The East Carolinian, September 14, 1979






The East Carolinian
Voi 54 No 6
u pages today
Greenvilla, N C
Thursday. September 13, 1979
Circulation 10,000
Dr. East may
try Senate
U IKRrn CRA
Uittif
KCl Political Science
Professor Dr. John East
said Wednesday that he
i- considering a run for
the U.S. Senate against
the incumbent Robert
Morgan (Dem N.C.).
Although no official an-
nouncement has been
made. Dr. East said the
preliminary support for
his candidacy looked
"encouraging
"1 have been ex-
ploring the potential of
the thing and there is a
very good chance that 1
may run. The encour-
agement has been sub-
stantial he said.
East, a prominent
conservative voice in
eastern North Carolina
said that one of his
primary concerns in the
race would be the recent
attempts b HEW to in-
fluence universit) poli-
cies in the state. He
described HEW- actions
as "a blatant effort to
take control of the uni-
versity system and
said that "it is un-
fortunate that the Ad-
ministration and those
who identify with it have
allowed this to happen
The 18-year-old pro-
, - n tested me
anti tobacco campaign
initiated at HEW by
former Secretary Joseph
Califano. In addition to
these local questions,
East said that he would
address the national is-
sues of energy, inflation,
and the "continued er-
osion of America's posi-
tion in world politics
"I have been
exploring the
potential of the
thing and there
is a very good
chance that I
mav run. The
encouragement
has been
substantial
Dr. John East
Dr. East made no
specific complaints about
Senator Morgan, noting
only that "North Caro-
lina hasn't fared very
well under the present
leadership team
Since no other Re-
publicans in the state
have announced an in-
tention to run ior Mor-
gan's seat. East added
that I d ��; think any
office should go un-
contented. I don't think
that it's healthy for our
system
No stranger to North
Carolina politics, Dr.
East ran for Congress in
1966, and in 1968 op-
posed Thad Eure in the
race for the N.C. Se-
cretary of State position.
Both bids were unsuc-
cessul. Referring to the
upcoming elections,
however, East said "the
trend of national politics
works to our advantage.
The political chemistry
of the thing seems
promising
According to East,
his decision to enter the
race would mean taking
a leave of absence from
ECU during the Fall
1980 semester.
In addition to his
teaching duties at ECU,
Dr. East is a� a
member of the North
Carolina National Re-
publican Committee and
is an active researcher,
lecturer and writer. His
articles have appeared in
such national publica-
tions as "Modern Age
"The Political Science
Reviewer and the Wall
Street Journal.
Affair on the Mall
enjoyed by everyone
Dr. John P. East, ECU Political Science professor,
may run for U.S. Senate.
(Photo courtesy of Daily Reflector)
By TERRY GRAY
4s3t. Mews Editor
Slnng! ol coioriul
flags lent a carnival
atmosphere to yester-
day's "Afair on the
Mall a campus event
sponsored by the Stu-
dent Life organizations
and local merchants.
An estimated 1500
students competed in
such attractions as a
watermelon seed-spitting
contest, barrel-walking,
frisbee-throwing, horse-
shoes, volleyball and
putt-putt golf.
The winning parti-
cipants were awarded
raffle tickets for 178
prizes offered by over
60 Greenville busines-
ses. In between draw-
ings students were
entertained by Bruce
Frye, a local guitarist
and singer.
WITH and WNCT-TV
stations covered the e-
vent while students con
sumed a truckload
(rpf walprmfjnns anri
gallons of free soft
drinks.
ECU Chancellor
Thomas Brewer was on
hand to present raffled
off tickets to the up-
coming ECU-UNC foot-
ball game on Oct. 27 at
Chapel Hill.
The purpose of the
event was to publicize
the services offered by
organizations comprising
the newly-created Office
of Student Life. Among
these organzations are
the Health. Food and
Counseling Servi.
Mndenhai! S udent
Center, Intrarnural-Re-
ationa.
nent. Campus Se-
curity, Student Govern-
merit Association and
the Student L nion.
The event was
termed a "tremendous
success" by its organi-
zers, Nancy Mize and
Wayne Edwards from
Intramurals and Inez
Fridley from Residence,
all who stressed that the
"Affair on the Mall"
should become a yearly
attraction.
Equality disputed
Faculty approval
Brewer, Mallory
endorse Fraternities
Chancellor Thomas B. Brewer
MESSAGE FROM
CHANCELLOR
BREWER
The admin-
instration of East Car-
olina University firmly
supports fraternities as
organizations which
greatly enhance the
educational experience
or our students. A
person follows many
paths in the quest for a
rewarding and happy
college life. Opportu-
nities abound which can
offer enrichment and
add to the value of your
education. Fraternities
have played an excellent
supportive role for many
years at East Carolina
and provide an impor-
tant option for students.
They allow you to
develop lasting friend-
ships, to contribute to
the broader community
through service, and to
participate in social,
cultural and athletic
activities.
I extend my best
wishes for a productive
and successful academic
I
ear.
-
By
JAMES B. MALLORY
Dean of Men
For many years the
connotation of social
fraternities has been
purely "social In our
complex and changing
world fraternities are
now realizing that they
must broaden their hor-
izons in order to justify
their existence on the
campuses of today�East
Carolina fraternities are
doing just that.
We believe strongly
that social fraternities
can become a vital link
in the chain of a well
rounded individual. Fel-
lowship, brotherhood,
opportunity for leader-
ship, citizenship, intel-
lectual : curiosity, and
democratic living: all are
vital factors in the
making of a man. The
individual fraternities at
East Carolina College
look to you to provide
such leadership, scholar-
ship, and good conduct.
If you are willing to
give of yourself, you will
see the fraternity system
grow and prosper, and
you, yourself will be-
come a better man from
having shared in this
great endeavor.
Take an active part
in rush, be discrimin-
ating, do not be pres-
sured into a hasty
decision and then if you
wish, join the fraternity
of your choice. 1 look
forward to seeing each
and every one of you
during fall rush.
HOUSTON (AP) � The U.S. Civil
Rights Commission, reversing an
earlier position, has called for
immediate equalization of men's and
women's football programs at
federally funded colleges and uni-
versities.
The commission, which holds no
enforcement or legislative powers,
announced its decision Monday in
Houston, where it begins two days of
hearings today on allegations of police
brutality.
Sex discrimination in federally
.1
funded educational programs is pro-
hibited by Title IX of the 1972
Education Amendments to the Higher
Education Act.
The commission had recommended
in January that the Department of
Health, Education and Welfare re-
quire substantially the same per
capita expenditures for men and
women for all athletic programs
except football.
At that time, it suggested that
football expenditures be gradually
equalized over a five-year period.
After its January recommendation,
the commission had held further
hearings in April, June and July.
The new recommendations �
which the HEW can either accept or
reject � withdraws the five-year
suggestion and calls for "equal per
capita expenditures for financially
measureable factors for all sports
without delay
Such measureable factors include
athletic scholarships, recruiting costs,
and "all other readily measureable
benefits and opportunities
Other cost areas that should be
comparable, the commission said,
include the opportunity to compete
and practice, the opportunity to
receive coaching and academic tu-
toring, medical and training services
and facilities and housing and dining
services.
Memphis offers course
on Southern Life
i
MEMPHIS, (AP) -
Some say its grits and
black-eyed peas, or
magnolias and honey-
voiced belles � what-
ever it is, Southwestern
at Memphis is going to
examine "The SOthern
Experience" in a six
week course.
"More and more, the
Southern experience is
becoming a nostaligic
thing � an exploration
of what people thought
was the South or what
they expected it to be
said Ray Hill, a pro-
fessor who helped put
the course together.
Open to the public,
the $30 course will fea-
ture Southerners looking
at such aspects of the
region's culture as its
characters, literature,
drama, history, language
and, most of all, its
mystique.
"Much of what is
left of the South is an
effort to be what people
vmmwMWmmiisaii
expect the Southerner to
be Hill said. "Once,
for example, we really
did have the Southern
colonel, who has now
become the chicken col-
onel. We had Southern
belles who were truly
clinging vines and
played the protected
Southern woman who
needed a man to help
them through every-
thing. I think we still
have a number of
those
Hill said the course
will compare the image
with the reality and try
to see how much of teh
reality is the result of
having been a Southern
myth. "Also we'll be
trying to see if we can
tell the difference he
said.
Kicking off the pro-
gram will be Will
Campbell, a self-made
philosopher who lives on
a 20-acre farm near
Nashville and heads the
Committee of Southern
Churchmen, who pri-
mary concern is bringing
ministry to alienated
minorities.
Campbell writes
books about growing up
in Liberty, Miss and
articles about the people
he has met all over the
South. Also, he is highly
critical about attempts to
examine the South and
explain its myths.
"I don't know why
we feel compelled to do
this he said. "How-
ever, if people want to
watch a Southerner be
Southern for an hour or
two, that's cool and
that's what I'll do. If it
swings, it swings. If it
don't, it won't mean a
thing
Asked why, with that
attitude, he agreed to
be part of the South-
western course, Camp-
bell answered in a typ-
ical Southern response:
"When your neigh-
bor invites you over to
his house for supper,
you go if you can. It's
that simple
m
"Walking the barrel" was one of many attractions
during yesterdays mall festivities.
(Photo by Huh Johnson)
Jack Anderson
The East Carolinian is proud to
announce the addition of to the
editorial section.
Jack Anderson, who has been
called America's foremost investi-
gative reporter, will be appearing in
the East Carolinian once a week for
the remainder of the year.
His column, to be titled Weekly
Special, will be appearing once a
week on the Editorial page.
Anderson got his first newspaper
job at the age of twelve, at the
weekly Murray Eagle , out of Salt
Lake City.
He had served briefly during
World War 11 as a cadet officer in
the merchant marine. He resigned to
be a war 'correspondent
Anderson joined Drew Pearson's
staff after his return to the states in
1947, and was Pearson's choice to
write the Washington Merry-Go-Round
column after Pearson's death, in 1969.
Anderson's column is distributed
through the United Feature Syndicate.

i
� -
�SS�mmtMmimi�m





Page 2 THE EAST CAROLIMA. .� September 1979
The East
Carolinian
Needs students to
work as reporters on
the news, features,
and sports desks.
Applicants must have
completed journalism
2100 or journalism

3100. Must be
willing to accept
responsibility and
work long and hard.
Apply today at the
EC office
second floor,
Publications Center
1800
Seafood
Thurs. Night
Specials
SHRIMP $4.75
OYSTERS $475
FLOUNDER 3.5
TROUT $2.95
PERCH $2.95
all you can eat
No take-outs please.
Meal includes:
French Fries, Cele slaw,
Hushpnppies
We are proud to
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have added
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AREAS FINEST
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for your
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Located On Evan St raat
SatilnQ Sporta World
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$3.00 per hour.
The East Carolinian desperatly needs
fast and accuratetypiststo operate
typesetting equipment. All hours and
shifts available, day and night.
Must be able to work flexible hours.
THE
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adwtlMd prto. wttfxn 30 o�y�
SUNGOL0
White
Bread
From snacks to paperbacks to back packs, Kroger Sav-on
has what East Carolina University students need this
year. Shop Kroger Sav-on today.
TIMEX �
WATCHES ci
Records and
Tapes
Sausage Pizza
�419
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1
DEALERS
OPEN 7 AM TO MIDNIGHT
mon OPEN SUNDAY
9 AM TO 9PV
600 Greenville BivdGreenville
,
Pec
music
A 'Contemp
Christian Choral
kvill have its
meeting tonight.
13. The organij
meeting will be
the lobby of
Fletcher Music Ce
7:45 p.m.
Christian
from artists like
Crouch and Bill
will be rehers I
special tour �
ester is schedul
talent is accept
sound and light
nicians are
Contact Mark &
2-9612 for fun
formation.
snea
There will
organization i
ot the Student
Educators Ass
(SNEA) on NX I
19, at .4
M e ti d e n h a 11 S
Center, Room 2
elementar)
dary educati
and those
educational
invited to at
Hollowel
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music
hri!
A Contemporary
ian Choral Group
have its first
meeting tonight, Sept.
13 The organizational
meeting will bejheld in
je lobby of A.J.
Fletcher Music Center at
7A5 p.m.
Christian rounds
from artists like Andre
Crouch and Bill Gaithen
will be rehersed. A
special tour each sem-
U-r is scheduled. All
is accepted, and
and light tech
nicians are needed!
Contact Mark Sexton at
J 12 for further in-
formation.
es
talent
sound
recreation
Organizational meet-
lngs for the formation of
several recreational
c'ubs will be held at
Mendenhall Student
Center.
CHESS CLUB (Mon
Sept. 17, 7 p.m. (Coffee-
house).
BACKGAMMON
CLUB (Tues Sept. 18,
7 p.m.(Coffeehouse).
TABLE TENNIS
CLUB(Tues Sept. 18,
7:30 p.m. (Billiards Cen-
ter).
STRATEGIC GAMES
CLUB (Wed Sept. 19,
7 p.m(Coffeehouse).
Sign up today at the
Mendenhall Billiards
Center if you would like
to participate in any of
these clubs.
ghc
snea
1 here will be an
organizational meeting
the Student National
Educator's Association
(SNEA) on Wed Sept.
-), at 4 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student
Center, Room 244. All
elementary and secon-
dary education majors
and those interested in
educational fields are
invited to attend.
art
Applications are be-
ing taken for Student
Union Artist. Qualifi-
cations: full-time East
Carolina University
Student with a back-
ground in commercial
Art. Applicants may
apply at the Student
Union Office, Room 234
of Mendenhall Student
Center, 8:30 am to 5pm
billards
Interested in joining
a billiards league? All
billiard players inter-
ested in forming a
league to meet weekly,
sign up at the Menden-
hall Billiards Center. An
organizational meeting
will be held Mon Sept.
17 at 6:30 p.m. in the
Billiards Center. Tro-
phies will be awarded in
several divisions.
catholic
The East Carolina
Catholic Student New-
man Community cele-
brates mass each Wed.
from 5-6 p.m. followed
by a get-together and
free dinner. 608 E.
Ninth St. behind the
library.
The Greenville
Hunger Coalition meets
ea�h Tues. at 8 p.m. at
6QB E. Ninth St. for stu
dfj and action addressing
local and world food and
development issues.
scj
13 September 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 3
bowl
Mixed-doubles in
men's and women's
bowling leagues are now
being formed at Men-
denhall Student Center.
Sign up at the ground
floor bulletin board in
Mendenhall. League
play will begin Mon
sept. 17 and Tues
Sept. 18 at 6 p.m. Bring
some friends and sign
up today!
The Society for Col
legiate Journalists wil
hold its first officia
meeting on Wed Sept.
19 at 6 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student
Center, Room 247. All
'members should plan to
Want to try newswriting?
Come up and fill out an
application between 8 and 5
in the Old South Building
SAAD'S SHOE
REPAIR
113 Grande Ave.
75M228
luality Shoe Repair
BONANZA
mi4�-

s
sga
Students interested
in filing for SGA Re-
presentative or Class
Officer may do so by
going by the SGA office
(room 228) at Menden-
hall. The last day to file
will be Tues Sept. 18
at 5 p.m. For more
information, call 757-
6611, ext. 214.
PART
TIME
JOB
Looking for a part-time
job with flexible hours
md real business
jxperience? Northwest
lutual Life Ins. Co.
as openings lor college
gents. Call'before noon
for appointments!
752-4080
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RESEARCH PAPERS
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I





The East Caroli
Editorials
mions
Thursday, September 13, 1979, page 4 Greenville, N.C.
Good luck to East
y
It is good to hear that a man like
John East is considering running
against Robert Morgan for the U.S.
Senate. East, a man well known in
eastern North Carolina circles for his
conservative views, has as a major
plank in his unofficial bid, a plan to
fight HEW for the rights of the
University of North Carolina system.
For students throughout the UNC
system, the possiblity of a strong
advocate voice in the Senate would be
a welcome advantage. Although Cal-
ifano is gone, his influence continues
to be heard as the HEW-UNC conflict
drags out.
Unless HEW is stopped in its
tracks, students will be the losers.
Another advantage to an East
candidacy would be that he is so
closely aligned with ECU, and with the
eastern region of the state. This
university is often given the leftovers
in funding, after UNC in Chapel Hill
has taken te lion's share. A direct line
from ECU to the U.S. Senate could
result in more and greater federal
grants coming our way � grants that
are needed to fund desperately needed
programs.
The eastern region, like ECU, also
needs more and better federally
subsidized projects, to help raise the
standard of life in the most
economically disadvantaged area of the
state.
Also, it is time to put a new team
in at the Senate level. East said,
truthfully, that North Carolina had not
fared very well under the present
leadership team. Morgan has never
had a high level of accessibility to the
common man, and it is hoped that
East will change this.
We would lose a valuable instructor
should East leave us for greener
pastures in Washington, but the
decision to try for a position of
national leadership is a strong
temptation.
Either way, whether East wins and
goes away to fight the battles of
government or whether he is unsuc-
cessful in his Senate bid, and comes
back to be with us here at ECU, we
wish him the best of luck in his future
endeavors.
G.C. Carter
Movement not new
lack Anderson and Joe Spear
WEEKLY SPECIAL
As Arab's Price Gouge Continues
How Will Carter, Congress Cope?
By Jack Anderson and
Joe Spear
WASHINGTON The
arrogant Arab oil cartel
known as OPEC is playing a
vicious game of crack-the-
whip which has sent the U.S.
economy spinning into an
ominous vortex of inflation
and recession. Because of
the petroleum price gouge
imposed by the oil-pro-
ducing nations of the Middle
East, American workers are
being laid off and American
consumers are paying ever-
soaring prices for every-
thing they must buy.
Every expert observer
we've talked to predicts the
Arabs will wield the whip
with increasing relentless-
ness in the future. They'll
use the price of oil as a
blackmail weapon to make
Uncle Sam kowtow on such
crucial foreign policy issues
as the survival of Israel and
recognition of the Palestine
Liberation Organization.
In the face of these
threats, President Carter
has been waving his arms in
exhortation like an orches-
tra leader without a baton
and Congress has been fid-
dling in futility with a long-
range energy program.
Intelligence strategists in
the government, however,
have been weighing what
countermeasures might be
taken if the oil sheikhs
decide to tighten the eco-
nomic thumb screws further
in the future.
Secret intelligence reports
warn forebodingly that the
United States can expect
more oil blackmail from the
Middle East Here are some
of the unpleasant alterna-
tives we would face: Coming
to terms with the Arabs and
letting them dictate our for-
eign policy; living on half
the oil we now consume or
taking economic retaliatory
action.
The first two options
would end the United States
as a political or economic
leader of the free world,
rendering us as impotent as
the now toothless British
lion.
On this basis, the intelli-
gence experts have drawn
up "contingency plans" on
steps that might be taken if
the Arabs persist in their oil
squeeze. The blueprint,
which has not been adopted
and merely represents a
hypothetical set of possible
"retributive actions con-
sists of seven steps.
A freeze of all Arab
assets in this country which
now amount to billions of
dollars in holdings.
A cut-off of shipments of
food, spare parts, machinery
and know-how to the Arab
countries.
Adoption of an artificial
price-rigging of wheat and
other grain shipments essen-
tial to the Middle East to
match increases in the
OPEC price of oil.
Ordering U.S. firms to
stop doing business with the
Arab world.
Blocking Arab shipping
and communications inter-
ests from using U.S. facili-
ties.
Suspending technical
and military assistance.
Stopping visas to Arab
students and businessmen.
The secret intelligence
papers caution strongly that
such retaliatory moves
would provoke Arab hostili-
ties and "drastically reduce
or perhaps halt" oil ship-
ments into this country. This
could lead to a crisis calling
for military intervention on
our part. In such an extreme
case, the 82nd Airborne
Division has had field exer-
cises centering on a take-
over of the Mideast oil fields
and the Marine Corps has
been trained in seaborne
landings on shores similar to
those in the area.
Jimmy Carter-Truman: In
these dark hours of political-
ly disastrous polls, Jimmy
Carter envisions himseh as
doing a Harry Truman in
1980. He and his inner circle
are casting him in the image
of the Man from Independ-
ence who staged the biggest
upset in presidential history
by defeating Tom Dewey in
1948.
But while Truman cap-
tured votes by lambasting a
"do-nothing" GOP Congress,
Carter may have to rely on
help from the Republicans
on the Hill this year and
next. When Congress
returned last week, we
talked to a number of Demo-
crats who had taken sound-
ings from their constituents
during the summer recess.
Without exception, they told
us they'd found the folks at
home were disenchanted
with the president.
They reported there was
no personal animosity
toward Carter; they just
believed he wasn't big
enough for the job. Seven
Democratic senators who
face tough re-election races
say they'll disassociate
themselves from the presi-
dent. They fear his coattails
may prove to be a lead
balloon.
Evidence of their luke-
warm support will become
apparent in the remaining
months of this year's
session. They'll either shun
backing the Georgian's leg-
islative proposals or offer
their own versions.
On the other hand, the
word in Capitol cloakrooms
is that Republican senators
and House members will
take it a little easy on the
beleaguered president.
Because of his low standing
in the polls, they want him
to get the Democratic nomi-
nation on grounds he'll be
easy to beat next November.
My sources tell me word has
been passed to ease up on
attacks on Carter until
after the Democratic con-
vention renominates him or
picks someone else.
Headlines and Footnotes:
Republican presidential
hopeful Phil Crane has dis:
covered a political truth:
Never count your campaign
egg until it's hatched. The
Illinois congressman hired
right-wing fund-raising
magician Richard Viguerie
to get him money but the
two came to a parting of the
ways recently. Viguerie
Enterprises hauled in $2.5
million in contributions on
Crane's behalf but the bot-
tom line was tha! ,fc's
outfit deducted $2 million of
that for their help.
� What a difference a
state makes if you are sick
The movement for
women's equality in this
country cannot be con-
sidered "new" any lon-
ger. Since the 1960's,
the "second wave" of
American feminism has
struggled to gain
advances for women's
rights in all areas of
life. Women have seen
progress in many public
spheres such as edu-
cation, employment, and
public service. Of
course, there is yet
much progress to be
made. Until sexual
discrimination is
declared illegal by con-
stitutional amendment,
women's rights will pro-
gress only by the mercy
of the powers that be.
Such rights as are not
guaranteed by the
Constitution could very
well be here today and
gone tomorrow.
A study by the Indiana Blue
Cross Company found that
the cost of staying a day in a
hospital in Wyoming averag-
es $133. A patient hospital-
ized the same day in Massa-
chusetts would be paying,
almost double that.
The Pentagon brass is
costing the taxpayers mil-
lions a year by throwing
away gold and silver,
according to experts. The
military uses silver in its
photography labs and medi-
cal facilities; gold is used in
items such as buttons and
eyeglasses. Other govern-
ment agencies such as the
Veterans Administration
manage to recoup up to 85
percent of the precious met-
als they deal with by recy-
cling. But the Defense
Department recovers only
21 percent of the silver it
uses. Metallurgical experts
estimate that the brass and
braid of the military ser-
vices are tossing away about
$320 million a year in reco-
verable gold and silver.
Copyright. �OT
Uaite4 Feature Syfce�. fa
i
Although there has
been substantial gains in
the public sphere, in
private life women's
rights have been incor-
porated only to a very
limited degree. Legis-
lation has been able to
affect private life to
some extent, so far as
divorce laws have been
liberated in order to
protect wives from
abuse and lack of sup-
port. (Many people feel
that the pendulum has
swung too far the other
way. Where it was once
virtually impossible for a
woman to divorce her
husband, the laws now
provide for wives to a
degree that many argue
is unjust to husbands.
Passage of the Equal
Rights Amendment
would force reconsid-
eration of all legislation
pertaining to divorce, in
the interest of fairness,
and just and equal
consideration for both
sexes.)
But the question of
women's rights in our
sphere of private life
generally comes down to
a question of morality,
and as the tried and
true saying goes, "you
can't legislate morality
Values regarding family
relationships, roles,
"women's place
"woman's responsibil-
ity are learned and
reinforced within the
family setting, so that
over the years they
become incorporated
even in the subconscious
mind. When we ques-
tion these values, we
may find that they run
so deeply as to make
any attempt at change
very uncomfortable and
confusing.
As an example, let
us briefly consider the
concept of patriarchy.
(Patriarchy is defined in
my dictionary as: "a
family, community or
tribe governed by a
patriarch, or the eldest
male; a form of social
organization in which
the father is head of the
family and in which
descent is reckoned in
the male line) Patri-
archy is the basis, the
bottom line, of our
society and of most
societies in the world.
And it has been for a
few thousand years.
Uur cultural values
are, for the most part,
patriarchal values. They
are based on the prim-
itive superiority of
brute strength, and con-
tinue to be so today,
although brute strength
has been refined into
technological-weapon
�strength. Man, by vir-
tue of the conquering
patriarchy were instilled
into societies by force,
non-acceptance generally
carrying the penalty of
death. (This is admit-
tedly an effective means
of transmission of cul-
ture.)
"Woman's place"
has traditionally been
defined and enforced by
the patriarchy as a
subordinate position.
Only in the last one
hundred and fifty years
has the social position of
women been elevated
above that of chattel.
Our society still balks at
the realization of true
equality between women
and men. In the public
sphere, concessions have
been made, but in the
private lives of most
people, patriarchal val-
ues still reign supreme.
In family situations
today, women are gen-
erally expected to defer
to the wishes of the
husband. Most women
will eventually do so
because of values in-
stilled in them from an
early age, which will
cause them to feel guilty
if they do not submit to
their husbands. Women
are expected to sacrifice
their interests and
ambitions, and ultim-
ately their identities and
"selves for the "good
of their children and
husbands, for the "sake
of the family
The East Carolinian
BUSINESS MANAGER
Steve O'Geary
NEWS EDITOR
ASST. NEWS EDITOR
FEATURES EDITOR
ASST. FEATURES EDITOR
ASST. DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
EDITOR
Marc Barnes
DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
Robert M. Swaim
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Anita Lancaster
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Terry Gray
Bill Jones
Richard Green
Terry Merrtdon
SPORTS EDITOR
ASST. SPORTS EDITOR
COPY EDITOR
ASST. TO THE EDITOR
AD TECH. SUPER.
Charles Chandler
Jimmy DuPi�
Berry Clayton
Leigh Coakley
Paul Lincke
THE EAST CAROLINIAN is the student
newspaper of East Carolina University
sponsored by the Media Board of ECU and
is distributed each Tuesday and Thursday
during the academic year (weekly during the
summer).
Offices are located on the second floor of the
Publications Center (Old South Building). Our
making address is: Old South Building. ECU.
Greenville, NC 27834. The phone numbers are
757-6366, 6367, 6309. Subscriptions are $10
annually, alumni $6 annually.






13 September 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 5
A.C.
an unmarried
D
man
VIRGINIA
taevtee
20 OFF ENTIRE STOCK
(INCLUDING SALE ITEMS)
�0 ECU Appreciation Sale
Patron mast iraaaat titfcsr thrinl II or f aoalty staff ears
This Friday Cr Saturday Only.
TERRY DRESSES
Rag. 14.90
7.92
Fri.ISat.laly
W
v
Frl. & Sat. at
7 & 9 p.m. in
STUDENT UNION Hendrlx Theatre
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
Sponsored by the Student Union Film Committee
Carolina East Mall
"CLEO FALL"
Fall Colors
10.32
Fri.ISat.laly
ALL WEATHER
Rat. 89.00
43.92
Frl.tSat.laty
"We're Happy When We've Made You Happy I"
Layaeayalaa
Vita, Haatar Chare, tatariaaa Eisrait Cart' Wslosms.
ui-
FRATERNITY RUSH
nen

tations
i,
m-
i�;ii an
will
fcr U 111
i m 11
md
u 111 rn -
md
od
and
'sake
AGER
landler
Pree
ton
(ley
the
)ur
;u.
'e
10
Begins Sunday Sept. 16 at 2p.m
at the bottom of College Hill.
ALPHA
al-fah
BETA
bay-tah
G MMA
gam-ah
DELTA
del-tah
EP5ILON
ep-si-lon
ZETA
ay-tah
ETA
ay-tah
THETA
thay-Uh
IOTA
eye-o-iah
KAPPA
cap-ah
LAMBDA
l.rob-dah
MU
OMICRON
omm-e-cron
SIGMA
sig-mah
UPSILON
oop-ti-lon
CHI
kEYE
OMEGA
(Mnay-fBk
greek
terms
Active - An initiated member of a fraternity, who is still active it
the college
Bidding � Inviting a rushee to join a fraternity
Chapter - The local unit of a national fraternity
Fraternity - A Greek-letter organization based on brotherhood
and honor
Creeks � Sorority or fraternity members
Hazing � Unethical initiation practices frowned upon by Greek-
letter societies
Honorary � A fraternity which bases its membership on scholarship,
achievements, and other prerequisites
Housemother � The chaperone or house director who lives in the
fraternity house
Independents � Students who are not members of social fraterni-
ties
Initiation � Ritualistic ceremony by which pledges are made active
members
Interfraterniry Council (IFC) - College organization of men's
fraternities
Pinning � The act of bestowkig a fraternity pin of a man upon the
girl of his choice
Pledge � A man who has accepted the bid of a fraternity and who
has taken the first step toward full membership
Preferential bidding - A system used during the last days of rush
by fraternities to indicate their choices
Professional fraternities � Specialized fraternities which confine
its membership to a special field of professional or vocational
education. One may be a member of both a professional and
a social college fraternity
Sorority - A Creek-letter sisterhood, also called a fraternity
ALPHA SIGMA PHI
BETA THETA PI
DELTA SIGMA PHI
KAPPA ALPHA
KAPPA SIGMA
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA
RUSH
What is the purpose of rush ot E. C. U.? The pn
mary purpose is to give you a chance to acquaint your
self with the fraternity system a E. C. U. You will have
the opportunity to visit with all the fraternity mem
bers and they will have the opportunity to visit
with you. Rush is strictly on a personal basis. We be-
lieve that membership in a fraternity is a tremendous
asset but we leave the decision to you.
TIPS FOR RUSHEES
Should I wait until I "make my grades" or get my
feet en the ground? Fraternity men and college officials
say No! Here's why:
1. The oil-pledge average is consistently high-
er than the freshman grade average.
2. Students who study hard need seme social life.
Only fraternities can offer this at E. C. U. but
they teach a proper balance between studies
and social life.
3. Fraternities offer guidance and assistance to
the new freshmen. Your "big brother" as
well as the other members of the chapter
will help you with all problems ronging from
academic to dating to personal problems.
"This is the
ground
way to get your feet on the
ATHLETICS
Learning to work together to
achieve a common goal is one of
the most rewarding aspects of fra-
ternity life. This teamwork is exemp-
lified in the field of fraternity in-
tramural sports. Competition is keen,
play is clean but- vigorous, and re-
wards are realized through effort and
teomwork. Intramurals at E. C. U.
ore well planned and organized. This
prog-ram gives every fraternity man
the opportunity t3 participate in
the sport which he most enjoys
PHI KAPPA TAU
PI KAPPA PHI
SIGMA NU
SCHOLARSHIP
The primary purpose for attending college is to acquire
an education Fraternity men at East Carolina recognize
this fact and act accordingly. Some of the programs which
aid m high grades are:
1. "Big Brother" assistance. Academic and personal
counseling and guidance are available.
2 Tutorial programs for students who ore weak in
specific areas or courses
3. Special study halls.
4. Fraternity system working in close cooperation with
Guidance Clinic aids fraternity men in "how to
study
5 Counseling from chapter advisors
6 Academic achievement awards.
SOCIAL
Good manners good taste, and good com-
panionship are part of the training of every
fraternity member. Whether a big formal or
a small combo party, the social opportunities
of a fraternity help make college life much
more enjoyable and pleasant. An integral
part of every fraternity's existence is its
social program1. This is the part of every
fraternity that is often visualized when one
thinks of fraternities. Social and recreational
programs are on important aspect of college
life tho is not to be neglected. As the
center of much of the social life of its
members, the fraternity seeks to develop the
social graces, the art of good living, the
development of courtesy and serves os o
healthy recreational outlet.
SIGMA PHI EPSJLON
SIGMA TAU GAMMA
TAU KAPPA EPSILON





EAST CAROLINIAN 13 September 1979
East Carolina Fraternity
ush
Se
Sigma Phi Epsiion
Tau Kappa fipsilon
Map denotes approximate fraternity location
Kappa Sigma
Alpha Sigma Phi
Rush location to
be announced
409 Elizabeth St.
Sigma Tau Gamma
Beta Theta Pi
Lambda Chi Alpha
Kapptf Alpha
a
����. �� ��� -ami�1�, m' win �wiitibwim





ernity
13 September 1979 THE EA8T CAROLINIAN Page 7
m
September 16-21
Tail Kappa fipsilon
Phi Kappa Tail
Map denotes approximate fraternity location
Pi Kappa Phi
Alpha Sigma Phi
Rush location to
be announced
409 Elizabeth St.
Deita Sigma Phi
Alpha Sigma Phi
KappfflrAipha
Sigma Nu
'���!�� I'��H�to
I
tV
mmmmmmmmmm
wmmmm
n&mwMmmmmimmmm
-fffimmmmmiwm





he East Carolinian
lian m
sports
Thursday, September 13, 1979, page 8
Greenville, N.C
Dye, Pirates wary of
new-look Duke team
ECU defense swarms State runner, must also do so against Duke Saturday
(Photo by John H. Grogan)
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
"This is the strangest thing I've ever gone into
in coaching
East Carolina head football coach Pat Dye is
definitely wary about his team's game with Duke this
Saturday, as the above statement testifies.
"They know everything about East CArolina he
continued, "but we know very little about them
"Duke has had all spring and fall to look at Eat
CArolina Dye noted. "Also, they've had the
chance to see us twice already this season
Saturday's 1:30pm appointment with the Pirates at
Wallace Wade Stadium is the first outing of the year
for the Blue Devils, so Dye and the Pirate coaching
staff has seen nothing of the "new" Duke football
team that is directed by rookie head coach Red
Wilson.
"Duke will play a lot of new people said Dye.
"They're actually starting some players who haven't
played enough to be recognizable
Perhaps his team's unfamiliarity with the Blue
Devils coupled with last week's 34-20 loss at the
hands of N.C. State are the reasons that Dye is very
concerned about Saturday's contest.
"It will be a tremendous challenge for us to get
back up mentally to play this game with the frame
of mind that we played last Saturday night Dye
said.
Dye has reason to be concerned about the
Pirates' mental attitude after last week's second-half
collapse against the Wolfpack that saw about
everything that could possibly go wrong turn sour.
Leading 17-13 at halftime, the Pirates watched their
lead go quickly in the second half before falling
34-20.
"We're just going to try and forget about it
Dye said. "About the only way to do that
successfully is to go out and win the next week
Dye was especially displeased with the Pirates'
defensive performance against the Wolfpack. "There
were just too many missed assignments. I counted
17. On those 17 missed assignments, State gained
205 yards. We just can't have that
Dye attributed the poor defensive job partially to
"the poorest coaching job that's been done here
since the Appalachian State game in 1975
Another worry of Dye's is the knee injury that
will most likely keep starting tackle, and senior
leader, Joe Godette out of action. Freshman Gary
Gambrell is expected to start in his stead
"We like our chances m the game said Dye. "I
certainly expect an eciting game. Duke has a lot of
offensive talent at the skill positions and we like our
skill people also.
Dye noted that though his Pirates have last
week's loss on their minds, there is still confidence
in the East Carolina camp. 'These guys think that
they're a good football team he said. "That alone
means alot
Dye also has a great deal of confidence in the
1979 version of teh Pirates. "I still feel this team
has a chance to have the best team that East
Carolina has ever had
Much will be learned of teh Pirates' chances
:ome Saturday afternoon.
Under new coach Wilson
Blue Devils look unpredictable
Green's performance
draws raves from
members of media
An impressive game at N.C. State last Se urday
brought many positive remarks in the direction of
East Carolina quarterback Leander Green. The
v ulfpack press box was literally loaded with
raiments about teh Jacksonville native's ability to
run the Pirate wishbone.
"Coach Rein (N.C. Tate's Bo) told me that Green
was the best wishbone quarterback in America
noted Smith Barrier, sports editor of The Greensboro
Daily .eu5.
"Heck, if he were playing with Oklahoma or
Alabama, there's no telling how good they could
be Barrier continued. "He can read defenses with
the best of 'em and has great quickness
"Green was absolutely great in the first half
noted Durham Morning Herald sports editor Art
Chansky. "He 'used' the sTate defense. He's one of
the best anywhere at running the wishbone
"Leander looks better than ever said Herald
statler John Evans during the halftime activities.
"With him at the controls, there is no limits as to
how good the East Carolina offense can be
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
"Expect the unexpected
This is the word from new Duke head football
coach Shirley "Red" Wilson as he prepares to send
out his first Blue Devil team into their first game
with East Carolina this Saturday at 1:30 p.m. in
W allace Wade Stadium.
Reasons for Wilson's statement are simple. The
team is loaded with youngsters; ten sophomores are
listed as starters. Also, Wilson himself is new in the
world of major college football. No one knows what
to expect from him and his team.
Wilson was a most successful high school coach
and at NAIA power Elon College. He is now
attempting to get his enthusiastic approach across to
the Blue Devils.
Wilson has put out an all-out effort to drum up
excitement in Durham and the Tar Heel state for
Duke football. "Red means Go" has been a slogan
heard on both radio and television and seen in the
newspapers.
One thing is for sure, this effort by Wilson to
drum up support for his squad has all the state's
football fans watchng intently to see if the new Blue
Devil coach can back up his pre-season promises.
"We will be an exciting team to watch Wilson
has said on many occassions. "We plan to have a lot
of fun playing football. Our brand of football should
be a good one for the fans to watch
Wilson will have the Devils operating an offense
very similar to that of N.C. STate's. The "Houston"
veer will be used at Duke for the first time this
season.
In charge of the offense is quarterback Craig
Browing, a sophomore from Fayetteville who has
surprised many by beating o ' departed Mike Dunn's
replacement from a year ago, Stanley Driskell.
"We have two fine quarterbacks said Wilson.
"Both have been impressive and both can get the
job done
Lining up behind Browing will be backs Keith
Crenshaw and Greg Rhett.Rhett lead the team in
rushing last year when he gained 412 yards and
averaged 4.8 per carry. Crenshaw is said to be
blessed with cat-like quickness.
Perhaps the strongest are on the Duke team is
the receivers. "We have five quality kids here are
all super said Wilson.
Starting will be Ron Fredrick, a transfer from
East Carolina, at wide receiver and Cedric Jones at
flanker. Also expected to see action are Marvin
Brown and super-speedster Chris Castor. Derrick
Lewis, a usual starter, is doubtful due to a knee
injury.
The offensive line figures to he solid. "I look for
the offensive line to be a real strength this year with
the proven performers that we have returning said
Wilson.
The starting guards will be senior Scott Hamilton
(6-4, 232) and senior Bob Riordan (6-3, 242). The
tackles include Jim Colantuoni, (6-4, 257) a junior,
and sophomore Greg Bamberger (6-4, 250). At center
is senior Kevin Kelley (6-4, 232).
Defensively, the Blue Devils have a problem with
experience. "Our defense has got to be one of the
youngest anywhere noted Wilson.
Sophomore defensive tackles Paul Heinsohn leads
the way after looking great in pre-season. The 6-6,
245 pound gem is known to be a great talent and
could become one of the Atlantic Coast Conference's
all-time best before his college career ends.
Starting up front with Heinsohn will be tackle
Wilson
Bro
wrung
F.A. Martin, ends Charles Bowster and either Ned
Gonet or Larry Lenoir, along with nose guard Eric
Drescher. Gonet is a converted fullback.
Three of these linemen are sophomores.
The linebacking chores w�.i be taking care of by a
couple of inexperienced juniors, Joe Rowe and Craig
Brown.
The secondary is a strong point. "This should
definitely be the anchor of our defense said
Wilson. "Craig Hoskins and George Gawdun should
have excellent senior years, and Dennis Tabron and
Greg Stroud had strong pre-seasons, as did Ed
Brown
Overall, the Duke team is young and
inexperienced. The Blue Devils are a team full of
question marks. Many questions about this squad
will be answered Saturday when the Devils and the
Pirates do battle.
AVID COLLEGE FOOTBALL FANS may see a
surprise change in the Duke lineup come Saturday
afternoon when the Blue Devils host East Crolina.
Ned Gonet, the second leading rusher on last
year's Devil squad when he gained 362 yardsw, has
been moved from fullback to defensive end by Coach
Red Wilson. The move was made in an attempt to
compensate for the lack of depth and playing
experience on the Duke defensive line.
A 6-2, 225 pound senior, Gonet is listed as a
possible starter for Saturday's 1:30,
Either he or sophomore Larry Lei
at right end.
EAST CAROLINA LEADS &e
pendents in total offense, averaging 390 yards per
game after two outings. The Pirates also lead the
13-member group in rushing offense wit an average
of 279 yards.
Individually, halfback Anthony Collins is the top
all-purpose runner with 117.0 yards average. He has
146 yards rushing and 88 on kickoff returns. His 22.0
kickoff return average ranks third. �
The Pirate offense ranks second in the scoring
parade with 25.5 points per game, behind only
Tulane's 33.0 figure.
Defensively, the Pirates' highest rankings come in
total defense (253.0) and rushing defense (157.5),
both good for fifth.
THE DUKE PEOPLE are expecting a good crowd
for Saturday's game, if teh weather is good. Sports
Information Director Tom Mickle and Devil head
coach Red Wilson have put out a super-big
lpromotion and good results are expected.
Tickets, by the way, will be available at the
game. The tickets ailoted to East CArolina were sent
back to Durham today (Thursday).
i
ECU transfer faces
old mates at new home
Ex-Pirate Ron Frederick
By JIMMY DuPREE
Asst. Sports Editor
"I know what type of an aggressive team East
Carolina is offensively as well as on defense, so I
know Saturday will be a tough game for us
These words come from the one person on either
team who is most qualified to evaluate the upcoming
Duke�ECU football game; sophmore wide receiver
Ron Frederick.
Frederick transferred to Duke University from
East Carolina following his freshman season with the
Pirates.
"I have no hard feelings over leaving East
Carolina said Frederick. "I left on good terms with
the players there and with Coach Dye
New Blue Devil head coach Red Wilson is
pleased and confident with . the sticky fingered
Frederick.
"Ron, like all our receivers, has great speed
said Wilson. "He is certainly an asset to our team.
Ron has been a great help in preparing for the East
Carolina game v
Frederick indeed remembers the last time he took
the field in a Pirate-Blue Devil cLsh in 1977.
With ECU trailing in the contest, Pirate wishbone
specialist Leander Green swept left behind the
purple-and-gold clad Frederick, who threw what
many considered to be the key block which allowed
the winning touchdown in the 17-16 Pirate victory.
That situation is also a primary reason Frederick
transferred to Duke.
The wishbone offense, as ECU OPERATES IT
calls for far more running plays than other offenses.
The veer, operated by the Blue Devils, is centered
around the run also, but Duke plans to take to the
air whenever possible.
"We're gonna pass a lot; that's a large part of
the veer said Frederick, "it's designed for more
long pass plays. With the wishbone, you're limited
to what you can do passing.
"You can throw the ball most of the time, but
it's usually to the backs or just short passes. I've
run the patterns that East Carolina will be using, so
I know what type of plays to look for.
The 5-10, 170 pound speedster from Goldsboro
cited differences in the 1978 Blue Devils under the
direction of Mike McGee and this year's
squadCoach McGee was more of a technician;
everything was more precision-oriented he stated!
"Coach Wilson is more of a motivation-type coach.
He believes in having a good time while still
stressing fundamentals
Frederick expresses great enthusiasm when
asked what his prediction for the game is "I don't
have a prediction, but I'm really excited about the
game he laughingly states. "It's going to be a big
game for us, and simply because I used to play
against these guys Vm with now
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an unmarried
wcman
UNION
Fri. & Sat. at
7 & 9 pm. in
Hendrix Theatre
EAST CAROUNA UNIVERSITY
Sponsored by the Student Union Films Committee
MtofH
Laatbar Handbag
Ho tons
�Shoaa Rapalrad To Look
Liko Now
Rlggon Shoe Repoir
Heather Shop
111 WEST 4TW ST.
pOWNTOWN GREENVILLE,
Parking in Front
and Rear.
ATTIC
N.C. No. 31 Nightclub
Fri Sat. & Sun.
SUPERGRIT
J
ABORTIONS UP TO 12TH
WEEK OF PREGNANCY
$175.00 "all Inclusive
t�
pregnancy test, birth control and
problem pregnancy counseling. For
further information call 832-0535 (toll-
free number 800-221-2568) between
9 A.M5 P M weekdays
Raleigh Women's Health
Organization
917 West Morgan St.
Raleigh, N.C. 27603
Student Union Coffeehouse Committee presents
The
Patio Jam
Fri Sept. 14,
from 6-7 p.m.
on the patio.
Mendenhall
All players welcome!
Don't forget
auditions,
Sept. 21 St 22!
EAST CAROUNA
Visit the Art Carved Representative
This Week
� BuNow and Save on Selected
Traditional and Contemporary
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Date.
Place:
Sept. 10, 11, 12, 13, 14.
Student Supply Store Lobb;
Supplier for the 1980
United States Olympic Team
Student Supply Store
Deposit required. MasterCharge or Visa accepted.

i





.Page 10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 13 September 1979
OPEN SUNDA YS
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13 September 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 11
The Fearless Football Forecast
ECU AT DUKE
NO IKK DAME AT MICHIGAN
TEXAS ST. AT TEX AS-ARLINGTON
VIRGINIA AT N.C. STATE
M DRYLAND AT CLEMSON
VKE KOREST AT GEORGIA
RICHMOND AT VM1
CUADEL AT NAVY
PI Rl)l E AT UCLA
VPPALACHIAN ST. AT VIRGINIA TECH.
FLORIDA AT HOUSTON
LSI AT COLORADO
DAVID MAREADY
(10-2)
ECU 24-17
MICHIGAN
N. TEXAS ST.
N.C. STATE
CLEMSON
GEORGIA
RICHMOND
NAVY
PURDUE
VIRGINIA TECH.
HOUSTON
LSU
CHARLES CHANDLER
(9-3)
ECU 34-17
MICHIGAN
N. TEXAS ST.
N.C. STATE
CLEMSON
GEORGIA
VM1
NAVY
PURDUE
VIRGINIA TECH
HOUSTON
COLORADO
TERRY HERN DON
(9-3)
ECU 28-17
MICHIGAN
N. TEXAS ST.
N.C. STATE
CLEMSON
GEORGIA
VMl
NAVY
PURDUE
VIRGINIA TECH
HOUSTON
COLORADO
JIMMY DUPREE
(7-5)
ECU 38-24
NOTRE DAME
N. TEXAS ST.
N.C. STATE
CLEMSON
GEORGIA
VMI
NAVY
PURDUE
APPALACHIAN ST.
HOUSTON
COLORADO
DICK JONES
Sports Director WITN-TV
ECU 21-17
MICHIGAN
N. TEXAS ST.
VIRGINIA
CLEMSON
GOERGIA
VMI
NAVY
OPURDUE
VIRGINIA TECH.
HOUSTON
LSU
State's Sullivan steps into limelight with
terling performance against Pirates
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP.)
- D vv i g h t Sullivan
figured his contribution
in North Carolina State's
opener against East
Carolina Saturday night
ild he 30 to 40
�yards, so no one was
fcnore surprised than he
when the final yardage
added up 131.
Sullivan was one ot a
�hall dozen running
backs Wolfpack Coach
Ho Rein figured to use.
iuJ in Rein's words,
"He had a hot hand
land we stayed with
him.
Those 131 yards�in-
luding two touchdowns
in N.C. State's 34-30
ictorj over the Pirates
in jut 15 carries
made most ol those in
arter-Finley Stadium
hirget tor the moment
hat they were wonder-
i who was going to
replace Ail-American back
Ted Brown.
Sullivan's pre-game
assessment of his con-
tribution was not out ol
lack ot confidence in his
own ability. He simply
did not expect to play-
as much as he did.
"I was surprised
he said, but explained
that the Wolfpack has a
much better running
game than most would
imagine.
l looked at what we
had back there and said
we have good talent,
and even if we didn't
have good running backs
we've got those trucks
up front
That was an allusion
to the offensive line led
by All-America center
Jim Ritcher and blocking
mates Chris Dieterich
and Chris Koehne.
Sullivan said Monday
he has changed his major
because thefe's more
money to be earned in
accounting than com-
munications.
"By the time I'm 38
I may be a millionaire.
Maybe 1 can be one of
the most eligible bach-
elors in the country if I
May single long
enough
But the last year has
not been all fun and
laughter for Sullivan.
For much of that period
he has been hampered
by injuries.
When spring practice
began the Wolfpack
coaching staff was toy-
ing with the idea of
making him a defensive
player, he said. It never
came about.
Instead of being an
obscure member of the
defense, he has opened
the season as the Pack's
most exciting offensive
player. "Publicity?
That's nice said Sul-
livan. "It's nice because
my little brother can see
it and read about it in
the papers
The subject of
injuries and his aware-
ness of them resurfaced.
Does his injury-prone
past concern him?
"1 think of it this
way; I'm going to play
hurt or not. I waited too
long for a chance to do
this and I'm going to do
it.
As a Durham native,
the 5-foot-10, 204-pound
junior was heavily re-
cruited by both Duke
and N.C. State. Why
leave the neighborhood?
"1 just didn't want
to go to Duke he
explained. "I used to go
to the games there and
the suport wasn't there.
It just wasn't my style
of school
Unfearlul of express-
ing a detailed opinion
on practically any sub-
ject, Sullivan surprised a
few writers when he
was asked about his
goals.
"Just go there and do
the best job possible.
J
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�.





The fiast Carolinian
features
' Thursday, September 13, 1979, page 12
Greenville, N.C
Auditions
being held
THE STREETS OF
NEW YORK is a rip-
snorting musical version
of the nineteenth cen-
tury Boucieault melo-
drama about an evil
banker and a very pure
and deprived heroine.
Complete with em-
bezzlements, fore-
closures, destitute but
honest characters thrown
out into the snow, and
the inevitable triumph of
good over evil, the
musical farce is a cele-
bration of the American
melodrama, resplendent
with laughter and tears.
Auditions for THE
STREETS OF NEW
YORK will be held
Thursday, September 13,
and Friday, September
14 in the Studio Theatre
of the ECU Drama.
Building at 7:30. Audi-
tions are open to ECU
students, faculty and
sfaff, and to members of
the G reenville
community at large.
Auditionees should
come prepared to sing a
song, and should bring
their own music (an
accompanist will be pro-
vided).
THE STREETS OF
NEW YORK, which won
the Drama Desk Award
for an Off-Broadway
musical, has parts for
eight men and seven
women. ECU Drama and
Speech faculty member
Del Lewis, who
appeared in the award-
winning New York pro-
duction, will direct.
Joe's Garage
Zappa cuts loose
Papperbok is
insanely funny
Frank Zappa is one of ieh most fluent latest album and first release on
rock musicians to date. Since 1966 he Zappa Records.
has produced 27 albums, including his
Lose ivaMet, lose self
By LARRY GRAHAM
Features Writer
Almost everyone who
keeps up with movies
remembers that troupe
from England, Monty
Python, from their in-
samely funny movie
Monty Python and the
Holy Grail.
Few people realize
that Monty Python puts
out books, too. And
following in tradition,
they too are insanely
funny.
The book I picked up
was The Brand New
Monty Python Papper-
bok. I noticed that the
corner of teh book was
dirty, but on closer
inspection I discovered
that the cover had been
"pre-dirtied With a
snicker 1 delved into the
bok. The first page con-
tains a set of safety
instructions for the bok,
a list of reading posi-
tions, and instructions
for handling a reading
emergency. (1. Close
bok. 2. Scream.) This
page sets the pace for
the rest of the bok.
Someone who is not
familiar with the special
craziness that springs
from Monty Python is
quickly initiated. The
most common thought
during fits of laughter is
"How did they think of
that?" Who but Monty
Python could think of
Llap-Goch, the secret
Welsh art of self-de-
fense? Or a news letter
that tells you how to
most effectively insult
foreigners? Or recipes
for rats? Or God's
report card?
The material contain-
ed is incredibly diversi-
fied, ranging from fake
ads to fake newspapers,
from flagrant fairy tales
to parodied to classics.
Plenty of plain sil-
liness abounds on every
page, some subtle and
some to-the-point. Con
cept humor and one-
liners are flung at the
reader with equal force.
In a few places
Monty Python draws the
reader into active parti-
cipation in the madness,
playing a game here,
completing a risque
dot-to-dot puzzle there.
As with most other
books of fame, Monty
Python prints what
people have said about
the bok. All the mem-
bers of Monty Python
thought the bok was
'triffic Rod Laver, Vir-
ginia Wade, and (Hie)
Nastase all thought the
same. A short biography
of one of the author's
friends is also included
for interested readers.
See FUNNY, page 13
By STEVE COOPER
Features Writer
It was supposed to
be an enjoyable week-
end. I'd planned a brief
escape from the college
life to enjoy the last few
days of summer in Wil-
mington. I trotted out to
the bank, withdrew an
amount I could guilt-
lessly spend, bought my
bus ticket, and got out
of town.
dreams are. There was
a half hour layover in
Kinston. I could handle
that. So, I'd be a little
late getting there;
what's a half hour? I
hadnt counted on the
two-hour layover in
Jacksonville.
What can you do for
two hours in Jackson-
ville? Nothing. So, for
two hours I wandered
about, aimlessly, bored,
angry. I ended up at
McDonalds, bought a
lifeline. It had my dri-
ver's license, my activity
card, my social security
card, my autographed
picture of Randolph
Scotteverything that
had meaning to me.
Everything.
Needless to say, the
weekend wasn't the
dazzling parade of
goodtimes that I thought
it would be. I survived
it, thanks to my room-
mate's generosity, and
when he took me to the
bus station Monday
evening he slipped a
couple of dollars in my
hand. I was to stretch
those two bucks to the
breaking point.
The first thing I had
to do Tuesday was get
some money to ive on.
The first thing I had
to do Tuesday was get
some money to live on.
The trouble was, the
nice lady at my bank
didn't believe I was the
person whose name was
on the check. I needed
my ID. So, I went to
get another ID made.
But to get the ID you
See WALLET, page 13
I donzed off, dream-
ing about the sea air,
and the ocean, and all
the other things that
Wilmington has to offer.
In just three and a half
short hours I would be
there.
Unfortunately, life is
never as good as
couple hamburgers, and
put the change back in
my wallet. That was the
last time I ever saw my
wallet.
Somewhere between
the Jackosnville McDon-
alds and my ex-room-
mate's apartment, I lost
my wallet. It was my
Football: What's the score?
Hi SPORTSFANS! wanting to seem ungrateful, I drank it neatly. I don't
Well ffuvs football season is upon us again and 1 � . r �, f . .
wen guys, luuiuau acaav F 6 recajj tne jetaiis 0f tne rest 0f tnat evening.
must sav that I m delighted. Ihave a few weeks ot , c , uL� j��i��
musi saj mai mi s t tne Kames you can finci out who sa dating
drunken Saturdays to look forward to when I can sit . � to be someone
in the great outdorrs, sip on a refreshingly strong J touchdowns are marvelous excuses
drink and fake an interest in what s happening on , . . nc , i u .�
�' a to hug and kiss. Of course, you have to keep a bare
the held. , eye on the game to check for touchdowns. The roar
Now I will admit that I m as rabid as the nex J necesgaril indicate that ,
person during away games, particularly those against hdown wag gcore(J Think hJ foolish ,d fee,
ACC teams but ECU's honor is a stake then Home J
irames well, that s a different story. A cartoon in ' , , ,? ' j . i . r a .k . �u
gameswen, ���� a j turned and kissed your date only to find that the
the Fountainhead last fall seemed to sum it up. The , ' , , , '
me i uuiiii�� l 9' roar was for a dropped bottle,
caption read, Another touchdownwho cares'
and the picture was of a few drunks a couple of
gossiping girls and one couple, necking. I think one
of the drunks may have been a cleverly disguised
drawing of me.
A friend from another school came to a home
game with me once, and at one point turned tome
and said, "Don't any of you even watch the game?"
I almost didn't hear him. I was fixing myself a
drink at the time.
I don't think there's an EAST Carolina fan alive
who hasn't felt a surge of blood on hearing, "Hey,
hey, EC at a football game. The entire student
body knows it (probably bacause it's so simple we
can all remember it, drunk or sober), and everyone
loves to wave, drink, and chant it. What a great
feeling�to be part of the huge mass of raving,
chanting, manic fellow students. It's a memory and a
, , , . joy I'll never forget.
East Carolina fans are a marvelous bunch to be Glorious footballat wonderful sport that gives us
with at a Saturday night football game. Everyone is the opportunitv to drink and yell to our hearts
incredibly friendly and everyone talks to each other. contentf and t0 :oin our feiiow 8tudents in supporting
When one person drops his bottle, the entire �ection q 8Chool.
cheers When one person asks what the score is, a
chorus' responds, "I don't know And "when one Football on a Saturday night in Greenville
uerson gets up to go to the bathroom, entire rows Where else do you get the chance to dress to
f impress on Saturday and wake up wrinkled and
Football games are the biggest social events of reeking at dawn on Sunday in an empty, littered
the year. Everyone gets wall-eyed together, and stadium,
people can travel the stadium looking up old friends
and making new ones. (I was once at a game,
iiquorless, having dropped my bottle on the way in,
and was sipping the last of my sprite when a guy
behind me whom I didn't even know poured four
fingers of bourbon into my cup, just to be nice. Not
Nowhere, that's where.
Yours truly,
775134
By RICHARD GREEN
and PATRICK MINGES
Joe's Garage is a stupid story
about how the government is going to
try to do away with music (a prime
cause of unwanted mass behavior).
It's like a really cheap kind of high
school playthe way it might have
been done twenty years ago, with all
the sets made out of cardboard boxes
and poster paint
Frank Zappa's description of
Joe's Garage, his latest album and
first release on Zappa Records, is
typical of his highly critical view of
his work.
Zappa is one of the most
misunderstood 'artists of our times,
and some idiot from Rolling Stone will
inevitably term Joe'S Garage as a
"concept album That would be like
saying that this album, unlike Zappa's
26 albums since 1966, is made of
plastic. "
Zappa has consistently expounded
his concepts on every subject from
the California lifestyle to Catholic
girls. The intricasies and sub-concepts
defy analysis, while allowing for
endlesss interpretations. After all,
isn't that what art is about?
To the delight of Zappa fans,
Joe's Garage contains no material
from his unreleased, four-record
collection, Lather (phonetic spelling of
leather).
Zappa made Lather in an attempt
ot free himself of his restrictive
contract with Warner Brother's, but
for legal reasons was unable to
release it. He had some albums
pressed at his own expense and
distributed them to major radio
stations for air-play. Most of the
material has been re-released on some
of his recent albums, such as Live in
New York and Studio Tan.)
After having severed his ties with
the dictatorial influences jpf the
recording industry, Zappa was able to
vent his musical and philosophical
idealogies without fear of censorship.
This allowed him the creative outlet
for his artistic abilitites that have been
held back for so long.
Joe's Garage weaves an intricate
scenario of lyrical and musical
themes.
Zappa exercised complete freedom
in the production of Joe's Garage,
creating an album that exceeds most
popular albums in worth and com-
plexity. The album is a rock opera
with political and moral overtones,
complete with roles and a libretto.
The production of Joe's Garage is
superb, rendering a clean, crisp
sound. With Zappa as the mixer, he
could manifest total control over the
technical aspects of his musical
endeavors. He blended sounds and
music to paint the scenes of America.
Joe's Garage resembles George
Orwell's 1984, with Zappa's "Centra 1
Scutinizer" enforcing legal codes
which have not yet been written. The
"Scrutinizer" warns of societal prac-
tices that may prove detrimental to
moral development.
The story of Joe's Garage is a
futuristic manifesto detailing a time
when music is outlawed because it is
a "major cause of unwanted be-
havior Joe; his girlfriend, Mary; his
band members, Larry and Warren;
and the sleazy Lucille, play integral
roles in the tragic tale of a good
Catholic boy's demise because of the
demon, music.
Joe's garage band confronts the
authorities when reported for making
music, and from this point, Joe's
fortune declines. He loses Mary when
she tries to get ahead and becomes a
groupie for a rock group.
In desperation, Joe has an affair
with Lucille, the Burger Queen, who
messes him up, mind, body and soul.
Such is your certain fate when you
stray from the righteous path and fall
prey to the lure of that demon, music.
Zappa's music on Joe's Garage is
his finest and certainly the most
palatable work of his thirteen-year
career. As always, Zappa has
surrounded himself with some of the
most talented musicians in the
recording industry. His role in the
history of rock is immense, and he
has continued to grow creatively in
his long career.
Frank's guitar licks are inspired,
from the dynamic rocking of "Wet
T-shirt Nite" and "Why Does It Huri
When I Bate?" to the gentle and
beautiful reggae sound of "Lucille
Has Messed My Mind Up Warren
Cucurulla on rhythm guitar and
Denny Walley on slide make signifi-
cant contributions to Zappa's wall of
sound. Arthur Burrow on bass, with
Vin �� Coliatu and Ed Mann on
pre lesion, round out the rhythm
section. Peter Wolf and Tommy Mars
suppiv melodic intervention on key-
boards, and Ike Willis turns in a
superb vocal performance as "Joe
Se ZAPPA, page 13
Stan Hope draws active crowd
By Larry Graham
Features Writer
The First Annual Stan Hope Outdoor Jam was
held last Sunday. Featured were four of the top
country�rock bands in eastern North Carolina, The
Bill Lyerly Band, Tumhleweed, Brecken Ridge, and
The Super Grit Cowboy Band. All four bands were
good , but often the audience is just as interesting to
watch as the bands.
The concert was set in the amphitheatre�like
slopes of the Stan Hope golf course. When I got
there, about 1500 people were already positioned on
the grass, many in chairs or leaning against full
coolers. The concert was enjoyed by a wide range of
ages; little kids wandered in and around the people
at the front of the stage while eighty�year old
women danced frantically with folkish beat.
College and high-school-age people were the most
represented.
Nobody came alone, as far as I could see. Groups
of four and five, usually lugging a giant cooler and
several blankets, arrived at one time. The concept of
'bases' seemed to play a big part in the seating.
More often than not, the people up front came from
a good distance up the hill. When it was time to get
another beer, the drinker trudged up the hill to the
site that his group had picked out. He or she then
went back down to the stage. By the time the
concert was halfway over, the bases were quite
crowded towards the front, with people scurrying
around trying not to step on anyone else's turf. Sort
of like penguin nesting giounds.
Not everyone came to the jam to listen to music.
Not the voice of naievete . Most people, especially
those up front, just sat down and worked on getting
wasted. Most did an admirable job, including the
guy I drove up with. Beer was the most common
vehicle to this end, and cans and bottles of every
favorite beer lay on the ground, a monument to the
drinker's tremendous effort. Other common party
snacks were pot and cocaine, pot being used by
many people despite the presence of at least ten
state troopers and local police.
People at a concert such as this one get very
friendly and outgoing. People came up to me and
offered me tokes of their best. One big guy,
apparently stoned out of his cranium, went into the
restricted area at the front of the stage and offered a
sizeable roach to Super Grit's bass player, while the
player was going into his solo. He eventually gave
up and walked back muttering "1 can't understand
that guy
Getting high tends to release any injibitions you
might have built up. Inhibitions were unheard of at
this concert. People came up to the front and danced
and swung around, often without caring who was in
their way. One partivularly active concert-goer
danced for just about every song every band did. At
times he would fall down, but in five minutes he
would be right back up, dancing in a wild, failing
manner which suggested that he was having an
immensely good time, if not taking something strong.
Couples dancing was the big thing, with people folk
dancing wherever they could. Some just invented
their own dances.
See CROWD, page 13
Ik
wj
need to i
card. So,
another
the cos!
five dollar
Fi
little, tinyl
paper,
license ol
dollar, atij
picture oiil
the form an
it would
of da-
T
long
cents
cigarette;
cigarette)
have
them; t�
A I put
out and
had two
before th
and did
more ml
cigarettes
going U
been smi
and wal
nicotine
me now ,J
make it
The
roomate
how my
the ligh
stairs4
money
Scott.
SEND r
the n
bent ov
waiting.
was dri
brochure
"That's
Nichols
junk fit
want m
"Sorri
don't n
deliver
1 needed
quoting
He
bent
the nextl
to give
that I hi
wasn't
k n o w
made
?near
very
mnst've
made
with whi
But
letter.
I ripj
there it
passpoi
Once aj
believed1
body a;
identitv
could (U
people
was 78-
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atfrw. uMklmjmmmtmt
mum





ille, N.C.
e
t s Garage is
lean, crisp
il e mixer, he
rol over the
musical
ounds and
of America.
ibles George
i - 'Centra 1
egal codes
written. The
K-ietal prac-
letrimental to
ige i a
a time
ecause it is
. anted be-
Mary; his
nd barren;
a integral
a good
of the
- the
making
it, Joe's
Mar) when
1 becomes a
is dn affair
v)ueen, who
1) and soul.
le when you
If'ith and fall
music.
s Garage is
the most
nirteen-year
iZappa has
some of the
ins in the
role in the
ise. and he
rreatively in
ire inspired,
g of "Wet
oes It Hurl
gentle and
of "Lucille
p Warren
guitar and
lake signifi-
es wall of
bass, with
Mann on
Rhe rhythm
ummy Mars
Ion on key-
jrns in a
Joe .
A, page 13
d
understand
jibitions you
iheard of at
and danced
who was in
concert-goer
and did. At
minutes he
wild, failing
having an
thing strong.
people folk
lust invented
D, page 13
?
Diet workshop opens
Crowd
13 September 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 13
(continued from page 12)
By RICHARD GREEN
Managing Editor
"We think people
who hear about our
recipes, menus, and
success stories will want
this training and get a
new, slim figure
That's Mrs. Harvey
Wooten, class instructor
for The Diet Workshop,
Inc. She lost 23 pounds
with the Workshop and
has maintained her
Wallet
(continued from page 12)
need to have an activity
card. So, 1 went to get
another activity card,
the cost ol which was
live dollars.
Five dollars! For that
little, tiny, pink slip of
paper. A new driver's
license only consts a
dollar, and it has your
picture on it. I filled out
the forms and was told
it would take a couple
of days to be processed.
Those two days were
long ones. I only had 75
cents and a half pack of
cigarettes. I had to have
cigarettes, I couldn't
have survived without
them; to Hell with food.
As I put that last butt
out and realized I still
had two days to go
before the ID came in
and didn't have any
more money to buy
cigarettes, I knew I was
going to die. I'd only
been smoking a month
and was already a
nicotine junky. "Take
me now, God; I can't
make it
The next day my
roomate called. Some-
how my ID card wa on
the light table down-
stairsno wallet, no
money, no Randolph
Scott, just the ID.
SEND IT
the next day I stood
bent over my mailbox,
waiting. At last a letter
was dropped in. A
brochure from Nichols.
That's it?" Junk from
Nichols? I don't want
junk from Nichols! I
want my ID
"Sorry, buddy. I
don't write 'em, I just
deliver 'em Just what
1 needed. A mailman
quoting the Flinstones.
He found me still
bent over the mailbox
the next day. I'd hoped
10 give the impression
that I hadn't moved. He
wasn't impressed. I
know he deliberately
made me wait. I'd
?wear that I got the
very last letter. He
must've had a heart
made of blck leather,
with whips for arteries.
But there it was. The
Setter.
I ripped it open. And
there it was, my ID. My
passport to survival.
Once again I would be
believed. I was some-
body again. I had my
identity returned. I
could flash this card and
people would know I
was 784858.
Funny
(continued from page 12)
This bok is fantastic
wealth of humor, 92
pages crammed to the
brim with essential
Monty Python. At $6.95,
the brand new Monty
Python Papper Bok is a
really triffic buy.
Support
East
Carolinian
Advertisers
slimmer figure for two-
and-a-half years.
The Diet Workshop,
the largest, privately
owned group weight
control program in the
world, will organize in
Greenville on Monday,
Sept. 17, at 7:30 p.m
at the Red Oak Christ-
ian Church, U.S. 264
bypass, West.
The Workshop's
"Four-point Lifetime
Weight Control Plan" is
based on a balanced
diet, behavior tech-
niques, nutritional
instruction and exercise.
The "Six-cycle Super
Weight Loss Program"
is the all-new and
proven program
dedicated to maximum
weight loss in a
minimum anount of
time, while preserving
daily nutritional needs.
"Crafted and tested
with care and intel-
ligence, the program
gives you the oppor-
tunity to lose weight
quickly and safely
Mrs. Wooten explained.
Wooten stressed that-
"You can count on The
Diet Workshop for good
nutrition, caring in-
structors and the infor
mation and motivation
that comes from weekly
meetings
Zappa
(continued from page 12)
Joe's Garage is perhaps the finest
selection of the album. It is a mellow
blend of percussion, harmonica, and
sixties flashbacks and is one of the
most pleasant tunes Zappa has
recorded to date. "Toad-0-Line"
features Zappa on a Santana-ish binge
and "Wet T-shirt Nite" is so melodic
that it could be released as a single.
"Crew Slut" distinguishes itself
with references to the Lather material
but otherwise lounges into monot-
onous repetition. On "Catholic Girls
he regresses into child's play as he
gestures defiantly at critics of his
"Jewish Princess" (Sheik Yerbooti).
There is no need for us to question
your motives, Frank.
Zappa's motives are crystal clear:
to present uncompromising musical
genius paried with significant
glimpses of the psyche of the United
States. Finally freed from the
restrictive influences of the com-
mercial recording industry, Zappa has
culminated his historic career with
Joe s Garage.
Special
Attractions
presents:
Mike Williams
in concert
Sept. 23,
at 8:00 P M.
on the
University Mall
If there are any newsworthy
events or personalities on
campus which you feel merit
students' attention, let us
know.
Please call 757-6366
First Class September 17
Red Oak Christian Church
Hwy. 264 By-Pass West
For more Information call:
756-6226,443-6501
Some people, such as myself, took a more serious
view of the concert. Some folks twerethere for the
music. Others took along cameras to snatch those
action photos ol" their favorite group. I am not
talking strictly of the bright-eyed girls that rushed up
and snapped a few with their pocket instamatics.
Some brought Nikons with foot-long telephoto lenses.
I inwardly turned green with stark envy, for I too
had been reduced to using an instamatic.
Many people who attended this jam had gone to
a similar one in New Bern a few days before.
Apparently there had been a little trouble at that
concert, for several people had been hauled away by
the police. There was no such trouble this time, and
Super Grit thanked "the law for not beatin' up on
the jippies and the hippies for not beatin' up on the
law
The concert was thoroughly enjoyable, I
thought as I left. Thoroughly worth the eight bucks I
had enjoyed the music and gained a new perspective
on concerts as a social phenomenon, rather than as
just a plade for music. Really, if concerts were for
music and nothing else, they would be pretty
boring, wouldn't they?
A story with a happy,
healthy ending
Fear of the unknown is something to which no one is im-
mune, especially a family with a history of genetic dis-
orders. For them, pregnancy is an anxious time. A March
of Dimes-supported genetic services program at the
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, is helping
to allay those fears. The program is headed by Miriam
Wilson, M.D chief of genetics division.
BOYD'S BARBER
and HAIRSTYUNG
1008 S. Evans St.
Phone 758-4056
By Appointment Only
Melvin H. BoydtMelvinH.Boyd,Jr.
Franklin C. Tripp
DO YOU HAVE TROUBLE
MAKING YOUR 8:00am CLASS?
HAVE YOU EVER SLEPT
THROUGH YOUR ALARM?
FOR AN INEXPENSIVE
GUARANTEE TO BE ON TIME
FOR ANYTHING !
CALL 758-7904
or 752-5506
FOR MORE INFORMATION
WE HAVE THE ANSWER!
OPTICIANS
opticians
OVER 1000 FRAMES�3
TO CHOOSE FROM
Single Vision-White Glass Lenses$19.50
Bifocal Lenses-White Glass$ 30.50
Single Vision Photo Gray Lenses$26.50
Single Vision Photo Gray Extra$30.50
Bifocal Lenses Photo Gray$38.50
Trifocal White Glass Lenses$37.50
Trifocal Photo Gray Lenses$47.50
(1.1 DIVISION LENSES)
CONTACT LENSES
by
Bausch & Lomb Softens Or Milton Roy Nature Vue
Soft Lens$149.50
Semi Soft Lens$130.00
Hard Lens$115.00
15 Student Discount On Glasses.
STUFFY'S
Famous Subs , Good Stuff
CUAr-VUE Opticians
GREENVILLE. N.C. 752-1446 BUILDING A
PHYSICIANS QUADRANGLE '9 ,WW 17HW.ITHST.
OFFICE HOURS
HBertleyMeH tAMSMPM
Gotdeboro MONTUES.THURS-FRI
(A.M1R.M. 114E. Walnut
WEDNESDAY Ou�nlown GoMaboro
ADJACENT TO EAST CAROLINA EYE CLINIC
BUY ONE GET ONE
FREE
ALL Beverages
AND
Chili or Cheese Dog
3PM to 5PM
Monday Thru Friday
located in Georgetown Shoppes
Greenville, N. C.
752-6130
offer expires : Sept. 14,1979
coupon�
With This Coupon
FREE
STUFFY'S T-Shlrt with purchase
of a 5.00 Food Order
Every Sunday
Taco Special
"On a college student's budget
yon can't afford not to eat here9
jm 9 Each
Fighting Inflation With Our Everyday Low Price:
HI-WAY 264 PLAYHOUSE
f
6 m lies west of Greenville
on Hwy. 264
If the HOTTEST Frat at
Faullt University
TacoCid Dinners
1. Beef Taco, Beef Tostado,
Sancho, Bean Nocho$1.79
2. Beef Taco, Bean Tostado,
Enchilada, Bean Nocho$1.85
3. Beef Taco, Beef Tostado
Bean Nocho, Cheese Enchilada,
Tamale$1.99
Big Red99
Jalapeno Peppers05 Each
TacosMl 79
Cheese Nocho
Bean Nocho
Beef Tostado
Bean Tostado
Bean Burrito
Beef Burrito
Frijoies
Tamale
Taco Sid Salad
Taco Dog a
Menus
.45 TacoChiiiDog60
.25 Taco Dog Supreme .75
.25 Taco Beef Burger. .60
. 55 Sancho70
45 Enchilada (Cheese).55
.45 (Meat)60
.55 (Combo)65
.35 Chili SO
.50 Spanish Rice35
.65 Super Salad89
.55 Added Ingredient 05
Beverages PepsiMt. Devy, Dr. Pepper, Tea
Small. .30,
Large. .50.
Medium. .40,
Coffee
Milk
IV






Page 14 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 13 September 19791
INTER-FRATERNITY
COUNCIL
Presents
OUR KICKOFF RUSH
2-6 SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 16th
AT THE BOTTOM OF COLLEGE HILL
Sponsored By:
HALLOW DISTRIBUTING CO.
H.L. HODGES
ATTIC
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OVERTON'S SUPERMARKET
BEST VALUE MOTOR LODGE
PANT AN A BOB'S
FLOYD G. ROBINSON JEWELERS
APPLE RECORDS
FAST FARE
EGGS-N-24
PIPELINE
JEFFREY'S BEER & WINE CO.
SILK SCREENS
PLAZA GULF
CAROLINA OPRY HOUSE
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CR AFTMENSHIP UNLIMITED
VARSITY BARBER &
KAIRSTYLING
KING AND & QUEEN
RESTAURANT
BEEF BARN
NICHOLS DEPT. STORE
McDonalds
happy place
elbo room
CALIFORNIA CONCEPTS
CHAPTER X
TREE HOUSE
DAILY REFLECTOR
STEREO VILLAGE
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PIZZA INN
U.B.E.
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� � �
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 14, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 13, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.06
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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