The East Carolinian, September 25, 1979






The East Carolinian
Vol. 54 No. 9
14 pages today
Tuesday, September 25, 1979
Greenville, N.C.
Circulation 10,000
'hough not scheduled for completion until December, work onthe new parking lots seems wen unaer way.
(Photo by John H. Grogan)
Letter investigated
Elections tomorrow
By KAREN W ENDT
cus Editor
SG elections lor Day
Sludenl Representatives,
I lass Officers ami Dorm
Representatives will be-
gin at :0U a.m. sharp
tomorrow.
Student apathy, how-
ever, has bt-t-ri a problem
with past elections, and
a- always, il may be a
problem in this one. In
the last election, only an
estimated 12 percent ot
students voted.
I hi- time we hope
to gel 30 percent of the
: iM- io vote said
I mi Mertz, chairperson
lor the SGA elections
committee.
Ihere are 20 students
tu be elected to the posts
ol da) student repre-
sentatives, and only 29
student! are running.
Charlie Sherrod, vice
president ol the SGA,
feels tin- is "terrible
For the office of
ire-hman das- president,
ihere arc six candidates:
Ldia Thomas, Charles
Butler, John Dedrick,
Erick Henderson, Wil-
iiam W aters and Ronald
Julie
The only candidate
lor Ire-hman class vice
president is John Quinn.
Quinn is also the sole
person running for dorm
representative in Aycock
dorm.
In the race for
sophomore class presi-
dent, there are three
candidates: Kirk Little,
Dill Hilliard, and Daniel
Brown. Vice-presidential
candidates are Peggy
Davidson and Howard
Brown.
In the junior class
presidential election,
there are three candi-
dates: Al Patrick, Cheryl
Bohem, and Debra Zum-
bach. Cariton Williams is
(tie only candidate fur
vice president.
Doug While, William
Little and Libby Lefler
are running lor senior
class president. The
senior class vice presi-
dency will go to either
Patrick Quinn or Michael
Gibson.
Nicky Francis is the
only candidate for grad-
uate student president.
The election of dorm
representatives will also
lake place tomorrow.
Howard Brown, Al
Patrick and Samuel
Bernstein will be running
lor Belk Dorm repre-
sentative.
UNCW president
is impeached
WILMINGTON -
Like the Watergate con-
troversy, a political battle
at the University of North
Carolina at Wilmington
has a familiar theme �
"Impeach the Presi-
dent
But Francis De Luca,
president of the Student
Government Association,
says he is no Richard
Nixon � although, like
tin- former president, he
claim- opponents are
trvmg to "do him in" for
political reasons.
"I don't feel like
Nixon because I didn't do
an thing wrong said
the 21-year-old senior.
But opponents in the
LNCW Student Senate
claim he has done lots of
things wrong. Recently
the senate voted unani-
mously to impeach De
Luca and set a trial for
this Wednesday.
vmong the charges
against De Luca are: not
being available to stu-
dents; falsifying infor-
mation concerning fund-
ed and non-funded stu-
dent organizations to the
Board of Trustees;
downgrading the SGA's
administrative assistant
lo a clerk typist; and
taking drastic action
without the knowledge or
consent of the senate.
Calling his actions
"unscrupulous in nature
and far below the level of
rectitude and integrity
that one should possess
as an elected student
leader the senate im-
peached De Luca for
'maladministration and
misrepresentation
If found guilty and
removed from office, De
Luca will not only lose
his position as president,
but a $l06-a-month sal-
ary, a tuition scholarship
and a position on the
UNCW Board of Trust-
ees. He is confident,
however, that the Stu-
dent Court will find him
not guilty of the charges,
which he claims have not
been substantiated.
"It ail depends he
said. "If it is a fair court,
then 1 don't see any way
1 can be impeached
Correction
In a story printed in
the September 20, edi-
tion of the East Caro-
linian, due to a mistake
in typesetting, it was
incorrectly published that
the Media Board pro-
posal was presented on
January 31, 1979.
In actuality the pro-
posal was presented on
January 31, 1978. We
regret the error, and
apologize to our readers.
Jones has four can-
didates for its repre-
sentative: David Buck-
ingham, Eric Henderson,
Jell Mitchell and Kenny
Hooper.
William Seabolt and
William Overman will be
running lor the position
in Scott.
Slay's two candidates
are Nancy Collins and
Samuel Mann.
Linstead has only one
candidate: Cameron
Stanlorth.
Clement will have two
people on the ballot,
fhev are Jaqueline Boys
and Linda Bishop. Gotten
also lias two candidates:
Lydia Thomas and Tanta
Chaplin.
Susan Marshall, Judy
Hunt and Jill Baleman
will be running lor the
position in Fletcher.
Telena Lester is Gar-
retl's only candidate.
Elizabeth Albright
and Dasha Elrid are
running for the post in
Greene dormitory.
The candidates for
Tyler are Cheryl Fel-
binger and Lil Johnson.
Students will be able
to vote lor their candi-
dates al twenty polling
places across campus.
Fhej are: the Allied
Health Building, Gotten
Hall, Fleming Hall,
Jams Hall, Greene Hall,
Garretl Hall, Fletcher
Hall, While Hall, Cle-
ment Hall, Tyler Hall,
Lnislead Hall, Jones
Hall, .Aycock Hall, Scott
Hall, Belk Hall, Slay
Hall, the Student Supply
Store, the Croatan,
Minges Coliseum, and
the Mendenhall Student
Center.
Voters are required to
vole in their own pre-
cincts, and all polls will
be open from 9:00 a.m.
to 5:00 p.m. with the
exception ol the Student
Supply Store, open until
7:00 p.m.
Every student on this
campus should vole in
the election. These are
our representatives up
lor office. Don't let
someone else make your
decision.
From STAFF REPORTS
SGA Attorney Gen-
eral Randy Ingram has
reported that he is
investigating the circu-
lation of a transcribed
personal letter to Brett
Melvin, SGA president,
from former president
Tim Sullivan.
Melvin asked Ingram
to look into the copying
and mailing of the letter
which Ingram said
"seems to be a serious
violation of the Honor
Code
A photocopy of the
original letter and a
transcribed copy, post-
marked vug. 27, were
sent anonymously to each
member of the board of
trustees, Chancellor
Brewer, Mayor Percy
Cox, Dr. Jack Thornton,
James B. Mallory,
Carolyn Fulghum, S.
Rudoli .vlexander, Col.
Dick Blake, Dr. Clinton
Prewell, Dr. David B.
Stevens, Cliff Moore, Dr.
Elmer Meyer, Dr. Maier,
Joe Calder and Marc
Barnes.
Board member Louis
5uigleion said he was
proud ol the I act that the
letter was not mentioned
al the vug. 29 board
meeting. He said the
anonymous correspon-
dence "reeked of cow-
ardice" and did not merit
consideration.
Most board members
would make no comment,
Inside
Today
�Pirates lose third
game in a row See
Page 7.
� Herman, Cotton con-
cert See page 11.
�Zappa, live on WRQR
See page 12.
Editorial
See page L
:rilicized
Transit changes discussed
By TERRY GRAY
Assistant Mews Editor
11 Transit System
manager Leonard Flem-
ing has his way with the
upcoming Legislature,
students here may soon
be gelling expanded,
more reliable bus ser-
vice.
The Transit Opera-
tions manager plans to
present several new pro-
posals to the Legislature,
including a plan to
replace one ol the buses
with two smaller and
more efficient vans. Ac-
cording lo Fleming, the
use of vans could result
in expanded service,
including a new night
route connecting the
University with local
apartment complexes and
shopping centers.
Other proposals
awaiting legislative ap-
proval include a new
driver-training program
and a new merit raise
system for drivc-s and
Transit System staffers.
The proposed changes
are in part the result of
an informal study con-
ducted by Fleming at the
University of Maryland
last summer. Fleming
said that he interviewed
transit authorities there
during July and August,
and came away with
some new ideas.
"They have a very
professional, top-rate
system there, with a
24-hour call-a-ride ser-
vice, an evening security
service, two-way radios
in all their buses they
have just about every-
thing in the way of
transit service.
viler two trips to the
Universit) of Maryland,
Fleming tried the idea of
using vans at ECU
during the second sum-
mer session. According
lo him, the results were
"fantastic
We cut costs lor the
same service by 60 by
running those vans. Our
International Harvester
buses only get about 2!
to SV2 miles to the gallon
111 town, and the vans
were getting 8V2 to
l0'2.
Fleming added that
outine maintenance for
the vans was also
cheaper.
"Cleaning, changing
oil, and tuning up cost us
around $120 for a bus.
We had the same work
done on the vans for
$41
11 the Legislature
approves the purchase of
vans, Fleming said that
ihe Transit System could
get two Dodge vans for
$15,500. New Ford buses
are currently priced
around $21,000.
.According lo Fleming,
the vans would not
replace all buses. In-
stead, they would be
used on routes with low
ridership, especially the
Brown route, or on new
roules.
Fleming's other plans
include a driver training
program and a merit
raise system within the
transit organization.
Prospective drivers
would be required to take
one classroom period of
technical instruction, and
al least three or four
hours of driving practice.
Since the Ford buses
drive differently than the
International Harvesters,
drivers would be re-
quired lo practice in both
makes, Fleming said.
Under the new merit
system, drivers would be
periodically and secretly
reviewed, and given
raises on that basis.
Fleming and others in
the Transit System are
currently working on a
new manual in which all
the new proposals will be
included. When asked
what he thought his
chances were for gettfng
il approved, Fleming
replied "I don't know,
but 1 think they might be
pretty good.
Laugh a li
������
STOCKHOLM, Swe-
den (AP) � The 30-year-
old man just left the
parly for a stroll and
some fresh air.
But he forgot to
pocket the key to the
street door. And rather
than rouse his neighbors,
he tried to get back in
the Stockholm apartment
hou c through the gar-
bage chute.
A newspaper carrier
found the repentent re-
veler early Sunday mor-
ning, firmly wedged half-
way in the cfcute. The
boy called police, bat a
fire brigade had to apply
axes and picks before the
man was finally freed.
but a few passages from
the letter troubled other
members.
Following suggestions
instructing Melvin on
how to run the SGA,
Sullivan slates, "It is
worth spending 10 per-
cent ol SG v s budget on
propaganda � er else
there will 110 SG.v to
spend the other 90
percent
Ashley B. Futrell,
ECU trustee and editor
of the Washington Daily
News, commented that
spending students'
money on "propaganda"
is not "a standard
practice and il is my
opinion that il is illegal
The SG.v has pub-
lished a newsletter lo be
distributed today. The
Media Board Constitution
slates thai "all student
publications funded from
the student activity fee
(not to include the
Sludenl Union publica-
tions), the Photo Lab,
and Radio Station W ECL
shall be administered bv
the Board The SGA
newsletter is not admin-
istered b) the Media
Board.
mother passage that
was particularly disturb-
ing lo some trustees
concerned Brett Meivin's
hearing before the board
on charge- ol illegal use
ol lunds in his election.
Sullivan is in Thailand
working lor ihe Peace
Corps, and he -aid "this
language training .is
is more difficult than 10
perlormances before a
trustee jurv
f rutee W iliiam H.
Stanley said, "ll that
statement was true, that
there was an attempt to
make a charade, if there
was a calculated attempt
to make a larce ol the
Hearing, then I resent
dial great!).
Futrell fell that "his
choice ol words is
unusualBosh Stanley
and Futrell agreed that
part ol Sullivan's lesli-
utoti) al the trial was
questionable.
It - a blueprint lor
something unnholesome,
it look- like lo me,
I" u 11 e 11 said.
ECU hosts Fifth
Annual Workshop
He has been called
the "hero of the high
school press in this
country and he's com-
ing lo East Carolina
University to spend a day
wilh a lew hundred
Eastern North Carolina
sludenl journalists.
Michael D. Simpson,
director of ihe Sludenl
Press Law Center, W ash-
inglou, D.C will be a
leatured participant in
lite filth annual ECU
Publications W orkshop,
Saturday, Sept. 29. Reg-
istration will begin al 8
a.m. in the Jenkins Fine
�rts Center.
The Pretos Law CtJler
la l he only national
organization devoted ex-
clusively lo protection ol
sludenl journalists' First
1 in c n d in e 111 right
Simpson, 29, graduated
from Davidson and
earned a law degree Irom
the University ol Georgia,
fhis fall's workshop
is co-sponsored by ihe
Division ol Continuing
Education and ihe So-
ciety lor Collegiate Jour-
nalists, the campus hon-
orary journalism frater-
nity. Joyce Evans is
president of the fra-
ternity, and Ira L. Baker
is adviser. Phil Martin is
assistant director ol non-
crcdil programs lor Con-
tinuing Education. The
theme of the workshop
will be "Press Freedom
and Responsibility
Dr. lhoma- B. Brew-
er, ECL chancellor, will
welcome participants and
visitors to the work-hop.
Sessions lor newspaper,
yearbook, magazine, and
radio and 1 -tall- w ill
be held Irom 1U:00 lo
I2:UU a.m. vfternoon
sessions will be devoted
�' 1
tu lab-workshops in the
same media ai eas.
V orkshop leader- 111-
i lude ihe lollow ing: I errv
tieriidou, The East Caro-
linian assistant director
'i 1 adverlisii Jell
Rollins, toruier Rebel
See W ORKM10P, page 5
m. ' w
1
m

1 iA
� j� -5sr ��" '1
J1
5;1
Michael D. Simpson, America's "Hero of the Student
Press will be the featured speaker during
Saturday s Publications Workshop.
Media Board creates
new Buccaneer position
By WANE HENDERSON
Copy Editor
Yesterday ihe Media Board created
an assistant editor position lor The
buccaneer and formed a committee to
investigate legal counsel guidelines for.
The East Carolinian.
Buccaneer Editor Craig Sahli asked
the board for a pay position of $1000 �
$125 a month for eight months � to
create ihe position. Sahli said he would
nol be able to carry on his job
effectively without assistance. The
board approved the position but did not
decide where ihe appropriation should
come from.
One board member suggested the
funds be taken from the current
appropriation for printing yearbooks.
There has been an excess of yearbooks
printed in previous years, and this
appears to be the case this year as
well. Some board members feel the
money spent on the excess should be
directed to the new salary position.
A major issue discussed at the
meeting concerned whether or not the
board should be responsible for the
acts of employees at The East
Carolinian. The newspaper employs
legal counsel as part of its advertising
budget. The counsel functions as a
bill-collecting agency. The committee
sel up at the meeting will decide if
legal fees for employee law suits
should be considered part of this
lunding. Members of the committee
are John Warren, faculty representa-
tive, Brelt Melvin, SGA president, and
fricia Morris, day student representa-
tive and board chairperson.
Salaries lor Easl Carolina staff were
also discussed at the meeting.
Employees receive a lull-month's salary
in August, December and Mav even
though they mighl nol work the entire
months. The board will investigate this
issue further, let ihe staff justify the
current payment system and vote on
ihe issue al a laler date.
Hospitality expenses were brought
up as well. Formerly included under
miscellaneous items on the budget,
hospitality must be listed separately if
at all. Rudolph Alexander, Associate
Dean of Student Affairs, felt the
expense should be budgeted.
Tn an operation as big as The East
Carolinian, there may be times this
(hospitality dinner is necessary
vlexander stated.
East Carolinian Editor Marc Barnes
said thai as far as advertising revenues
were concerned, hospitality to adver-
tisers is "an investment on returns
Other items on the agenda included
ihe approval of an operations manual
tor The Rebel and a report on the
progress of WECU radio. The FCC is
apparently holding up the construction
permit for the new station and could
continue to do so for some time to
come.
V

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classified
FOR SALE: 1971 Ply-
mouth Fury. Very good
transportation. New tires.
Inexpensive. Call Pete at
158-7955 or leave mes-
sage at 757-6147.
FOR SALE: V4 Carat
diamond ring. $400. Call
758-3424.
FOR SALE: 1975 Harley
Davidson Sportster, black
with chrome. Immacu-
late, 10,000 mi. Call
750-5301.
Camera,
102, 58
condition.
FOR SALE.
Minolta SRT
mm 1.4. Mint
$190. Call 752-3543 after
.) p.m.
FOR SALE: Yashica TL
Eleetro . Brand new
condition. $125 or best.
Call alter 0 p.m. 752-
1654.
FOR SALE: World Sport
10-speed. 3-weeks old.
Like new. S120. Contact
in library N.C. Collection
between 1-3 p.m. ONLY.
Rich Lytle.
FOR S vLE: Couch with
pillows, 350; blankets,
curtains, vacuum cleaner.
ll in excellent condition.
Call Glenn Griffin 758-
o575.
FOR SALE: 66 VW Bus.
Man new parts. Very
good condition. Tape.
$895. Call 756-0895.
FOR SALE: 1973 Mus-
tang Mach 1. Excellent
condition. Good gas
mileage. Sporty green. A
bargain at $1900. Call
758 -('J22.
far went g
FEMALE ROOMMATE:
W anled to share 2
bedroom trailer. $75 plus
1 2 utilities. Call 758-0312
alter 2 p.m.
FEMALE ROOMMATE:
KCl student wanted to
-hare furnished 2 bed-
m apt. at Eastbrook.
0 per month plus lfe
utilities. Call 752-8677.
ROOMMATES: I or 2
needed to share 2-bed-
room apt. Completelj
lurnished. Walking dis-
lance from ECU. Call
1-1242.
FEMALE ROOMMATE:
Mature responsible fe-
male needed to share
furnished 2-bedroom apt
at Village Green.$105 per
month includes heat and
hot water V2 phone and
electricity. Call Stacy
758-6621.
FEMALE ROOMMATE:
Wanted. V6 rent and
utilities. 408 Lewis St.
Walking distance to
' campus. Call Susan,
758-6277.
MALE ROOMMATE:
Needed to share 2-bed-
room apt. at Tar River.
Immediately. Call Mark
or Mike at 752-2643.
ROOM FOR RENT: To
male. Call Mrs. Bert
Whitehurst at 758-1239.
personal�
LOST: Girl's double
strand serpentine chain
bracelet at ECU and
V estern Carolina football
game. Please return be-
cause of strong senti-
mental alue. Reward
offered. Call Millie at
758-0269.
EARN A FREE SKI TRIP
to Killington, Vermont
and make money too as
an Intercollegiate Ski
Association Campus
Representative. Call
(919) 942-2610.
DANCE CLASSES: Sun-
shine Studios. Beginning
Sept. 19 classes in ballet,
jazz, yoga, disco and
.Arabic (belly dance). Call
758-0736 or 756-7235.
PAINTING: Is your room
or apt DULL? New coat
ol paint looks great! Low
-ingle room rates. Call
Dave at 758-2411.
babysitter needed for
young child. Transpor-
tation provided. Call
756-9487 alter 5:30.
BELLY DANCING! Fun
exercise lor increasing
your suppleness and
energ) level. Call Donna
Whit lev at 752-0928.
SAILING RACING Crew
wanted. .Jifcejid Para-
lico raves. No pay.
Experience preferred.
Call Tuny at 752-7278.
lYPING: Fast, accurate
typist, reasonable rates.
Call 752-2724 after 5
p.m.
having a party?
Why Not
Have It With Us?
Dine With Us For Your
Birthday, Anniversary, Or
Other Special Occasion
And
We'll Provide The Cake Free!
Plus We'll Take Free Pictures
For You Too!
Reservations Required
In Advance.
nun
Call 756-2011 For Details mi s. e�. si
BEACH MUSIC FESTIVAL
vove Beacl, M
ftve
&0
Page 2 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 25 September 1979

v
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Tickets $8.00 advance
$10.00 gate
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Make Your Reservations Early � 919-326-3010
CONVERT YOUR OLD COINS & SCRAP
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$9.00 9 $1.00 fan nht for Mm Cairn
Sliver Coin � 50�, 25, 10 (1964 or before) 9.00 per
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Silver Dollars � (1935 and older); Old Coins (Vi cent,
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COLD COWS tap dollar
PAID IN CASH
HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH
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COMPLETE
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From snacks to paperbacks to back packs, Kroger Sav-on
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25 September 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 3
THANK YOU SALE
UBE is slashing prices
for its biggest sale,
of the year
We want to thank you, ECU
Students for making this our
best fall ever! To show our
appreciation, we're slashing
all our sportswear prices
528 S. COTANCHE
GREENVILLE, N.C.
Clip these coupons and come on down to UBE and save
ECU T-shirts and
novelty T-shirts
Reg. $2.95
and $3.95
$1.00 off
� ���HHHMiaHinMWHHHHIBai
iCU and plain zipperj
front hooded
sweatshirt
Reg.$9.95
to $11.95
$2.00 off
Sweatpants
Reg. $5.95
$1.00 Off
ECU women's
co-ordinated
short sets
Reg. $11.95
112 price
Tennis shorts
Reg. $6.95
i
and $7.95
$1.00 off
r ECU and plain
p�llover sweatshirts
Reg.$7.95
$2.00 off
� ��MMUBMMaB �-��-� � � � �� � -
j ECU sport shirts
j Reg. $9.95
i to $10.95
i
j $2.00 off
� n i
wTld coupon
20 off any
sportswear
Gym shorts
Reg $2.99
to $5.95
$1.00 off
ECUana'plarn
sweatshirts
Reg $5.95
to $7.95
$1.00 off
ECU and plain
nylon jackets
Reg $9.95
to $17.95
$3.00 off
ECU and
plain jerseys
Reg. $5.95
to $6.95
$1.00 off
Hurry downtown and Save $ave $aVG!
Prices will never be this low again.
Sale ends Friday Sept. 28.
I s
I


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The East (iaroli
editorials
& Opinions
Tuesday, September 25, f979f page 4
Greenville, N.C
Students don h care
The average student at ECU could
care less about the ever-present
arguments between the Student Gov-
ernment Association and the campus
media.
The average football player, or
freshman biology major, or English
graduate student doesn't really care to
read constant news coverage of what
Brett Melvin said at this or that
meeting, or what the editor wrote about
it in his editorial column this time
around.
Most of us just don't care.
Out of a projected enrollment of over
10.000 students, only 12 percent of us
bothered to turn out to elect the student
government leaders during the past
election. The SGA Elections Committee
is hoping for a turnout of 30 percent
during the up-coming election, but it is
doubtful this goal will be reached.
Student apathy is also manifested in
other ways. Copies of the newspaper
are left in racks, not to be read,
although we go to a lot of trouble and
expense to insure that every student has
an opportunity to have his or her own
copy of the newspaper.
Also, after a three-year absence of
the BUCCANEER, there areMII cases
and cases of yearbooks to be jpjcked up.
The office across the hall is open every
day. with hopeful, eager yearbook
employees waiting for students who
never show up. After three years of hot
debates, the formation of a Media
Board, and at least one SGA election
riding on the existence of a yearbook, a
lot of students who have voiced concern
� Letters to the Editor
in the past do not even bother to come
over to the Publications Building and
sign their name for a book that they
have been concerned about.
Are we so concerned with ourselves
and with what is going on in our little
corner of the university that we don't
care what is going on around us? Are
we content to do our homework during
the week and party on the weekend,
without ever doing anything else?
If this is the case, then we as a
student body live a dull existence. We
seem to have lost our youth and vitality,
and we seem to have already started
living as though we have crossed the
hill toward mandatory retirement age.
The ugly head of Complacency is
rearing again this year, and as a result,
we all suffer.
The solution is simply stated, but
the problem is hard to solve. It will
involve work � hard work on
everyone's part.
We need to get off our rear ends
and get involved in what's going on.
vVe need to have a voice in how we are
governed, and we need to let our
student leaders � and newspaper
editors � know how we feel about
what s going on around us.
Such involvement doesn't take very
much time, but the payoffs are
tremendous. We learn leadership and
how to communicate better with others,
and these are qualities that are as much
m demand as the degrees we will
presumably be holding in our grubby
httle hands at the end of four years.
Name change is "ill advised "
l o u i � bidtlor:
Mans EaM Carolina
Lmversily students were
surprised viih the name
change ill tin' campus
newspaper Irom rount-
aiuhcad l I lit" East
Laruliinan . a name
given the campus news-
paper -U car- ago when
ihe school wa.� nothing
more tlian a localized
Community College lor
teat her�.
During that period 30
years ago, the name ol
thi- newspaper matched
me total make-up ol the
sluUeul body because
maii il not all the
students were Irom the
surrounding communities
in Eastern .North Caro-
lina. :l that lime the
school did not have many
students from out-ofstate
or foreign countries as
there are today.
1 suppose that all the
students enjoy being in
eastern North Carolina.
Others ise they would not
be here, but this is a
campus newspaper sup-
ported with student lees.
The name should reflect
its academic quality and
the pride the students
have in being at the
University.
Hie new name shows
clauish altitudes of trying
lu keep our distance Irom
ihe real ol the stale. The
uauie represents ihe
opinion ol the old
conservative who thinks
in terms ol regions, with
ihe we versus ihem
syndrome. The newly
named paper with all the
local groceries and olher
-lore advertisements
could mistakenly be
bought as a regional
newspaper.
Since ihe newspaper
is supported by student
Ues, I would think thai
names should have been
suggested and pul into
vole by the student body.
Therefore to chose a 30
year old name is ill
advised and a 30 year
step backwards.
vl least that's the
way it looks from here.
ndy C. .vdiele, Jr.
Mascot is a "dodo"
lu the Edilor:
is all the football
Ian- know, ECU has a
new representative this
year on the gridiron. I
am referring to the
Pirate's Parrot. 1 have
ivo complaints to lodge
against this kiddie show
reject. First it is a dumb
looking costume. The
beak of the parrol is Hat
and looks as if the parrot
had run face first into a
brick wall. The comic
expression on the parrots
lace lends itself more to
ridicule than support.
Secondly ihis has to
be the most "do noth-
ing" 'naseol I have ever
observed. Through three
games, this thing has
done little more than
stand on the 30 yard line
and occasionally clap its
hands. Even when the
two Wolfpack mascots
ran over and kicked the
parrot in ihe tail il did
nothing hut turn around
and cover ilsell. 1 am
ashamed when I see the
proud ECU Pirates being
represented by this ar-
ihrilic dodo bird.
Paul W. Young Jr.
SGA
To the Editor:
s most of you know,
Wednesday, September
20 is SG.v elections and
at this lime 1 would like
to encourage all of you to
vote. Remember, voting
isn't a right, it's a
privilege. Think of ECU
as a machine made up of
all its working parts such
as ihe board of Trustees,
each department, the
professors, SGA, elc. As
students you don't have
any choice in who the
members of ihe Board of
Trustees are going to be
or who your professors
are going to be. That's
what makes SGA so
unique as lunclioning
part of the ECU ma-
chinery You do have a
choice. You are given the
privilege of voting for
those whom you think
are best qualified and
will work for you.
If you don't vote and
you become dissatisfied
wilh your represenlative
in ihe course of the year,
don't complain because
you did have the chance.
Remember, the choice is
yours.
h hope the voter
turnout is much higher
this year than in previous
years and that you will
be satisfied with the
actions of SGA this year
because we have a lot of
students running for SGA
who really care about the
students and are willing
to work with them.
Don't forget to vole
Wednesday, September
20.
Cheryl Boehm
Candidate for
Junior Class President
Thanks
To The Edilor:
1 wish to express my
appreciation to Mr. Terry
Gray, assistant news
director of the East
Carolinian, for his ob-
jective and well-written
article on my possible
candidacy for the U.S.
Senate. In addition, 1 am
grateful, lo say the least,
for the accompanying
editorial in the Septem-
ber 13lh issue.
John P. East
Professor
Dept. of Political Science
Furthermore . .
Transit defended by the SGA
EDITOR'S NOTE. In the
Sept. 20 edition of this
newspaper, several mem-
bers of the SGA Transit
system signed a letter
which was written in
protest of news coverage
of a recent rash of bus
accidents. Unfortunately,
due to technical prob-
lems, the letter was
almost loo faded to read.
Therefore, in the spirit of
fairness, the letter is
reprinted here.
To the Editor:
in the article and
jdilorial of the Septem-
ber 11th edition concern-
ing the SG A Transit
system, numerous mis-
conceptions were formu-
lated.
While those accidents
did occur since January
1, 1979, the paper would
have ihe readers believe
ihal lliey were the fault
ol the present transit
system and SGA admin-
istration.
For reasons which
most people already are
tainiliar with, this admin-
istration did not take
office until June 6, 1979.
Since lhal lime the
transit system has been
revamped (which the
paper should be familiar
wilh since ihey wrote
numerous articles con-
cerning this).
Under the new sys-
tem, a transit committee
was sel up in the middle
of June. In mid-July,
ihey began work on a
transit manual which is
now nearing completion.
The manual will con-
lain instructions on main-
tenance checks, driver
disciplinary action and
numerous olher articles
not covered in the
editorial or article.
Since this action has
been taken under the
new administration, there
has been one reported
accident. This one, which
occurred on August 30,
involving Chubby Ab-
slure, was due to a short
in the back-up lights on
ihe bus. That short has
been repaired and was
not present in the safely
check made earlier that
month.
Over the summer,
repairs were made to the
buses so lhal now they
are up lo par, which ihev
haven't been in the past.
Maybe the reporters
should be more careful to
verily their stories.
Neither Chubby nor
Brett Melvin were con-
tacted by OSHA con-
cerning the issue of the
insurance policy, as the
quote attributed to Col-
dough staled, but in-
stead Charlie Sherrod
and Joe Bullard were
contacted on this mailer,
neither of which now
hold the oil ice ihey did
at that lime.
For future references,
SG v money does pay for
ihe insurance on the
buses.
lu the lulure, let s
separate rumors from
tacts.
Chubby Abshire
vdminislralive Mgr.
Leonard Fleming
Operations Mgr.
Jesse M. High
Edward T. Wallers
Brett Melvin
Student Body President
Photographer objects
lo the Edilor:
This letter is in
response to the Editorial
lhal appeared in the
September 20th issue of
The East Carolinian. Let
me say 1 have no
objection lo an editorial
expressing an opposing
viewpoint. The first sen-
tence in the second para-
graph is an outright lie
as lasl year's BUC was
published. If you don't
believe me, just ask ihe
1000 students who al-
ready picked them up. It
was the year before lasts
thai was not published
and even lhal was not
ihe fault of t1 ��� Photo
Lab. Th. .second dis-
tortion of truth was in
saying lhal the Photo Lab
was pul on trial thus
shilling the blame en-
tirely on ihe Photo Lab.
The responsibility was to
be shared equally by
both the newspaper and
ihe Photo Lab according
lo ihe Media Board sub-
committee.
the newspaper staff
can write whatever they
please but what is finally
printed is the responsibil-
ity of the edilor and
reflects the credibility of
the paper.
1 have been associ-
ated with the campus
newspaper for 3Vfc years,
during which lime six
editors have come and
gone, the best of them
being Jim Elliott. The
editors lhal have followed
cither have not wanted
the position, couldn't
handle the pressure, or
command the authority
that goes wilh the
position, it's been a
downhill slide for the
pasi ihree years wilh a
credibility so bad that in
my opinion, that's why
ihey changed the name.
They say we're not doing
our job properly. The
first issue of the paper
had al least forty mis-
lakes on the front page
plus the use of ihe word
irregardless. Their paper
layout goes on until 3:00
orl:00 a.m. The paper
doesn't even make it on
the streets on time or at
the same time every
issue. The first five
issues they couldn't even
gel it together to give the
Photo Lab proper photo
credits. There must be
internal problems some-
where lo cause all these
mistakes. One has to
wonder how they have
the time, much less the
gall to criticize another
media lor how it runs its
stall and operation.
Peter E. Podeszwa
Head Photographer
The East Carolinian
MANAGING EDITOR
Richard Green
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Anita Lancaster
NEWS EDITOR
ASST. NEWS EDITOR
FEATURES EDITOR
ASST. OIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
EDITOR
Marc Barnes
DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
Robert M. Swaim
ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR
Leigh Coaktey
BUSINESS MANAGER
Steve O'Geary
Karen Wendt
Terry Gray
Bill Jones
Terry Herndon
SPORTS EDITOR
ASST. SPORTS EDITOR
COPY EDITOR
AD TECH. SUPER.
Charles Chandler
Jimmy DuPraa
Barry Clayton
Paul Line
THE EAST CAROLINIAN is the student Publications Center (Old South Building). Our
newspaper of East Carolina University
sponsored by the Media Board of ECU and
is distributed each Tuesday and Thursday
during the academic year (weekly during the
summer).
Offices are located on the second floor of the
mailing address is: Old South Building, ECU,
Greenville, NC 27834
The phone numbers are: 757-6366, 6367,
6309. Subscriptions are $10 annually, alumni
$6 annually.

i

0 W'ltwtiMfciinjmaM
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"Touch of Magic" to be theme
25 September 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 5
ECU NEWS BUREAU
GREENVILLE � "A Touch of Magic" is the theme
lor East Carolina University's 1979 Homecoming
week, a five-day celebration featuring films, concerts,
parties and a football game with the Citadel Bulldogs.
A popular music concert by "Wet Willie" and the
Atlanta Rhythm Section" in Minges Coliseum
ollidally opens Homecoming Week Tuesday, Oct. 9 at
8 p.m.
Two events are set for Wednesday, a women's
volleyball game with N.C. Central at 7 p.m. and a
Humphrey Bogart film festival in Hendnx Theatre at 8
p.m.
On Friday, another film, "The Buddy Holly Story
will be screened in Hendnx Theatre at 7 and 9 p.m.
Saturday's schedule includes an alumni coffee hour
at 9 a.m the annual Homecoming Parade at 10 a.m.
and the football game at 1:30 p.m. Saturday evening
highlights will be"an Alumni "Keg Social" at 5 p.m. at
the Greenville Moose Lodge and a homecoming dance
from 9 p.m. until 1 a.m. featuring "Bo Thorpe and the
Generation 11" in Wright Auditorium.
Returning alumni are invited to view an art
exhibition in the Gray Gallery in Mendenhall Student
Center from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. Saturday. On display
will be an exhibit sponsored by the Southeastern
Center lor Contemporary Art.
The gallery will host visitors at a reception at 11
a.m. Saturday. A special invitation is extended to
alumni and friends of the ECU School of Art.
Tickets lor the films and concerts are available from
the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall Student
Center, and may be purchased by mail. Details are
available by telephoning the Ticket Office at 757-6611.
Further information about other events is available
from the ECU Alumni Office at 757-6072.
Homecoming '79 will take place on
October 13 when ECU will face the
Citadel Bulldogs in Ficklen Stadium.
This years theme is, "A Touch of
Magic The parade will begin
Saturday morning at 10:00 a.m. from
Rose High School. All those interested
m entering a float in the parade or
participating in the house or dorm
decoration contest must submit a
written committment to Dean Mallory
or Mike Smith in Dean Mallory's office
as soon as possible; The written
committment should consist of your
organization, which contest or contests
vou will participate in, how we can get
in touch with you if needed and signed
b) vour respective advisor.
This year all floats entered will be
allowed up to 8150 for preparation and
all house or dorm decorations entered
will be allowed up to $40.00 for
preparation. This money can be
secured through the Student Fund
accounting Office one day after your
written committment is submitted to ,
Dean Mallory's office. All money will
be allocated on a first-comefirst-serve
basis since there is only enough money
lor 15 floats and 15 house or dorm
decorations.
All entries will be judged on design,
color combination, originality, com-
pleteness ol theme, workmanship, and
overall evaluation. Awards will be
given lor first place and second place
lloal entries. first place house
decoration, and first place dorm
ile. oration. All awards will be
presented during halftime of the
loot ball game.
The Homecoming Steering Com-
mittee strongly urges you to participate
vear to make Homecoming '79 the
best ever! It vou have anv questions,
please leel free to contact Dean
Mallory at 757-6824 or Mike Smith at
758-0000 anv time.
Rules for electing Homecoming Queen
and her court.
Procedures for Delegate Registration
1. Nominees must be ECU students
and onlv one (1) girl mav represent
each organization.
2. vll candidates must submit an 8
bv ll) black and white, glossy
photograph, along with name,
address, and telephone number to:
Rob Kidney, Kappa Sigma
Fraternity, 700 E. 10th St
Greenville N.C. 27834.
S. information must be
submitted no later than 12:00 noon
October 5, 1979.
uttng Procedures
1. Voting will be held in the lobby
ol the Student Supplv Store Oct.
8-9-10 from 8:00-4:00.
2. vii) student with a valid ECU
1.1). and activit) card ma) vote.
3. mi eight girl court will be
selected and notified rhursda) prior
l" the parade on Saturday.
rransportation in the parade will be
provided lor the court and all girls
are expected l� ride in the parade
did attend the game with escort.
1. queen will be chosen from
these eight girls (on totals
accumulated during the voting
period) and presented at hall-time.
ll organizations are urged to
submit an entry so that the court will
represent .ill students ol East Carolina
University. Voting procedures are
organized bv the kappa Sigma
Kiaternilv in conjunction with the
Intelr ratei'nil v Council. It there are
.in questions please contact Rob
Kidnev at 7.)2-55i3.
Ill
Portraits
will be
taken:
Workshop
continued troin page 1
editor; Rich) Smith ol
the A in stim tree Press;
John W arren, ECl jour-
nalism lacult); oodv
I'eele, sports editor lor
the Daily Reflector, Bill
Sloess ol Delmar Pub-
lishing Co Professor
James Rees and Dr.
Cat lion Ben ECL De-
partment ol Speech and
Drama, Tommy Forrest,
Dad) Reflector photo-
grapher; Don Schlienz,
Daily Reflector news
editor, Craig Sahli, editor
ol the ECl Buccaneer;
.lame- V ise, editor ol
Heel magazine; Dr.
Sail) Bretl ol the ECU
E ilglia h l)e part in e n I ;
Georgette Hedrick, in-
loi inatioii ami publica-
tions coordinator lor ECl
Medical School; vshlc)
I" hi i ell, editor and pub-
hshei ol the it ushington
Daily i us. Henrietta
ii.ii boui. Hock Mount
High School; Vlonika
Outlier land, loriner Hue
i aneei editor; and Ira L.
Bakei. I.t .1 journalism
I earlic i .
CLIFF'S s&
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
IMfcgW MW� (N.C.HEkI GfWYvlin. Korm Crolin�
w� mnn
ALL YOU
a.7s CAST EAT!
MONDAY-THURSDAY
TROUT, FLOUNDER,
CRAB CAKES
TEA is included with meal
CLIFF'S SUPER
SPECIAL
WEDNESDAY
CRAB CAKE SPECIAL
2 Golden Fried Crab Cakes
French Fries, Slaw, and
Hushpuppies. QQ �
ALL TOU CAN EAT SALAD BAR witl �m1.
�'
f
I





I I It � 11 s. arid
tc knew
vs of Sept. 18 no
items lor People, Places
and column will be
accepted unless they are
typed, double-space, and
include on the bottom a
name and phone number
ol a person who can be
coulacled if there is some
problem vith the piece.
We reserve the right to
edito lor brevity, and will
"ids run the items we
consider most important
the most students.
Hue lo space limitations
ie are unable lo print all
nl the items received, but
c vill do our best lo
print as man) as possi-
ble. Deadlines are 2:00
p.m. on Fridays lor the
lucsda) edition, and
2:00 lucsda) lor the
1 liuisdav edition.
l iKtt ts o
Beginning this rues-
la) ul 1:30 p.m. a
scussiou group on
Christian worship shall
begin. W e will be Irving
sec how Gods pre-
iicc made manliest
in ilic breaking ol the
cad (communion) and
iu the proclaiming ol the
word (sermon). k e shall
aUu do some discussion
on tun Lnilcd Method-
crecdal beliefs and
now the) ailed our
spiritual life, ll vou are
interested in deepening
ur understanding ol
id i ome on over and
i Ml Us!
I: lor some reason
vou cannot come at this
Lime but would like to be
.i participant let us know
and in a be iv c ca n
cliangi our time. Call
i Stewart or Gar
. rson at 758-2030.
- ussions will lake
in tiic Lounge ol
Methodist Student
ueuti i. 501 L. 5th.
il 5th and Hollv
t Hi i )I center ttie tebel
Vi ltil
flic Wesley Found-
i lion io putting on
ipeii Nov. 29, 30 and
i . 1. mdilioils will be
ueld I ue� Sept. 25 and
( I Sept. 20 in ihe
iiulli-purpose room at
,ne Mctiiodist Student
Center, JUl t. 5th St.
11 tun Gar ret I
iJoiui). tudilions will
-tail at 7:30 p.m. Please
uriiig music and be
prepared lo sing (pianist
i i be a adable). Ever) -
tiic welcome. ll vou
i auitol make il call Lisa
itisoii at 7j8-2030.
i ii'ii 'i
l4tlH il
fhere will be an
organizational meeting ol
tiic College Republicans
vCil. Sept. 20, at 7:30
p.m. in BB-iUl. All
Republicans are urged to
liiue and so are all other
nilcrcslcd persons, fhe
purpost oi this meeting
- it reorganize itsell and
:tt w officers lor the
t � .10) school year. We
a ill also discuss many
republican projects lor
die upcoming vear.
sM
1 here will be an
organizational meeting
or people taking the
l'hvsical Education Snow
"kniig class (credit or
tioii-credil) which will ski
over Christmas and
Spring Break, in Brew-
�ler, B W ing, Room 102,
w i ti Sepi. 26, at 7 p.m.
�(d
The Ledonia Wright
vlrovmerican Cultural
Center is open daily from
9- a.m. lo 5 p.m. Monday
thru Friday.
Organizations wishing
lo use ihe center during
evenings and on week-
ends are to contact the
director ol services ol
Mendenhall Student
Center.
itxrt jtier
Ihe 1979 .CU-1 Rec-
reational Tournaments,
sponsored bv Mendenhall
Student Center, will be
Ueld in Billiards, Bowl-
ing, fable Tennis, Chess
and Backgammon. All
lull-time students are
eligible to participate.
Gel our information and
registration forms al the
Mendenhall Billiards and
Bowling Centers.
beta ru
Bela Nu Chapter of
Sigma iheta Tau will
hold its lirsl business
meeting oi the ,7980
vear Sept. 25 al 7 p.m. in
Room 101 ol the nursing
building. Sigma Theta
lau is a national honor
society ol nursing. All
members are encouraged
lo attend.
if il III I
fhere will be a
Famil) Child Association
meeting on lues Sept.
25, ai 5 p.m. in Room
I 13 in the Home Eco-
nomics Building. All
Child Development and
Family Relation majors
and minors are urged to
attend.
emt
til LMT's interested
ni joining a first Re-
sponded Squad please
call Lester Nail al 758-
3038.
The Rebel is now
accepting high-quality
I hlcralure submissions.
Poetry, essays, plays,
interviews, and short
stones will be accepted.
�ll work must have
name, address, and
phone number ol writer.
tddrcss manuscripts to
the Rebel, Mendenhall
Student Center, Green-
wile, .C. 27831.
�Illlf I
The East Carolina
Circle K Club meets
1 ues. nights at 7 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student
Center (Room 221). Ev-
en one is welcome lo
conic!
miI
fhere will be an
important meeting ol the
Soctcl) ol Utuled Liberal
Students (S.O.U.L.S.)
I'hurs Sept. 27 at 8
p.m. al the Ledonia S.
V right . vfromerican
Cultural Center. Perti-
nent information con-
cerning Homecoming will
be discussed.
crafts
Gratis workshops are
now available al the
Grails Center in Men-
deuhall. Beginning Dark-
room, Macrame, Pottery,
atained Glass, Quilting,
Vv ood Design, Floor
Loom Weaving, Begin-
ning Jewelry, Batik,
llaudbuilt Christmas
Ceramics, and Christmas
Patchwork are the work-
shops which are avail-
able.
vll lull-tune students,
student dependents, and
I acuity, stall, and their
dependents who are MSC
members, are eligible to
participate. Everyone
musl register lor work-
siiops al the Crafts
Center no later than
Saturday, Sept. 29.
Gratis Center hours are 3
p.m. until 10 p.m Mon.
through Friday, and 12
noon until 5 p.m. Sat-
urday .
IKlfl
On Huns Sept. 27
at 7:30 p.m Phi Mpha
the la History Honor
Society will have its lirst
meeting in ihe Richard
C. lodd Room located in
L) W tug ol Brewster.
Featured as guesi speak-
er will be Dr. uilhonv
Papaias who will talk on
the Significance ol Sports
in e-lcrn Civ ili.alion.
dl members and pro-
spective members are
cord tall in v ited to
a l lend.
ma�cct�
Ma-cot try mils w ill be
held Wed Sept. 29 al
Mmges. 1 lie actual Iry-
oui lime w ill be posted at
various plait's. ll you
have all) questions ask
au ul ihe cheerleader
episcopalians
fhere will be an
l.jo-i opal sen ice ol Holy
Communion at 5:30 p.m.
al t lie hapel in the
Meihodi-i Center, 501 E.
� i.n St V cdne-day .
epi. !(. Supper will be
served billowing the ser-
vice (charge $1.50). v 11
students welcome.
Persons wishing to
examine platforms of
candidates in Wednes-
day's SGA elections may
do so in Mendenhall
Room 228.
Screening lor the
Student Government U-
lorney General, Public
Defender and 3 Honor
Board Positions will be
held on Fri. Sept. 28 at
2:00 p.m. in Mendenhall
Room 228. .Appllications
are available in the SG.
Office through Thurs. at
5:00 p.m.
cliemlsls
Student affiliates ol
the . merican Chemical
Society are offering lu-
toiing services tor all
chemistry courses, in-
cluding nursing chemis-
try. Interested persons
should contact the
Chemistry Departmental
Office in the lobby of
Flanagan Budding.
fhe ECL Student
kffiliulcs ol the wneri-
can Chemical Society will
meet Mon Oct. 1 at 7
p.m. in Room 202
1 lauagau. Prospect i e
new members ami all
interested persons are
til v lied.
medieval
1 in Mctliev al and
l e ii a t - - a il ce S I u d i e s
cuiinai .SMR 5000)
will nc ollered Spring
iriii. -icr 1980, lues,
an.I I Itui ')U- It): 15.
1 in topic i- Medici al
and Humanistic Life in
1 in ee i.nu � J- lorence,
t'ai i- and Oxloiil: mi
Interdisciplinary Explor-
ation oi the Flow of
Civilization from about
1200 to about 1000.
1 "i i ui ihci informa-
tion -it aus one
nl .in seminar instruct-
ors: Dr. McMillan (Eng-
lish, l)i. Ran (Philos-
ophy), or Dr. Bassman
(foreign Language).
Captain's Soup
& Salad $1.75
The best cup of clam
chowder south of Boston,
with crisp, green salad
and your choice
of dressing.
11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Daily except Saturday
(reek
: non-credit course in
New Testament Greek is
being ollered by the
Wesley Foundation at the
Methodist Student Cen-
ter, 501 E. 5th St.
Classes will begin on
Mon. Oel. 1 and will
continue every Monday
and Thursday from 7:30
to 9 p.m. lor 10 weeks.
fh5 is an introductory
course and no prior
foreign language study is
required. The course
would be ol particular
interest lo those persons
who anticipate attending
graduate school in reli-
gion, lo lliose who are
now involved in leaching
bible classes in churches,
and lo those who would
like lo study a classical
language to enable lur-
ther scholastic explora-
tion. moderate course
lee will be charged, ll
you have a serious
interest in learning to
read the New Testament
in ihe original language
and are prepared to
spend some lime study-
ing outside ol class as
well, call 758-2U3U and
have your name, or
come to class Monday,
Oct. 1.
I if t and
recieatlcn
W ho fhe Greenville
Recreation and Parks
Department.
Hal x Physical
I il iiess Program lor
nun.
Where? fhe Elm
direct Gy uinasium.
When October 1
iinough Nov. 23 (each
kveek Mou. through In.).
I ones: 1 classes,
1J p.m1 p.m.
I p.in2 p.in.
(� p.m p.m.
. p.nid p.m.
Coal i IU per month
i'H the 1st lour weeks;
:iu per month lor the
Jii'l tour weeks.
nuclear
Concerned about the
proliferation of Nuclear
power plants and Nuclear
weapons? Beginning
I'hurs Oct. 4 at 8 p.m.
a study group on altern-
atives to nuclear power
and nuclear disarmament
will begin. The study will
be led by Rev. Gary
.vnderson at the Meth-
odist Student Center.
Faculty and students who
are concerned about
these issues are encour-
aged to come. Call the
MSC d you are inter-
ested � 758-2030.
Hie ladies of Sigma
Caniina Rho Sorority
cordially invite you to
Sorority Rush on Thurs
Sept. 27 at Mendenhall
Kin. 244, at 7:30 p.m.
Please be prompt.
7 : �
�u artist
Applications are be-
ing taken for Student
Union Artist. Qualifi-
cations: Full-time East
Carolina University Stu-
dent with a background
in Commercial Art. Ap-
plicants may apply at the
Student Union Office,
Room 234 of Mendenhall
Student Center, between
the hours 8:30-5, Mon
Fri.
Icaltl
fhe Student National
Environmental Health
association will meet
Wed. at 7 p.m. in the
Re Ik Ruilding audito-
rium. All environmental
health majors or pro-
spective majors should
attend. All other inter-
ested persons are wel-
come.
1
There will be a
meeting of the East
Carolina Gay Community
al 5 p.m. Tues Sept.
25, in the Newman
House. The agenda will
include election of new
officers and a pot luck
dinner. All interested
persons are welcome. For
information contact Mark
al 752-0790.
tead club
fhe East Carolina
Road Club invites all
bicycling enthusiasts to
participate in our weekly
program ol events. The
club offers weekly races
and tours, and monthly
meetings with programs
on bike care and similar
topics ol interest.
For up lo the minute
details, Call Mike's Bike
Shop (752-5291) and ask
lor Mike.
��P
AUTO SERVICE SPECIALS
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WE SERVICE NATIONAL ACCOUNTS
All size
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� uh-
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756-5244
- - X s
minm
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r
ttflftttl
IMULAMtM
East Carolina University
Student Union
presents
Come in and see our
complete line of Frater-
nity � Sorority Jewelry.
FLOYD G. ROBINSON
JEWELERS
107 EVANS ST.
GREENVILLE
758-2452
Looking for a
NUTRITIONAL
ECONOMICAL
Meal or Snack to get yon
through the day? Try onr new
FRUIT-n-NUT mixes 12
varieties
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with a special guest TBA
Tues Oct. 9
8pm
Minges Coliseum
$4 Students (in advance)
$6.00 Public
NOW ON SALE !
i
t
I





The East Caroli
nian �
sports
Tuesday, September 25, 1979, page 7
ake takes 23.2Q win
Greenville, N.C.
Pirates lose third game in a row
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
Wake Forest quarterback Jay Venuto completed 28
ol 33 passes for 334 yards, both new team and Atlantic
Coast Conference records, to lead the Demon Deacons
to a thrilling 23-20 win over East Carolina Saturday
night in Groves Stadium.
Venuto, who was redshirted last season, was on the
money all night as a confused Pirate defense struggled
in their attempts to stop him.
Running back James McDougald
(Pholo by John Grogan)
cJLJ
Pat Dye 9s worst start
the
ma.
Fur the .iniitime in his career as a head coach at
La La,u mm, Pirate head coach Pat Dye has watched
ins team drop three consecutive games
With locs io N.C. State, Duke and most recently
wakt ro die Pirates now stand 1-3 including an
opening i, �� over Western Carolina.
1 hati like heck to see this happen said Dye "I
fed especulv bad lor the fans. They're the ones that
must hurl. hs my responsibility to make sure that
Uiey do ,ave lu hurt'
"ig about the Pirates' 1-3 mark is that
not a team that should own such a
Last Carolina team is loaded with talented
ai hve suffered at times from lackadaisical
play and at others lrom just plain bad luck.
Us really eating at me inside said Dye "I've
never been around losing much as a player or a coach
and aimplv cant stand to lose.
"What we've got to do now is say the heck with
the garner we ve lost; they're finished now. We've got
to try and win our remaining seven games "
There will be no real pressure on the Pirates to do
this though, as many observers have lost faith and
conl.dence in the 1979 ECU squad
. l01 g,Ve" Up- "We had rea problems
alter the Duke game We played very poorly there. But
last Saturday at Wake there was some real progress
made J ,avv m re oneness deve rf fc
titan 1 ve seen all season 6
'�������������������������a
LADY PIRATE BASKETBALL will get a big boost
tin, year when WNCT-TV airs The Cathy Andruzz!
Snow, a weekly program featuring the ECU head
coach.
This is a real boost for our program said
vndruzzi joyously. "It will give our team some much
needed exposure. It should certainly help our
attendance out.
LaDY PIRATE TRYOUTS begin next week. All
interested girls should go by the Minges Coliseum
gymnasium any day next week and contact Andruzzi
between 2:30 p.m. and 5:00 p.m.
TRYOUTS FOR MENS' basketball will be held
October 15, said Pirate coach Dave Odom. The
lirsl-year coach noted that anyone interested in trying
out should contact him during the first week in October
so that he may give them some important information
�����������������,�.��,
THE ECU "SOCCER TEAM'stands 3-2-1 after
defeating Davidson 2-1 yesterday afternoon. This
marks the first time the Pirates have been over the
.500 mark since 1974.
�������������������������
� �
WITH HIS 132-YARD performance against Wake
Forest, ECU halfback Anthony Collins now has 414
yards on the season, and an average of 103.5 per
game. He is averaging 7.8 yards per carry. If he
continues this pace, Collins would finish the season
with 1138 yards and become the Pirates' first
1000-yard runner since Carlester Crumpler achieved
the leal in 1972 and 1973.
"It was a fine football game, one
I'm sure the fans enjoyed. I didn't see
anyone on either side quit
Pat Dye
The Pirates had a chance to tie the game with no
lime left on the clock but watched a 54-yard field goal
by Vern Davenport fall short. This miss concluded
what was a most exciting game for the more than
28,000 gans present.
"It was a fine football game said ECU head
coach Pat Dye, "one I'm sure the fans enjoyed. I
didn't see anyone on either side quit
Fhis was a big change from a week earlier for East
Carolina. .After that game, a 28-14 loss to Duke, Dye
Venuto stars in
said that his team had not put forth the necessary
eiiort needed to win.
Things were different after the Wake game,
though. "I can accept losing this game a lot better
than the one last week because the kids came back and
ioughl said Dye.
"We just ran into a guy with a really hot hand
said the Pirate coach in reference to Venuto.
To say Venuto had a "hot hand" is being modest.
vll this 6-0 205-pound junior did was break two
records, lor most completions and passing yardage in a
single game, that were held by ex-N.C. State and Los
vngeles Ram great Roman Gabriel.
Venuto was equally successful at throwing long
downiield to his outside receivers and throwing in the
Hal to his running backs.
.vlso starring in the game was Pirate halfback
Anthony Collins, who rambled for 132 yards on just 8
carries despite missing over half the game due to a
minor shoulder injury.
Collins finished the game with all three Pirate
touchdowns, one a 72-yard beauty of a run.
Collins first scored at the 12:43 mark of the second
period. This lied the game at six all and followed two
Wake Forest field goals. A two-point conversion
allempt by ihe Pirates failed.
The game was also tied at halftime, at 13-13, as
both teams scored after Collins' initial touchdown. The
Deaes socred on a one-yard run by star halfback James
McDougald and the Pirates scored on a 7-yard jaunt by
Collins belore intermission. Both teams' conversion
allempis were successful.
Wake went ahead in the third quarter when Venuto
hit end Wayne Baumgardner on a 27-yard scoring toss.
Just three plays earlier Venuto had set up the score
when he connected with Kenny Duckett on a 53-yard
pass.
The Pirates tied the game with 8:40 remaining
when Collins scampered 72 yards for a score.
"The end look me on the play and we got a good
block on ihe corner said ECU quarterback Leander
victory
Green. "(Billy Ray) Washington made a great block
downiield and Collins just outran the rest
Bill Lamm's extra-point try was good and tied the
game at 20-20.
The Deacons scored on the ensuing possession
when kicker Phil Denfield connected on a field goal
lrom 40 yards out to put Wake ahead 23-20.
The Pirates spent the rest of the evening trving
desparately to spring a long gainer that would set up a
score.
On their last possession of the contest, the Pirates
drove lrom iheir own 37-yard line to the Wake 38
belore time ran out on the clock. It was then that
Davenport attempted the 54-yard field goal that fell
aboul ten yards short.
'Vern has kicked them from over 60 in practice "
said Dye. "He was just awfully tired at the end of the
game. Davenport is a starter at split end.
viler ihe game both coaches looked drained vet
had enough left in them to express praises in ihe
direction ol their opponents.
1 think East Carolina is the best football team we
have played without a doubt said Wake coach John
Mackovic, whose team has now upset Georgia and
Lasl Carolina on consecutive weekends. "Thev played
an excellent game. And that guy (ECU QB Leander)
Green is as good ol a wishbone quarterback as there Is
an) where.11
"We knew Wake Forest had a good football team
belore we got here1 said Dye. "Thev can compete
with anvbody they play1
Dye did point out that he felt the home field
advantage and the home crowd were a big advantage
lor the Deaes and noted that he was pleased with th
pla ol the Pirates. 'Tin proud of our people. We have
nothing to be ashamed about. I have to he proud of
our ullciise and the play of Leander Green
The win puts the Deacons at 3-0 lor the season, the
best start by a Wake Forest team since 1951. heading
into next week's big game at N.C. State.
Ihe Pirates are a disappointing 1-3 and will host
VMl this Saturda) at 7:3U p.m. in Ficklen Stadium.
Deacon quarterback sets new marks
By JIMMY DuPREE
Assistant Sports Editor
What can you say to a quarterback who is
red-shiried one season and leading his team to its best
start in over 25 years the next?
How about congratulating him for being named
Spurts Illustrated magazine's Offensive Player of the
W eek lor his part in an upset victory over the touted
Georgia Bulldogs in his second outing of the year?
How about congratulating him for establishing two
new ulantic Coast Conference passing records in a
23-20 win over the Pirates of East Carolina?
However, the player involved is Wake Forest senior
Jay Venuto, any praise directed his way is likely to be
verbally deflected to the strong Demon Deacon
ullensive line.
The Sports Illustrated thing is just something
bestowed on me for the entire team's play said
Venut.
"Anything I do is just a reflection of the offensive
line.
"The two times I got pressure were my own fault "
ollered Venuto. "I left the pocket and I shouldn't have
and East Carolina's defense was just too fast
Venuto ripped the Pirates for 334 yards passing
while completing 28 out of 33 attempts establishing
new Wake and ACC records in both categories
Venuto, a native of Salem, New Jersey, ran for onl
one net yard and WFU collectively had just 111 on tht
night.
They did a pretty good job shutting off our
running game, so we knew we would have to pass to
win. r
Passing seems to have become a way of life for the
upstart Deacons.
In the victory over Georgia, Venuto connected on 2(
out ol 34 aerials for a total of 283 yards.
Wake quarterbacks last year passed for a new
school record of 1,816 yards in 11 games for an
average of 165 yards per contest.
Venuto thus far in the 1979 season has passed for
over 700 yards in three games, for an average over 233
yards.
"We have some of the best receivers in college
iootball lauds Venuto. "I don't think they've
dropped one pass over the last three weeks.
"Our receivers can beat anyone in man-to-man
coverage They blitzed a lot and that's what we knew
they would do.
"We knew that when they blitzed, they'd drop back
into man-to-man, so we tried to create that situation as
much as possible. Someone would get open; it was just
a matter of getting the ball there
Again and again Venuto hit his wide receivers, m
wei as anyone out of the backfield. Tight end Mike
Mullen and fullback Albert Kirby led the Deacs
platoon with seven each, while wide receiver Wayne
Baumgardner snared six.
"We send oat five receivers on almost every pass
play we call Venuto explained, "often we line up
three receivers wide to the lef ��at's one of our
iavorite plays.
"When I come to the line I try to see how the
defense is set and then eliminate the receivers to one
side of the field or the other, but we don't rely on
having just one primary receiver ,
Venuto's analysis of the Pirate defense Saturday
drew praise from Wake Forest's rookie coach John
Mackovic, but especially ECU h -ad coach Pat Dye.
We ran into a guy with a H hand tonight Dye
said following the game. "W tried to come with a
rush and they hurt us with a long past.
We gave him too much time to throw and he
dumped the ball to his backs well
ECU senior defensive back Charlie Carter echoed
his coach s sentiment.
"Anything I do is just a reflection
of the offensive line
Jay Venuto
He (Venuto) ran around a lot and that made it
hard lo stay with the receivers lamented Carter. "I
think he's the best I've faced since I've been here-
better than Rozantz (former Appalachian State
standout quarterback Tom)
After three impressive wins, Venuto and his Demon
Deacon teammates now must prepare for what may be
their loughesl test thus far: the nationally ranked
w'ollpack ol N.C. State.
Woodrovv WilSon, Bubba Green, Simon Gupton and
Donnie LeGrande will anchor perhaps the strongest
defense in ihe ACC, but Venuto looks to the challenge I
with optimism.
"I've heard people say that the game might be
televised, but we'll have to wait to find out said
Venuto. "That would be nice for the team, but we just
want io get ready now.
"Right now we're playing together as a team.
individuals. I think that's the main reason we've dune
so well
Would Jay Venuto want to repeat this week as
player of the week?
"It really doesn't matter that much to me. Mavbe
when I'm fifty I'll look back and it'll seem important.
I'd really like to see McDougald or James Parker (nose
guard) get it now. They really deserve it
u





Page 8 THf east Carolinian 25 September 1979
Lady Pirates disappointed
at William and Mary meet
Anthony Collins on 7 yard TD run
(Photo by John Grogan)
By JOHN NOLAN
Staff Writer
The Lady Pirate vol-
leyball team returned
S. lurday night from a
tour-team match at Wil-
liam and Mary where
ECU registered a disap-
pointing 1-2 slate.
ECU heat William
and Mars lor their first
win of the season, 15-8,
15-13, hut lost to Virginia
Com in on weal th U Diver-
sity, 15-10, 15-12, and
NCSU, 15-9, 15-5.
"1 was disappointed
in our play against
William and Mary even
though we won ex-
plained Coach Dillon
whose team's record now
stands at 1-4.
"We lacked teamwork
and showed no con-
sistency . However, 1
though we improved our
play as the day wore
on
The Lady Pirates did
show some gutsy play in
the first match against
Virginia Commonwealth.
Down 11-2, the girls
made a great comeback
in scoring eight unan-
swered points to close
the gap to 11-10. But the
inconsistency that Coach
Dillon spoke ol turned
what might have been a
great win into an agon-
izing defeat as ECU lost
the next lour points.
Against State, ihe
Lady Pirato played what
Coach Dillon considered
to he their best match ol
the day.
"We played State
earlier this week so we
knew their game plan.
We worked verj well as
a team and blocked
extremely well. What
hurt us vyas our services.
We were very weak in
our serves and lost a
total of nine serves by
either netting them or
hilling them out ol
bounds.
What I'm hoping is
Jial the girls won't get
discouraged and will
learn from their mis-
takes
Coach Dillon ex-
plained that no one was
to blame for the losses. It
was just a case ol
spurratic play by the
vv hole team.
The Lady Pirates face
a tough Duke squad
Tuesday at 7:00 p.m. at
Minges in what Coach
Dillon calls "a big one
It is the last home match
unlil October 16.
Pizza inn
AMERICA'S FAVORITE PIZZA
Experience pays off for ISFL CfcRTAlHI
By H l BOCK
1' Sports It ritcr
tnes, it s qual-
Inne; Houston 30, Cin-
iiinati 27 in overtime;
Kansas Citv 35, Oakland
Louis 7; Detroit 24,
Ulanta 2 .New Orleans
30, San Francisco 21-
I'dV
Oil
lor
l 'ark
h a in pie: T a in p a
Doug Williams
ust live pas-
5u lay, bul two ol
;n unit ior touch-
- ind the Bues beat
g I - 21-0.
uelimes, - quan-
pays oil for
Buffalo's
aughl 10
255 yards and
- the Bills
New York
; Sub Craig
Denver came
! i ol 16
rJ yards,
liree 1- in
as the
rallied t ir a
it. lory o er Seattle.
In Sunday's other
il I League
. New
2 . San Diego
17. Balti-
. . Minnesota 27.
Bay 21 in over-
km:
Piedmont Airlines' discount fares are like money from
home!
Super Saver Fare saves you a super 25 (Fri. thru Sun
or 35 (Mon. thru Thurs.) roundtrip if you make your reser-
vations and ticket purchase 30 days before departure, and
stay at least 7 days.
Weekend Excursion Fare means a 30�o roundtrip dis-
count if you leave Saturday and return any day except Sun-
day (12:01 pm until midnight)or Friday.
For complete information, including time and reservation
requirements and fare availability, see your travel agent or
call Piedmont Airlines. Discount fares subject to change
without notice.
79-CNP-2
TRatlisWIif
Creemwillt, N. C.
Wed Ladies' Nite Thurs.
Mitch Bowen Tommy G.
and Band and Co.
The skirt and
sweater return.
And, oh, what a
comeback. A simple
pleated 100 wool
skirt by Halston VI
does nothing but
flatter your figure.
William Kasper's
1 00 cashmere V-
neck sweater and a
Paula Saker blouse
in a deep rose with
poppy print.
1 10 E. 4th Street
GREENVILLE, N.C.
just off the mall, downtown
VISA'
master charge
PIZZA BUFFET
ALL THE PIZZA AND
SALAD YOU CAN EAT
$3.39
MonFri. 11:30 2:00
Mon. �P Tnes. 6:00-8:00
Evening buffet 82.II9
758-6366 Hwy 364 bypass Greenville , N. C.
"A demonstration of how good a movie intelligent people can
make when they have better-than-intelligent material to work
on
PAULINE KAEL
D. H. LAWRENCE'S
The
Rocking
Horse
Winner
Made in 1950, before the movies had begun to tap D. H. Lawrence as a literary source, THE ROCKING
HORSE WINNER was not so much an attempt to introduce Lawrence to movie audiences as it was a
means of utilizing one of his more macabre stories at the tail end of a curious cycle of a largely super-
natural thrillers, a cycle that had included HALFWAY HOUSE, CORRIDOR OF MIRRORS, and, most
famous of all, DEAD OF NIGHT. Early audiences seemed not to understand it�although the fact that
they were disturbed by it suggest they probably understood it more thoroughly than they believed. It
is a disturbing film and thus has a whole new audience ready to discover one of the more startling and
off-beat British films of the early 50's.
Thur at 8 p.m. Kendrix Theatre
Sponsored by the Student Union Films Committee





25 September 1979 THE FAST CAROLINIAN Page 9
teams
'eon
B)
ilt KM.Ht.l. N1SSENS0IS
I' Sports U liter
Southern California
i it mi in the tir&t
Wabama rolled u
tic second halt ami
ihoina �lit things
much down the
Hut no matter
v i mi slice ii. college
ill s three top-
i teams had mat-
- tirmlv under control
lav.
I lie same could not
said lor the rest ol
The Associated Press
"op 1 enty. Notre
Dame, Penn State and
Pittsburgh were losers
while Texas, Nebraska,
Michigan State, Missouri
and W ashington hat! to
rally tor second-hall vic-
tories.
There likel) will be no
changes at the top ol this
week's ratings. Top-
ranked Southern Cal
surged to a 35-0 halitime
lead as All-America
Charles White rushed tor
153 ards and two touch-
Flag football registration
held by Intraniurals
I
CKI GL1 VRMIS
- . .
CD Kit
-t, KOOTB l.l.
Ke Klag Football
his tall. It
ilroail) done
lime to gel your
lor the
;it ration is
I until Oct. I I.
w ill be
KTIC IK IKK
- low that the
lt has a
I athletic
L- read) and
L-are tor vour
. - a an intra-
Susan
training
ii : I'ichl hours ,i?
londa rhurday: 2
.m Room
G m.
. i - day . I-
7 p.m IM
NCINC CLl B
be an
ting nt
ig Club on
Oct. at 1
i Memorial
t�in.
All interested persons
should attend. Prior ex-
perience is not necessary.
Dr. George Weigand will
serve as club advisor and
instructor.
ALMOST
ANYTHING GOES
There will he an
vlmost Anything Goes
plavers' meeting on
ruesdav, Oct. 2, at 7
i.in. The meeting will be
held m Brewster B-102.
vll participants are urged
lu attend thi meeting.
1) VTES AND
DE xDLJNES
Horseshoes entry da-
le- run through Sept. 27
with play beginning Oct.
I . rchery sign-up will
run until Oct. I. 1'lay will
begin Oct. . Entrv dates
lor the Track and Field
Meet arc Sept. 2 until
Oct. 8. Pla) begins Oct.
it).
Don't lorget to sign
up lor Almost Anything
Goes b Oct. 1.
DON'T FORGET
The Team Goll Tour-
nament bfgiib loda) and
will run through Thurs-
ila at the .) den Country
Club.
downs and plastered
Minnesota 18 1 i.
Meanwhile, runnerup
Alabama broke open a
relatively close game
with tour touchdowns in
the final period and
flattened Baylor 15-0
while third-ranked Okla-
homa scored 21 points in
the opening period, 21
more in tin- final one and
crushed Tulsa 49-13.
Elsewhere, though.
fourth-ranked Texas over-
came a )-3 halftone
deficit to turn hack Iowa
Mate 17-9, tilth-ranked
Notre Dame was knocked
it 28-22 b) No. 17
Purdue, Texas S. 1
stunned No. 0 Penn State
27-11, No. 7 Nebraska
and No. 8 Michigan
squeaked past Iowa and
Miami of Ohio, respec-
tively, bv 21-21 scores
and ninth-ranked Mis-
souri walloped Missis-
sippi 33-7 alter trailing
7-3 at halitime. Houston,
the No. 10 team, was
�lie.
The onl) loser in the
Second Ten was No. 13
Pitt, which bowed to
North Carolina 17-7.
Eleventh-ranked Michi-
gan downed Kansas 28-7,
No. 12 W ashington edged
Oregon 21-17, No. 11
Florida Stale thrashed
Miami. Fla 10-23, No.
15 Arkansas whipped
Oklahoma State 27-7. No.
I Ohio State trimmed
ashington State 15-2(),
No. 18 Southern Meth-
odist held oil North
Texas Mate 20-9, No. 19
North Ca rolina State
trounced est irginia
38-1 1 and No. 20 I CLA
mauled Wisconsin 37-12.
W e wanted to come
out lastand we did
said I SC's � W lute, who
scored un a spectacular
b8 aid scamper and a
M) yard hurst as the
I rojans tallied on live ol
their lirsl six possessions
against Minnesota. Coach
John Robinson, however,
said he "didn't expect
this kind ol game 586
v a i ds to M i nnesol a's
2.o. 1 thought it would
be more dillicult.
Ii would be an
understatement to -av
v I a ha in a is an mi I -
-landing loolball team,
hul I want to sa) il just
the same, Baylor Coach
( ran I Teatl said alter t he
Bears sullered their
worst pa-ting in a
decade.
"Sleadman Sheal) is
just an outstanding quar-
terback, Major Ogilvie
and Steve W hitman are
line running backs that
-how great balance and
that o 11 e 11 s i v e line is
ever) hit as good a you
hear.
vlabama not onl)
allowed Baylor to cross
midi-ield just once in each
halt but intercepted six
passes, recovered two
tumbles and blocked a
punt while the oflense
reeled oil 131 yards on
the ground.
Hei-nian I rophv win-
ner Bill) Mm- scored
twice while romping lor
109 y aid- on 11 carries
while J.C. an- rushed
for 122 on 20 to lead
Oklahoma over Tulsa.
invites the homecoming
representatives to have their
portraits made.
Specializing in
black and white 8 by 10 Y
203 S. Evans 752-3980
PIRATE
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$3.99
� 6oe. Steak
� Baked Potato
� tree Salad Bar
Free Soft Drink
� Free Jello or Pudding
Offer valid seven days a week (lunch
and dinner) to
COLLEGE STUDENTS Sl FACULTY
Show your College I.D.
to ordertaker to get the Special!
CALL 76-6508
to reserve Banquet Room for Groups
50 N. Greenville Blvd. Greenville
ABORTIONS UP TO 12TH
WEEK OF PREGNANCY
$175.00 "all inclusive"
pregnancy test, birth control and
problem pregnancy counseling For
further information call 832-0635 (toll-
free number 800-221-2568) between
9AM-5PM weekdays
Ralegh Women's Health
Organization
917 West Morgan St
Raleigh, N.C. 27603
THE BEST OF BOTH WORLDS
DO YOU HAVE
TROUBLE MAKING
YOUR CLASSES?
HAVE YOU EVER
SLEPT THROUGH
YOUR ALARM?
WE CAN HELP
FOR MORE INFORMATION
CALL 758-7904
THE FIRST COMPACT
THAT TAKES TAPE
SERIOUSLY.
JL
?N


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PAIR ELECTRONICS BUILDING next door to TAR





Page 10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 25 September 1979
Lee, ACLU reopen controversy
By WILLGRIMSLEY
11' Special Correspondent
Bowie Kuhn, the lord
lugh commissioner of
baseball, is a man of
dignity, unquestioned in-
ii indwell-meaning,
in hi?- latest square-
oil with Pitcher Bill Lee
ilu- Montreal Expos,
don us, but we have
line up in the
Spaceman's' corner.
Detrimental to base-
Someone's gotta be
Bill Lee - or
Space'1 or Moon
an, u his mates call
m � i- the freshest
l breeze to blow
the diamond in
- His manager ion-
ium a mars el. I o
animates, he i a
w ho keeps the
room loose. He i
inig
the darling of the college
liberals, most of the fans
and the media.
With all his idio-
syncracies, he's the kind
of guy you wouldn't mind
our son growing up to
be.
So he gets belted with
a $250 fine for acknow-
ledging � honestly and
oli-handedly � that,
sure, he'd used a little
marijuana in his lifetime.
He didn't say he was a
junkie. He didn't say he
was hooked on the stuff.
He just admitted in a
conversation that he had
exposed himself to the
horrible weed that more
ihan hall of the nation's
school kids treat like
bubblegum.
This all happened in
the .spring. Now the
mailer has been re-
opened by Lee, with the
support of the American
Civil Liberties Union and
the players association,
to test the constitutional
right of free speech.
It's hard to see how �
baseball can win this
onv.
W ell leave that to
(he judges. But it is in
our province to reveal bill
Lee as the person he is
� not an ogre, not a
slumblebum but a bright,
articulate athlete and
family man, father of
three, who is a blythe
spirit yet genuinely con
corned about the qualit
o I I i f �
111.
He cuts
fakerv.
through all
hypocrisy,
social snobbery and pon-
tifical, holier-than-thou
altitudes to put his sport
and his world jn true
perspective.
His greatest sin, il
any, is that he goes
heavy on the hyperbole.
He once referred to
Billy Martin and the
Yankees as "that neo-
INazi and his Brown
Shirts Of the 1972-74
champion Oakland A's,
he said, "They remind
me ol Gates Brown lying
on a rug He rated
Cincinnati's Big Red
Machine as third in
fundamentals behind the
Taiwan Little Leaguers
and Southern Cal's col-
lege champs.
Personally, he is a
physical fitness and rock
V roll freak. He is deep
into the evils of pollution,
nuclear energy, tobacco,
alcohol, junk foods, sugar
and white breads.
'The "Spaceman"
was fined not because he
used marijuana � it
would be naive to believe
scores of ball players are
not as involved, or more
� but that he said so
publicly.
In baseball's eyes,
hat is the cardinal
crime. By mentioning it,
the maverick left-hander
defiled the minds of
countless innocent Young-
sters. That's ludicrous.
Surveys have shown kids
are into the "dope"
scene probably more
deeply than their sport
heroes.
largely an act. friends
insist he is a man of
intellectual depth and
feeling using his kooki-
ness as a platform.
The bothersome ele-
ment is that baseball �
or any other pro sport �
feels that it can purify its
ranks by stifling free
speech.
THE DELI
KITCHEN
"Home -cooked meals at
reasonable prices
open 7a.m. to 7:30p.m.
AFTER 5:00P.M. SPECIAL
$2.75 meal Includes meat,
2 vegetables,biscuit or corn
bread, and iced tea
t in or Take out located on cornei
Dickinson and Raleigh Av.
752-5339
Cag
e
unced
as l Carolina will
13 home games on
1979-80 basketball
as announcer
ay by Uhletics Di-
I Cain.
ile the large
liedule, the Pi-
J-15 a year ago,
season on
. I, participating in
le r C lassie at
id, Va along
Kh hmund, irginia
Aeallh an.i esl
fech � 'ii Nov. ,0
against
4.
rirales begin the
hedule
g in Dec
une opponents
I linois Mate. Old
nun, UNC-Wil-
ls Madi
- n-Milwaukee
lilficult road
includes trips to
Maryland, Duke; N.C.
and
�cne
Slate, South Carolina,
Detroit, Oral Roberts and
Nevada-Reno in addition
to return engagements
with Old Dominion, LING-
VO ilmington and Madison.
Our schedule has
plenty of teams from
irginia, North and South
Carolina, yet we still
have 11 opponents from
other stales, too said
new Pirate mentor Dae
Odotn. "1 Like having a
good regional base to our
schedule and yet at the
same tune having a
national perspective in
our program.
Practice opens lor the
Pirates on Oct. 15.
1 he complete sche-
dule:
Nov. 30-Dee. 1 �
Spider Classic. Rich-
mond, a. (Virginia Com-
monwealth, Richmond,
West VicginiiSTech);
Dec. 4 - LYNCH-
BURC; 5 - MAINE; 8
� at Duke; 10 �
SOUTH CAROLINA-
vlkEN; 15- M.vDISON;
18 - OLD DOMINION;
21-22 at Wolf Pack
Classic, Reno, Nev. (Ne-
vada-Reno, Northern Ari-
zona, Kent Stale);
Jan. 2 � at N.C.
Male; 5 � UNC-ASHE-
V1LLE; 7 � at Oral
Roberts; 10 � at Baptist;
12 - vTL.v.MTC CHRI-
STIAN; 14 � at Madi-
son; 21 - B.vPTiST; 26
� UNC-W1LM1NGTON;
Feb. 2 � at Detroit; 7
� at South Carolina; 9
� ILLINOIS STATE; 11
� DEL.xW.vRE STATE;
l.j � at Maryland, 16 �
at UNC-Wilmington; 20
� at Old Dominion; 27
� C vMPBELL; 29 �
vlMJONSlN-MlLW.OJ5
KLE.o
Home Games in C.PS.
B 15 Original
Formula
Available at
Nature's
Harvest
Downtown
5th St.
Leather Belts
$6 to m
Laather Handbags
$10 to $25
�Shoos Repaired To Look
Uko New
Riggan Shoe Repair
& Leather Shop
111 WEST 4TH ST.
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
758-Q2M
Parking in Front
and Rear.
A greeting
card makes
someone
happy and
shows vouVe
remembered.
Select from our gallery
of beautiful expressions.
�C
O
Q
O
O
(
A
fAee&swi
Creative excellence is an American tradition.
CENTRAL NEWS AND CARD SHOP
321 Evans St. Open 7 Days a Week
Local and Out-of-Town Newspapers
OVERTON'
Grade A Whole Fryers 36lb.
Overtoil's Finest - r f f IL,
Ground Beef $1.59 ID.
3lb. pkg. or more
Gwaltney Franks 12oz. Pk9. 99
Crest Toothpaste 0ur price 98
Reg. or mint 7oz. tube Reg. 1.53
Kraft Single Slice 98
Anerican Cheese 12 oz. Pkg.
Del Monte Ketchup
Quart Bottle
Coca-Cola - (no limit)
16 oz. carton of 8 plus deposit
Starkist Chunk Light Tuna Fish
6 oz. can
US No. 1 White Potatos 78
10 lb. bag
Golden Bananas
4 lb. bag
Listerine Mouthwash $1 .58
Reg. 2.79 24 oz. bottle
Bic disposable Lighters 99
Reg. 1.98 value Twin pack
Please have coupons clipped.
Kraft Mayonnaise Qt. jar 98
with this coupon and 7.50 food order o
excluding advertised specials. �
Without coupon 1.18. Z
Limit one coupon per customer. a.
Expires September 29, 1979. o
78 ISL
Cold Power Detergent gt.box 98
with this coupon and 7.50 food order o
excluding specials. Without coupon 58 m
Limit one coupon per customer. �j
Kraft
Macaroni Cheese Dinner 4$1.00
7 oz. box
Expires September 29, 1979.
Bounty Towels gt. roll 38
with this coupon and 7.50 food order
excluding advertised Specials
Without coupon 1.18.
Limit one coupon per customer.
Expires September 29, 1979.
o
o





h� Kastarolinian
features
Tuesday, September 25, 1979 page 11
Greenville, N.C
'Bread and Roses9
afresh release
Just ten
Woodstock
By PATRICK MINGES
Features Writer
years ago, on August 21, 1969, the
Arts and Music Fair captured the
imagination of the nation and the spirit of the '60s.
This summer, an effort was made to rekindle that
flame of consciousness in upstate New York, yet the
attempt was a dismal failure. Little did the promoters
realize that the Zeitgeist of Woodstock had been
regenerated two years earlier and has now been
released in a phenomenal new album, Bread and
Hoses.
The Bread and Roses Festival of � Acoustic Music
was held over three days in October 1977 at The Greek
Theater of the University of California, Berkeley. It
was the most dynamic assemblage of folk legends ever
on the same stage. The Bread and Roses Festival was
an important musical, social and political affair as was
the event at Yasgur's farm.
Bread and Roses, a non-profit organization based in
California, was founded by Mimi Farina. Its purpose is
to bring free, live entertainment to people who
otherwise might not have the opportunity to enjoy
uch. Hospitals, mental health facilities, geriatric
homes, and prisons house people who are in desperate
need ol the joy, diversion and positive human contact
thai live entertainment can offer. The Bread and Roses
Festival had two aims: to raise funds for the operation
ol the organization and to bring back to life the sound
oi acoustic music.
The event was hosted by Mimi Farina, emceed by
Howard Hesseman, the first underground FM disc
joekev in the nation who now plays Dr. Johnny Fever,
and featured such luminaries as Joan Baez, Jackson
Browne, Hoyt Axton, Boys of the Lough, Terry
Garthwaite, Toni Brown, Ramblin' Jack Elliot, Arlo
Guthrie, Richie Havens, John Herald Band, Dan Hicks,
David Lindley, Country Joe McDonald, Maria
Muldaur, Mickey Newbury, Tom Paxton, The
Tersuasions, Malvina Reynolds, Buffy Sainte Marie,
Pete Seeger, Dave Van Ronk, and Jesse Colin Young.
The entire event was recorded live by the Record
Plant. The proceeds of the record sales of Bread and
Ruses will provide operating funds for the Bread and
Roses continuing community services to institution-
alized audiences. The engineering and production of
Bread and Roses is superb � a necessity considering
iis content is entirely acoustic.
Aside from the tremendous social significance of
Bread and roses, its intention to bring a renaissance to
acoustic music is worthy of special note. In a time
when music is dominated by walls of power and
inuitilracking wizardry, it is refreshing to listen to the
simple beauty ol acoustics.
Each side of the double album seems to exist as a
separate entity, possessing specific characteristics and
growing in spiritual and musical wealth throughout the
album.
Side one is perhaps weakest, but reveals the roots
oi folk music deep in the culture of America. It
features such obscure early '60s New York influences
as Ramblin1 Jack Elliot, Malvina Reynolds, and Dave
Van Ronk, all Dylan compeers. The strongest
selections are by Pete Seeger, Jesse Young, and John
Herald.
See BREAD, page 14
Wargaming
is popular
By JOHN W.vLDEN
Features Writer
The hobby of wargaming has grown considerably in
the United States and abroad since 1968. ECU recently
started its own wargaming club. Yet if asked what a
wargame is, most people could not tell you.
To clear the air, a wargame is a simulated portrayal
of a historical battle. The game board is basically a
map in which the area of the battle had taken place.
Each piece or counter represents a military unit such
as an army or a division that fought in that particular
battle. The players have the job of fighting the historic
battle in their own way and obtaining the necessary
victory conditions lo win the game.
Wargames are definitely not little kids' games. The
rules are very complicated and sometimes take hours
lo learn properly. The games themselves can take from
a lew hours to a couple of days to play. Both patience
and concentration are needed to play them. This is
going to scare off the average "Monopoly" player who
starts a game expecting to finish within the hour.
Another discouraging fact is the price of wargames.
vn average wargame can run from $10-15 while the
bigger games cost as much as $30. This may also help
to explain why wargaming has not become as widely
known as backgammon or chess.
When asked why he played wargames, Wade
Dudley, an ECU graduate, says he likes the challenge
and the escapism of the games. Dudley could be called
a hard core wargamer. He owns a huge collection of,
over 200 wargames and admits to spending at least ten
hours a week playing them.
Like nearly all wargamess, Dudley denies any
fascination with real war. He says that no one could be
more peace loving than him. In fact, Dudley feels that
the wargames help to bring out the foolishness of all
wars.
Whatever a wargamer's motives for playing, the
possibilities for new games are endless. Although most
gamers prefer games from the World War II era, the
leading manufacturers of wargames keep coming up
with wargames to suit any player's taste. The variety
of the games ranges from the Punic Wars all the way
up lo the Vietnam era.
Unfortunately, each new game also brings with it a
new set of rules that must be learned. This is probably
why wargames will never catch on heavily in the
United Stales.
For those interested in wargaming or for those who
are just plain curious to see some wargames, the first
Strategy and Tactics wargame club meeting will be
held on Thurs Oct. 4 at 7:00 p.m. at Mendenhall.
For those who could care less, there is always
poker.
Woody Herman and the Young Thundering Herd will appear in Wright Auditorium
Sept. JO, al 8:00 p.m.
Gene Cotton will be in concert Tuesday, Sept. 25, at 8:00 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
East Carolina
j
offers ways to study
By CHERYL FISHER
Features Writer
The ability to study
well indicates a success-
ful sludenl. To study
means: lo acquire ihe
knowledge of, to ex-
amine, to search into. Is
thai not what we are all
here al East Carolina
for? .Alter being here
awhile it becomes ap-
parent that there are
many different ways
through which you can
learn lo sludy, and ECU
offers them all.
Take for example the
lawn-studier. These peo-
ple take advantage of the
cool days of late and
settle themselves on the
grass in some quiel,
secluded spot on campus.
The idea sounds re-
freshing and could be
quite advantageous ex-
cept that by the time you
gather up everything,
from pillow to pencil,
that you will need for you
study in the wilderness
and lake it outside with
you fifteen or twenty
minutes of your precious
study time has slipped
by.
Once you get to your
back-lo-nature nest,
many problems could
arise. If you decide to
study while lying on your
back you may find you
have company. Just when
you get to the exciting
part where the cell is in
the clevage stage of
development, a leaf or an !
acorn will decide to see if
you are still awake,
entertaining you with a j
plop on the head or, I
better yet, a tap dance
on your book.
If the supine position
does not suit you; the
stomach is always avail-
able. While lying on the
stomach, if variety is
needed when breezing
through 50 physics prob-
lems, the ants are readily
available as a source of
energy.
As soon as you
become enthralled in the
wonderful world of text a
sudden gust of wind may
decide to give you a
study break by scattering
jour neatly compiled
notes about a radius of
1.257 miles, or a perfect
blue sky bursts into 400
billion raindrops. People
who say studying is a
bore, "just do not know
how 'much fun it can
be
vboul studying and
lun, 1 am sure many of
)ou have run into a
studying controversy with
your roommate. If you
haven't you do not
realize what you are
missing.
How often has
your roommate
announced that
heshe would he
out for the
Herman Cotton to
appear in concert
evening,
By WILLIAM JONES
Features Editor
As ihe L.A. Herald-Examiner puts
it, "Woody Herman has the unique
distinction of being able to please the
kids of the kids he pleased 20 years
ago.
The Student Union's 1979-1980
Artists Series will present its first
guest, Wood Herman and the Young
Thundering Herd, on Wednesday,
Sept. 26, at 8:00 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium.
Unlike other famous band leaders
from the 'big band era Woody
Herman has remained active, con-
temporary and progressive.
Herman has been able to avoid
stagnation by continually adapting his
musical style to the timely demand of
the audience. He is constantly working
with new and young musicians, looking
for new sounds and new twists to the
golden oldies
Herman made his debut as a band
leader on election night, 1936. Now, at
the age of 69, he seems to find it
impossible lo stop performing.
Herman's band, The Young Thun-
dering Herd, was so named by jazz
writer George Simon. He called the
"shouting jazz band" the "thundering
herd" because he thought it sounded
like a herd of animals thundering
along. The exuberence of the original
herd' caused Herman himself to say,
"When they blew, I ducked The
'newest Herd' can be expected to.
provide the same vigor.
Hermans performance here will
��������������������������������������
Coming
Attractions
You are about to
greet the Sandman when
awakened by a dreaded
dream come to life. One
roommate plus two new
laces all having a party
for the term paper your
roommate suddenly re-
membered was due at
nine o'clock sharp the
next day. One writes,
lealure a mixture of
contemporary numbers.
one edits and one types.
i keep you awake and
all ruin your chances lor
a possible 100 on that
lest you have just spent
the night studying for.
We have all seen the
serious' studier who
lakes all his belongings
lo the middle of ihe mall
amidst the guitarists, dog
walkers and frisbee
throwers of America.
This fellow claims he has
lo gel oulside before he
goes crazy with claustro-
phobia. He can often be
identified as the student
humming to himself in
the back of ihe class-
room.
Whal about the Croa-
tan lor an official cram
session al lunch. It is not
easy to memorize 25
different theorums for
your main class between
the reverberaling hellos,
how ya doin's and the
crunching of your nutri-
tious bag of potatoe
chips.
The library is also a
good place lo study and
definitely ihe most tradi-
tional place at any
university, but do not try
lo sludy al a seat near
the door. If you take
note, those students who
do take those seats are
the students whose heads
spend the whole evening
bobbing up-and down as
the people pour into the
building.
Mendenhall Sludenl
Center presents The
Marriage Go Round, the
first Dinner Theater of
the semester beginning
October 3. Tickets musl
be purchased 36 hours in
advance and are available
al the Central Ticket
Office.
The Faces of France,
a travel-adventure lilm,
will be presented Wed-
nesday, Oct. 3, at 8:00
p.m. in Hendrix Theater.
Ihe film will highlight
various aspects ol France.
oldies and
Tickets are
available at the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall.
The Encyclopedia of Jazz says of
Herman, "His real importance in jazz
history lies in his retention, often
against severe economic odds, of an
uncompromising band that progressed
with each new trend and provided an
incubator for some of the most brilliant
soloists and arrangers throughout the
years
On the day preceeding the Woody
Herman concert, under auspices of the
Student Union, Ariola recording star
Gene Cotton will appear at Wright
uditorium on Tuesday, September 25,
at 8:00 p.m. The concert is a return
engagement for Cotton.
In the past, Gene Cotton has been
known as a veteran of the college and
small club circuits. Now Gene has
established himself as one of America s
finest singer-songwriters, as evidenced
by his lalest single, "Before My Heart
Finds Out This melodic ballad is jusi
one of the many sensational songs
found on his debut album for Ariola
Records, Save The Dancer.
Gene was born in Columbus, Ohio,
and comes from a musically inclined
family. He spent his college years
alternating between a political science
career and performing on the local folk
club scene. Opting for the latter, he
dedicated his time to touring midwest
venues and singing his way over the
east coast. He feels that there is no one
single influence in his life, but rather a
potpourri ol tastes.
In 1974 Gene had a charted single
called "Sunshine Roses" which
climbed lo a top thirty spot on the
national playlists. The song was a
significant step in the right direction,
but it wasn't until the release of
"You've Got Me Running" that Cotton
gained national acclaim.
Cottons lalest album, Save The
Dancer, has Kim Carnes singing duet
on "You're A Part Of Me" and
features such notables as Larnie
Londin, Kenny Buttrey, Joe Osbourne.
Jack Williams and Shane Keister. In
addition, the album is produced by
Steve Gibson, whose accomplishments
include working with Olivia Newton-
John, Neil Young, and George
Harrison.
limited number of tickets are
available al the Central Ticket Office on
a first-come, first-serve basis. Tickets
for ECU students are priced at $1.50
and $3.00 for the public. All tickets
sold at the door will be $3.00.
ECU archive is largest
By JEAN HARTON
Staff Writer
Whistling women
and crowing hens always
come lo no good end
The above is an
example of a folk proverb
from East Carolina Univ-
ersity's Folklore Archive,
it is the largest univer-
sity-based archive in the
country, according lo Dr.
Paul Dowell, associate
professor in the English
department and co-di-
rector of the archive.
Dr. Douglas McMillan
started the collection in
1970, and today it
contains approximately
100,000 index cards oi
folk sayings and almost
2,000 individual collec-
tions of legends, super-
stitions, ghost stories,
songs and other reflec-
tions of human culture.
Students collected
most of the material,
which is an "on going
record of folk culture in
Eastern North Carolina
See STUDY, page 13
Learning- Abour Coa�&rrT�e Harp VMay
said Dr. Dowell. The
folklore is mainly from
this region, but the
archive does contain
material from all across
the stale and other states
as well. Historians, soci-
ologists, anthropologists
and others interesled in
culture mighl use the
information. .According to
Dr. Karen Baldwin, co-
direclor of the archive,
The collections are pri-
mary research mater-
ials
ECU's Folklore Ar-
chive is listed wilh the
Library of Congress, and
stories from the archive
have been read for
meetings of the Amer-
ican Folklore Society.
National Geographic used
a slory from the archive
in the book, 'We
wnericans" (copyright
1975).
"The primary prob-
lem wilh the archive is
the lack of space in the
English department
commented Dr. Baldwin,
winch is whv we arc
going lo start using the
computer
.Assistant Professor
John Warren suggested
the use of the English
department's terminal
and created the computer
program. The terminal
ma) be used by the
faculty, administration,
or anyone with the
proper authorization code
and phone number,
fhrough the telephone
the computer can be
connected lo anv where in
the United Stales.
.viler the data have
been submitted, the
terminal can recall all the
lolklore pertaining to a
specified subject. Ac-
cording to Dr. Dowell,
the folklore is classitied
bv the informant's name,
address, birthplace, age,
race and occupation.
Dr. Baldwin and Dr.
James Kirkland, an
See FOLKLORE, Page 13
&1 DtwoHowb
THtS? �"I6HT O'CLOCK
CLASPS fl� KIUIN6 rA� I
M)TT C0ff��
BUT, rJKp THIS fIX
OF Cr)fHCh� SO I CfliO
lAlflK Up
'J2
coffer? its
p�C)fflCfOATep
V






Page 12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 25 September 1979
Zappa speaks his mind
on local radio program
By RICHARD GREEN
"You should always
he aware of the iact that
the first order of gov-
ernment is lo perpetuate
ilself.
Just look at the track
record of the people who
are in government. Do
vou actually think they
are working lor you?"
Composer and gui-
tarist Frank Zappa spoke
his mind on everything
from music to politics
Sundav night on Allan
riandelman's radio pro-
gram. Forum, on KQR.
Handeltnan called
Zappa at his home in
California around 10:00
p.m. and hegan taking
telephone calls at 10:30
from the Greenville area
and elsewhere around
the country.
Fred Midgett of
Maysville, N.C was the
first caller, but he was
calling from La Jolla,
California where he is
vacationing. Midgett is
an avid Zappa fan who
had missed the first two
.shows with Zappa on
WKQR.
Zappa was quite flat-
tered to be called from
La Jolla via North
Carolina. 'This is
science he said.
Midgett asked some
detailed questions in-
eluding an inquiry into
the origin of a bootleg
Zappa album that "ap-
peared" in a record
store. Zappa had no
knowledge of the release
and commented, "Just
remember � people are
o nice
Zappa has produced
twenty-seven albums in
his career, but including
bootleg material, he said
the total exceeds forty
albums.
Jerry Jaffee, in
charge of album promo-
tion for Poly dor Records,
called from New York
City to ask Zappa what
the impact of artists
having their own record
labels will be on radio
stations.
"1 think, ultimately,
that radio stations are
gonna have to loosen up
on the restrictions
they've been placing on
records,11 Zappa pre-
dicted.
Zappa's latest album,
Joe's Garage, is getting
more airplay than any of
his previous albums. It
See ZAPPA, page 13
Newborn survives odds
Zappa 102977
Photo b Fred Midgett)
Chocolate chip romance
ends in cookie suit
Minn.
K 'W alke's
over a
chip
is fian-
i g, he
,i ii it
� we-
'd to
irried
had
-� tor
lhe
Mav,
she returned the ring.
"I fell that 1 should
have some recompense,
he said. He asked her lor
a dozen cookies lor each
Li the) had been
together.
1 he 21-year-old wo-
man missed an uig. 22
deadline, but finished up
the job lasl week. Her
deli t was paid and
Kowalke s treezt r as
lull.
1 ve given aw a) at
least 100 doen said
kow alke.
NORFOLK, Va. (AP)
� Against all odds,
ernetta Shemeika John-
son, born weighing oni
a single pound, has clung
lo hie lor 1:2 days at
Children's Hospital of
the King's Daughters.
ernetta. a twin born
three months prema-
turely Sept. IJ in nearby
Suliolk, is the smallest
bab ever treated at the
N oil oik hospital. Her
twin died, and doctors at
iiist thought the girl's
chance lor sur i al w ere
mi slim thai they dis-
couraged a request to
nave her transferred to
the hospital s sophisti-
cated neonatal intensive
n- unit.
Doctors normally
not try Lo save inianls ol
her size, and neonatal
specialists elsewhere in
the state said they knew
l no baby that small
hing lor more than a
lew hours.
If she anil lour other
unusually small pre-
mature newborns at
Kings Daughters survive
to lead normal lives, it
could trigger changes in
national medical guide-
lines, said Dr. Frederick
nth. director ol the
hospitals neonatology
unit.
I rider the guidelines,
lie said, the five babies
would have been con-
sidered too small or too
piemature to trv to saye.
Our policy is that
babies born belore 25
weeks of gestation are
not viable Wirth ex-
plained. "Our reason is
that babies' lungs have
not matured enough to
sustain life al that point.
.vll over the nation,
physicians have sup-
ported those babies, only
to have them all die
Closed eyelids are the
criterion doctors use to
tell if a baby has reached
its 25th week, Wirth
said. "If a babv can't
J
open his eyes, doctors
don t resuscitate the
baby
However, Vernetta
and the other four
See .NEWBORN, page 13
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I
Doctors are warned against
allowing death with dignity
B DANIEL Q. HANEY
Associated Press Writer
BOSTON (AP) -
Doctors should be reluc-
tant to accept the re-
quests of sick persons tor
death with dignity
because their desire to
die may change, be
based on needless tears
or be a quest tor
attention, two physicians
sa).
In recent years, doc-
tors have paid increasing
attention to patients'
wishes tor quiet death as
tlu- development of res-
pirators and other ad-
vances allowed them to
keep people alive
a tier the) lost
sciousness.
team ol physicians
who treat people with
bad burns recently re-
commended that patients
long
con-
Study
be allowed to make life-
and-death decisions, be-
cause "who is more
likely to be totally and
lovingly concerned with
the patients' best inti�-
es'ts than the patient
himself?" Now, two
Cleveland doctors say
this view "may be iome-
what naive and, in
certain clinical situations,
potentially dangerous
In today's New Eng-
land Journal of Medicine,
the doctors said that
before pulling the plug,
doctors should make sure
the patient who seeks
death really means what
he says.
'Physicians who are
uncomfortable or inex-
perienced in dealing with
the complex psycho-so-
cial issues lacing crit-
ically ill patients may
ignore an important as-
pect of their professional
responsibilities by taking
a patient's statement at
lace value without fur-
ther exploration or clari-
fication they wrote.
The doctors, David L.
Jackson and Stuart
Younger, described six
cases they encountered
in the intensive care unit
at University Hospitals of
Cleveland.
In one ease, an
80-year-old man with
lung disease at first said
he did not want to be
kept alive by a respirat-
lor. However, later, he
changed his mind several
limes. They case, they
said, shows that "one
must be cautious not to
act precipitously on the
side of the patient's
ambivalence with which
one agrees, while piously
claiming to be following
the principle of patient
autonomy
in another case, a
52-year-old man with
multiple sclerosis said he
did not want doctors to
try to save him if he
developed serious com-
plications. However, he
later admitted he was
upset with his family for
not paying attention to
him.
An 18-year-old wom-
an with chronic asthma
resisted treatment with a
respirator. But after she
was questioned by doc-
tors, she said she was
afraid of the hospital
equipment. Her fears
were calmed and she was
discharged eight days
later.
The doctors said they
hoped their experience
would help other physi-
cians copy with situations
25 September 1979 THfe EAST CAROLINIAN Page 13
Newborn
continued from page 12
Pop Sanchez
(Photo by Richard Green)
infants, all born with
closed eyes, survived
their first hours and were
transported to King's
Daughters. Three are
certain to go home, and
the hospital plans follow-
up checks for brain
damage, he said.
"If these five babies
are normal neurolog-
ically, it would be a real
shocker to the entire
nation Wirth said.
New York doctors
have reported the survi-
val of a baby even
smaller than Vernetta.
Chaya Snyder, born se-
ven weeks ago weighing
just under 15 ounces, has
a good chance for a
normal life, doctors at
Monteliore Hospital in
the Bronx said Friday.
Since Vernetta's ar-
rival here on Sept. 13,
she has "done great
in which "superficial and
automatic acquiescence
to the concepts of patient
autonomy and death with
dignity threaten sound
clinical judgment
said Dr. Edward Karot-
kin, a neonatologist.
Unlike many larger pre-
mature babies, she
hasn't needed an extra
oxygen to help her
breathe since she was i
lew days old.
Warmed by a radiant
heater, Vernetta's eyes
opened occasionally when
nurses touch her. Her cry
is almost inaudible, bare-
ly a whimper.
Nurses feed her le
than a teaspoon ol
hall-strength milk ever)
two hours, and a needle
nourishes her inirav
uously around the clock.
"She has all of her
lingers and all oi her
toes � everything a nor-
mal babv has, juM
smaller, said nur-t
clinician Calh) Kohler.
The babv is doing
ainazingl) well
Have vou noticed how
the stud) rooms in the
dorms are right next door
to the television rooms?
Just try to concentrate
between the congregation
ol socializers and their
laughter from Mork and
Vlind) as it echoes
Ilirough the walls.
Last, but not least, is
vour vcrv own bed. Many
do resort to studying
.liilc surrounded by
mattress, pillows, and all
me comforts ol home.
How comfortable a bed
can make studying. Do
vou know all the places a
bed can make the mind
wander while trying to
study?
These are just a few
of the many study habits
executed by students
lodav. 1 am sure we all
lit into one of these
categories at one time or
another. Between the
monotony of biology, the
thrills of physics, and the
agonv of historv, we the
students of East Carolina
will survive. We are, and
continued from page 11
shall be dedicated and
persistent to our profes-
sion as students.
Our motto must be
"study to our hearts
content In that case
many of us will be at The
Elbo Room, or Pantana
Bobs at precisely ten
o'clock. But amidst the
noise and excitement of
ECU, our efforts, pens
and minds echo with
"The Name of the Game
is Study
Zappa
continued trom page 12
Folklore
jumped thirty points on
Billboard's Top LP sur-
Irom 67 last week to
37 this week. In Sweden
) crbooti is the
sixth best-seller and
Jot's Garage backs it up
at number -even.
Local callers wanted
to know when Zappa will
be louring this area. He
aid llial he is not
louring at all until next
year but is working on a
movie entitled Baby-
Snakes.
Zappa had to get back
to work, so he said
goodbye at 11:30 (DST).
But he promised he
would conduct another
interview with Handel-
man shortly after Nov. 1.
Zappa seems to like the
folks in N.C and the
teeling is mutual.
associate professor who
leaches folklore, are now
working with East Caro-
lina's School of Medicine
on a project concerned
with folk medicine and
home remedies. They
plan to put this inform-
ation into the terminal
and to publish the
collection of cures in the
lulure.
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
UNITED FIGURE
SALON
Limited Tlmo
2 for th�
Price of 1
Bring a friend $37.90 each
and share thepffer ends Oct.6th
cost of a 4 month program
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Come In and Enjoy!
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and A COMPLETE MEM
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including the best tasting
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LASAGNA
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Coming Sun. Oct. 7�
Johnny Paycheck, Mike Cross
Detbert McCllnton, and Heatemonth'





Page 14 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 25 September 1979
Michelob beer can and
ice chest saves lives
v Michelob beer can
and tiberglass ice chests
saved the lives of two
Florida men who were
adrift for two days after
tlicir fishing boat sank
Sunda) off the Bahamas.
'Yeah. Michelob
37-year-old Robert C.
Rice said Wednesday
afternoon just before a
checkup at the U.S.
Public Health Service
hospital.
He and David Feder-
ico, 20, both of the West
Fuhn Beach area, used
the beer can to reflect
sun ra to signal the
Japanese container ship
Rokako, which docked at
the Portsmouth Marine
Terminals Wednesday.
liies used the chests as
life rafts.
The Japanese are
greatest people in the
whole world said the
badly sunburned Fed-
erico.
They stayed afloat for
hours in 10-foot seas in
the two heavy duty ice
chests. Federico kept his
bleeding, cut foot inside
the chest so it would not
attract sharks, he said.
Federico, a self-em-
ployed mechanic, and
Rice, a carpet salesman,
left West. Palm Beach in
a 23-foot fiberglass boat
about 7:30 a.m. Sunday.
"We checked the wea-
ther and the forecast
sounded good Federico
said.
Bui after they had
cruised eastward towards
th
rich Gulf Stream
fishing grounds, they
noticed water in the
cabin area in the bow of
the boat and the weather
was getting rougher.
The men stopped the
boat and discovered a
212-foot by V2-inch crack
up forward near the bow.
"We called for the
Coast Guard and then we
tried every channel on
the' radio Federico
said, but eventually,
water short-circuited the
radio and they had to
abandon ship.
Wearing life jackets,
the men freed two heavy-
duty ice chests to use as
life boats, steadying them
with bunk cushions.
'Those Pompanette
ice chests were great.
They saved us. I've
fished in that'area before
and 1 remembered that
one night I saw 75
sharks. I didn't want to
have nay foot in the water
because it was bleeding
from the cut Federico
said.
Rice said they saw
one shark during their
time in the water. "I
turned away. I wanted to
ignore it so I wouldn't
think about it Federico
said.
Rice said the chests
proved very seaworthy,
especially with a sea
anchor rigged up by
lassoing a chair from the
boat and tying it to the
chests. The chair sank
beneath the water and
lightened the line so the
ice chests pointed into
the wind.
"We could ride the
waves better that way
Rice said.
We used a beer can
to reflect the sun's
rays Federico said of
attracting the Rokako.
Free beer,dope given
away at party
Bv L vRR POPELKA
Bluio would be proud.
hi fine Animal
House" fashion the stu-
- at the University ol
is oiisin in Madison
. arried out Delta
mut coveted
I he roga Party.
rO-G.v! TOGA! TO-
Last sear the students
Madison held what
. eved to be the
biggest loga partv ever,
with 10.000 voga-clad
in a huge circus
.uunai House"
asts till talk a-
bout that nationally-pub-
licized event as if it were
one of the seven wonders
ill the world.
Bui now they have
something new to talk
about: TOGA 11.
e're going to have
a loga parlv twice as big
as last year's screamed
V isconsin Student Asso-
ciation President Jim
Mallon when 1 called to
jk about the event.
" ou've never seen any-
thing like it. We've got
lour bands hundreds of
barrels ol beer and it's
going lo last eight
hours
Bread
CO
nlinued from page 11
tond -ide is infinitely stronger, exposing the
western influence upon folk music. In an inebriating
nance, Hoyt Axton shows what a lovable
in is with "Boney Fingers" and
gelina both portraits of the working class. Dan
k "I Got Mine" is pleasant, but the unique Irish
ul Boys ol The Lough are among the strongest
inances ol the albui.
Perhaps the most powerful collation of
.nuances in modern music is exhibited on side
ol Bread and Roses. It begins with The
Persuasions1 stirring vocal performance, a capella, of
Just mother Night with the Boys This song is
aled to the residents of correctional institutions,
present via radio transmission of Bread and Roses
Festival.
Richie Havens, in a remarkable guitar performance,
wields the most dynamic exhibition of music and lyrics
on the album. The hries of "What About Me" reveal
essence ol the Bread and Roses concept:
"Well, 1 worked in your factories
nd studied in your school
nd 1 fill your penitentiaries
uid your military too
W ell, I feel just like a stranger
In the land where I was born
.nd I live just like an outlaw
You've got me always on the run"
Jackson Browne and David Lindley, the
"glimmer-twins" of folk-rock, present the last
attraction ol the festival. Browne is one of a second
generation ol folk singers who have made a significant
contribution lo the seventies. The entire Bread and
Roses group is assembled on stage for a choral
performance of "Just a Closer Walk with Thee and
thus the album ends.
lvo (actors fce supposedly characteristic of the
Hfcj � a flight from social responsibility and an
increasing dependence upon a tenuous technology. Is
,i Lit up to ghosts from the sixties to break these
trends of self-destruction, to shatter the "me-genera-
lion Atypology, and bring about a neo-renaissance for
ihe eighties? Perhaps it is true that others are not
worthy of our concern, but to quote the song most
symbolic of the concept behind Bread and Roses,
"There but lor fortune, go you and I
Between sets Varjian
lot! his I mal event: a
Dalai Lama look-alike
contest.
The Dalai Lama, a
Tibetian spiritual leader
who sports a toga every
day, was scheduled to
-peak in a building just
one block away from the
part) that same day. But
universil) ollicials, tear-
ing a disruption, moved
the speech off campus.
We're not saving
we're better than God
shouted Mallon into the
microphone. "But they
had lo move because ol
this event
Before the contest
Barjian announced that
since Dalai Lama is a
really spiritual kind ol
guv, you've got to get
into the right frame of
mind.
"This is to help you
he shouted, tossing the
crowd about 20 plastic
bags filled with mari-
juana
Meanwhile several
contestants filed on stage
lo show off their togas,
give speeches and moon.
One of the mooners
had a giant "TOGA H"
painted on his buttocks.
The third place Dalai
Lama was a puppet
weariiig a toga. Second
was a man with a pink
tlamingo on his head,
mil the winner was a tat
guv who wore a plain
white toga and received
boisterous cheers.
Back down on the
street where the crows of
about 15,000 students
pushed and shoved to get
closer lo the stage,
people set off fireworks,
climbed light poles and
passed out.
One of the losers was
a student in a Richard
.Nixon mask who raised a
peace sign as the crowd
chanted, Bull-shit!
Bull-shit! Bull-shit
He never mooned.
The group in the
gorilla heads � who did
� won.
The final band of the
night, which played for
more than 2Vfe hours,
was an Animal House"
clone called ihe Shakers.
l'he played several re-
frains ol "Louie, Louie
"Shout" and "Twistin
the Night Away" while
toga-wearers danced in
eircles with hands on
each others hips through
a maze of drunken
bodies.
One man wore a toga
made of an American
Hag. Another had a
linloil loga. Two others
wore helmets with flash-
ing lights and carried a
doll the) called Heidi.
"We rescue oung togas
in distress one said,
blowing into Heidi's ear.
Wanted:
iFeature Writers
Call 757-6366
AL PATRICK
PART
TINE
JOB
Looking for a part-time
job with flexible hours
and real business
experience? Northwest
Mutual Life Ins. Co.
has openings for college
igents. Call before noon
Tor appointments!
754-4080
1
- Uue
OPTICIANS
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ACADEMIC RESEARCH
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FOR
Double Barrel Productions
Present
Polydor Recording Artists
Atlanta Rhythm Section
JUNIOR
CLASS
PRESIDENT
rora�;ft'Mi�.(biK,j
with Special Guests
Mothers Finest, Super Grit,
& Jesse Bolt Sun. Sept 30
at the Hugo Outdoor Theatre
20 min. south of Greenville
$7 Limited Advance$9 all others
Gates open at 11:00
(no glass)
tickets at Apple
CHARLES
BUTLER for
FRESHMAN
CLASS
PRESIDENT
A paid political advertisment
Showing Monday & Tuesday Oct. 1&2
Mendenhall 7:00 & 9:00
MUSIC BY THE BEATLES. JOHN DENVER RlTACOOLlDGE KANSA CTHEPS
BLENDED WITH 2.000 VISUALS OF BREATH-TAKING PHOTOGRAPHY
SHOWN ON 3 LARGE SCREENS FROM 14 COMPUTERIZED PROJECTORS
A UNIQUE 75-MINUTE ENTERTAINMENT EXPERIENCE YOU WON T WANT TO MISS
A PARAGON PRODUCTION PRESENTED THROUGH CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
All students admitted for $1.00
(includes skate rental) when
presenting ECU I.D.
104 Red Banks Rd.
Behind Shoney's
756-6000
East Carolina University
Student Union
presents
GENE
COTTON
Tonight!
8pm
Wright And.
$1.50 Students
$300 at the door


i





Title
The East Carolinian, September 25, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 25, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.40
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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