The East Carolinian, September 6, 1979






"Let us dare
to read, think,
speak
and write
I
The East Carolinian
Telephone
Numbers
757-6366
757-6367
757-6309
Peculation 10,000
Vol. 54 No. 4
Thursday, September 6, 1979
12 pages today
Greenville, N.C.
David's wrath ending
S.C. (AP)�Fires be-
lieved started by
downed power lines
burned at two Grand
Strand motels this
morning.
The first, reported at
the Marlena about 6
a.m destroyed the
mail building and three
nearby private cottages.
Damage was estimated
at $1 million by city
police.
The flames were
contained about 8 a.m.
The second fire
began about 7:30 at the
By the Sea Motel in the
Crescent Beach section
of North Myrtle Beach
and continued to burn
two hours later. But a
policewoman at head-
quarters said the fire
was under control.
No damage estimate
was immediately avail-
able.
David, which has
claimed at least 900
lives, struck Savannah
in its second slap at the
U.S. mainland in two
days. Heavy rains, high
seas and anxiety
spawned by the hur-
ricane were blamed for
at least seven deaths in
Florida, Georgia and
South Carolina.
Meanwhile, tropical
Storm Frederic, packing
winds of 50 mph, was
southeast of the Domin-
ican Republican and
moving west.
In the wake of one
of the century's most
destructive storms,
about 90 percent of the
city of Savannah was
without power this
morning. Police, hospi-
tals and other emer-
gency agencies were
operating with auxiliary
generators.
The First estimates
show Hurricane David's
taunting dash through
Florida caused more
than $60 million
damage.
The storm left many
Floridians tearful and
depressed, but their
most often-heard words
were: "It could have
been worse As they
turned to mopping up
the remains, state of-
ficials began looking for
federal disaster aid.
At Holden Beach in
Brunswick County, a
portion of a fishing pier
was washed away in
Tuesday's heavy rains.
Other piers at Ocean
Isle, Sunset Beach and
Long Beach suffered
neavy damage, said
Ellis" Stanley, civil pre-
paredness coordinator in
Bolivia.
The western end of
Long Beach on Oak
Island was eroded
severely, with dunes on
that portion washed
away, Stanley said.
Hundreds of
residents in Brunswick
and Carteret counties
evacuated inland Tues-
day as heavy rains and
high winds in coastal
areas signaled David B
advance.
In Georgia. two
students from Frana
who were not immed-
iately identified, went
swimming alter the
hurricane passed and
were missing today, ap-
parentlv dragged out to
sea bv strong current
More than 900
people were killed in
the Dominican Republic
before Davi'i boun
off Florida M nday.
Unofficial estim ites put
damage- in Flori
more than $00 milli
Six deal raru
from heart atta ks to
ear accidents, were
blamed on the storm in
tha:
The Media Board met for their first meeting of the
year yetserday.
Photo Lab inventory
discussed by Media Board
o
real need at ECU
By KAREN WENDT
News Editor
The Media Board
held an organizational
meeting Wednesday,
and the Photo Lab was
the main item on the
agenda.
Pete Podeszwa, who
had been removed from
the post lor academic
ineligibility, was re-
named to the position
of Head Photogranher
of teh Photo Lab.
The Media Board
ordered an inventory
this summer, conducted
of all the branches of
the Media. This in-
ventory has been com-
pleted.
The Buccaneer, East
Carolinian, the campus
radio station, WECU,
and the Photo Lab were
all inventoried. There
were no shortages re-
ported, with the ex-
ception of teh Photo
Lab, which ahd an esti-
mated $4,000 in equip-
ment unaccounted lor.
The acting head of
teh Photo Lab, John
Grogan, told members
of teh Board that the
equipment was being
stored in his and
Podeszwa's homes while
t he renovations to the
lab wre being com-
pleted.
A question arose
concerning the timing of
the renovations. Acting
chairman of the Media
Board, Charles Sune,
commented, "I have
spoken with the internal
auditor Sune added,
"He (the internal aud-
itor) feels the inventory
was conducted before
the renovations.
At the meeting,
which is scheduled for
September 10, the op-
erations manuals for the
East Carolinian and
WECU will be discus-
sed. Also, an auditor
will be appointed to the
Rebel and a permanent
chairperson for the
board will be selected.
"We have a lot of
pressing things Sune
noted.
For many years now
students in Jones, Ay-
cock, Scott, Belk, and
Tyler dorms have been
aggravated by the ped-
estrian crossing at the
10th street and college
Hill Drive intersection.
Bobby Robertson, an
employee at the Green-
ville City Planning De-
partment, stated that
the 10th Street overpass
is not the direct re-
sponsibility of the City.
Robertson added that
if the citizens of Green-
ville expressed enough
concern, and if ECU
helped to pay for the
cost, it might be feas-
ible for the City Plan-
ning Department to
build an overpass for
the students, but that
the direct responsibility
lor the overDass lay
with the N.C. Depart-
ment of Transportation.
Blake commented
that the department
seemed very concerned
and understandin
However, William F.
Caddell, Chief of High-
way Planning, said Fri-
day that due to inflation
and a tight budget it
was doubtful that ECU
would get an
S . until
finally ta-
will have
chance- and
street as
-
si -
take their
in.
Fees rapidly increasing
By SUSAN FERNALD
Staff Writer
The cost of a college
education in North
Carolina's three largest
public universities is
expected to go up
between 3.2 and 5.7
percent next year.
At East Carolina
University costs will go
up 5.7 percent from
$2,725 to 82,880. Tui-
tion and fees will re-
main the same.
The University of
North Carolina at
Chapel Hill costs for
full-time, resident, stu-
dents will rise 3.2
percent from $2,954 to
$3,050 with no increases
in tuition and fees.
North Carolina State
University predicts total
costs will go up 5.5
percent next year from
$2,703 to $2,852 with a
slight fee increase.
The nedw budgets
lor UNC, N.C. State
and ECU are based
upon the resources of
the students and their
families in general,
assuming that each stu-
dent would contribute
around $1,000 to the
university each year at-
tended.
According to ECU's
Financial Aid Director,
Robert Boudreaux, the
price raise was made to
deal with the rising cost
of living and was neces-
sary because, "every
institution has to esta-
blish a reasonable bud-
get
At East Carolina the
increases have already
taken place in the
voluntary meal plan and
in dorm room pric. The
meal plan price has
increased $150 from last
year's yeariy plan price
of $1,000 and semester
see FEES page 3
y
��
J
"�M
-���
The parking lot at the base of College Hill Drive
was flooded due to the rains that David brought to
(Photo by Pete Podeszwa)
Green ville.
Newspaper work- as seen from the inside out
By MARC BARNES
Editor
Maybe you are walk-
ing across campus, and
you stop in at the
Croatan-or maybe you
walk down the hall of
your dorm on the hill
and pick it up out of
the bright red box that
still reads FOUNTAIN-
HEAD on the outside.
Either way, this news-
paper just appears
every Tuesday and
Thursday by magic, it
seems.
It ain't magic-it's a
helluva lot of hard
work, and the purpose
of this piece is to
explain a little bit of
how its doen.
First, we start with
you, the reader. Maybe
you have run a touch-
down in the last few
days, or maybe you are
teaching a seminar, or
maybe you are involved
in student government.
Either way, in whatever
circumstance you find
yourself, we decide that
you are newsworthy,
and we decide to do a
story on you.
We look for subjects
that we feel the stu-
dents here at ECU
would like to read
about. That's one of the
reasons for the addi-
tions of the Features
section of the paper, a
section which should be
much stronger than in
the past, as will all the
sections of the paper
very soon. The difficulty
with the paper right
now lies in the fact that
students are hard to
reach because phones
haven't been hooked
up, some schedules are
not yet finalized, and
we are hard at work
with some leftover re-
modeling, as well as
trying to build up a
good staff.
But back to you,
the reader. A reporter
will get in touch with
you, or maybe you will
be interviewed by a
news desk editor or
assistant. After the
interview, the writer
will return to the news-
paper office, type the
story up, and leave it
here for the copy desk
editor to read over and
correct.
Other inputs to the
copy desk editor besides
the copy which is writ-
ten by reporters in-
cludes state
and national news from
the wires of the Asso-
ciated Press, and news
releases from the ECU
News Bureau.
People
Also, organizations
on campus send us
news releases which we
incorporate into a
column called 'People
a column which we
hope to expand as soon
as our typesetting capa-
bilities expand.
Production
After the copy desk
editor completes his
work, the copy is sent
to the typesetter, who
sets the type into long
strips of photographic
paper. These strips rep-
resent one-column or
two column widths,
depending on what the
desk editor wanted.
Once these strips are
typeset, they are sent
back to the desk edi-
tors. The editors mea-
sure the length of the
strips of copy, and they
use this information to
make up rough sketches
of what they want their
pages to look like.
They send the strips,
and the sketches (which
are called 'dummy
sheets') to the layout
room, where the layout
workers coat one side of
the copy with wax, and
affix them to longer,
more complex layout
sheets called 'mechan-
icals
For photographs,
which are provided by
the Photo Lab, the desk
editor indicates on a
small photo tag the size
of the picture desired,
and the production
manager or one of her
assistants figures up the
percentage of how much
the photo must be
enlarged or reduced by
the printer. After this,
she pastes a red win-
dow in the spot on the
mechanical where the
photo must go, to let
the printer know exactly
what he is to do.
After all this is
done, the mechanicals
are placed in a 'flat'
box, and the circulation
manager comes in the
middle of the night to
take them to a printer,
which is located this
week in Ahoskie, some
80 miles from here. The
reason that we make
mention of who our
printer is this week is
that there is a severe
.paper shortage right
now, and live weeks
into the school year, we
will have been printed
by four different print-
ers.
Newspaper publish-
ers, who normally court
our business, are afraid
that they will run out of
paper for their own
publications, and they
re understandably con-
cerned about taking on
any extra printing work
just now.
The circulation man-
ager waits around the
printing house until the
paper is completed, ana
then he brings the
completed papers-all
10,000 of them-back to
Greenville for distribu-
tion. After he is
through with distribution
of the paper, he does
the mailings for the
subscription trade.
Before any of this
can be done, the adver-
tising department must
sell a lot of ads to
support the other arms
of the newspaper. We
have an ad rate struc-
ture which is compar-
able to the daily paper
here, and this is a good
selling point for the ad
salesmen who go out
into the surrounding
'areas and sell space to
local businesses.
The salesmen report
back to the office every
day, witb the require-
ments of their advertise-
ments ready for the ad
artists, who arrange the
ads in a style which is
designed to help the
local businessman sell
his merchandise to the
students and faculty of
ECU.
Plans are in the
works to perhaps have
several special editions
during the course of the
year. These editions,
which would hold more
advertising than regular
issues of the paper,
would free up space in
regular editions for
more news coverage.
Edmund Arnold, who is
the foremost authority
on American newspaper
design, recommends a
60 percent advertising-
40 percent news ratio in
each newspaper. These
special editions may
help us reach this goal.
Incidently, this news-
paper is in touch with
Mr. Arnold, to invite
him to help critique our
paper. Arnold is noted
for the redesign of the
Christian Science Moni-
tor, and the U.S News
and World Report,
among other leading
American newspapers.
Many of the stu-
dents here have the
constant complaint that
this newspaper should
meet the needs of the
students, since it is
supported by student
fees. We agree that
meeting the needs of
our readership is our
highest priority, but it
is a priority that we
have chosen for our-
selvesnot one that is
dictated by student fee
money.
The fact is -this
year, for the first time
in many years, we are
75 percent self support-
ing. Only 25 percent of
our operating budget
comes from student
fees, and next year, we
hope to be 100 percent
self supportingwith not
one cent coming from
student fee accounts.
Later this year, we
are adding a VDT
typesetting system, a
state of the art compu-
ter which should allow
us to put together a
newspaper in one quar-
ter thf amount of time
that it takes us now.
This will allow us to
spend more of our time
concentrating on content
and style of be paper,
and the paper will-look
a lot better than it ever
has.
All non-adverl -
pages will be chang
irom the present eight-
column format to a new
six-column format. I
get an idea of wl
six-column layout
like, look at the fr
page of the Rat
News and Observer. It s
a cleaner style, and it
will be easier to read.
We are also retyi-
ing the body ty
which are defined a
the words you are
reading right now. The
display type -the head-
lines-will match ll
body type, and both ot
these type styles were
picked for their readi-
bility.
Maybe you don't
understand the technical
jargon, and maybe vou
don't have any idea of
what we are talking
about. Suffice it to say.
that we will be looking
a lot better in the
weeks and month:
ahead. What we dc
Isn't magic, but we
have the training and
the know-how to bring
you a good looking
paper. Between the
classes and the bad
meals, and the constant
headaches, that's
exactly what we intend





'age 2 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 6 September 1979
Sorority Rush has been a tradition at ECU for many
years.
Rush week planned
B) JANE BIDD1X
Staff Writer
This year Sororit
Rush is the most excit-
ing ever stated Pan-
hetlenic President Eva
Pitt mail. The girls have
It.en winking hard in
preparation with rush
onl a week long in
order lor that week to
he the best, most tun
filled rush week ever,
according iman.
�n g. .g on . .
an jl week and will
conclude Thursday night
at 7:00 p.m. with the
Convocation ceremony in
Wright Auditorium.
The ceremony is a type
of orientation U let
girls know a little about
what to expect from
Creek Life according to
Diane Gray. Panhellenic
Membership Chairman.
Gray invites any
girls not signed up for
rush to attend the
Convocation ceremony to
see if they would like
to become a part of this
action packed week
from Sept. 9 through
Sept. 14.
The ceremony will
include comments from
Dean Fulghum on Greek
i.itt- and a welcome from
Panhellenic President
Eva Pittman. A slide
show will be presenle'd
to show some of the
many facets of sorority
life along with displays
from all the sororities
showing a little about
their activities and
special interests.
Gray says the pro-
gram will last a little
over an hour and that
refreshments will be
served.
The week itself pro-
mises to add excitement
to the lives of all
involved. Beginning
Sunday night the girls
will travel to all eight
houses in two nights in
order to get aquainted
with each sorority. On
Tuesday night a tour of
the houses will be given
with displays of the
individual activities each
sorority is involved in.
Wednesday night is a
break and a chance for
the girls going through
rush to think about
I heir resj active choices.
A skit depicting
some facet of the soror-
,ity is given on Thursday
night wit' the most
exciting and beautiful
night Being Friday,
known as Preferential.
This is the night girls
choose . which sororitv
they wish to become a
member of and the
night concludes with a
beautiful candlelight
cereme on the mall
�vith all the sororities
"gether with their new
members.
"Come be a part of
the Greek community,
its an experience vou
must try in order to
understand the many
rewarding aspects it
offers invites Pittman.
Buckley believes in Reagan
GREENSBORO iNC AP
Political columnist
William F. Buckley Jr.
says he believes former
California Gov. Ronald
Reagan will win the
1980 presidential elec-
tion, defeating Sen.
Edward Kennedy,
D-Mass.
"My personal feeling
is that Sen. Kennedy is
going to run and that
he will be beaten
Buckley told an aud-
ience 'of 2,500 at the
University of North
Carolina at Greensboro
Tuesday. "On the other
hand, I am always the
eternal optimist.
"Quite apart from
the fact that I happen
to be very fond of Mr.
Reagan personally, it is
not easy for me to say
anything in opposition
to someone who says he
became a conservative
as a result of reading
one of my books
Bucklev said.
classified
�r
@
FOR SALE: 2 Acoustic
.guitars. Conn 6-string,
like new, $150.00 with
case. Ventura 12-string,
like new, 8150.00 with
case. Call 752-3426.
YARD SALE: Books,
etc Political Science,
German, others; Plenty
of material for term
papers! Sat Sept. 8
and 15, 9 a.ml p.m.
2111 Southview Drive.
FOR SALE: 1974 Ford
Mustang II Ghia. V-6,
automatic, air, AMFM
tape player stereo.
$2395. 756-3870.
FOR SALE: 1973 Mus-
tang Mach I, excellent
condition, good gas
mileage. Sporty green
color. A bargain at
11900. Call 758-9322.
Mkt. -Sat. Sept. 8,
Evans Mali-Hohl Down-
town Greenville Assoc
Info. 752-3456.
FLEA MKT: Greenville
Collectors Club 8th
Annual Antique Flea
MktSat. Sept.
FOR SALE: TSyota
Corolla 1979. New tires,
new battery, very good
condition. Asking $2500.
756-7873 6-8 p.m. or
room N-305 Science.
pereond�
EMPLOYMENT: Oppor-
tunity. Hargetts Drug
Store will be accepting
applications for employ-
ment on Thurs. Sept. 6.
Flexible hours!
TYPING SERVICE: Call
Cynthia any time after
5 p.m. at 758-4693IBM
typing and low rates.
WANTED: A mature,
responsible roommate to
share 3 bedroom atp in
Winterville. Rent rea-
sonable. Prefer seniors
or grad student. Phone
756-8091 or 756-7022
(between 3 & 11).
NEED: A roommate and
some furniture; Call
Brian 752-3343.
FOR RENT: 12 k 65
iiiobih home, 2 bed-
t.MMn I 150.00 mnth.
50.0'l deposit. Call
52-617
BABYSITTER: Faculty
member needs mature
reliable babysitter for 5
year old for some eve-
nings during the week,
weekends and occas-
sional business trips.
Mut have own trans-
portation. Call 752-0578
after 5.
LOST: 1979 Men's ECU
class ring. Fire blue
stoneinitia!s WPH.
Reward offered. Call
Phil at 758-5375.
Policy explained for column
By RICKI GLIARMIS
The Greek Forum
will take on a new
identity this year. In-
stead of a column each
week, a story will
appear in its place.
Along with the main
story of the week will
be listed upcoming
events for sororities and
fraternities.
Instead of "Greek
Foium keep an eye
out for "Greek News
In order to make
thi work, full cooper-
ation is needed from
eu� h house on campus.
W if 11 nish coming up, a
lot I icvvs will need to
be .tied.
�rii i us begins
Sm ept. at 6
I Riishees should
it i to Mendenhall
, ving lot where they
be driven to the
Milt houses for
tin - heduleu parties.
Informal parties will
be held on Sun. and
Mon. Open house will
be held on Tues Sept.
11. On wed sept. 12,
sororities and rushees
will have a rest and
start back on thurs.
with skit nights. On
F Sept. 14, Pref
nights will be held all
over campus.
'Student
Life
Celebrates9
has been
postponed until
Wed. Sept. 12
HI-WAY 264
PLAYHOUSE
6 MILES WEST
OF GREENVILLE
ON 264 WEST
DOUBLE
FEATURE
3-D WITH
JOHN HOLMES
WIDCSCftCCM
3-DIMEMS10N
jM
LOLLIPOP
ThsyYcLtekin'Oood!
.JOHN'JohnnyWldd'NOLI
IN k
COL
; m
Rush registration
ends Thurs. so hurry
and sign up. Rush is a
good experience for
girls interested in
pledging a sorority or
for those who simply
want to meet new
people and see new
faces.
Greek Forum wh'I be
printed in each Tues.
edition of the EAST
CAROLINIAN. In order
. to meet deadlines, art-
icles from various
houses should be placed
in the Sigma Sigma
Sigma box in Dean
Fulghum's office, on
second floor, Whichard
Bldg.
Articles must be in
by 9 a.m. on Mon. or
they will not be printed.
Articles are not to be
turned in at the EAST
CAROLINIAN office, nor
are they to be turned in
to the Sigma house. If
they do not appear in
the box, they will not
be printed.
All articles should be
typed. If this is not
possible, they should be
neatly printed. When
names appear, please
print them clearly. Dur-
ing rush, sororities and
fraternities will be re-
Leather Belts
$6 to $19
Leather Handbags
$10 to $25 1
�Shoes Repaired To Look
Like New
Riggon Shoe Repair
ft Leather Shop
111 WEST 4TH ST.
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
7564204
Parking in Front
and Rear.
ceiving many pledges. It
will be impossible to
print each pledge's
name in Greek News.
However, you may send
in the number of
pledges you received.
Any type of news
that your house is
participating in is good
news: fund-raising, ser-
vice projects (campus or
community), house re-
modeling, out-of-town
socials, pledge projects,
or dinners.
Don't forget to send
announcements in by 9;
a.m Mon. mornings,
in Whichard in the'
Sigma Sigma Sigma
box. Let's show campus
what we can do!
, by Nature's Way
specializing in
natural hair cuts for men & women
The Complete Redken Salon
APPOINTMENTS ONLY 758-7841
Downtown Mall Greenville, N.C.
Where the Loft was located.
The East Carolina University
Panhellenic Association
Cordially invites you to
participate in
SORORITY RUSH!
Convocation:
(if going through rush,
attendence required)
September 6, 7 p.m.
Wright Auditorium
Rush Week: September 9�14
AKA Rush: September 19
7:30 Mendenhall
HOPING TO SEE YOU SOON!
STARMNO JOHN
SE1ENA HOtMIS
usuil
Some
than
a suim i
FEES
rooms
from $476
Tuition and
ECU install
will remain
costs for m
risen from $62
The cost f
win ne use
utilities, hall
administrat
study pr
and various
penst -
The effei
increase on
dents has arj
ding to one s
facts weren't
to her. but
in� what waj
Pe
in
Start th�
right by me
tians and lei
About )uur
with Christ.
the First C
sade for Ch
ing this Tl
7:00-9:G0p.m.
ter B-102.
there!
13 M
The I
Society will
o. ganizationj
Wednesday.
at 7:30 p.mj
221 of M
Anyone intj
law school
legal profess
come. Great
are being
please come

al
Bn
clothii
In





forget to send
lents in by 9;
mornings,
iard in the
ima Sigma
how campus
i do!
Way
vomen
Ion
�, p.
r�- ,
Ex Miss N.C. unhappy
Some students enjoyed the torrent rains more
than others. These students decided U was Ume for
a swim (Photo by Pete Podeszwa)
FEES
cont.from page 1
rooms has also gone up
from $476 to $522.
Tuition and fees for
ECU's instate, students
will remain the same
costs for meals have'
risen from $625 to $675. '
The cost for dorm '
will De usea io pay
utilities, hall advisors,
administrators, work
study program students
and various other ex-
penses.
The effect of the
increase on ECU stu-
dents has varied. Accor-
ding to one student, the
facts weren't very clear
to her, but upon hear-
ing what was involved
replied, "I thought
everything was going to
go up and it made me
think twice about com-
ing back to school, but
now 1 don't htink its
wrogn because of food
prices and everything
going up
Further cost increas-
es have not yet been
decided; however, any
additional raises will be
made in view of addi-
tional expenses of the
schools, changes in the
economy, and the norm
of what each college
student and their family
can reasonably handle.
RALEIGH, NC (AP)-
Debbie Shook, who was
stripped of her crown
as Miss North Carolina
following a dispute with
several Jaycee organiz-
ations, will file suit
today seeking restora-
tion of her title and
more than $85,000 in
damages, her attorney
said Tuesday.
The suit will be filed
in Wake Superior Court
and will nMKZ
three state Jaycee or-
ganizations: the Winston
-Salem Jaycees, the
Raleigh Jaycees and the
North CArolina Jaycees,
according to attorney
William Potter Jr.
Two business man-
agers who were ap-
pointed by the Jaycees
for Miss Shook during
her reign, Ray Snider of
Winston-Salem and Judy
Cross of Elizabethtown,
are also named in the
suit, her lawyer said.
Miss Shok, who is
from Spruce Pine, was
crowned iMisp North
Carolina last year when
the pageant was run by
the Winston-Salem Jay-
cees. She was stripped
of her crown one day
before she wa� to crown
a new Miss North
Carolina in May at the
state pageant, this year
run by the Raleigh
Jaycees.
Jaycee officials de-
posed Miss Shook after
she complained to
newspaper reporters
that she had not re-
ceived all the prizes
promised hfr when she
won the title
The suit seeks $75
000 in damages for
Miss Shook's "wrongful
dismissal Potter said,
as well as $7,000 to
$10,000 in full prizes,
including a $5,000
wardrobe which was
promised but never re-
ceived.
In addition, the suit
seeks approximately
$5,000 for "wrongful
handling of financial
transactions" on behalf
of Miss Shook during
her reign, Potter said.
The suit asks the
court to order that Miss
Shook's 'title be re-
stored, returning her to
full status as a former
Miss North Carolina, he
said.
PART
TIME
JOB
.ooking for a part-time
job with flexible hours
ind real business
ixperience? Northwes
kiutuai Life Ins. Co
las openings for college
igents. Call before noon
for appointments!
752-4080
September 1979 THE EAST CAROLINA AN Page 3
SOUTH SEAS
PET SHOP
GREENVILLE SQUARE
Your compute Pet
Supply Headquarters.
Ray any Bowl and get
Goldfish FREE.
offer good while
supply lasts
Mon-Fri. 12-9 Sat. 11-6
Elections soon
By JANE BIDD'X
Staff Writer
"Student govern-
ment elections will be
held Sept. 26 for all
class officers and legis-
lators for both day
students and dorm stu-
dents according to
Elections Committee
Chairperson Tim Mertz.
Mertz also stated that
the filing dates are
from Thurs Aug. 6 to
Tues Aug. 18 at 5
p.m.
Mertz was appointed
chairperson last week
by the summer Legis-
lature his freshman year
on the Rules and Judi-
ciary Committee and on
a special committee 1&
rewrite election rules.
As a third year
student, Mertz has been
inactive in SGA for the
past year and is not
Pec)lefplacesfar(i.
ciu�cicle
Start the year off
right by meeting Chris-
tians and learning more
about your relationship
with Christ. Come to
the First Campus Cru-
sade for Christ gather-
ing this Thursday at
7:00-9:00p.m. in Brews-
ter B-102. See you
there!
law �ccietT
The ECU Law
Society will have an
organizational meeting
Wednesday, Sept. 12th
at 7:30 p.m. in room
221 of Mendenhall.
Anyone interested in
law school andor the
'legal profession is wel-
come. Great new things
are being planned, so
please come!
nJ skills
A new program for
Increasing Learning Effi-
ciency will be offered
by Dr. George Weigand
beginning September 5,
1979. There will be two
groups. One will meet
on Monday and Wed-
nesday at 1:00 p.m. and
the other group will
meet on Tuesday and
Thursday at 1:00 p.m.
in Room 305 Wright
Annex. The class is
available to all students.
Attendance is voluntary-
no formal registration is
required.
legislature
North Carolina Stu-
dent Legislature meets
Wed Sept. 12, 1979.
The meeting will be
held at 7:30 p.m. at
Mendenhall Student
Center, room 248. Inter-
ested students are en-
couraged to attend. For
information concerning
NCSL contact Chair-
person Anne Northing-
ton -758-6358 or Vice
Chairperson Larry
Zicherman-756-4004.
ccrceit
The ECU Student
Union Special Attrac-
tions Committee will
present Gene Cotten in
concert Sept. 25, at 8
p.m. in Wright Aud.
Tickets are $1.50 for
students and $3.00 for
the public.
eaieeit
A series of work-
shops will be conducted
by the Career Planning
& Placement Center in
the areas of interview-
ing techniques and the
preparation of the re-
sume. "Interviewing
Techniques" will be
held each Tuesday in
September beginning
September 11. "Resume
Preparation" will be
covered each Thursday
in September beginning
September 13. There
will be two sessions
each day-one at 2:00
p.m. and another at
4:00 p.m. in Rawl 130.
Every senior is invited
to attend.
Because your life should
always have a casual side
nnd clothes to match.
Brody's is more than just a
clothing store, it's a way of life.
Where else can you
find everything
you need to dress
for your casual
lifestyle and at
prices to make you
smile.
For women, there are dresses.
Skirts. Blouses. Shorts. Pants.
Jeans. Everything
for easy living.
we've got
traditional chinos.
Fashion jeans. Oxford
cloth shirts. Cotton
knit tops. Gym shorts.
And more.
And Brody's
has shoes too
from loafers to
running shoes.
High heels to clogs. Not to
mention women's accessories
galore.
r So come in and make
Brody's a part of your life.
Downtown, Pitt Plaza
planning to run foi a
position in this election,
thus fulfilling the non-
partisan requirement for
the elections chairper-
son. SGA Secretary
Lynn Calder has also
been appointed to serve
on the committee as a
representative from
SGA.
This year more ad-
vertising is planned in
hopes of increasing
( turn out to a
p ble 30 per cent,
i rl - said, and added
thatwae hopes students
will get out and vote
for the use of their
money.
"Rules will be
strictly enforced this
year and any violation
of not taking down
campaigning materials
will result in the candi-
date losing his or her
$10 registration, fee
Mertz stated.
Poll workers will be
provided by the March-
ing Pirates this fall.
The band plans to use
the proceeds to cover
expenses and needed
equipment.
Piling takes place in
the; SGA Office in
Mendenhall. For further
information contact Jim
Mertz at 757-6611 Ext.
214 or 758-3903 after 5
p.mi
WRQR $r A
FOOTBALLWEEKEND
WE'VE GOT
A WINNER
CONGRATULATIONS RANDY CATES
from
WRQRHALLOW
DIST.CO.
WE HOPE YOU ENJOY THE
ECUN.C. STATE
game
GO PIRATES!
Thanks for listening to WRQR
WESTERN
SIZZLIN
STEAKHOtTSE
SPECIAL
No. 16 8oz. Ribeye $3.39 with ECU D Includes
Baked Potato with margarine,
Offer Good Thru Sun. Sept 9
SPECIAL
No. 1 8oz. Sirloin $1.00 OFF with ECU D
Includes Idaho King Baked Potato with margarine,
V
Texas Toast
Offer good Moo. Sept 10- Wed. Sept 12





The Kast laroli
Editorials
& Opinions
Thursday, September 6, 1979 Page 4 Greenville, N.C
The K
ft.
Johnny can H read
The American system of public
education is clearly in trouble, as is
readily seen by professors who teach
incoming freshmen here at ECU.
According to a report in the U.S.
News and World Report, there is a
widespread dissatisfaction with school
systems in both the primary and
secondary levels. Parents are begin-
ning to demand rapid improvements,
including chages in tests and text-
books, as well as more discipline to
counteract behavioral difficulties both
in and out of the classroom. As we
see almost anytime we pick up the
newspaper or watch the nightly news,
violence and vandalism are occurring
with alarming rapidity throughout the
nation's public school systems.
Students in the public schools are
faced with a dilemma-often, the
learning atmosphere is nonexistent,
and often, they are being taught
courses which have little to do with,
survival skills they will need in the
world outside.
Another problem which is surfacing
in the school systems is a lack of
money. Budgets have skyrocketed to
132 percent, while at the same time,
pupil enrollment has declined by 9
percent. The resluts of these increases
in educational costs have pushed the
average per pupil cost from $816 in
1969-70 to a projected $2,070 in
1979-80, which is an increase of 154
percent.
Teachers, too, are feeling the
pinch. Many professional teachers are
experiencing what is being called
"teacher burnout and they are
leaving their jobs as a result of it.
Increases in violence, threats, and
vandalism are cited as leading causes
for teachers to search for other ways
of earning a living.
One of the more disheartening
factors is that it is the students who
will be hurt the most by the current
problems in American schools. Test
scores on nationwide tests used to
determine college entrance are down
by 11 percent, and some high school
textbook publishers are gearing their
texts down to a sixth-grade compre-
hension level. In fact, the U.S. News
and World Report estimates that 13
percent of all high school graduates
are functionally illiterate.
Also, United Press International
reports that a survey of parents are
worried about drugs in the schools,
discipline, poor educational standards
and the search for good teachers. For
the first time as well, according to
the UPl, teachers strikes were listed
as an impediment to quality educa-
tion.
Parents also have their problems.
Often, they do not know the cost per
student (which is contributed by
government for educational purposes),
and only one third knew the local
school superintendants name.
Solution to these complex problems
will be as complex as the problems
themselves-however, some progress is
being made. As of July, higher scores
on the national Teachers Examination
are being required, and a new
program called "Quality Assurance for
Professional Personnel" program is
being started.
The new program is intended to
do two things; first, it will screen
new teacher training applicants, so
that people who lack subject know-
ledge don't waste their time learning
to teach what they don't know, and
improve the design of education
curricula for those who will benefit
from training. It is yet to be seen
whether school systems will cooperate
with these new efforts.
Whether or not the educational
community can clean up the mess
that is now public education is yet to
be seen. The blame is hard to
pinpoint, and the problem is even
harder than that to solve.
One thing is for certain, however.
It is not the job of college instructors
to scream at students "for being
ignorant, when they haven't had a
chance at a quality education before
they get here. The problem is back
there, back at Hometown High, and
until you can solve that, or at least
make an effort here to make up for
lost time, there will still be Johnny s
who can't read
"EIGHT O'CLOCK CLfSS�S MlTHOvr tEPK&CrJTATIG
IS TY�Wy '
American Journal
Pro-nukes fight back
Business mirror
Standard of living decreases
By JOHN CUNNIFF
AP Business Analyst
NEW YORK (AP) - A
remarkable test of wills,
like that in a poker
game, is taking place
between lenders and
borrowers.
So far, neither one
is revealing many signs
uf weakness, even
though the stress has
been building relentles-
sly. Lenders keep rais-
ing their rates. Bor-
rowers keep paying the
rales and asking for
mote.
Aren't higher inter-
est rales supposed to
discourage borrowing?
That's what the books
� say, but it hasn't been
working out that way.
In fact, as borrowing
continues you can hear
ihc critics grousing that
the Federal Reserve has
it ail wrong thai
ufcuplc and companies
ar�: , borrowing because
ihry have to, not be-
i-a�s�r they have to, nol
ft- iu-� 'hey want to.
There's .a difference,
they say. If borrowing
were a matter of choice,
they say, then raising
interest rates might in-
deed discouraging such
choices. When it's
needed people will bor-
row at any rate.
Thy add that so
long as the country has
13 percent inflation the
Federal Reserve's 10.5
percent discount rate
and the banks' 12.25
percent prime lending
rate are poor deterants
to borrowing.
In fact, this school
of thought observes, it
can even pay to borrow.
In many instances, 13
percent inflation effect-
ively cancels out bor-
rowing costs.
The issue is indeed
a confusing one, and
even today, 50 years
after the beginning of
the Great Depression,
"experts" still argue
about whether the cor-
rect monetary policy
was pursued during the
The traditional view
is that loose money en-
courages economic ac-
tivity and that tight
money restricts it. But,
as some enconomists
say, these arenot tra-
ditional times.
The ingredient not
fully understodd, they
assert, is the brand of
inflation. Some maintain
we shouldn't even use
the inflation label to
describe some of to-
day's rising prices. It's
misleading, they say.
Simplified, the argu-
ment is: Many of to-
day's high prices result
not from increased de-
mand or because of a
shortage in the pro-
ductive capacity of the
country. People are go-
ing our and buying, and
industry is not straining
at the limits of its
capacity to produce.
What is happening,
it is argued is that the
standard of living is
recalling decreasing. Ra-
ther than surrounding
themselves with goods
and services, people are
being denied them.
And why are they
being denied since so
much income is going
into maintaining living
standards, which- have
become enourmously
more costly because of
the sudden rise in the
price of imported ener-
gy?
Whatever, Federal
Reserve policy seems
aimed at reducing de-
mand by raising interest
rates, and it has con-
siderable support among
economists and business
people. They see it as
the only corrective.
When high interest
rats have forced the
economy to slow, they
say, the aberrations will
disappear.
It may work out that
way, but .with some of
the "experts" still ar-
guing over whether the
United States pursued
the proper money poli-
cies 50 years ago, you
never can, be sure.
When 8,000 pro-
nuclear demonstrators
massed in Rocky Flats,
Colorado at the nuclear
weapons processing
plant there, the bus-
iness executives who
direct the nuclear in-
dustry were pleased but
hardly surprised. They
had helped plan and
finance the demonstra-
tion, held on the site of
earlier rallies against
nuclear power
THe 1970s have
been, in some ways,
quiet after the tumult of
the 1960s, but they
have never been quiet
enough for corporate
higher-ups. Spooked by
the growing strength of
the anti-nuke movement,
and worried about the
long-term effects of pol-
itical reform, the cor-
porations have taken the
offensive.
Their game plan in-
cludes an aggressive
public relations war on
the anti-nuke forces,
surreptitious research,
and a long-term study
of ways to blunt and
absorb social activism.
The public relations
effort was quietly
launched in late spring
by a group of manu-
facturing firms and util-
ities that do business in
the nuclear field. THeir
objective: to offset the
enormous negative pub-
licity of Three Mile
Island. A memo dated
May 1979 from the
giant Bechtel Power
Corp. of San Francisco
to colleagues in the
nuclear industry outlined
highlights of the nation-
wide campaign: A
26-minute film boosting
the glories of nuclear
power, designed to be
shown to the "press
and to specialized
groups Briefings for
industrial leaders, "edi-
torial roundtables" and
a "seminar (on) today's
social problems A
major fund-raising ef-
fort, spearheaded by
Middle South Utilities of
New Orleans and Kan-
sas Power & Light Co.
College campus pro-
grams conducted by
Edison Electric Institute,
an industry public relat-
ions and lobbying arm.
A persuasive program
for senior citizens,
headed by the Westing-
house Corp. A "scien-
tist's program direct-
ed by the Atomic In-
dustrial Forum, another
PR and lobbying organ-
ization. A stable of
pro-nuke speakers.
The most desirable
spokespeople, according
to the Bechtel memo,
are university scientists,
followed by "the young
engineer" and, interest-
ingly, the Nuclear Reg-
ulatory Commission,
which supposedly keeps
an eye on the industry.
The alleged safety and
economy of nuclear
power are the themes
of the campaign, along
with assurances that
renewable sources of
energy, such as solar
power, are years away
from being practical.
The industry offen-
sive began soon after
the memo was circu-
lated. Anti-nuke demon-
strators outside the Liv-
ermore Radiation Lab in
California were given a
"Social Ecology Survey"
questionaire to fill out.
The survey, addressed
to "Fellow Conversion
Project Dernonstrators
was designed to pin-
point attitudes of anti-
nuke activists. Unknown
to the demonstrators, it
was commissioned by
the Edison Electric In-
stitute.
The Rocky Flats
pronuke demonstration
was another part of the
nuclear industry's new-
offensive. The rally was
financed in part by
Rockwell International,
operators of the plant,
and was co-sponsored
by a United Steel-
workers union local. The
featured speaker, a
former U.S. labor sec-
retary, scored points
with workers by exhort-
ing the crowd not to let
"the kooks take your
jobs awav from you
While one branch of
American business
swings into action to
stop the anti-nuke
movement, other leading
corporations are spend-
ing big bucks to find
out how they can a-
bsorb reform movements
into the power structure
with a minimum of
fuss. To do this, they
must first find out what
makes anti-establishment
activists tick. The cor-
porations have hired
Arnold Mitchell of SRI
International, a high-
powered California think
tank, to tell them.
Mitchell is a re-
searcher who com-
manded rapt attention
two years ago by de-
scribing how the back-
to-fhe-basios, "voluntary
simplicity" trend could
be made to work for
American mega-corpora-
tions. This time around,
Mitchell has constructed
a psychological profile
of an inner-directed,
idealistic, conserv-
ation-minded person
that he thinks will fuse
populist ideals and
traditional business
practices in the years
ahead. This "practical
dreamer Mitchell
says, is the business
and government leader
of the future.
Young actii-t in
the anti-nuclear. con-
sumer, and small-is-be-
autiful movement- are
the tpes of practical
dreamers Mitchell has
in mind. I ritil thi new
breed of social critic?
are steered into elite
government and busi-
ness circles �where they
will presumably be iso-
lated and made power-
less�the U.S. faces
years of social unrest,
'Mitchell warns.
Arnold Mitchell's
�;lients are not enthusi-
astic patron? oi social
change. Shell Oil, Time.
Inc Xerox. Polaroid,
Mercedes Benz and Levi
Straus? are footing the
bill tor hi? continuing
?tudy.
Are the 1970s really
a quiet decade? That's
the pupular notion, but
the behind-the-scenes
action? of America"?
most powerful corpor-
ation? show they don't
believe it.
DAVID ARMSTRONG
Letters
Letter? to the editor
are welcome, however,
thev must contain the
name, address, and ID.
number. No letter? will
be printed if the) are
not signed in ink by the
person writing the
letter.
Letters must be re-
ceived by noon, Mon-
days and Wednesdays,
at the newspaper office
on the second floor ot
the Publications Build-
ing, which is directly
across from Joyner Lib-
rary .
Letters will be edited
for brevity, libel or
i obscenity.
The East Carolinian
Managing Editor
Steve Bachner
Editor Marc Barnes
Director of Advertising
Robert M. Swaim
Production Manager
Anita Lancaster
News Editor
Asst. News Editor
Features Editor
Asst. Features Editor
Karen Wendt
Lisa Drew
Bill Jones
Richard Green
Asst. Director of Advertising Terry Herndon
THE EAST CAROLINIAN is the student newspaper
of Eat Carolina University sponsored by the Media
Board of ECU and is distributed each Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic year (weekly during
the summer).
Editorial opinions are those of the Editorial Board
and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the
university or the Media Board.
Sports Editor Charles Chandler
Asst. Sports Editor Jimmy DuPree
Copy Editor Barry Clayton
Asst. to the Editor Leigh Coakley
Ad Tech Super Paul Linke
Offices ere located on the second floor of the
Publications Center (Old South Building). Our
mailing address is: Old SOuth Building, ECU,
Greenville, NC 27834.
The phone numbers are: 757-638, 8387, 8308
Subscriptions are 810 annually, alumni 86 annually,
t
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hv Kasl r.iirolinian
k
ers
dler
lee
I
�he
Uf
iCU
p09
laily
sports
Thursday, September 6, 1979 Page 5 GreenWHe, N.C,
Kickoffset for 7p.m
Pirates invade Wolfs den Saturday
Pirate split end Yern Davenport
(Photo b John H. (.r'an
IU CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
"This i- probably, the strongest, most physical
team thai we've every played since I've been at
East Carolina
This was the assesmenl of the North Carolina
Mat. football team by Pirate head coach Pat Dye at
hi- Wednesda) afternoon press conference as he
looked ahead at his team's 7 p.m. Saturday
encounter vith the W olfpack.
'I don't know what to expect in the game he
continued. "They're so big and strong that 1 don't
knew even it we played out best it we could win
But Dye did say that he felt the Pirate chances
would he fairl) good d they could avoid a repeal of
the mistakes that lead to the Pack's 29-13 victory
last season.
"It we don'l give them anything easy, we can
make a contest out of it said Dye, obviously
remembering the -even turnover- that plagued his
team against State a year ago.
"1 was encouraged by the tan) that we did not
have a single turnover last week against Western
Carolina he -aid "And this happened with us
using a lot ot reserves, including three different
quarterbacks.
One thing that doe- bother Dye about la-t
week game is the 110 yards in penalties that were
assists against the Pirate "You can't have that sort
ot thing against a good football team. Dye -aid.
" il North Carolina State may just be a great
football team by the end of the year. They may be
now. e just don't know v et.
Due thing that must lie pleasing to Dye i- the
fact thai, unlike la-t season, the Pirates go into the
State game relatively health).
Last vear both ECU halfbacks, Anthony Collins and
Eddie link- (now a New York Giant), were forced
to -it out the entire game with injuries.
In addition, -tarting tight end Joe Codette was
hurt on the very first -eries of down- and did not
play tile rest of the game. A big blow came at the
end of the first half when beamier Green was
sandwiched b) a pair of Wolfpack linemen and was
forced to -it out most of the second halt.
"We were certainly forced to play handicapped
Dve later -aid.
Hut no excuses came from Dye tor the loss.
"N.C. State played an excellent football game and
we didn't he -aid.
So it revenge tune come Saturday, right
"1 know our team feels we didn't plaj well la-t
vear noted Dve. "We would definitely like to
make a better showing of ourselves this tune, I
hope the game i- no runaway. It shouldn't be it we
( an avoid the turnov ers.
The team attitude toward- the game seems to
he one ol great anxietv av- Dye. 'The) are
definitely, looking forward to playing the game he
-aid. "That i- encouraging
Encouraging also must be La-t Carolina 31-6
thrashing ot Western Carolina la-t week that -aw
the Pirate offense ama 51V yards total offense.
Leading the way for the offense against the
Catamount- was fullback Theodore Sutton wh
112-vard, two touchdown performance gave him two
irreat game- in a row. dating hack to la-t seasons
Independence Bowl.
"Theodore is about to become a great plaver.
said Dye. "He been a good player ever since he's
been here and is ju-t now crossing the tine line
that separates the good from the great.
.
�MJI
vwwwwiKwwr, wm s-
M a n euvering Mike H a h k i n
(Pi
Publicized A-A Richter
ready to live up to laurels
H - nter ol attention.
. ni Richter, the N.C. Mate All-America
H - praises have come from all over
,untrv during pre-season. Richter has received
publicity and praise, in tact, that it will be
i live up to hi billing.
But the 6-3, 245-pound senior recently received
ne unusual praise from sports editor Bill Brill of
. Roanok Tirrn s.
"Few piaver- m recent collegiate football history
. �, are as good at their positions a- their
' wrote Brill in a recent story. "But it you
believe the pro scouts, Richter is even better than
thev -av he 1
"The besl tributes to Richter have been paid
byother ACC coaches, who refer to their own
ters a- 'the second best in the league They do
not have to mention number 1.
On coach outside of the ACC whose team must
face Richter and the Wolfpack this Saturday night
aj spoken highly of the Hinckley, Ohio native.
' honestly think that State may have m Richter
the best offensive center that ever lined up to
pla a college football game -an! Ea-t Carolina
; i man Pat Dye.
"He's a better center than Ted Brown a runner.
Some thing- he can do are inhuman
flu- i- high praise from even a "nice guy like
Pat Dve. But Dve logic i- evident a- Richter s list
honors is long and ever-growing.
j, wa- named a first team -election on la-t
season's Associated Pro- and American Football
aches Association (Kodak) All-America teams. He
a unanimous cho.ee by everyone to repeat again
thi- season.
Richter 1- a very legitimate candidate tor the
(Jutland Trophy, an' award given annually to the
nation best lineman. There has also been some
buildup b) Mate people mentioning him as a
Heisman Trophy candidate.
All tin- along with hi- size and speed (he runs
a u fljvard dash), make Richter a big pro
prospect � tact, most scouts -ay he is a "can't
miss" prospect.
The amazing thing about Richter is that he gets
x this attention as an offensive lineman, an area
that i- almost always overshadowed by quarterbacks,
running backs and receivers
But Richter is so good that his play is noticeable
t0 even the worst backfield-oriented fan It is not
uncommon to hear fans or member- ol the press
yell, "Boy, what a block. I cant believe it. Its
Tut, believe U, J K.chter is very real; and
verv much a threat to the East Carolina defensive
h�e come Saturday night at 7 p.m.
With Hurricane David speculated to be heading
( ree, Ic's way all week, Pirate tans have been
Grccnviiie 7 grassy bank
! tg the south end zone of Carter Stad.um this
h v ma also find themsleves taking cover
?alU anotherhurncane That's Nathan "Hurri-
�� Bitter as the Wolfpack kicker has become
cane ruuci, a
known around Raleigh.
Pi ite fans may remember that it was Ri ter
br the most part, did East Carolina in last
J w.tb his five field goal, 17-point perlormance
Tom Wolfpack's 29-13 defeat of the Pirates last
reason.
Strength, speed, experience
characterize Wolfpack squad
N .C. State's Bubba Green
By jiMn Dl PREE
tsst. Sports Editor
Victor) was sweel as the Pirate- conquered
Western Carolina University Saturday in the season
opener at r icklen Stadium.
But while ECl was notching it- premier victory,
the Wolfpack ui N.C. Slate wa plotting to end the
Bucs quest tor the unofficial .North Carolina State
chain pn ui-hip.
The Wolfpack return- a host of players
offensively and defensively, the big question mark
in the State camp is who will, replace Ted Brown?
hile maintaining strong contention for the
coveted Heisman Trophy until -lowed by injuries,
Brown firmly estblished himself in the annals ol
NCSl -tar- as the schools all-time leading rusher.
Though not certain who the back to replace
Brown will be, as defensive head coach Frank Orgel
States "Thev have a -table full of back
Apparently the leading candidate tor the -lot 1-
junior Dwight Sullivan, who wa- hampered la-t
season with a hamstring pull and an elbow
infection.
Senior S-ott Smith return- at quarterback to
direct the veteran tilled veer offense. Billy Rav
Vickers, the leading returning ground gainer from
last season's Tangerine Bowl champions, round- out
the Pack backfield.
The strong force m the State offense remains
their powerful line.
All-America center Jim Richer open- his final
season in the red and white with preseason honors
1 omine Inmi all directions.
t. tards Chuck Stone and I
- - Chris Koehne an I
form me of the most devastating
W eiver Lee Juki 5 and
Dawson round out the starting -
- - king gam
ker N RiU
team- leading scorer in 1978. Ritter
number on East CArolina la-t vear
amassed IT point- m the Pack 29-13 v
Defensively, the Wolfpack again seems I
weakness
Massive Bubba Gree and Brian O'D
currentlv battle tor the one -tartn.
- non Gupton. Senior middle g
round- out the front line.
Replacing departed inside linebackers B
and Kvle Wescoe will be sophom R I
Abraham and Dann Lute.
Outside linebacker- David Horning and
Hannah add to what may be one
devastating defenses in the nation.
"Thev're certainly the largest team w.
faced in quite a while said Orgel. "C a h R
-av- he really can't find a weakness
and we really can't find one either
Head coach Pat Dye looks forward
meeting, but -tates cautiously, C. Si
mi pares with any team we've ever
probably the strongest physical footl 1 am w
ever played.
Collins, ankle, ready for N.C. State
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Spurts Editor
"I felt useless
Sound- bad, huh? It was.
The date was Saturday. Sept. 9, 1978 and the
place was Raleigh. Carter Stadium in Raleigh. The
East Carolina Pirate- were about to face the N.C.
Stale Wolfpack in what was a football game of
major importance to two teams that would
eventually play in post-season bowl games.
Absent from the Pirate lineup was Anthony
Collins, a 5-11 sophomore halfback that would
eventually be his team's second leading rusher as
he amassed 179 yards and averaged 5.8 yards per
carry.
The Pirate- went on to lose that game 29-13 in
what was a humiliating defeat for the team and a
humiliating experience for Collins. . -
"There tva. nothing I could do said Collins,
who was badlj hampered by an ankle injury at the
time. "1 kept'feeling like 1 was getting in the way
on the sidelines. I knew that I belonged on the
field but that just wasn't possible
So Anthony Collins is definitely looking forward
to this Saturday's game with the Wolfpack. "I have
two games work to do he said.
"My goal and the team's goal is to go 11-0
said Collins, "and we've got to win this one if that
is to happen
Though the Wolfpack are clear-cut favorites for
Saturday night's game and are, likewise, clear-cut
favorites to win the 1979 Atlantic Coast Conference
Championship, Collins feels the Pirtates do have one
advantage.
That being that the Pirates have one game
under their bell, a 31-6 defeat of Western Carolina,
and the Wolfpack do not. "1 don't care who you
are, you're going to be a little nervou that firsl
game; a lot more so than usual he said.
Aside from his health, there is a lot ot
difference in Anthony Collins now as compared to a
vear ago when he'was forced to miss the State
game.
"Anthony is a much more complete player,
said East Caroline coach Pat Dye. "Last year he
was not a very good blocker, but he has overcome
that and now does a great job
"1 worked a lot on my blocking last season,
said the man his teammates call simply "A.C
never was asked to block in high school. So 1 guess
that's why it's taken me three years to master the
technique
Though it mav have taken him a vvh.le to learn
to block, Collins has always been an excellent
runner.
"He showed us a great deal from the very first
dav that he came to practice Dye said. "He is
and always has been, an excellent runner both
inside and outside
Could "A.C gain 1,000 yards this season He
definitely has that potential said Dye. "I will say
that he "will get the ball more this season than last.
We've worked that into out offense
How does the Penn Yan, N.Y native feel about
the thousand? "That's every back's goal of
course he said. "1 feel that both 1 and Toad
(fullback Theodore Sutton) have a chance. If one of
us could do it, 1 feel that the rest of our offense
would benefit
Collins looked back at last season at the stage
and saw a number of things he likes. "We have
more talent this season. We're probably a better
team now than we were last season at this time
There is no doubt that the Pirates are a better
team heading into the State game. With "A.C c
hand, the Wolfpack could be in big trouble.
��
ASKS:
�-��
A'ilp
A.C at full power
U'holo by John H. Grogan)





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iber 1979
6 September 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Pafl. 7
; �
c
0
Lott takes TMen over Conners
B WILL GRIMSLEY
P Special Correspondent
YORK (AP) � Old George Lott is d y
m .i but not overawed by the hardsockin g,
ipingi grunting, two-fisted racket swinging brerd
modem tennis players.
l Jimm) Connors used that two-handed stu,f
Bill niden, he'd lie lucky to get two games t
ih, venerable doubles star of the late 1920's
I uU 1930 s commented as he watched the
n-ar-old American championships unfold in the
j,ig, almost antispectic setting at the new
tilling Meadow complex.
Bill, who was a master tactician and could
a,i) hol in the book, would have, exploited the
, ! reach of the two-handed stroke and would
driven the kid crazy
H, now 72, who still teaches the game at the
md Park Racquet Club outside Chicago, came
liwn to watch Slew Hester's big show but
pally to promote the doubles tournament,
' he feels is being gradually downgraded.
bridged the gap between Tilden and the era
.u�nh Vines, F.ed Perry and Donald Budge
I siayed on to marvel at the exploits of Jack
.� Pancho Gonzales, Rod Laver and, more
. the games Big Three - Bjorn Borg, Jimmy
and John McEnroe.
M, js not one to insist that the present-day
iUners don't compare with the old-timers and
� when l.lden died they lost the mold. On the
he is bug-eyed over the tremendous
a�ccs made b) the game since it went open 11
- ago.
"h is foolish to compare men who played in
different periods of time he said, "but my feeling
is that the game today is far superior in the
second, third, fourth and lower plateaus. There are
manv more good players. At the very top, players
are no better and no worse than they were in the
old days
II somebody stuck a gun to his head and forced
him to pick a top plateau, the occupants, he said,
would be Tilden, Budge, Gonzales and Borg, in no
particular order. .
Kod Laver had the best record of anybody he
added, -winning the Grand Slam twice both as an
amateur and a professional, but I would have to put
him a notch below those I've named.
"Like Ellsworth Vines, Laver was unbeatable on
davs when he was on but he suffered too many
losses to lesser players. Borg because he s so
young and already winner of four Wimbledons at
age 23, could wind up with the best record of all.
"But 'i think potentially the best player in the
world today is this kid, McEnroe. If he ever gets
his head on straight and settles down, nobody
should beat him , ,
Lott who won five U.S. doubles titles with three
different partners and ranked No. 2 behind Vines in
1931 is a stickler for court decorum and believes
greatness is forged more in the mind than with
arms and legs. . ,
That the reason he has reservations about the
20-year-old McEnroe, who in two years has hit the
tennis scene like a bombshell.
"He has a natural instinct, quick feet, a delecate
touch he said. "He ahs all the stuff to be a great
()IU. like Tilden, Bulge and Gonzales - if he d only
learn patience and restraint.
"He is not as bad as Connors and he seems to
be getting better, but I wish all these surly,
racket-banging kids could learn that they only hurt
themselves when they go into such tantrums. It
breaks up concentrations
Lott said he vvas particularly disenchanted with
Connors.
"A couple of weeks ago in Indianappolis, I saw
him make an obscene gesture to the umpire, he
added "His mother was in the stands. It was
terrible
Lott said he tells all of his young pupils that
they should pattern their court temperament after
Borg or any of the Australians.
"You would think Borg was an Aussie the way
he remains cool, never changing expression whether
he's losing or winnrng Lott said. "It's a way of
life with Australians. Eve only seem one Australian
blow up - Bob Hewitt - and he mellowed when
lie go! older
The veteran teacher acknowledged that Tilden, in
his heyday, was not beyond court flareuos.
"Tilden was an actor Lott said "He even
played Dracula on the stage. He was a showman.
But he was never vicious or vulgar.
Bob Hope
Affair on the Matt' delayed Sg keep
Red Cross
By R1CK1 GUARMIS
Sports
Writer
he "Affair on the
which was sche-
for Wednesday,
5. has been post-
due to bad wea-
MalL
Sept.
x ned
ther.
The "celebration"
been rescheduled
Wednesday Sept. 12
m 3 p.m. until 7
p.m.
- veral deadlines are
proaching. Flag Foot-
A deadline is on Sept.
7 Co-Rec. Softball dead-
line is Sept. 13 and the
Tennis Singles Deadline
is Sept. 13.
Captain's meetings
for these three events
are Sept. 10 for Hag
football. This meeting
will be held at 4 p.m.
in Biologv 103
Tennis Singles cap-
tain's meeting will be
held on Sept. IT at 4
p.m. in Memorial 104.
Co-Rec Softball captain's
meeting is scheduled for
Sept. IT, at T p.m. in
Brewster B-102.
This weekend, sever-
al members of the ECU
Pepsi Physical Fitness
Club will travel to
Wilmington to take part
in a Triathlon. This
event will consist of
swimming, biking, and
running. Good luck to
participants from ECU.$
Football officials
clinics are being held
this week. The first
meeting was held Wed-
nesday. The next meet-
ing will be held on
Thursday, Sept. 6, from
7 p.m. until 9 p.m. in
Brewster C-103. Friday's
meeting, Sept. 7, is
scheduled for 3:30 p.m.
until 5 p.m. at IM Field
si.
Upcoming e n t r y
dates to keep an eye on
are One-on-One Basket-
ball on Sept. 10-20, and
Team Golf on Sept.
10-20.
Almost Anything
Goes, a popular event
on campus, has been
planned lor Oct. 3. The
entry date for .this
program is Sept. l-Oet.
1.
ready.
ABORTIONS UP TO 12TH
WEEK OF PREGNANCY
$175.00 "ail inclusive"
pregnancy lest birth control and
problem pregnancy counseling For
further information call 832-0535 (toll-
free number 800-221-2568) between
9 A M 5 P M weekdays
Raleigh Women's Health
Organization
917 West Morgan St.
Raleigh. NC 27603
SALE
LaCosta Shirts,
V-Necks, & Cardigan
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Warm Ups
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ALL US FOR ALL YOUR PARTY NEEDS Wl
HAVE DELIVERY & CATERING SERVICES
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WE SUPPORT THE PIRATES
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Copyright 1979
SN.
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0060635630
senville





Page 8 THE EAST Ci lOLINIAN 6 September 1979
The Fearless Football Forecast
CU AT N.C. STATE
SOUTHERN CAL. AT TEXAS TECH
PURDUE AT WISCONSIN
ALABAMA AT GEORGIA TECH
APPALACHIAN ST. AT WAKE FOREST
HOUSTON AT UCLA
SOUTHERN MISS. AT FLORIDA ST.
NORTH CAROLINA AT SOUTH CAROLINA
OHIO ST. AT SYRACUSE
STANFORD AT TULANE
WILLIAM AND MARY AT VMI
N- TEXAS ST. AT OKLAHOMA ST.
CHARLES CHANDLER
ECU 21-16
SOUTHERN CAL.
PURDUE
ALABAMA
WAKE FOREST
HOUSTON
FLORIDA ST.
NORTH CAROLINA
OHIO ST.
STANFORD
VMI
N. TEXAS ST.
JIMMY DUPREE
ECU 24-22
SOUTHERN CAL.
PURDUE
ALABAMA
APPALACHIAN ST.
UCLA
FLORIDA ST.
NORTH CAROLINA
OHIO ST.
STANFORD
WILLIAM AND MARY
N. TEXAS ST.
DAVID MAREADY
N.C. STATE 17-16
SOUTHERN CAL
PURDUE
ALABAMA
WAKE FOREST
UCLA
FLORIDA ST.
NORTH CAROLINA
OHIO ST.
STANFORD
VMI
OKLAHOMA ST.
TERRY HERN DON
ECU 27-24
SOUTHERN CAL
PURDUE
ALABAMA
WAKE FOREST
HOUSTON
FLORIDA ST.
NORTH CAROLINA
OHIO ST.
STANFORD
VMI
N. TEXAS ST.
Chip Alexander
Raleigh News and Observer
N.C. STATE 21-17
SOUTHERN CAL.
PURDUE
ALABAMA
WAKE FOREST
UCLA
FLORIDA ST.
NORTH CAROLINA
OHIO ST.
STANFORD
WILLIAM AND MARY
N. TEXAS ST.
The
ECU to hosth
Mayor's Cup tourney set
ROUGH GOING AT CARTER STADIUM: ECU quarterback Leander Green is
sandwiched between several N.C. State defensive linemen in last year's 29-13
n olfpack victory. The two teams meet again this Saturday.
Young Yaz following Dad
By DAVID MAREADY
Staff Writer
Saturday and Sunday, September 8th and 9th,
the East Carolina Pirate Soccer Team will host the
annual Mayor's Cup Soccer Tournament on Minges
Soccer Field.
The Pirates will face the tough Duke Blue Devils
at 1 p.m. on Saturday followed by a traditional
battle between N.C. State and the UNC Tarheels at
4 p.m.
Sunday's roundup will include a consolation
game at 1 p.m. for Saturday's losers and the
tournament championship match at 4.
"Our defensive players are
going to have to see a lot of action
in a hurrywe are very young
99
Brad Smith
NEW YORK AP-
az is � a familiar
word in big league
baseball. Get used to it.
It could be around for
the next 20 to 25 years.
Kidding? Not in the
least.
Another Carl Michael
astrzemski is being
readied to pick up the
glove and bat of the old
man when Yaz Sr Mr.
Indestructible ol the
Boston Red Sox, finally
decide- lie- had
enough�if ever.
Keen-eyed diamond
- 'lit- call Yaz Jr just
turned 18 and a fresh-
man at Florida State, a
natural.
"Sure, I'm pointing
lor a baseball career
the trim, handsome
youngster said while
lounging in the Red Sox
dugout prior to Mon-
day's game with the
New ork Yankees at
Yankee Stadium.
"Dad wants me to
get an education first.
I'll try to work my
baseball around my stu-
dies. 1 have been play-
ing in an independept
league this summer.
Yaz Jr. motored
down from Boston with
his father for the Yan-
kee series, hoping to
see his famous dad gei
his 3,000th hit. Earlier
this year, he had seen
the eider Yastrzemski
hit his 100th home run.
"1 think that's the
toughest-400 home
runs the kid said.
"Anybody can hit sin-
gles V astrzemski, a
Boston fixture for 19
year, needed only five
more hits of any des-
cription o join the
exclusive 400 homer-3
000 hit club.
"That will be some-
thing special the
youngster said proudly.
"Only Hank Aaron,
Stan Musial and Willie
Mays have done both.
Nobody in the American
League
Yaz Jr clean-cut
with an athlete's build,
�,aid his father stuck a
bat in his hand when
hi- was big enough to
toddle and he hasn't
been spittin' distance
for � "ar C'UD since.
"At first, he taught
me the do's and
don'ts the youngster
explained. "Now he
doesn't correct me too
much. We work out
together all winter
Th Yastrzemskis
live on Highland Beach
in Florida, not far from
Boca Baton. Mike�as
he prefers to be called
so there will be no
confusion with father
Carl � is the only boy.
He ha three sisters,
one older, two younger.
Mike specializes as a
third baseman-outfielder,
is a switch-hitter but a
natural lett-hander.
Scouts contend he has
all the ingredients of
potential greatness
� power, speed, excel-
lent arm and the inspi-
ration of a father des-
tined for the Hall of
Fame.
Although his father
attended Notre Dame
and got his degree from
Merrimac College,
young Mike chose
Florida State because of
its reputation for pro-
ducing good baseball
teams. While Yaz Jr.
could break into the
minors today, his father
insists on a college
education.
"It took me seven
years to get through
college, going one term
a year because ol base-
ball conflicts the elder
Yastrzemski said. "Mike
has to go three years
because he is on a
scholarship. He's a
bright boy, makes good
grades. I want him to
have all the options
It was obvious that
alternatives mean little
to the Yaz off-spring.
Third year Pirate coach Brad Smith considers the
Tar Heels to be the toughtest of the three Atlantic
Coast Conference teams. However, he feels the
chances are good for the Pirates.
"I am very confident with this team
commented Smith, "they are a good group of
players capable of winning any game they go into
this season. Whether they win or not will depend
on developing a team leader and the character of
the team as well as the skills
Smith will rely heavily on several returning
lettermen from last year's squad including the
team's only seniors, Phil Martin and Jeff Karpovich.
Both scored five goals last season and will be the
driving force behind a veteran offensive unit.
Several other lettermen will lend support to the
offense including sophomore, Brad Winchell, who
was named to the All Tournament team in the 1978
Mayor's Cup. As a freshman, Winchell led the
Pirates with nine goals and contributed four assists.
Defensively, the Pirates lack the maturity of the
offense, yet returning defenders including Stan Griff
and Dennis Elwell combined with a group of
promising new freshmen should produce a talented
backfield for the Pirates.
In addition to seniors, Karpovich and Martin,
there will be eight sophomores, six juniors and

ECU soccer action
thirteen freshmen on this year's squad. Most of the
freshmen will be on defense.
"Our defensive players are going to have to see
a lot of action in a hurry noted Smith, "We are
very young
The Soccer team has seen some early action
already this season in two scrimmages. In the First
scrimmage against the Goldsboro Soccer Club, the
Pirates easily won 7-0 with a second string team. In
the second, against the Pirate Alumni, they also
won bv a close 3-2 score.
Visit the Art Carved Representative
This Week
� Buy Now and Save on Selected
Traditional and Contemporary
Rings.
� See our Wide Variety of New
Styles.
Men's Contemporary
Women's Fashion
Date:
Place:
. . . symbolizing
your ability
to achieve
Sept. 10, 11, 12, 13, 14
Student Supply Store Lobb
Supplier for the 1980
United States Olympic Team
Student Supply Store
Deposit required. MasterCharge or Visa accepted.
F
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The East Carolinian
IN A
MARY
set
b Most of the
o have to see
th, "We are
earl) action
In the first
leer Club, the
tnng team. In
mi, thev also
CA805
features
Thursday. S�pfmb0r 6, 1979 PQ� 9 Qf-vlto. N.C,
Folk dance
club begins
By WILLIAM JONES
Features Editor
"If you can skip,
ou can folk dance
So says Dr. Peter
Fricke, a visiting assoc-
� iate professor with the
'� Sociology Dept. Dr.
; Fricke is from Louth, in
(Lincolnshire County, En-
�gland.
j He is one of three
t 'dance leaders' in the
! University Folk and
Country Dance Club.
�tThe other dance leaders
�tare Barbra Skelly
I (country dancing and
European folk) and
Greysolynne Fox (Balkan
and Mideast dance).
Also, Nelson Jarvis,
an ECU undergraduate
who plays with the
Bassett Mountain String
Band, instructs in
EjJ square dance. Douglas
Baker, of the Green
Grass Cloggers. teaches
clogging.
Dr. Fricke went to
sea in 1956. Throughout
his travels worldwide,
he has found folk
dancing to be a com-
mon denominator among
all peoples. Most port
cities hae folk dnacing
groups, which welcome
traveler- from other
countries, Fricke says.
Thus providing an in-
ternational community
which can help the
'foreigner' feel at home.
I
Dr. Fricke, along
with Ms. Skelly and
Ms. Fox, helped start
the Folk and Country
Dance Club last year.
ECU is the first univer-
sity in the US and
England which Dr.
Fricke has been to that
did not have a folk
dance club.
The University Folk
and Country Dance Club
is open to all members
of the university com-
munity. Folk dancing
experience is not neces-
sary.
The club will have a
business meeting Sept.
6, in Brewster D-109, at
7 p.m. It will meet on
Thurs. thereafter at the
same time and place.
A special event�
'Folk for AH will be
presented on Sept. 19.
It will feature dancing
demonstration partici-
pation and will be held
in Mendenhall Student
Center at 7 D.m.
Woodstock: Part II
By JAY STONE
Features Writer
Continued from Tue�Sept. 6
Woodstock
entertainment
Graham Nash and David Crosby were to among the
performers at Woodstock. (Photo by Henry Dmz)
Woodstock
recreation
Changing social mores were highly visible. Photo
by Lee Marshall)
Bradbury captures lift
By WILLIAM JO.ES
Features Editor
There are few wri-
ters, living or dead, the
: calibre of Ray Bradbury.
"Bradbury takes life,
I captures, bottles it, and
; sprinkles it out again in
the form of words, like
! so much spice on sterile
And that is the art
; of writing in it's highest
; form. Not to convey
! notions and theories.
. Not the simple adjec-
I live-laden telling of
? tales, engrossing as
' they might be. But, to
give the reader living,
breathing stories full to
I the brim with wonder,
3 pain, fear, love, and
t eery other feeling coro-
- mon to homo sapien.
Long After Midnight,
� hi- most recently pub-
lished book, follows in
the Bradbury tradition.
It contains 22 of what
the cover aptly des-
cribes as 'hauntings and
celebrations Most of
the selections have been
previously published in
magazines, such as
Playboy, and Life.
The stories range
from bizarre and terri-
fving desires and fears
which we all hide, to
the most personal, ex-
cruciatingly tender emo-
tions. But, they all have
one thing in common-
Bradbury's superb capa-
city to transform the
written page into an
intensly accurate record
of what it feels like to
be human.
Long After Midnight
begins with a story
entitled, 'The Blue Bot-
tle It is set on Mars,
where two friends are
continuing a month long
search for the fabled
Blue Bottle. Legend has
it that the Bottle con-
tains something special,
very special. And it
does. But not always
what the finder expects.
'The October Game'
deals with an insane
hatred that develops
between a man and his
wife. On Halloween, the
'game' of passing
around 'pieces' of the
'old dead witch' comes
to a bizarre and sudden
end.
'The Miracles of
Jamie' demonstrates a
vivid recollection ol
detail about childhood.
And the special ways in
which a child can view
the world.
Ray Bradbury has
been published in every
major American maga-
zine. What is perhaps
his most famous book,
The Martian Chronicles,
has been made into a
TV mini-series which
will air this fall. It has
also been made into a
play which has been
touring colleges for the
past several years. Long
After Midnight is ano-
ther in a long list of
delightful Bradbury
accomplishments.
The crowd that gathered on Max Yasgur s farm
in August 1969 would be unlike any other crowd
that had . assembled in history. It was hands down
walking away, the largest crowd that had ever
assembled anywhere for peaceful purposes With no
ulterior motives except Rock and Roll. There was a
random mixture of gurus, prophets, vagabonds
jugglers, clowns, college students, blue collar
lorkers, and street people. Th. drer.�ty m
lifestyles and ideologies was educational in that
people were simultaneously cast in the roles ot
Teacher and student. Everyone was anxious to share
belongings and knowledge. Eventually people
developed a tremendous sense of affinity for one
another. . , . . . .
These factors along with the physical impact o
400,000 people partying and living together without
hassles or negative vibrations contributed to making
the audience the real star of the show Even
performers who had played many festivals and
concerts later said that the crowd made Woodstock
one of the peak experiences of their lives.
The spontaneity and freedom of the festival gave
many people their first opportunity to get to know
themselves and to explore a, lifestyle independent
from family, friends, or community. For three days
they could leave behind jobs, girlfriends, boyfriends
parents, everything that was straight. They would
make the pilgrimage in decorated cars, vans, and
buses, in tye-dye shirts, army fatigues, and saris
(Saris are popular dress among Hare Knshnas)
with books, bongos, and guitars with wine and
drugs. Whatever their choice of lifestyle, they could
be themselves. j
One of the groups at Woodstock tha played a
major part in getting food to the people, helping
with drug "freak-outs" and keeping the peace, as
well as cleaning up the garbage after the concert
was over, was the Hog Farm commune. Led by
Merry Prankster Hugh Romney (alias Wavy Gravy)
the Hog Farmers arrived in a $17,000 chartered jet.
One of the emotional rushes of the festival came
when Wavy Gravy announced, "Breakfast in bed for
500 000
Abbie Hoffman made a contribution to
Woodstock as well. After working in the hospital
tent for twenty-two consecutive hours he P�unced
upon the stage in the middle of a set by the Who
grabbed the microphone, and screamed Free John
Sinclair After which he was promptly smashed in
airman. r�� Townshend s
the head with the top neck ot rete
Tbbie's point was that as long as John Sinclair
was in jail for two joints, the festival was a
contradiction, even though there was a camp called
Movement City at the festival with emmisanes
representing the various radical elements in the
country, for the majority Woodstock was a peaceful
gathering. It had been staged to promote peace in a
Time of war and harmony at a time when the rift
growing between the counter-culture and the
establishment was perpetuating a malignant,
Correction
All thumbs
In tha September 4 shaw, the huge-thumbed
issue of the East Caro- hitchhiker in Tom Rob-
linian, p. 11, the article � novel Even Cow-
"Albums .Spotlighted" girls Get the Blues.
was not written, by Unfortunately, the
Sissy Hankshaw. aricle wa� severely
The original article edited due to space
was written by Pat limitations, and in the
Minges in the style of a process, Sissy got credit
letter from Sissv Hank- for the story.
festering hostility between the two groups. To
activist groups such as the Weathermen, the
Students for a Democratic Society, the Movement
for a Democratic Society, and others, full scale
revolution was beginning to look increasingly
attractive. �
Woodstock was a turning point. It vented the
anxieties and frustrations of a tumultous period
when paranoia and reactionary policies governed the
actions of both the underground and the
establishment. The climate on the street was
becoming increasingly volatile after the riot at the
Chicago Democratic Convention. In 1969 anything
seemed possible, including revolution.
Perhaps because of this climate of turmoil and
confusion, Woodstock assumed a religious quality.
For hundreds of thousands, it was a pilgrimmage to
Mecca. They needed to know who their brothers
and sisters were, where they were from, and what
they were like. They wanted to see their cult-heroes
and political leaders close-up, and find out what
they had to say. In a very real sense, people came
to the festival to commune and to plot some course
of action. To find out if there would be revolution
or a policy of passive assertiveness.
The fact that peace and harmony prevailed is a
testimony to the sincerity of the cause that people
were fighting for. The radicals of Movement City
came to regard' Woodstock as a political failure,
however, because of the generally mellow
atmosphere and the spirit of affinity that
transcended the event itself. People began to see
the youth culture and its values in a new, more
positive light.
Woodstock certainly had its detractors and the
press became its chief arch-advocate with quotes
like: "Young people die of dope" and The smell
in the air over the festival was like Egyptian filth.
But there were positive reports as well. Quoting
Max Yasgur, "What happened at Bethel this past
weekend was that these young people together with
our local residents turned the Aquarian Festival into
a dramatic victory forthe spirit of peace, good will,
and human kindness
Lou Yank, head of Monticello police called the
young people "the most courteous, considerate
group of kids" he had ever seen.
Many newspapers carried exaggerated accounts
of "mountains of garbage" generated by Wood-
stock. In truth, there was garbage, but thousands
stayed after the concert to help the Hog Farmers
clean it up.
Please turn to page 12
Humor
"1ft trf-X -w
i:
Pieces ofSkylab spotted overUClK J left by David.
Two ECU students
frolic in the floods
To- All of you who never get any mail (This, of
course, does not count hate mail from jo�rp.��J.
menacing thin notices from the bank and nasty
letters from the phone companv
I was thinking the other day a rare event) of
how seldom some of us get maiL Thu� occured
me as I pondered my cobwebbed mailbox and
Realized that yet another year of pitying smiles from
h mailman las about to begin. I know there are
others like me. Granted, I am a pessimist, but no
enough of one to believe that I am the only soul
who 'attend, this university who doesn't receive
mail. The telephone company corresponds with me
regularly. We no longer speak via the phone; it has
been disconnected. .
At any rate, I pondered thi. sad state of af airs
for awhile,and since my television was on the blink,
I certainly couldn't think of anything else to do, so
I though I'd write you all a letter. You know just
something to read and pretend it came out of your
mailbox A real, honest-to God letter.
Now that my explanation for this atrocity is out
of the way, I'm trying to figure out how to get this
damn thing started.
"Hello
"How are you?"
"How was your summer?
I personally happen to hate latters that begin
that way. You know, right off, that you re in for a
one-page bore. And I'm already sick of people
asking how my summer was
The minute you get back to scnool, that s the
opening gambit for every conversation.
"How was your summer?
"My summer was fine. How was your
summer?" M
"Oh, my summer was fine, too.
And then you look at each other for a minute
and realize that you have absolutely nothing else to
say. Then again, if you remember someone fairly
well from the year before, you might add. How s
your schedule?"
The response is invariably hostile, with a politely
added, "And yours?" An equally nasty epithet
follows. End of discussion.
I read once in a magazine that universities house
the soil from which intellectual conversation sprouts.
I found the magazine under a pile of National
Lampoon . I have no idea how it got there. Even
so I sometimes wonder where that intellectual
conversation is supposed to be born. I found
thorugh the old trial-and-error method, that it is not
easily born, if at all. I tried.
For instance, last year, after returning to school,
I was approached with the never-fail, "How was
your summer?
"Summer?" I mused. "What is summer?"
Summer is what one perceives it to be. Yon and
I may have a different idea of what summer is. To
me, it may be a state of mind, or a season while it
could be
When I looked up, my partner in intellectual
repartee was heading uneasily for the door. "My
summer was fine, thanks
I have since, of course, given up.
So, uh, what's your schedule look like?
Yours,
7751M
I
- mm itai mmm�m
-m � �r ��





Page 10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 6 September 1979
4
&
rrlV'
i
V
:
lT

� �� .
61
-�;
-1
w I

ss2
�fi
33 a
More than any other
element, friendship is
the foundation of a
sorority. Old friends are
shared and new friends
are gained. Friendships
never to be forgotten
are formed. Members
share their concerns,
interests, affections and
understanding. There is
no greater gift than a
true friend�living,
learning and loving
while sharing in the
unique experience of a
small group relationship.
College education is not
just a four-year class-
room experience, but a
development process
wherein a sorority
woman may prepare
herself for her years
ahead as a citizen of
the community, mother
or career woman. The
sorority encourages the
member to become in-
terested in campus and
community activities.
Past records prove that
sorority members are
consistently prevalent a-
mong campus leaders.
Opportunities to develop
leadership and organ-
izational skills and re-
sponsibility are an in-
tegral part of sorority.
Today's sorority woman
is an individual who is
committed to the pur-
suit of excellence in
many areas. The soro-
rity encourages these
interests thus adding
another dimension of
diversification to the
campus community.
Service to the less
fortunate is freely given
within the sorority.
Each has numerous
philanthropic projects as
diverse as the indiv-
idual's interest. A
national philanthropy is
actively supported by
each of the 26 NPC
sororities. Whether col-
lecting for a drive or
working as a hospital
volunteer, sorority
members can always be
found participating in
some phase of com-
munity involvement.
Sororities work with-
in the university frame-
work, encouraging and
supporting academic and
cultural growth. They
strive to provide an
atmosphere wherein
scholastic potential is
furthered and intellec-
tual ideas are
exchanged.
Through the friendship
and sisterhood of soro-
rity membership, college
can indeed mean
SO MUCH MORE
!
A
f





6 September 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 11
Greek Life
Skateboardingbalancq,
Photos by-
Green
speed and poise
THE INTER FRATERNITY COUNCIL
INVITES YOU TO
RUSH
SEPT.16 SEPT. 23
The fraternity system at East Carolina plays an
important role in campus and community activities.
Each of the 12 fraternities that make up the IFC
have something to offer every man.
Functions of fraternities include such things as;
socials with sororities, participation in Intramurals
and community involvement. Each of our 12
fraternities have unique ideas and capabilities, yet
they are all bound together under the common goal
of friendship and personal betterment.
By becoming involved in fraternity life a person
can receive a once in life time experience of living
and learning with people from different back-
grounds. If you feel you are a well rounded person,
scholastically and socially, or you feel that a
fraternity experience can help you attain this, then
the Greek Life is for YOU!
PI KAPPA PHI
PHI KAPPA TAU
KAPPA SIGMA
DELTA SIGMA PHI
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA
SIGMA NU
SIGMA PHI EPSILON
KAPPA ALPHA
SIGMA TAU GAMMA
BETA THETA PI
ALPHA SIGMA PHI
TAU KAPPA EPSILON
GO GREEK
BISCUIT INN
Invites you to come in and try our delicious
homemade biscuits.
Featuring Biscuits
With
Gay Community meets
6:30 8:00
Mon. -Sat.
333 S. Greene
(corner of 4th
By STEVE COOPER
t futures K riter
The East Carolina
�Cav Communitv held its
;tir-t weekly meeting on
Tuesday, September 4th
'J& 5:00 in the Newman
�House. The session was
basically a discussion of
-e events in the near
"future in which the
�ECGC will participate.
l The ECGC is an
'organization that pro-
Sides a non-sexual
atmosphere for Gay
Ipeople to meet other
IGay people. Its purpose
"t to "help members of
.�the Gay community
�Increase self-awareness
�and pride, and also to
;fac ililitate harmony be-
tween persons of all
�;iffectional preferences.
Membership in the
Organization is open to
all ECL students, staff
and faculty. However,
participation by all
uiieinbers of the Green-
ville community is wel-
come and appreciated.
I The ECGC is a
university recognized
Organisation and
ahhough it is entitled
rto student lunds, it has
so far been self-sup-
porting. Last year,
I-through fund-raisers,
dinners, donations, and
'A winning the Burger
"King "Best Darn
Organisation" contest
ihe ECGC was able to
pay for its peer counsel-
ing center.
This center was sug-
gested by the ECU
counseling service. It is
manned by students
who have been screened
and trained by profes-
sional counselers. The
service provides a
friendly ear to any
student who might be
having doubts or prob-
lems.
The ECGC also runs
a roommate referal ser-
vice that helps people
find compatible room-
mates and housing
which they can afford.
At present the
ECGC is getting ready
for the "National March
on Washington for Les-
bian and Gay Rights"
on October the 14th.
The purpose of this
march is to "end all
social, economic, judi-
cial, and legal oppres-
sion of Lesbian and Gay
people The march is
being held in conjunc-
tion with the National
Third World Lesbian
Gay Conference that
runs from October 12th
through the 15th.
200,000 to 300,000
people are expected to
attend the march which
is occuring ten years
after the Stonewall riots
that began the current
LesbianGay rights
movement.
The ECGC now
meets every Monday at
5:00 at 608 East Ninth
Street (the Newman House
For information about
the group, roommate
referral service, or the
Washington March, call
752-6088.
STUFFY'S
Famous Subs
Good Stuff
NCSU Game
Special!
Take a Bucket
to the Game
10 DISCOUNT
and Greene on all
2 blocks from Large Orders of Chicken
The Attic)
when you call in your
order For Group
or Take-Out
, � - n Cal1 752 3595
ham
cheese
sausage
smoked sausage
tenderloin
steak
chicken
butterjelly
combination of
any ingredients
BUY ONE GET ONE
FREE
ALL Beverages
AND
Chili or Cheese Dog
3PM to 5PM
Monday Thru Friday
located in Georgetown Shoppes
Greenville, N. C.
752-6130
offer expires : Sept. 14, 1979
I ll"iM ' COUPON
With This Coupon
FREE
I STUFFY'S T-Shirt with purchase
I of '5.00 FoodOrder j
Makethe campus connection.
� �
If you want to be listed in the ECU Telephone Directory
for 7980, you need to order your phone now.
The deadline is September 7.
You can place your order at the Carolina Telephone Phone
ShopBusiness Office at 1530 Hooker Rd.
So get in on the connection, and order your phone today.
DGQQ Carolina Telephone
UMTED TELEPHONE SYSTEM
V





Page 12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 6 September 1979
-� Jf '
Surfing hurricane swells on the Outer Banks.
Woodstock
from page 9
Why is this man cooking a watermelon?
Photo by Richard Green
The world had to wait for those people who
were at the festival to drift back to city streets and
rural communes to learn of what a positive
experience it had been for the majority. The hard
cure were n high on the festival they didn't want
lo leave. They talked of staying and inventing a
new way of life. They would put up windmills for
energy, take care of Mav's cows for him, and call
the land "Jerusalem City
The original promoters of Woodstock. Michael
Lang and Artie Kornfeld, were pressured into
selling their shares of Woodstock Ventures for
STo.000 apiece.
W arner Brother Communications has since made
about S35,0OO,0O0 on the film and many more
millions on the records. By buying Woodstock,
W arner Brothers managed lo pull themselves out ol
debt, and begin making money oil the youth
culture.
Woodstock came and went, changing lives in the
process, however. it epilogue persists. Something of
Woodstock linger- and flourishes today. It is more
than nostalgia. It is too intangible and omnipresent
to isolate or define. oodstock i a legacy
bequeathed, not only to the young, but to all
Americans In 1969 it was the passion play for a
culture, a -wan song tor the idealism oi that era.
With the passage of ten years, however, it has
come to represent a much larger force. People are
beginning to perceive a void in the culture. They
recognize the menacing danger of apathy, of
lethargy and inaction.
Ten years mav have been a necce-sary period to
cool off and reassess our priorities. There were
many casualties a a result of the brash sponteniety
of the era: Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, the Kent
State and Jackson State massacres. The psychedelic
revolution was forced to become invisible after Tim
Learv and Ken Kesey were busted and discredited,
in the same way that all artistic movements have
retreated in the face of authoritarian retaliation.
This tact has been borne out through the passage
oi history, from the Renaissance to the Beat
movement.
In the lQSO's, however, many new battles must
be fought that will decide the kind of future our
nation is to have or if one will even exist. Old
issues will be scrutinized for re-evaluation as well.
Energy will become a particularly critical issue as
our dwindling oil reserves continue to be consumed
and pressure to sacrifice the ecology for electricity
mounts. We will have to be at least as courageous
as our forebearers were in the sixties if we are to
face these issues. It will take a unique combination
of the courage to be an individualist and a will to
cooperate in achieving common goals. It will take
idealism to win victories over corruption and
m n-democratic dogmatism.
The patriotism exemplified at Woodstock when
Jimi Hendrix played "America The Beautiful" can
perpetuate itself and nurture a new America. A
country that will be more flexible and receptive to
the wishes of its people. It can be a land governed
bv a more pure democracy, when freedom is
absolute. Young people today often express a sense
of loss because they missed the activism and
excitement of the sixties. Having had a mere 33
percent voter turnout for our last national election is
indicative of a sense of alienation and loss of
purpose.
People want an active role in the political
structure of their country, but they are not willing
to get arrested or beaten in the head for
disagreeing with its law and social customs.
Subsequently, protest in the United States has
become much more subdued and passive, the theory
being that one cannot effect change by provoking
riot
Efforts are still being made to organize a
"Woodstock II" or "Second Coming however at
the present time prospects for the festival look
dismal. Promoters John Morris and Michael
V adleigh have seen their proposal rejected by town
alter town. Though it was first postponed to
September 7th, 8th, and 9th it now looks doubtful
that any such event will take place at least until
next year. Morris is reported to have scouted for
locations in California and seven other states have
extended invitations for the festival. The agenda for
the show is said to be evenly divided between
veteran- of the first Woodstock, current big name
acts, and up and coming bands.
Tickets to the three-day event would cost $37.50
and would be sold on a random, computer-selected
basis, with a certain number allocated to each part
of the country and Europe. Total sales would be
limited to 300,000.
As for Michael Lang's opinion of doing another
Woodstock: "For me, Woodstock, from conception to
completion, was a wonderful experience. I think
that's true for all of us who worked on it,
something that we will always cherish. I've been
asked repeatedly about doing another Woodstock,
but I think the festival was unique event, and to try
to repeat it would be a mistake. Times have
changed, and new ideas should grow out of new
times
Woodstock is not a place or time-
Woodstock is in your mind,
Woodstock is wherever you find it-
Bring back the sixties man.
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
UNITED FIGURE
SALON
Limited Time
2 for the
piece of 1
Bring a friend $07 QA
and share the Oi m5JUeach
cost of a 4 month program
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 6, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 06, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.04
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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