,
p. hi. at I lie Led i n 11 a S.
A �igut iin � uiciican Lul-
ui .ii Cculei. Perl ineul inlor-
iiaiioii . .hi. i'innig lioine-
IIg in In 111sCUss�� d.
I I III ll
I in Medieval and Ken a is-
an Studies Seminar
u - 1 ii .juMJj win be nilered
-pi nig Di'inestei 1980, 1 ues.
and I nui.s. :J0-10:15.
1 in tuple is Medley al and
iluiiiaiii Lile m 1 dree
in - Hoi iiiee. Paris and
.) ,� a . n Interdisciplinar)
i. M"i a. i.mi ui the 1' low ol
i iainui 1 rum about 1200
. � an. ml I dUU.
1 "i I in i in i in lor in at ion
i . an. une ol ihc seminar
m�s. Dr. McMillan
jn 1)i . K an (Philoso-
ui Oi. Bassinan (Fo-
ii Laiiiuages).
ABORTIONS UP TO 12TH
WEEK OF PREGNANCY
$175.00 "all inclusive'
pregnancy test, birth control and
problem pregnancy counseling For
further information call 832-0535 (toll-
free number 800-221-2568) between
9AM-5PM weekdays
Raleigh Women's Health
Organization
917 West Morgan St.
Raleigh, N.C. 27603
NEED X-TRA
CASH?
Fair prices paid for
gold and silver.
Mixed Media
120 E. 5th St.
758-2127
RESEARCH PAPERS
10,250 on File � All Academic Subjects
Send $1 00 for your up-to-date, 306-page mall order catalog
ACADEMIC RESEARCH
P.O. BOX 24873
LOS ANGELES, CA 90024
r
fAME 1
address
tlTY
ISTATE
ZIP.
V uere I lie Elm Slreel
u - iiiiiasiutu.
A urn i October 1 through
��v. l- leach week Mon.
nil � H Ji, 11 I II.).
Imiii I classes,
i i.ni1 p.m.
i p.in. -2 p.tu.
ii p.in p.in.
. p.m i) p.m.
I I Ml I
Hie paper, due to space Got eminent vltorne. Gen-
iimilalioiis, but we will do eral, Public Defender and 3
��ui lest. Ilotioi Board Positions will be
neld mi Kn Sept. 28 at 2:00
p.m. in Mendenhall Room
ISA. applications are aail-
llie next meeting of the aide in the SG. Ollice
ECL Law Soeiel) will e ludd ilnough fhurs. at 5:00 p.m.
luesdu), October 2nd at 7:30
p.m. ill Mendenhall Miilli-
I'uipose room. Members will
need lo be present for a short
business meeting al 7:30 with On Ihuis Sept. 2 al i :30
M�t�fy
College
Graduates
BECOME A LAWYER'S ASSISTANT
� Program approved by American Bar Association
� Day or Evening classes available
� Employment assistance
A Representative from The National Center tor Paralegal
Training s Lawyers Assistant Program will be on campus
on Monday, Oct 8, from 9:00 am - 4 30 p m at the Place-
ment Office to meet interested students. For more informa-
tion contact the Placement Office or The National Center for
Paralegal Training, 3376 Peachtree Road, NE. Suite 430.
Atlanta, Georgia 30326, (404) 266-1060
Please send me information about a career as a lawye
assistant
Name
Address
City
State
Zip
Phone
I lie Second uinual Lol
,ei Fair ol St. Timothy1
a speaker lo lollow. The
speaker lor this meeting will
p.m I'hi vlpha Theta
iiistor) Honor Soeiel) will
lh(
Lpiscopal Church will be held Ue Charles "Sonn" McLaw- liae u- hist meeting in ihi
iioru, Jr a local attorney in Kichard L.
3at Oct. ()th Irom I0-3 al St.
I'aul s Episcopal Church.
lucre will be fun lor all at
the lairpoll) rides Irom Law horn will talk
I0-12, game- for children,
puppet shows at ll and 3,
Greenville and the retained
student attorney. Mr. Mc-
about
Lost jlO per month lor uol dog
lie I -1 loui
i II ' Ml I ll lol
weeks; Si10 per
Hie 2nd lour
t r o . e u I o o d s,
. iiuulr) store, bake sale,
raits and live entertainmenl
ui
fodd Room
located i n I) Wing ol
lirewsler. Featured as guei
-pcaker will be Dr. .withonv
common legal problems that t'apaias who will talk on ihe
-tudenls have and what lo do aiguiticance ol Sports in
V e-iei n Civ ilizalion. v II
members and prospective
members are eordiall) invited
in attend.
atioul I hem. di students are
vclcoine to attend.
L) nn Calder, President
rjo-oyj I



:jspring day summer day fall day
Feb 11 - May 9 June 12 - Sept 9 Sept 18 - Dec
DSPRING EVE FALL EVE
March 18 - Sept 20 Oct 21 � May 9
THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR
PARALEGAL TRAINING
3376 Peachtree Rd . NE
Atlanta. Ga. 30326
404 266-1060

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7th 1979
( gates open at noon)
HWY 264 BYPASS N.E. � ADJACENT TO CAROLINA OPRY HOUSE � GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
TICKETS $7.00 ADVANCE � $10.00 GATE
SOFT DRINK AND FOOD CONCESSIONS PROVIDED BY GREENVILLE JAYCEES
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NO GLASS CONTAINERS





The East Caroli
tiditorials
& Opinions
Thursday, September 27, 1979, Page 4
Greenville, N.C.
Once more, with feeling
Well, here we go again.
Former SGA President Tim Sullivan,
and present SGA President Brett Melvin
are singing the same tune, only with
different words this time.
Melv.in, who was prevented from taking
office until June 6 this year because of
allegations that he was involved with the
printing and distribution of the Alternative
Press, now finds that his name is being
associated with Tim Sullivan once again.
Last go round, the Alternative Press
vvas printed and distributed freely on
campus. It was pure propaganda attempt-
ing to discredit some candidates and
promote others.
At a Review Board hearing after the
SGA election, Melvin was originally
prevented from taking office because the
Alternative Press was linked to him.
Because of the printing of the Alternative
Press, the Review Boai held that Melvin
had exceeded his campaign expenditure
i.mit. It is a matter of public record that
Sullivan was the main force behind the
development, printing and editing of the
Alternative Press.
This time, the same mode of operation
is d.scussed. The SGA Newsletter, which is
caiied propaganda" by Sullivan, is an
illegal publication on its face, because the
Media Board constitution states that all
publications on this campus fall under its
jurisdiction, except for certain Student
Union publications.
It is not the Alternative Press that we
aie concerned with at the present. The
Aer native Press was very effective in
.viiat a was designed to do � get students
to vote for its candidate. But people do
have the right, as private citizens, to do
what they want to with their money and
time. If they want to distribute a
propaganda sheet, it's up to them.
The printing of what has been called a
propaganda sheet with student fees is
unacceptable. It's one thing to sell your
entire Marvel Comics collection � as
Sullivan is reported to have done to finance
the printing of the Alternative Press � but
is altogether different to use student fees
for propaganda.
Was there a "performance" before the
Board of Trustees?' The letter seems to
indicate that this was the case. This should
disturb each and every student who
faithfully lives by the motto, "We will not
lie, cheat, or steal, and we will not tolerate
those among us who do
THE EAST CAROLINIAN is certain that
there will be those who say this is an
example of the "hostile press" on this
campus. This is not the case. We are a
responsible press, and we feel that the
public has a right to know.
Due to the printing and distribution of
the SGA Newsletter, the Media Board
should publicly denounce the printing of
propaganda with student fees, and it
should take action against further illegal
spending.
The 3oaid of Trustees should launch an
investigation of its own to determine
whether Tim Sullivan's testimony was a
performance. We hope the board will not
put this matter on a back burner. The
board must take action at the next meeting
to clear this up.
JACK ANDERSON
WEEKLY SPECIAL
GAO Estimates Waste, Fraud
Cost Us $11 Billion in'79
By JACK ANDERSON
WASHINGTON Unlce
Sam. like a rube gawking at
the carnival midway, has
had his pockets picked this
year for a staggering $11
billion. That's the official
estimate of the number of
taxpayer dollars that have
been frittered away by
waste, fraud and corruption
under federal government
programs thus far in 1979.
The figure comes from a
compilation of reports by
the General Accounting
Office, the congressional
watchdog agency set up to
ferret out theft or squander-
ing of money by government
agencies.
The $11 billion rip-off
occurred in the first nine
months of 1979 and undoubt-
edly will rise higher before
the end of the year. In other
words, the bureaucrats have
bilked an average per capita
of $1,800 paid by 6.111,111
Americans in annual income
taxes.
The GAO investigators
� found that the governments
Medicare and Medicaid pro-
grams were swindled out of
more than $4 billion. They
reported that careless book-
keeping and outright corrup-
tion cost the U.S. Treasury
$1.7 billion in the purchase
of services and supplies by
the General Services Admin-
istration. Crooked GSA offi-
cials and private business-
men have admitted their
guilt and have gotten off
with a legal slap on the
wrist.
The Agriculture Depart-
ment recently was found to
be dumping still usable
expensive office machines
and equipment at a subur-
ban Washington trash heap.
The department was paying
a private firm to haul the
desks, typewriters and filing
cabinets away. Local resi-
dents and used-equipment
operators were finding easy
pickings at government
exper
Jim v Carter came rid-
ing ii.Washington three
years ago promising to clean
up the town with efficient
honest government. But the
pilfering and plundering of
the people's money goes on
at a clip of more than $1 bil-
lion a month
Brazen Betrayal: While
posturing as an elder states-
man. Richard Nixon contin-
ues his brazen betrayal of
the American people who
twice elected him president.
In his Watergate cover-up.
Nixon lied and connived in
an unsuccessful attempt to
save his political life. His
latest trickery is motivated
by sheer money grubbing.
Back in 1973. Nixon was
pressed by newsmen as to
the source of $1.5 million he
paid for his Pacific estate at
San Clemente - the Western
White House where he took
his leisure in surf and sun.
He squirmed out from the
heat when a White House
spokesman proclaimed that
Nixon intended to bequeath
the property to the Ameri-
can people for public use.
On grounds of Secret Ser-
vice security, he appropriat-
ed $702,000 for the upkeep
of the estate and such fancy
trimmings as redwood fenc-
es around the swimming
pool. Upon his exile in dis-
grace from the White House,
the once poor boy from
Whittier, Calif took refuge
at the baronial retreat with
the services of aides and
guards paid for by the
government.
Earlier this year, the ex-
president reneged on his
promise to bestow the prop-
erty on the public He quiet-
ly sold the San Clemente
estate for an undisclosed
amount to private buyers at
presumably a hefty land-
boom profit and is now pre-
paring to move into a pur-
chased luxury apartment in
Manhattan.
We've learned that his
broken promise might land
Nixon in court. Justice
Department attorneys are
studying whether the 1973
White House announcement
is legally binding. If they
find grounds, they may haul
him into court on a civil suit,
demanding that the ex-presi-
dent keep his word.
So far, Nixon has escaped
being called to book under
oath in a court of law
because of the hasty pardon
granted him by his hand-
picked successor, Gerald
Ford. And a Justice Depart-
ment source cautions that
Nixon may still evade any
legal consequences for his
latest deception because
there seem to be no laws on
the books to cover his San
Clemente caper.
Florida Laundromats: The
federal Drug Enforcement
Administration has come up
with convincing evidence
that international narcotics
rings are using Florida
banks as laundromats for
their ill-gotten gains.
A secret agency report
discloses that hard green
cash in $20, $50 and $100
bills are flowing into banks
in the Miami and Jackson-
ville area and most of the
deposits are coming from
Colombia, the Central
American source spot for
illicit drugs being smuggled
into the United States.
For instance, the federal
reserve branches in the two
Florida cities last year accu-
mulated $3.2 billion more in
cash than they paid out. The
Miami branch douled its
cash deposits in three years.
Fifteen percent of those
Where does the ECU
newspaper come from
cash- on-the-barrelhead
deposits originated from the
Central Bank of Colombia.
The Treasury Department
wont venture an explana-
tion of this curious develop-
ment but the DEA internal
document does.
"A sophisticated interna-
tional banking system has
evolved in southern Florida
to facilitate marijuana and
cocaine drug traffic from
Colombia to the United
States it charges.
"The banks in Miami are
being used effectively by
traffickers to facilitate the
movement of illicit drug
profits, domestically and
internationally
The banks themselves
aren't in the business of not
accepting money but the
federal government might
well consider freezing some
of the more suspicious bank
accounts of known drug
peddlers.
Bless Us: Pope John Paul
II will chat with President
Carter during an informal
call at the White House dur-
ing his Washington visit next
month but there'll be no
state dinner for the pontiff.
The official explanation is
that the pope is coming to
the United States as a pri-
vate citizen rather than as
head of state. But some
White House aides confiden-
tially disclose that Carter is
on an economy kick and
doesn't want to spend the
money.
We've also learned that
the pope would have pre-
ferred to have paid his U.S.
visit in 1980 but feared that
he might become involved in
American presidential poli-
tics between the Baptist
Carter and the Roman Cath-
olic Ted Kennedy.
Copyright. 1�7�,
United Feature Syndicate, 1m.
You just walk up to the rack and there
is the ECU newspaper. But how many
people wonder how this phenomenon
occurs, who writes the stories and where
the money comes from? Not many.
Over sixty people, most of them
students, work all week long to produce
two papers each week. While that might
seem like a lot of manpower for only 24 to
36 pages, just remember that these people
are students. They have homework, tests to
study for and personal lives to deal with as
well as working on a newspaper.
The highest paid employee on our staff,
the editor, gets about $44 weekly, but
considering the time involved, he makes
less than one dollar per hour. We are still
setting type on a twelve-year-old machine
that was obsolete 11 years ago.
Fortunately the Media Board agreed
that we needed some improvements, and
our office was remodeled and $30,000 in
new typesetting equipment is on the way.
These improvements will help to reduce
the workload and allow us to concentrate
on writing.
Each Tuesday night THE EAST
CAROLINIAN staff has board meetings in
which previous editions are critiqued by
journalism professors for style and
make-up. (Content of future articles is not
discussed.) These sessions are a first for
East Carolina papers. THE EAST
CAROLINIAN is the only student member
of the North Carolina Press Association.
another first.
One problem on the minds of
newspaper publishers around the country is
the shortage of newsprint, and it has
greatly affected THE EAST CAROLINIAN.
Our paper has been printed by three
different companies this year: the first two
issues by Wilson Daily News; the next
three by Parker Brothers Publishing Co
and the rest by Mount Olive Tribune.
Mount Olive has agreed to print THE
EAST CAROLINIAN for the remainder of
the 1979-80 school year, but the layout
sheets are different. This has caused some
problems with typesetting and layout. Also.
Mount Olive can only print for us at a
certain time, which happens to be later
than we would like. Therefore, each edition
comes out later in the day on Tuesdays and
Thursdays.
We can always use talented reporters,
but many of them cannot seem to find the
time to work for us. We also need students
lo call us with ideas or tips for photos and
stories. Letters to the editor are welcomed
on almost any viewpoint concerning the
East Carolina community.
We need your help to serve you better,
so let us know how you feel. Call, write or
stop by. Somebody is always here working
for you.
Richard Green, Managing Editor
The East Carolinian
MANAGING EDITOR
Richard Green
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Anita Lancaster
NEWS EDITOR
ASST. NEWS EDITOR
FEATURES EDITOR
ASST. DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
EDITOR
Marc Barnes
DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
Robert M. Swaim
ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR
Leigh Coakley
BUSINESS MANAGER
Steve O"Geary
Karen Wendt
Terry Gray
Bill Jonas
Tarry Herndon
SPORTS EDITOR
ASST. SPORTS EDITOR
COPY EDITOR
AD TECH. SUPER.
Charles Chandler
Jimmy DuPraa
Diane Henderson
Paul LincKa
THE EAST CAROLINIAN is the student
newspaper of East Carolina University
sponsored by the Media Board of ECU 'and
is distributed each Tuesday and Thursday
during the academic year (weekly during the
summer).
Offices are located on the second floor of the
Publications Center (Old South Building). Our
mailing address is: Old South Building, ECU,
Greenville, NC 27834.
The phone numbers are; 757-6366, 6367,
6309. Subscriptions are $10 annually, alumni
$6 annually.





U September 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 5
Meal plan examined
B) BREND v WNSON
Staff Writer
1 lie meal plan offered at
4aA lias not been a popular
�ue lor students. Ot an
esiunaied 12,000 students
enrolled at ECU, onlj 670
subscribe to the plan. Stu-
denl partieipalion, however,
i- higher ttu year than last
Servomation, a S4-50 mil-
ii lood service corporation,
i ides tht" meal plan at
I . 1 luce complete meals a
ia are served in Jones
Caleleria; a fast lood dining
� i ice i ottered in the
cafeteria al Meiulenhall Slu-
u ut Center, and the Calley
Jinc Dortnitor) is pri-
inaril) a sandwich shop. A
meal ticket is translerable in
i aeh ol these locations.
�iiuatioii is also respons-
e i"i meals lor the athletic
tg hall.
Ser omalion Corporation
ias three different meal
- ledules. lO-meal per
t sehetlule costs 5"ii5 a
lor the 15-meal
300U a semester and lor
Ji-nicai plan, ibid a
-iiic-tci. 1 he- cost ol each
ARMY-NAVY STORE
Backpacks, B-15, Bomber,
Fiatd, Deck. Flight, Snorkel
Jackets, Peacoats, Parkas,
Shoes. Combat Boots Plus
Over 400 Different Gl Items
1501 S. Evans Street
I PART
TIME
JOB
Looking for a part-timel
job with flexible hours!
land real business!
experience? Northwest
Mutual Life Ins. Co.
d openings lor college
nts. Call before noor
j appointments!
752-4080
plan has gone up $40, $50,
and $50, respectively, since
last year.
Some students complain
the lood service at ECU is too
expensive. Others who prefer
a complete meal like those
served at Jones say it is loo
tar to walk. common
complaint ol students who
purchase the plan concerns
the allocation amount limit. If
a student misses a meal or il
the price ol a meal does not
amount to the price allocated
tor that meal, he is not
reimbursed.
Despite complaints, 75
more students purchased the
meal plan this ear than last
sear. Perhaps a reason lor
this is that the meal plan has
undergone some changes this
vear. Unlike last year, anv
meal ticket can be used anv
da) ol the week. Last year
the 10- and 15-meal programs
were limited to weekdays.
mother change is thai, in
addition to being a sandwich
shop, the Galle) is being
made into a convenience
shore. Items will be sold that
might be Useful to students
who cook in their rooms.
Inflation has been cited as
one reason lo purchase a
meal ticket. Rising food
puces ma prompt students
to participate in the meal
plan. Another reason may be
that the student is guaran
iced a well-balanced meal
ever) day unless he is unable
to go lo either ol the three
dining facilities.
Food Service Manager Ira
Simon says that Servomation
Corporation gets a lot of
compliments as well as
complaints. Simon believes
thev always try their best to
please the students.
classified
caral
lia
,i � �? 100.00. IMione
i OK D LI
illoml
�)� 3K BLD vUouble)
ii ' included 3 15,
O.NL KOOM lor rent to male.
Call Mis. licit Whilehursl.
, 5d-1 2M.
peraoncl(g)l
b K i LULL SKI TRIP to
Killington, Vermont and make
iiioucn too as an Inter-
coiiegiatc Ski association
Campus Representative. Call
1 ), Mi-2010.
i LM vLL ROOMM IE: Ma- utLLV L NCLNC! Fun exer-
fliringa party?
C .MLR . FOR S vLE: Minol-
ta sRl 102, 58 mm1.4. Mint
condition. &190. Call 752-3513
alter 5.
V
U
M
A
G
i .
Moving Sun iu�. responsible lemale
A
i'
needed lo share furnished
2-b.lrm. apt. at Village 'f l)iltlld Whitle)
if
.&&
, i. l ar Riser �pls.
i hj.j v mow St. 'pt. 0.
.SlllC.�: TL Electro X.
lirand new condition $125 or
ocsl. Call after 0:00 p.m.
. j2-U)5l.
, .v) SVi'EM: Maraiil.
. j lieceiver. Bom' 301 s.
sola-Room div ider.
I .hens C. Drive alter �� ���"�: 210 m,K Peas
�im- for increasing your
ippleuess and etierg) level.
752-
v) 2�i
OCR ROOM or apt. dull?
coat �! Mini looks
�.� Low single room rates,
r" �
.1, , i J ,i v t � i .)�)- 111.
I I
PATRONIZE
East Carolinian
I ADVERTISERS
U .i. ill .
i .RL 5 vLL: Sal Sept. 2V,
, a.m. to 12 noon at E.B.
�vock Jr. High. Sponsored
,i. flic Greenville Kiwanis
�,uih. Jeweb), Christmas
, cev-oUes, ami other mcr-
v(:ill-i
dLl -NC M CH 1,
uoiidiiioil, good gas
oil grccu color.
,� ; i h)K). Call 75M-
Maii new
, ood roildltiOII,
, , i. , Jil Oil )o.
Ciccn. $1205month. ln-
ciules lu-al & hot water. 12
pitouc and electricity. Call
tlk) i"5ii-0021.
1 OR RLM: Two bedroom
i)ilu �pl. m complex with
uool. Close to campus with iliNlllLR needed for
voung child. I ransporlalion
pi o tiled. , jiiiltli , alter
i h.l .LL ROOMM It ).
.MED: Pa) 12 rent and
nuiii.es. 103 Lewis St. . �, CCLR .IE 1HMS1
v'v alKiug distance to campus, a. - iaol�- rales. Lall alter
ail Susan, 758-0277. � �� .�-�-��
��o�
?
r�
v
all i oi)-ooO� .
Why Not
Have It With Us?


in i'
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Natural L-Tryptophan
Hailed by medical experts as the first safe, non-barbituate,
non-toxic sleeping pill that can virtually wipe out stress , depression ,
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IT IS NOT A DRUG
IT IS NOT HABIT FORMING
HIARTAKTAK
KICK ASS
ROCK& ROLL
it &
w e
'&
Replaces valium , tranquillizers, and anti-depressants.
Available at Nature's Harvest
Downtown �th St.
752-933
T- SHIRTS
WILL BE ON SALE
AVAILABLE AT
APPLE
RECORDS
Dine With Us For Your
Birthday, Anniversary, Or
Other Special Occasion
And
We'll Provide The Cake Free!
Plus We'll Take Free Pictures
For You Too1
Reservations Required
In Advance.
FRIMTC
Call 756-2011 For Details 2311s Evans street
Ask About Our Gift Certificate Greenviiie. N C
THE PADDOCK CLUB
Private Gay Discotheque
ThisweekcndEat,Eat,Eat
cp New Outdoor Patio
Wed. 9-11:00 P-m-2 beere or e price �aae'
Sun. 5-9:00 P-mBeach, Country, Disco, and Rock Music.
Open 9:00p.m.�until
Wed.�Sun.
MEMBERSHIPS AVAILABLE
AT THE DOOR
September 29th � a hearty brunch bonanza!
All the hotcakes, syrup, butter and sizzling patties
of pure pork sausage you can eat. All the fresh,
hot coffee you can drink. No limit. No kidding!
You'll get a cold glass of juice, too. Orange or
grapefruit. A juicy decision.
Nobody canja
ke McDonalds
All for $2.29. And all you have to do is just sit,
relax, and enjoy while the special All-You-Can-
Munch Brunch hostess keeps the hotcakes,
sausage and coffee coming till you cry "Uncle
The $2.29 All-You-Can-Munch Brunch. Satur-
day, September 29th, 6:30-10:30 a.m. Much
munching at the 10th Street McDonald's !
can do it
$





Eastern N.C.drug
use uie
"g
Preregistration procedures changing
�- 1Q7Q
t HI I

HKVD1 INKS
Full Service
Hair Salon
Relax tn
� Ihrrl I url
Permanent
Super uts
Kivrratc Shoppingenter
( all 7 ,1 W2
friend
17 home
to study
i
Cliffs

A � .

' ��.�'
rhey re great 1
le '� � �
Available at
U B F
Yearbook
Portraits
will be
taken:
Captain's Soup
& Salad $1.75
The best cup of clam
bhowder south of Boston,
with crisp, green salad
and your choice
. - of dressing.
11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Daily except Saturday
Electrolysis
Permanent Removal
of Unwanted Hair
Mrs. Vicki Smith,
Licensed Electrologist
103Oakmont Dr. Greenville
756-3780
Tues. Wed. Fri. 10:00-5:00
Thurs. 2:00-7:00
BEACH MUSIC FESTIVAL
vovc Bead, M
g
.a�
.x

SSX
Gc
o
V�v
,e
�W
&"
v
&
tP

t
c

v&
fc-
I

CONTACT
Being
Held
At
Tickets S8 00 advance
$10 00 gate
TRAV-L-PARK
Emerald Isie, N C
OUTDOOR STAGE
OCTOBER 7-11 a.m. - 7 p.m
Rain or Shine
Make Your Reservations Ear
-26-J010





� �� ��
mmm
The Kasl Curolini
Sports
1
-
�I
Thursday, September 27, 1979,Page7
Greenville, N.C.
Face toughVMInext
Pirates looking for rebound
ECU HB Sam Harrell on the move
iPholo b) John H. Grogan)
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
. look at ihe past few seasons could give excellent
insight into what Saturday night's football game featuring
East Carolina and VM1 will be like.
For the past three years ihe Pirates and Keydets have
had lough, defensive struggles that went down to the wire.
In 1970, the Pirates went to Lexington, Va. and came
away with a 17-3 victory. "But said ECU head coach Pat
Dye at his weekly Wednesday press luncheon, "we had to
struggle, struggle, and struggle before we finally beat
I item ;
The following year the Pirates won in a game played at
Fickleu Stadium 11-13. "They outplayed us from start to
finish, though said Dye.
Last season the Pirates went back up to Lexington and
won once again, by a score of 19-6. The score was only
IJ-O until Pirate halfback Sam Harrell scored with less than
a minute remaining in the contest. In reality, the Keydets
were in it from start to finish.
VMI always seems to play us tough said Pirate
assistant coach Henry Trevathan. "They're all aggressive
and lough players. That team is always well-coached
Wilh VM1 sporting a slrong defense, having given up
Mill) one touchdown in three games, the Pirates must be
sharp offensively come Saturday.
I'his is one area that Dye has lots of confidence in.
Our offense is becoming, or may already be, the best
offensive football East Carolina has ever had proclaimed
L)c. We're averaging 377 yards a game now. 1 don't
know if we've ever done that before. We plan on
increasing that number even more
Dye Icels that the impressive offensive statistics, which
Dye
Green
"We have a few minor injuries. Against
a tough VMI team we will need really
good effort from all our players. VMI
never lets up
Pat Dye
pui I lie Pirates second in total offense among the 13
southern Independent teams, have come against tough
competition. I feel like we've played three good defensive
iootuall teams and not one of them stopped us
Dye is especially happy with the play of quarterback
Leaiider Green. "Leaiider has not played a bad game yet
-aid tiie sixth-year Pirate mentor. "In fact, he's had a
(�real season. The only times that he has looked bad have
m-eii when we were Uvo touchdowns down and the delense
was zeroing in on linn. When we dictate whether we run or
ihrow, he s very ellectivo
Dye said that the entire offense was executing well. He
tiled each and every member ol the unit, mentioning that
me team was together
1 hough lie is happy with the offense, Dye iet it be
known ihai ihe Pirate defense, a big question mark all
reason, was still concerning him. "But he said, "ihe
guys arc trying hard and it's just a mailer of lime before
.lOllg-i IV ol k oul.
I in- deleiisive problems are evident in ihe Pirate slats.
Lu�l season I he leain forced an average ol lour opponent
turnovers. Hits season ihe number is down lo onl) one.
I lie problems go back lo the North Carolina State
jiiic (j. Jl-JlJ Pirate loss) said Dye. "There was just a
�. m chaos and contusion between the coaches and plavers
Jye knows wild a lough VMI team upcoming Saturday
and CC power North Carolina a month down ihe road, the
I'nuics must improve delensively.
I uere - a great opportunity lor u lo improve said
Jye, because aller VMI we have an open dale.
�loiiiccomiug and iheu another open dale. In a month we
iouid tie an entirely dillerent football learn defensively;
.oai is, it we lake the nglii approach
iJui ai the moment the Keydets ol VMI are on Dye's
moid. r have a lew minor injuries. he said. nd
i.nn-t a lough VMI team we will need really good ellort
i.oiii all �ui players. V Ml never lets up.
I ue keydets, 2-1, have losl lo onl) Virginia b) a store
i J-J. 1 ne Pirates have lost three in a row lo CC
��uiipeiiiioii ami stand al 1-3 on the season. Gametime
vttuitiay ai ricklcu Stadium is . :00 p.m.
Keydets have revenge in mind
VMFs Jones among best
SHORTS ON SPORTS:
VMI kicker Craig Jones leads the nation in career field
ds with Y2. vt the start ot the current season he ranked
hi ihe all-time field goal derby. Texas A&M's Tony
�nil ivas at the to ol ihe NCAA list with 56. Thus far
- a-on Jones is 3 of 5 in FG attempts. One of the
though, was from 63 yards out. Jones' career
. a, is 70 overall and an astonishing 81 from 50
and in.
B ClivRLES CHANDLER
Spurts Editor
When Coach Bob Thalman and his VMI
Key del- invade Ficklen Stadium to play the
Lasi Carolina Pirates Saturday, revenge will
be the name ol the game.
It has been live long years since the
keydets defeated the Pirates. That was back
,� '1971, Coach Pal Dye's first season at
LCI, when VMI claimed a 13-3 win. Since
liicn the Pirates have won every game, by
2o-12, 17-3, 1 f-13 and 19-6 scores.
Our kids are definitely frustrated said
flial.naii. "We've talked about our losses lo
Lasi Carolina a lol and you can believe that
will he on our minds come gametime
Saturday. We'd like to get into the 'w
column against ECU for a change
(batman believes his club will have as
lough a lime as ever against the Pirates,
desp.ie ECU s 1-3 record. "In my opinion
hast Carolina has the best 1-3 team in the
cMUiitry said Thalman. " vga.n we will
nave to pui everything together to win.
.ad everything wasn'l together lor the
Kevdets last week in iheir 19-0 loss to
Virginia. "We hurl ourselves loo many limes
ails.
� n.� i
ills
�������
- a team, the ECU Pirates are averaging 4.9 yards
lime ihe) rush the football. Halfback Anthony Collins
eragmg 7.7 yards per carry while fullback Theodore
ii averages 7.0. The two have gained 411 and 245
respectively, through four games. Collins' figure
- mm third among Southern Independent runners. The
thing lor the Pirates about the statistics of this duo is
i .ii will return next season.
�������
he hast Carolina defense has received a great deal of
m from almost everyone: coaches, the press and
Some ol this criticism is understandable. Last season
Srates ranked second nationally in total defense. At
point, ihe Pirates rank 11th among the 13 Southern
lent lea ins.
i.ei week said Thalman. We seemed lo
g.�� I tie hall up everv lime we gol our
�Mieii.se m gear.
One thing that really irritated Thalman
.liMiut l Virginia game was a punt return
i.n a iMUvltdovvii and a 70-yard plus run Irom
��Mintage lor a score by the Cavaliers.
iiioM' plays were very disappointing, said
liiamiaii. Virginia played well, but those
piays pioiiatd) killed our chances of winning.
V' . .an t give up hig plays like thai against a
U .uii ke Lasi Carolina.
in.onnhi km.us also that his team must
scute ii ituv .in- lo heal an Easl Carolina
leam hiniM' olleiise is its strong point. 1 he
kevdets nave averaged only eight points per
game in iheif Once coil tests. The first two
we v.i tones over William and Mary 3
an i Ku niiiond i .
Ve ran score; 1 know that quipped
Iuinan. We moved ihe ball well oil the
gi.tuud against Richmond. 1 think we
emiioiied ihe football about 10 minutes in
thai game.
I ue key del ground attack is a balanced
one, as ill roe runners have gained 1 15 yards
mi more ami none have as many as 200.
; -piiomoie Floyd xllen leads the group with
I j.aid.s on 53 carries, which averages oul to
�at ds per carry .
tailback Jell Washington has 167 yards
wiioe lullhack Butch Hosteller has tallied
i , tt. Hi. - a uam. V Ml has passed ihe
. i mi - and . otiiplelcd 12 for 91 vards.
i i- '� yanls in three games, an average
� ' 'd- passing pel contest.
in. K kdels are quarterbaeked t� senior
� Hum ii Freshman Frank Brown has
,n .i �! up iruin the jayvee lauks and is
m . ie�l
-ii action ai-o.
1 lo.
t
VMI kicker Craig Jones demonstrates his specialty
I lie hcydel passing attack is almost
hie V vL ileieiise lias been as lough as
in i, cu.ieuilv ranks loth in the nation in
pl - deitM-M, allowing only �3.i yards
in. miii .in an way- in three games.
iii, Kevdel secondary is anchored by
si.oiig saiety Mark Bellamy. Bellamy along
wii nose guaie Jeit Morgan are both
a u-pivud by tiie Pirate slal I. " I Imse
a.i uiuhi Jims ioi almost ait) team yuu II �'
an. v m ii, -ant ECl assistant coach Henry
I I . V .1 I II.I II .
I ue Key.lei delense has actually allowed
�n.i .in touchdown all season, the long run
.j,aoi-i Viigmia. 1 lie Milters have conic
gain- Hie special leaills.
riiatutau noted that he It'll his leam
.ne'iii not he as talented a East Carolina,
nut that itie Keydets have ways ol
compensating.
his uam has a lol ot character said
lliahnan. We're not the biggest or the
lastesi or tin- most talented team you'll see,
but we feel this character will gel us over the
rougn spots. The important thing is that ihis
team believes in itsell.
flic Pirate offense, on the other hand, has been
applauded for their play, and rightly so. East Carolina
ink, second among the Southern Independents m total
,i,e and second in rushing offense. In passing offense,
Pirates stand 10th. But, of course, what can be
epci led ol a wishbone team?
On the professional side of the sports world, thee are
-me interesting things taking place. First, last Monday
iiiglo s televised football game was a real shocker, ihe
Viand Browns, now a surprising 4-0, upset the
dcteitding National Football Conference Champion Dallas
boys 2o-7 The Browns completely dominated the game
torn Mart lo finish. The Cleveland dr'ense frustrated
Cowboy quarterback Roger Staubach so much that on a
number ol occasions "Roger Dodger displayed a
, hildish-like anger, something very uncommon for the
usually calm Staubach. This game further exemplified the
tan thai ihe American Football Conference is far superior
to ihe NFC .
�������
In baseball, some storybook seasons are turning into
nightmares. Houston's Aslros and the Montreal Expos, two
usual eeiJar-dwellers, have led their respective divisions in
ihe National League for most of the year. Both have now
been overtaken by two clubs who are annually among he
best in the majors, the Pittsburgh Pirates and the
Cincinnati Reds. Both ihe Reds and the Pirates are hot now
and appear headed to destroying the dreams of the
Cinderella Expos and Aslros.
�������
Spurring ihe Pirates' drive to the top has been
old-timer Willie Stargell. Now 38 years old Stargell is
playing as good as ever. Just a few nights ago, he
slammed iwo homers in a crucial game with the Expos to
push Ins season total to 31, among the best in the majors.
It has been Stargell, not last season s NL MVP Dave
Parker, who has taken Pittsburgh lo the top of the NL East
Division.
Getting the ball
IWashin
ashy
ECU
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
"He's a iremendous threat at his position. We must
lake advantage of him more
East Carolina head football coach Pat Dye is definitely
unhappy with the amount of times he has been able to get
the ball to star light end Billy Ray Washington this season,
as the above stalemenl exemplifies.
Washington, blessed with super speed and quickness,
not lo mention great hands, is considered by many to be a
good pro prospect. One thing is for sure, he is an excellent
college player.
"The only thing wrong with Billy Ray is our not getting
the ball to him said Dye. "But you can be sure that we
are doing all we can to work out ways to get it to him. And
we will thro 10 him much more as the season wears on
Nothing could make Washington more happy. "I love to
catch the football said Washington. "I know I'm helping
ihe team when I do plus it's just a big thrill
This season has been one of transition for Washington,
having been moved from split end last season to tight end
this year. The senior from Jacksonville says the move has
been a successful one.
It's been pretly easy quipped Washington.
At
played split end, there was usually two men onme
light end, ihe defense can't do that nearly as easy
' This opens up things for Pirate Quarterback Leander
Green, who played wilh Washington in high school. "I can
do more things al tighl end said Washington, "and that
gives Leander more of a variety of things that he can do
The Green-lo-Washington combination must surely be a
nightmarish thing for opposing teams. The two have played
together so long lhal ihey just seem to look for each other
when ihe lime comes for ihe Pirates to pass.
"You can sure tell that they've played together a long
time said Dye wilh a smile, "it seems like every time
thai Leander throws the ball, Billy Ray is not too far
away
Washington says he feels that he, Green and the Pirate
offense are doing a good job thus far this season despite
ECU's 1-3 record. "But he said, "we can impfove a lot.
We have made some little mistakes that can kill you. I
think ihey have been mental. When we get our heads
completely straighl, we'll be right
Pan ol gelling "completely straight" would mean
gelling lite ball lo Washington more, as Dye said he would
like to do. All Washington did last season was average 30.3
i i i � i t � mi � ii i .
light end a lol better loo. I feel like I am helping the team yards on each ol his 1 receptions. This year he has caught
in more ways now. Being in tight, 1 have to block a whole seven for an average of 19.9 yards per catch.
ol more, plus 1 can sneak out and catch passes II those numbers gel much better, Dye wUl hai
ive a lot to
The great aspect of Washington being at tight end is
thai ihere he is nol as apt to be double-covered. "When I
smile about.
So will Leander Green.
Washington runs one of his fancy patterns
I
i
(
V
?
v - � � �� � ?�
- �. A






Page 8 THF FAST CAROLINIAN 21 September
1979
The Fearless Football Forecast
� Ml ,1 LCI
mmiiii c jidi.in v vi iRn
a M. KOREST l N.L ST vTE
?L Kl .1 WRGIM v
1 � .UN A SI v IK CIT vDKI.
t:v�s sivri JK A v
��� N SI .11 v NOTRE D .
I ii iL I" I SI
I I ROLLN vT Cl ORGI v
I i CL i
ND l .in v I GEORGI v rECH
N KDl I.
LI I iRLES CH vNDLER
22-13-1
EG I 35-10
Noi ili Carolina
N.C. Stale
irgmia
- ppalaehtan Stale
V fexas Slalc
Notre Danif
Southorn Cal
Souih Carolina
t CL .
Ucorgia I cell
Purdue
I'ERM HERNDON
J2-1.M
ECU .ii-12
North Carolina
.C. Male
V II IIIUl
Citadel
V lexas Slalc
u lnaii Slalc
Doulhcrn Cal
L�eoi jia
I CL .
Georgia I cell
i'ui �1 in�
JIMn DuPREE
�I'J-lO-J
LCL 28-15
.North Carolina
N.L. Slalc
V ii uiia
� ppalachian State
V I exas Stale
None Dame
11 i iieni Cal
Gcoi ia
I CL ,
Urorgia t'ccll
I'm due
JOHN NOL xN
(,
LCL 24-7
Nor ill Carolina
W ake Forest
irginia
Appalachian Slate
N . 1 cxas Stale
Noire Dame
Southern Cal
.oulh Carolina
I CL.�
Georgia Tech
Purdue
KEITH DKI M
Durham Morning li
LCI 211 I
North Carolina
V ak�' Eol
V irginia
Jiiadel
Y I xa- - . i
Viiehigan 3
LSI
Soulii Carolina
I CL �
Georgia I cell
Purdue
Face USC Friday
Surprising Pirate booters are 3-2-1
! - (
Dl.i H
i n e r
after-
lina
. �. i its
al the
with
1111
Brail
-
-
-
Karpovich
111 ith. I he hat c se cral
- - i could make
lit riea.
- in o cr Dav nl -
the I'ii ah's second
illv e v ictor, the plav
i kai po leh a- lie isl
Smith. karpo-
ed holh goals lor
- Ill l ll.ll lOlltCst .
the I�t � I
karp has ever
said S m i I h.
11 in- season lias
�osl lor us.
most impro ed
ii i 111� learn this
mmm
1890
Seafood
Thurs. Night
Specials
SHRIMP $4.75
OYSTERS $4.75
FLOUNDER 3.50
TROUT $2.95
PERCH $a.95
all you can eat
No take-outs please.
Meal Includes
French Fries, Cole slaw,
Hnshpupples
We are proud to
announce that we
have added
one of the
AREAS FINEST
SALAD BARS
for your
dining pleasure.
OPEN FOR LUNCH
Daily
(except Sat.) 11:30 � 2:30
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MON � THURS.
f:oo � 10:00
FRI. & SAT.
f :�0 � 10:30
till-
Located On Evans Street
Behind Sports World
lie - pla) nig Irani ball
this cai, u Inch is different
than 111 llii past. Now he's
11 i ah aid in pass oil. lies
making Dungs: happen for
ti 1.
� noiiier pla) er thai
"ninth has licen extremcl)
i'u a- il iih 1- tin uard Phil
V1��1 tin. Mart 111 sufl ercd
: � -a iioinl ing season
� I un allei being spec-
ial Uiai .1 - a sophouii rc.
I ' i I J, I J lilt I
puotieil) last year because
"i 1111' 01 mpic lr outs
said Plinth. ll j in I a lot of
m-sure 'Hi him. This
season he dues nol have
.lit. piessun and 1- playing
in in 11 heller.
kai po 11 ii ami Smith,
along viih sophomore Brad
V in. 11.I1, lead the Pirate
hoot 11 111 si oriug with lour,
tin 11 and three goals.
11 -1' . . 1 v el.
i iiiw three gu s ha e
in1' 11 the backbone ol our
li'a said Plinth.
concei 11 to Smith is
1 hi: team s delense. We're
pla nig pi rii well delens-
ivclv, -aid Smith, "but
we re jusl er voung.
V e vr a (so had some
injuries there that have hurt
ti
Mosi prevalent among
those iiijUiics is that ol
D mils LLm'II. v ho ma) be
him loi the season.
i 1Patronize
-2-1
Ihr Pirates' 3-2-1 recordadvertisers
puts lliem far ahead ol last
cai s puce, when the)
(unshed ihc season at onl MU-2.of
Right now said Smith, "we arc the only1
vaiail) Irani al this school vilh a w iiiiiing record. Now dial s a changeThe East Carolinian
li is a change that Smith
hopes will sta stationary.
.Hardeer
REGISTER FOR OURGR AND
RE-OPENING GIVEAWAY!
You could win a color TV! Help us celebrate the "re-opening" of
our two remodeled Hardee's in Greenvilleat 2907 E. Tenth Street
and on 264 Bypass (E. Greenville Blvd.). Come by for the best eatin'
all around and sign up for our big prize drawing. Because this Satur-
day September 29th, we're going to give away some great gifts.
And you could be a winner!
First Prize � a color TV � Second Prize � a 10-speed bicycle �
Third Prize � a cassette piayerclock radio � Fourth Prize � a
tune-up valued at $50 � Fifth Prize � $20 worth of gasoline.
There's still time to register. Just stop by any of the three Har-
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noon on Saturday No purchase is necessary and you can enter as
often as you like. The drawing will be held at 2:00 p.m. Saturday at
the Hardee's on 264 Bypass. You need not be present to win.
Pick up your free gifts! Even if you don't win a prize in our Grand
Re-opening Giveaway everyone who comes by any Greenville Har-
dee's this Saturday to help us celebrate will receive a free 12-ounce
Hardee's "Best Eatin ECU plastic tumbler with any pur- jftl
chase, while supplies last. Plus some special surprises.
Stop by one of Hardee's three
Greenville locations and -
enter today!
910Cotanche
Chart
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264 bypcibs (E.
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Then join the cel-
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X
-��&.





"�� � -�
�-t� �
Blue Devils down Lady Pirates in opener
11 September 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 9
i
JIMMY DuPREE
w. Spoils Editor
l-a.lv Pirate field hockey
' llu' 1979 season
ill a disappointing 4-2
�� lo the Lad Blue Devils
lhike I iiiversil).
Duke ha a pretty
team, just like we
said ECU coach Laurie
i rants.
I lu Lady Bucs trailed
10 al ihe end ol the first
half of play, with Duke left
inner Gloria Butler netting
ihe ball jusl before the
halllinie.
Butler's scoring spree
continued into the final half,
scoring twice before the
ECU offensive attack could
begin.
There was a gaping
hole in the right side of our
defense and Butler just read
it perfectly explained
grants. "We changed from
a 1-3-3 defensive alignment
to a 5-3-2 and that seemed
to lake the hole out of the
defense and gave us more
scoring mobility.
"For a young squad, we
did real well Arrants said.
"I was worried that we
might not score at all in the
game. That's been our
trouble over the past few
yearsiJ we haven't scored
al all in the first game of
the season.
"I think this year's team
is way ahead of last year's
alter only one game. Butler
scored three times within a
period ol seven minutes, so
1 know we had some
lapses. '
The game was not all
Duke offense, however.
viler ihe Devils pulled
ECU field hockey action
tPitoto h John 11. Grogaii)
Gamecock player dies
out to a 3-0 margin, East
Carolina uiilracked an of-
fense barrage led by junior
left inner Sue Jones.
Jones flicked the ball
into the nel after the Duke
goalie had blocked a weak
shot for the Pirales first
score ol the afternoon.
Minutes later, Jones
again pelleted the visitors
goal, and the Lady Devils
lead was cut to one.
N eer surrendering,
ECU penetrated Blue Devil
territory late in the contest,
but a rule infraction lor
obstruction turned the ball
over to Duke.
Obstruction occurs
when a player moves
between her opponent and
the ball or puts her stick
between an opponent's and
the ball explained .r-
i an is. 1 here is also
third-part) obstruction
where a teammate of the
player controlling the ball
comes between the ball and
a defensive player. "
fhe Pirates were again
on the offensive and driving
io llie Duke goal when lime
expired in the contest.
It s definitely a game
ol momentum, said vr-
i a 111 s.
e tried to cover lor
each oilier loo much and
missed some key assign-
ments. Duke had better
leaiiivvoi k.
e II be working on
iccciviug the ball better on
passes that will help us a
fi,i eal deal oil ollense.
game vrranls said of
Ireshman Jane Radford.
She had never even seen a
hockey game before she
cattle. Many of the high
chools in North Carolina
don t have a hockey pro-
gram.
Il s a very las I, very
changing game
East Carolina must now
prepare to hosl UiNC-Chapel
Hill next Tuesday. The Tar
Heel ranked 18lh nation-
ally, possess a balanced
quad with speed and great
penetration.
NX e II try lu make
adjustments and gel ready
ioi Carolina. We re a young
team, but we did real
well.
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uWIK LOVLEH
a U rilvi
. S.C.�l�) -
iiie end
-ity ol Suulh
leam died
011 ju-i be hi re
. . act ice.
'I H o 111 e -
i- rushed to
-iiorilv alter
dressing
)U p.m
laud County
1 Barroti III.
breallitiig
Usl Keeled OVCT
gamed eon-
li.il I 011 -aid.
u 11111 � 1 said a 11
.1 - made to i e iv e
ii . pound de-
uieiiiaii, iue vtunger
-eilior middle
I "iu� 1.in Jr.
1 understand Ins brother mood now, Carleu said
1- on in- uav it) Florida to .mk-ii piaeuce was over.
ii��4im in- pareus iiarron �� - t -ad nine lor me
� -
�� .10.1 ioi eveivone euneeriied,
"It's a sad time for me and
everyone involved
USC coach Jim Carlen
r ran la singled out
1 m toionei -aid Sinclair Jones lor her two goals as
ad men niiiiii; weights, but lllt' ��lten�ie standout lor
o 1 oe ibl not know ii lu- LCI . Deteiisivcly, Ireshman
� 'I .i.tii ivoiking oui belore Mt4"1 hallback Dana Salmon
� " i,i 01 luesday s ,m center ball back Devvie
� �.no. ll.nii-011 were lauded lor
-iiuiiiii down the Division 1
,1, lr B1' law�I, H,ll(. Devils aller the
�'� i"w ii mi me table and d e I e n
� ��� � i iMealuiug hcav ilv,
1 i.
WEDNESDAY IS NOW
V
t�tf Hump
k

i v e a I I i g u in e n t
i liauge
i ne� e�)ioner said an
autopsy will he jieiloimed at
uaoii-i tiospuai W I'tlncsilay ,
.ti.oiiugli ue -aid as lar as he
mii ifii Sinclair died a
,i.i a. deaib.
Uoaeu Jon Carleu said
,n, hi in i - oi me leam were
ii.nu.l oi Sinclair s tlealb
. tile -tail ol 1 uesday s
.wi.K.iui. Practice was held
,i.ini . p.m.
a very good
.u .i aid. Il v ou ve ever
ii. itiie ou lov etl v erv
, i you ti Know what 1
n .to.
i jo io-i a voungsler 1
i v t i lllUto. I -ai leu
I mine i losi'ting bun sell
,n- .nine at ihe Rc.
'hi � i ulelie Center.
I in not in a
aai i.hi -an! dtliciair eotu-
l.aitied .il a -ore throat while
i iiiow iill 1 enu last
in ,a- i ed-lin led
����! .ti m Hijuiv in r7i�.
i .1- o a.ii oiot iiuie jiul oui hv
" .Li. i , -i. ie-t i ilutl hun
' � �"r;iii regarded
r ' r � H" ii.id a bright
kvuii .ii. vaineeoeks.
oi i ai lied -i letters
' � �au, -ottfi and track
i vli.oiii sul iJade High
� i i � -
� I� - iiiu i, i ietl Sinclair,
i ' Mil an.i ran track
� i in v ei -ii oi Marv -
Dm new goalie played
erv well in " her lirsl
TACOS
39
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ic
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rii� � a-t Carolinian
inian 1 m
features
Thursday, September 27, 1979, Page 10
Greenville, N.C.
Cotton plays to sparse crowd
By WILLIAM JONES
Features Editor
It's always a shame to see
good music go unlislened to.
Unfortunately, such was the
case last night at the Gene
Cotton concert in Wright
auditorium.
The auditorium was barely
one-quarter filled. Besides
making the hall a veritable
echo chamber, the small
audience m the large room,
lent itself to the "low energy
syndrome
Intimidated perhaps by
Wrights cathedral-like vasl-
uess, the audience was
nonetheless eventually "won
over' by Cotton and The
micrican .tees' prolessional,
well arranged performance.
Cotton's music has e-
volved over the past few
years from acoustical easy
listening (with a country
flavor) to a more electrified
rock u" roll (still with a
country flair) formal. Cotton
is one of the few performers
io successfully combine am-
plified acoustic guitar with
electric piano and organ,
synthesizer and blazing Led
Zeppliuish lead electric
guitar.
From the beginning, the
Cotton concert took on an
informal air. He joked with
members of the audience
who, like Cotton's fore-
lathers, were from Albe-
marle, iN.C, and asked that
ihey slay around after the
concert to talk aboul the
area.
ill of Cotton's newer
songs were well-accepted by
me crowd, but his older
releases were by far the most
popular.
Cotton justifiably holds a
grudge against the record
companies he has been
associated with. . �BC records,
which he worked with a few
years ago, refused to release
as a single a song which he
was sure would do well on
i lie charts. They called it
uash
W ithiu weeks after the
-oug was released on a
Cotton album, it was re-
corded by the Bellamy
Brothers and went number
one. Hie song was, "Lei
our Love Flow.
triola, the company Cot-
ton is presently under
contract with, was supposed
to have released Cotton's
latest album, "No Strings
Ulached" last July. The
release dale has been succes-
sively pushed back since then
and still has yet to be
realized.
For ihe concert's closing
number, "You Got To Shine
our Light Cotton asked
lor audience participation in
singing the song's chorus,
ll )ou want to dance or clap
your hands, feel free; not to
nllend the Southern Baptisls
winch 1 in sure are out there
grousing cheer from the
audience). Bui, ya'll feel free
t-o let the Spirit move you, all
ughl fhe audience re-
sponded by singing, stand-
ing, dancing, clapping, hol-
lering and all manner of
appreciative expression in-
digenous to eastern North
Carolina and called lor an
encore.
Hie) received the encore
and more of Cottons unique
i.UK u roll. Its u shame
liiere weren't more people
there far the "Spirit lo move
Minority Arts informs
lull
(hi
m played to a nearly empty Wright Auditorium Tuesday night. The small
iai did attend was enthusiastic. il'hotos b Chap Gurley)
After twelve year absence
student returns to college
By ULLl M JONFS
features Editor
School sure is ditlerenl
in ii was twelve years
1, doesn't seem to be
nl U grind' these
iav Mas lie peoples alti-
. u - hav c changed.
lion Keedy is an ECL
it. lie is majoring in
�pology, with a special
-i in underwater ar-
g. L nlike most
i,Cl undergraduates, Rob
- belween 0 and 10 years
(li won't say exactly
ere in between) and has
lutml) ami a couple ol
ssiuiis under his belt.
1 lie scenery has deli-
improved. ou can
i 11 astronomy (heavenly
dics) all the way to
, ia�s, lie -ays with a
. ul MC.
Bob has been a diving
uiirui.iur lor nine years. He
uas been tree diving and
� living with scuba for almost
o vcar. He has been in
flic Navy, worked with the
VC. Division of Human
licsources and has worked
,n underwater construction
and -ai age.
Does he feel out ol place
iMuuji lo school with a
nunch ol youngsters'
Not at all. I've met
Mime super people here,
i n made a lot of good
ii tends.
fiie most difficult thing
atioul coining back to school
alu-i lhis long a lime, he
-av is getting back into
me academic swing.
Koii aitended N.C. State
j dozen years ago. �! that
iiiuc lie was more interested
hi chasing broads and
laving a good lime" than
hunt' well in school. He
quo alter his grades began
to reflect Ins overinlercsl in
extracunicular aclivilies.
"Nuw, he says, I
know exactly what I'm
.ivmg lo accomplish with
-riiooi. 1 know exactly what
I nave to do.
Mr. Keedy hopes to
attend graduate school at
eillici Texas v&M (which
nas the best underwater
a.cliacology program in the
Limed Stales) or Florida
male.
By K Ai VEN.vBLE
Staff Wriler
1 be Minority rts
Com in 11 lee intends to pre-
sent programs dealing with
minority cultures as a
means ol informing and
enlightening ihc majority,
according to Ken Ham-
mond, coin ui it lee advisor.
Matlyuu. Bryant, com-
mittee chairperson, feels
Hie Minority . rts Program
is a primary source ol
activities lor blacks. The
iu.i Black rts Festival al
ixL came as a result ol the
Minority "rta Committee's
work.
Last year Minority . rls
sponsored a Jewish . rls
Festival, fins year an
lutei national Festival will
ne on the agenda.
flu committee, organ-
ized in 1971 by the Student
ECU intellect not shown
by 'writing on the wall9
liw L Kin GK H �M
t'eatuies U i tier
m
Coming Attractions
Dl.YNEK THE TER
Vie tide n ha I
center presents,
itagv
i
lU-
lll IC
� lie
billing oil the
vitui'M'lves.
i .ii-
.in
, an
i
warning
uilellect ol an
i list i tut ion can
�.ecu by reading
walls
ECU
came from the
ol iin- Cioatan. Taking
I began to search the
and Iuid oul just where
lands.
1 ne walls 1 looked al were
.i,i i wt It scribbled over with
( ol statements, some
,tdicuhius, some blatant lies,
laiuuatioiis and warnings ol
� jinsals tor other things
Atiileu. I iiad lo look hard to
�,id anything intelligent or
niiliiy .
, great deal of the graffiti
ui naihrooin walls is con-
tented with sex, mostly
ud vet Us tug tor gay sex,
iottowed by strings ol volatile
, i -maiKs ami sarcasm lrom
-naigiits. Some straights
were chastising others tor
.taunting the gays; alter ail,
,m y reasoned, there were
n � coin pet ilioti lor straights.
uue men praised their
�in iii u uds for whatever ihey
did best. Other people looked
mi se with a bit of humor:
�r alter death or I'm not
llacial leusion is ex-
,n-sscd nowhere more strong-
ij man on the bathroom
ali Whites and blacks
,i � in lo light over who can
nate tile most. Some writers
y lo speak sense, but they
an- quickly shouled down.
Bigotry - Ignorance" sla-
Student
The Mar-
Co Round beginning
wed October 3. Ticket
i,M tins, the first Dinnei
I mater ol ihe scmesler, are
available at the Central
fieket Otlice and musl be
purchased 30 hours in
adi ance.
.MEKIC .
Major Uiraclioiis pre-
nts America ill concert on
lusday, Oct. 9, at 8:00
p.m. in Muiges Coliseum.
FK uNCE
Chris Burden's Faces
oj iiantc, a travel-adven-
ture lilm, will be shown in
lleiidn.x Theater at 8:00
p.m. on October 3.
D.vNCE
� homecoming dance
wid be held on Saturday,
Oil. 13, in Wright vudilor-
.uiii. Music will be provided
iiv lit au Thorp and Gcnera-
Liiioii, is currently doing a
study ou the usage of ihe
Ledonia Wright Cultural
Center. Minority rls is
also sponsoring a monthly
I dm series on minority
interests. The films will be
shown in the Ledonia
W nghi Center.
Ordinarily, the Minority
Mis Committee operates
with six members and one
v bairpei'sou. �l present one
oi ihe positions lor mem-
bership is open.
This year the Black . �rts
Festival is being held in
November, though in the
past 11 look place in
February. Hammond said
die dale was moved up
tiecausc of a lime limitation.
when ihe festival was held
ui February, it had lo be
planned in January afler the
Christmas break. The plan-
ning began this year in the
spring, which gave the
committee extra lime.
Sunday, Nov. 1, 1979,
tie ECL Gospel Ensemble,
tlie Fountain of Life Choir,
ami ihe New Birth Chorale
wilt perlorm.
On November 5, the film
ho Killed Martin Luther
king, Jr. will be shown at
me Hemlrix Theater. The
uexi night, Tuesday, a soul
lood dinner, consisting ol
i ned chicken, black eyed
peas, chitterlings, etc. will
be catered by Bell's rest-
aurant. The dinner will be
in the Ledonia Wright
Center. There will be
speakers at the dinner.
Black Hoots and Two
Centuries ol Black vmeri-
ian �rl" will be shown
Wednesday night as part ol
tue film scrie at the
v ullural center.
Jubilee" will be at the
lleiidn.x Theater Thursday.
To wind up the week,
Friday and Saturday nights
Richard Fry or in Concert"
will be shown al the
lleudrix Theater, and on
Saturday there will be a
disco held alter the home
game.
Bryant said any member
oi a minority should give
suggestions for acliv ilies in
Mendeiihall al ihe Student
Liiioii Ollice.
The lead guitarist for the American Aces lept through Led
Zepplitush licks.
Artist to visit
S"
By CHEHVL FISHER
features U i �
louy Hepburn, a con-
� eptual artist, will be here on
am pus October 11 and 12.
llepliuru is head ol ihe
.�, ii,m,I ol De-ign at Hred
University, located m ew
t.uk.
according to W illiam
llmioii lrom ihe art depart-
ment, Hepburn s interests
aic broad, and
mixed media
rope,
r;la
he works with
uch a- wI,
and ('anil.
al-o
si
Ul)i
and
Hepburn
� ii an s.
fuii Hepburn will be
demonstrating his talent lrom
approximately 10:00 a.m. lo
LOO p.m. iii ihe pottery
-uj.Jio ol the Leu Jenkiri vrl
�cf
Ai
page
Humor
1
�, 11 i 11ug-
Germ has victory
! in Greenville
,ed one, bul he was
� Why is it every lime 1 come lo Greenville, I get sick? I
uean, 1 never get sick in Wilmington, when I have the
tunic lor it. Bul as soon as I hit this campus, the latest
� infection hits me.
I A through high school I never missed a day. 1 could
�walk through the swamp, through the rain and the snow,
�and 1 never gol sick. I sometimes felt left out when
t everybody else had ihe newest tlu from Bolivia, and there I
twas, healthy. Here, however, all I have to do is walk
t through the hallway lo ihe shower, and I get some new
� uiiporled malady
Its not fair. Why can'l it happen to the rich students
and
at
IlljIOts.
Itouted by al least live
1 iiiiiik the anti-while
. i ling is most intelligently
summed up by this slate
uteiit: Black is beautiful
Ian is grand, Bul while is Hie
eoioi ol ihe big boss man.
V ii v lew times did 1 find
am good humor on these
.vans. Yv lieu 1 did, it was
ji.eiiy god. I went to China
and saw a hen lei said one,
appealing lo my love ol puns.
Incic were pleas: "Please do
ikii Know cigarette bulls in
,ne toilet, ll makes them wet,
-oggy ami hard to light
Some things thai begin as
me statement become long
-iiuigs ol dialogue. One such
-mug, shorter than most,
.vein, One charcoal steak
mis 300 times ihe carcinogens
one cigarette "Bul who
.nohcs sicaks "Most res-
. a ai a ii Is do.
Politics is an ail bul
, Mioied topic. Nixon has his
detractors as well as his
dclendeis. ldi vinin is
sparsely haled, if remem-
im ied at all. Religion is
another small-time subject.
whose pay lor their education and their off-campus
aiiei �) uiai maslerpieee
ts just anolher luxury. Bul me, I'm struggling lo put
mucaimed dead by myself through college. I can'afford to be siek. Try telhng
.mho-i 4 third ihal lo ihe pathogens.
k ! c�d ,s he u�i �� i g�i �yfirsl week we1l lo one of my,
� ,�.�� �.� �- �� "���� �.c-�He didn.1.have any81
.to�i.
i1,1 i I'd jusl go lo Ihe drug slore and buy some. "Oh,
A ,11, all reading uuiie -Wl � edieine he told me. "Go lo .he infirmary and
� l k� - VJ'f "rugWhT' eould resist sueh an offer?
JU ?cuTi ' Uu.or.una.el:my malady was loo big a job for Sud.fed.
.voii.l s.iy mat EjjU uas a
l.ou.i .oug way to to. 3ee B eCTERl.v, page 12
LEARNING- IbOvr Coat�. m P v))
lellow, shall we say, carnivores,
i .meed my sell onto the bathroom scales the other
g .uni discovered to my horror that I had gained five
nouo.t I should have guessed it anyway since my clothes had
,eeme i trifle snug, but ever the self-deceiver, 1 chalked that
ap t redistribution of weight 1 did happen to notice,
uowev , that the weight was redistributing itself all in one
,�.acc. I hat s why 1 made my trip to the scales.
Five pounds sat down and tried to figure out how I could
oo-sibly have gained live pounds. Okay, so I have a weakness
krispy Kreme doughnuts, but I only had four last
fuuisday and hadn't eaten dinner, unless you count peanut
uuiiei crackers. I mean, whal effect can six little crackers
nave? 1 admit 1 did drink a few cold Budweisers at "happy
uour on i 'ay, and 1 seem lo remember something about a
rHamburger, lues and a chocolate frostie afterwards, but I'm
mil , .milling thai. It could have been my imagination.
v on Saturday I hardly ale anything. No, wait; that's
ie da; 1 had a meatball sandwich at Darryl's, and I did have
ie or lour strawberry daquiries that night, but who counts
nijutds?
Sunday I studied and ale a big bag of M&M's. hut
udyiiig takes a lot oul of me, and there's no telling how
many calories 1 burned highlighting all those chapters.
By Tuesday my jeans were so tight 1 could hardly bend my
Miees much less sit down. That's when I decided to check the
- alls.
I guess I'll just have to cul back. I'm simply not one of
inose people who can go on a stringent diet. I have friends
wiio ean eat only hard-boiled eggs for a week at a time, but
Uiey lend lo rely so heavily on chocolate Ex-lax that they gain
wi ighl instead of losing. 1 could conceivably just count
�atones or carbohydrates, but I hate those people who sit
down lo a meal and begin pouring over little books to figure
the number of calories per potato. Besides, I'm so bad at
math, Id end up eating 5000 calories instead of 500. So. I'll
j.i-l have to cul back.
What I'll do is try to eat a balanced meal like normaj
people do; although I admit that is hard to accomplish in a
university atmosphere.
Oh what the hell, 1 can always go back on the meal plan
ami start eating al Jone's again.
Thai's a surefire way to lose weight.
Yours,
775134
W Qr)MV No�l
1CT?THIS Cj�tT�KfOL0
ev: yi,
r ��. .1 j
im
4
i
I





Kremlin steps
up swipes
at Hollywood
B Mkkl FINKE
I ssociated Press If riter
MOSCOW (AP) �
I Ik- So iel press is
Lulling Bob Hope the
Pentagon's comedian"
us the Kremlin steps up
its swipes at that most
-nHiuaii ol institutions
� Hoik uood.
i he list ol film stars
and movies attracting
lo�ct�v s attention is
gruving almost weekly,
including Elizabeth Tay-
lor, Jane Fonda, John
I i a ol i a, pocaly pse
Vm, and even James
Bond s Moon raker.
The "latet target ol
3oiet barbs is Hope,
a nose recent trip to
China irked Tass, the
ol I icial So vie I news
agency, said this week-
� nd, ami not just because
v hal it said was his
low standard ol eo-
�i about Chinese
laundries.
Mow this clown, an
d ol the " vmerican
slablishment,
. - i China and
; iiiov ie w hose goal
advertise the
backed policy
.v and political
eitienl between
and ashing-
I .i maintained.
- . : ll-pc will be
: soon in a .New
d dublou-
�King the
Last.
Hiding in the news
Hope lias in-
Ironi V ash-
star m a show
iinmemorating
i �d anniv ersary ol
uisar Sadat s
it -setting journey,
l , u�ulem.
last . eek, 1 ass
i Miss 1 a v Ior s
pleled trip to
loliug that not too
ago her films were
Led in tjypt be-
ol her strong
� l-i aeli -land.
w hy tin- a id N ict
res I in Hoik wood s
le and products
1 iir reason ma well
lal as more and
V eslern mlluences
.tit Sov iet society,
i crninenl is teeling
need to combat what
H-L'a a Holly wood s
g r o u s 1 y alluring
Siberian school-
proudly displays
a-i German maga-
u er ol teen-idol
a, though she has
; ii In- films.
Artist
d ii m page 10
iJ . hug. On Thursday night,
I ,ber I I at 8:00, Hepburn
pn ill a slide show.
Hepburn's visit is spon-
i U the Ceramics Guild.
I in atmosphere he creates is
a technical one, so
�ne i an benefit Iroin his
and knowledge as an
vnd Soviets line up to
see Miss Taylor's U.S
made Cleopatra now
showing at local movie
theaters, though it is
years old.
Soviet citizens go to
the cinema an average
172 times a year,
making them one ol the
world s leading movie-
goers, behind Singapore
and Hong Kong. In
kincrtca, people go only
atioul iive limes a year.
ud the price ol a
movie ticket here is
uieap, ranging from 45
to , o cents.
hde many Russians
may never gel the chance
to sec a high quality
Hollywood production,
Soviet artists often look
io the esl for inspirat-
ion ami technique in
their lilm-making.
el Sov iet propa-
ganda persistently tries
to portray .vmerican
movie culture as vapid,
sell-aerviug and heavily
pi olit-orienled.
lor instance, the
newspaper Lileraturnaya
Ga.ela recently said
movies about .vgent 007
were unlimited stupid-
ity and contained all the
l line-worn values ol
vV iu-i n mass culture �
sc, violence and sup-
ei individualism, in the
w oi U ot a rev icwer.
I hough usually a-
veisc io liking Hollywood
iU av agan.as, the Soviet
prcas ueveriheless gave a
ihumos-up rev iew to
pm aly pse i o w ,
Francis Iid Coppolas
conti i)v ei sial Vietnam
v ai epic.
Liui newspapers al-
I mat Hollywood
�n and the Pentagon
icaniol up to try to kill
no iniii because oi ils
lira y an 11 - mcruan ,
a n 11 - w a i message �
which is wiiv it won
�iHici I a v 111 .
The 'Spice of Life9
2.1 September 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 11
Big Brothers
founder has
lived long
CINCINNATI (AP) -
Irviii V cstheimer, saw a
boy silling through a
garbage can lor lood in
lA)3 and has since spent
To years helping boys
through the organization
lie lounded, the Big
Brothers ol America Inc.
I realized then how
important il was lor a
latherless child to have
mi dull friend io go to
nail games with, to talk
ovei problems � some-
one who genuinely cared
about him said West-
iieimer, who today cele-
oraics his 100th birth-
day .
Io mark his birthday,
ne planned lo give a $100
savings bond lo every
huby born today in a
Cincinnati hospital.
City officials were to
dedicate a plaque com-
memorating the civic
contributions ol the ter-
mer investment broker,
art collector and un-
ottieial government liai-
son.
Mill.
1 he Big Brothers
organization merged wiih
Big Sisters ol .wnerica in
Wi Ollicials saul more
than 100,000 youngsters
navr ,ieeii matched with
adun companions, and
the organization now has
oil ices in 350 cities
across the nation and in
Hi loreign countries.
1 can't understand-
why 1 have lived so long.
Bui the fact is I have, so
1 ve decided this later
pail ol my lile to service
lo others Wcstheimer
said.
1 have lived a lile in
rectitude as nearly as
possible within the lim-
itations ol mankind. 1
think since the good Lord
wanted me to live so long
he also probably wanted
to be able to account
good use of my
me
lor
lime.
Westheimer, whose
woe died m 1972, has
eight grandchildren and
two great-grandchildren.
He said he remains lit by
eating three controlled
meals a day � no sugar
or all � by exercising
every morning and taking
three 15-minule walks a
day.
'My parents lived lo
celebrate llieir golden 50
years wedding anniver-
sary, as did six of their
eight sons, including
me, Westheimer said.
Watermelon
seeds ain't
cheap
? HOPE, Ark. (AP) �
Deems like you can't buy
anything cheap anymore.
Ivan Bright and his son
Lloyd plan to sell their
watermelon seeds for
do33 each, or eight for
�5o0, or a dozen lor $100.
Bui these aren't just
any old seeds. They
come from the Bright's
JUO-pouud melon that
eclipsed the 197-pounder
listed in the 1979 Cuin-
ness Book ol World
llecords. Hope city ol-
ncials certified the mel-
on s weight alter il was
picked late lasl mouth.
Hie Blights are pre-
serving the monster mel-
on in a cool room until
me vrkansas Stale hair
at Litilc Rock later ibis
month.
Ivan says he will cul
ilie melon at the end ol
I lie lair. With an esti-
mated OOo to 700 ds
inside his beauty and
people reportedly lining
lor a hare, he hopes to
make more than J5,0U0.
S&A
V
w
tr&L)
w.
t-1
Leather Belts
$6 to $19
Leather Handbags
$10 to $25
Shoes Repaired To Look
Like New
Riggan Shoe Repair
& Leather Shop
111 WEST 4TH ST.
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
756-0204
Parking in Front
and Rear.
If it s sick to love a
then the world's going
lit happened to secretaries first. Then lawyers, bookkeepers, waitresses-
cabbies, housewives, and businessmen succumbed to the beauty of our
jPitot Razor Point and Flneliner pens.
Some people felt it was sick to get so emotionally involved with our
pens. But is it really so crazy to love a Pilot Razor Point pen that writes witt
a sharp smooth line and costs a mere 79C? Is it nuts to flip over its uniqut
little metal collar that smartly helps to keep its point from going squish'
If it is crazy, it's going to surprise a whole lot of people. In fact, we
understand that Riot Razor Point even has what it takes to score extra
points with football players
It also comes to our attention that many
coaches are fans of the Pilot Rneliner.
Along with all the other Razor
Point features, the 69C
Pilot Rneiiner has
the strength and p- ���
drive to go through carbons. 1gggf gP P CSX
CAR WASH
$1.50
Sponsored by the 0KT
Fraternity
Place: Exxon 264 By-pass
and Arlington Blvd.
(Pitt Plaza).
9:30am-3:30pm
It's hard to resist a pen
that holds the line like a Pilot.
Sat. Sept. 29
fineine marker
Downtown Greenville's Annual Fa
I h $
Coming
Saturday
Sept. 29
9 A.M
7 P.M.
Evans
Mall
Downtown
Greenville
See and shop all of the exciting values offered for sale on
Evans Mall during Downtown Greenville's Annual Fall Flea
Market Saturday, September 29th From 9:00 A.M. until 7:00
P.M.
�Music by Barry Shank & Oom Pah Band From 1:00 P.M. until
4:00 P.M.
�Now over 1,000 FREE parking spaces available in the Heart of
Downtown Greenville.
SPONSORED BY THE
Downtown Greenville Association
v.
"RIDE THE BUS. IT'SGREATi-
HOMECOMING
CORSAGES
STUDENT STORE LOBBY
Sales Date: Oct. 1st, 2nd, 4th
3.25
sold by:
FLETCHER DORM
(Eaatd &armt
RESTAURANT AND PIZZA
129 Carolina East Mall
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
GRAND OPENING
AT THE CAROLINA EAST MALL
IN GREENVILLE
FEATURING
NE W YORK
STYLE PIZZA
and A COMPLETE MENU
OF ITALIAN FOODS
including the best tasting
Italian cuisine availabe
LASAGNA
VEAL SCALOPPINE
SICILIAN PIZZA
HOT AND COLD
SANDWICHES
SPAGHETTI
take-out available 756-8704
open at 11:00 a.m. dally





Hdcje 12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 27 September 1979
Trip to
New York
offered
B WILLIAM JONES
tfutures Editor
1 lie Student Union Tra-
vel Committee is ottering a
thanksgiving holiday trip to
New ork Cit.
Our ot the world's great
lultural centers. New York
gives students the oppor-
iuuit) tn isil renowned
4eras, ballets, museums
ami art shows and to enjoy
ii national cuisine. Stu-
uls k.u see everything
mil Mars s parade to
uegie Hall.
I he iiiglu life in New
� k i- second lo none in
nit'i) and excitement.
A iii'ther one prelers the
lime romance ol a
imiiii cab rule- through
Uiutial Park or the jet-set
dness ol Studio 5 i, Nev
k lias something tor
i one.
Germ
continued Irom page 10
��l ol the tup will be
a double occupanc)
al the Hotel Edison.
Ihue lo sign up lor the
her 15.
I ne Statue uj Liberty is one sight available to those who
iuue advantage uj the New ork trip.
I had everything: strep throat, hay fever, a stiff neck,
uervosa anorexia, non-specific urithritis, anemia and a
nervous rash. Instead of "Hiya, Coop, how are you?" my
liiends would say, "Hey Steve, whatcha got this week?"
Some thought 1 went through medical journals looking for new
diseases lo catch. For some of my friends, however, my
illnesses were slightly beneficial. "Steve, how do you spell
letracycline?"
II didn't make sense. 1 always took care of myself.
Would you like a cigarette, Steve?"
"No, lhank-you. (This was last year, before I became a
nico-lreak.) 1 don't smoke. It causes lung cancer
Would )uu like a beer?"
No, lhank-you. 1 don't drink alcoholic beverages. They
cause liver cancer
How about a coke?"
No, 1 don't drink carbonated liquids. They cause
cc-lluble
"French fry?"
Fried foods cause high cholesterol"
Ham sandwich?"
"Ham sandwich!? How gauche! How tacky! How
un-Kosher
Well, what would you like?"
Do )ou have any yogurt?"
Despite this strict, healthy diet, I still got sick!
1 his year 1 made a vow not to get sick.
1 he first three days went just fine. Then on the fourth
� Id) : diack! . hack
V lull's wrong?
Nothing. 1 think a gnat just Hew in my throat
Fifth day: " dl CK! AHACK! AHACK
ie ou all right?"
�re you all right? Maybe you should go to the
iiilirmary.
No, no, no! I'm fine, really. 1 just choked on a butter
beau.
Sixth dav: "vHvCK Wheeze! AHACK Puff!
.ii .ck Crum
Steve, 1 really don't think it's healthy for you to turn pale
nlue and clutch your ribs in a death grip while your eyes
oulge. Lio to the infirmary.
"No, your concern is unnecessary. I'll live. Besides, that's
a tiood place lo catch a cold
viid on the seventh day: I was doing fine. I only coughed
ever) leu minutes or so, or when I tried to laugh. We were in
Sambo's and somebody told that joke about the kind of meat
ihat priesls eat on Fridays. My body convulsed violently; the
ulutes of my eyes turned crimson; every muscle in my feeble
little bod) contracted. When the spasm finally ceased, I
crawled from underneath the table and back into the booth.
1) Ineuds stared at me angrily.
"Well, Sieve. Now that you've spewed phlegm all over our
strawberry sundaes, will you please go to the infirmary?" I
palhelicall) agreed.
" dl right, vll right. I'll go I was defeated by another
bacteria.
Support
East
Carolinian
advertisers
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Features writers
call 757:6366
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The Student Union Coffeehouse Committee presents
Joe Collins
along with
D J (Deborah Hofloway)
Fri. & Sat, Sept. 28 & 29
9 & 10 p.m.
Rm. 15, Mendenhall
Admission 50 cents
STUDENT UNION
THE ECU FRATERNITIES AND
Al 11 11 SORORITIES PRESENT THE
a�d of GREAT GREEK
CONCERTS
N.C. No. 3
Nightclub
WED. OCT. 3, 1979 AT THE ATTIC WITH
SOUND SOUTH RECORDING ARTISTS
THE TAMS.
Wear your greek jersey
and recieve discount on admission.
y-
THE PARTY BEVERAGE CENTER
Corner of 10th & Evans St.
Open 24 Hours
CALL US FOR ALL YOUR PARTY NEEDS WE
HAVE DELIVERY & CATERING SERVICES
�.�-�. 7J52:�?�3 or 752-5933
WE SUPPORT THE PIRATES
MARATHON RESTURANT
Now offering FREE MEAL every day for a week
to the first person to give the correct number of
pieces of wood on the inside front wall of the resturant.
Marathon Resturant
560 Evans St
752-0326
46
"One off the year's best films
New York TimesTime Magazine Rona Barrett, ABC-TVNational Board of ReviewNew TimesCue Magazine
FUNNY! FUNNY! One off the funniest movies in a long time.
Gene Shalit. NBC-TV

Fri & Sat nt. 7 & 9 Hendrix Theat
Sponsored by the Student Union Films Committee







Title
The East Carolinian, September 27, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 27, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.09
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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