The East Carolinian, September 4, 1979






Let us dare
to read, think,
speak
id write
The East Carolinian
Telephone
Numbers
757-6366
757-6367
757-6309
Greenville, N.C
JL-L-f. 4,19-71
Circulation 10,000
Hurricane David
headed for Carolinas
Rain will he the best uc can hope for with hurrican David headed toward North Carolina.
Futrell remembers 'HazeV
At 11:00 Monday
night, a hurricane watch
was issued for an area
of the East Coast which
extends to Cape Hat-
teras, N.C.
At that time the
hurricane, named Hur-
ricane David, was lo-
cated slightly northeast
of Cape Canaveral, Fl.
A hurricane watch is
issued when there is a
real possibility of hur-
ricane conditions affect-
ing a specific area. This
means the possibility of
winds amounting to 75
mph or above and
severe rain conditi ns,
or dangerously high
water.
-and her wrath
j& K KK W ENDT
News Editor
-hlev Futrell, the
B iard "I Trustees Vice
President remembers
when hurricane Hazel
came through the area,
man) years ago.
Imiu
It va; a rough
m" rmembers Fut-
rell.At the time Futrell
a- li ing in Vv a-h-
ington, N .C. On ater
Street the water was
"six leel deep in the
store
Futre
according to
Futrell also said ol
the "blow" caused
thousands of trees to go
down and cause a
power outage that last-
ed about 10 hours.
The most dramatic
thing that he rem-
embers was when he
saw a hou.�e "floating
upstream, floating
w�t. This only hap-
pens during Hurricanes
"We just weren't pre-
pared said Futrell.
He doesn't think the
same thing could hap-
pen today, though.
"People have remained
more prepared
time was a writer lor
the Washington Daily
News, remembered go-
ing around the town in
a motorboat with a
fellow newspaper em-
ployee, to deliver news-
papers, and to cover
the damage that the
storm was inflicting up-
on hi town.
To deliver the pap-
er ihc hauu go up
eing children seining for
lish in front of the
Elementary School.
Fifteen minutes after
the winds started, the
twon's phone lines were
down, and soon after
the local radio station
lost its power so that
the area was without
contact for quite some
time.
V" &W
to some of tnr nouses
in the motorboat, get
out, and go into the
house to find someplace
dry to put the paper.
The day alter Hazel
hit, he remembers se-
Futrell
to
what
said "It
nelfeve
like, unless
All precautions
should be taken immed-
iately, after a watch has
been issued.
It has been believed
that if the hurricane
stayed close to land it
would reduce to a
severe rainstorm by the
time it left Charleston,
S.C.
According to mete-
orologist Craig Weber
of television station
WCTI in New Bern, the
storm might be moving
into the Gulf Stream.
Weber speculated that
if the storm
New Bern.
Weber explained that
many people do not
undersand what is
meant by a hurricane
moving ashore. He ad-
ded that people at the
eye of the storm are in
danger, but people who
are up to 150 miles
away must also take
precautions, since the
storm might cause da-
mage as far inland as
that.
Weber noted the
tide changes, which he
said many people had
not considered as part
of the hurricane picture.
This week, the moon
will be full, and that
the added tidewater
might add to the tor-
rential rains to cause
severe flooding in low
lying areas along the
coast.
latitude north 17.7,
longitude 62.0 west,
near the island of
Barbados, and about 250
miles east of San Juan,
which is about 850
miles from Miami.
Frederic was moving
at 10 to 15 mph, with
gale winds extending
100 mph north of the
center.
Pam Johnston, dis-
aster preparedness co-
ordinator for the Virgin
Islands, said residents
there were "taking Fre-
deric more seriously
than David
"We haven't been
through one of these in
years, but they may
have learned from
David she said. There
were no David-related
casualties reported in
the Virgin Islands, but
the hurricane washed
system is pullingthe
other onealong.Frederic
might sartfollowing
David allthewav,but
Fredericisfurther
north
White-�aid"it isnot
unusualforhurricanes
to followeachother.But
damage was surprisingly
We think the hurricane is going to
parallel the coast and continue north
and be a threat somewhere in the
carolinas
DrSeilFrankl , director of the
Miami hurricane center
NSCC cards available
B ED WILLIAMS
Staff Writer
There's a niall card
on campus that is
lugger in impact than it
i- in i.e. The card is
the National Student
Consumer Card and it
si 'beneficial to all ECU
students and certain
Greenv ille merchant
Located on the card
are fourteen different
area merchants. Under
each merchant title is
an explanation of dis-
counts given bv the
Vice President
Sherrod said,
are 13,000 of
rds, making one
for every-
merchant title is an ex-
planation of discounts
given by the merchant
to the bearer of teh
card.
SGA
Charlie
"There
these care
available
bod)
Sherrod mentioned
that he will distribute
the cards to the
"dorms, snack shop,
and Croatan" so that
thev can be picked up
bv students.
The idea was begun
b Mark Reid, treasurer
of NC State Student
Government. He and
Sherrod got together
and the idea for a
National Student Con-
sumer Card spread to
Greenville, Sherrod said.
The idea has re-
sulted in advertising for
local merchants and
discounts for students
who have possession of
teh card.
The discounts range
Irorh ten to 25 percent
on some items, making
this card a valuable one
to have. So remember,
don't leave your dorm
without it.
it ' is
you see it
As for rebuilding,
"It took a couple of
vears Futrell reflect-
ed.
Quite a few of the
houses along the river
were blown out to sea,
and for a long time
afterwards river prop-
erty was difficult to
sell. "Nowadays, you
can't buy it said
Futrell.
Stream nor
will slow down
ward progress
may
Jofeheatward
in for-
but it
tensify in
strength of the winds
and rains.
Weber also specu-
lated that if the storm
follows the latest pat-
terns, which became
available late last night,
the storm might head
ashore at Charleston or
Myrtle Beach, S.C. The
northeastern quadrant of
the storm would then
be at Wilmington and
-As a
weakened Hurricane
David sidled along
oay, the killer hurri-
cane's younger brother,
Frederic, drifted slowly
along the same path
blazed by David last
week.
Frederic's torrential
rains and gale-force
winds swept the Lee-
ward Islands today, and
forecasters expected
Frederic to pass just
north of the Virgin
Islands and Puerto Rico
late tonight.
At 9 a.m. EDT, Fred-
eric's center was near
out bridges and sewer
lines and caused mas-
sive power outages.
Forecaster Ron
Hurricane Center also
would not rule out the
possibility Frederic
would follow David to
the Gold Coast.
"It's still too early
to say, but Frederic has
a chance of going
further north up the
coast he said. "Fred-
eric has a chance of
going further north up
the coast he said.
"Frederic is more or
less on the line of least
resistance.
"One low pressure
light and forecasters
aid the storm could
swing north to threaten
the Carolina
"We think it going
to parallel the coast and
continue north and be a
threat somewhere in the
Carolina- sometime in
the next i8 hours
said Dr. Neil Frank,
director of the National
Hurricane Center here.
Hurricane-force winds
slammed the wealth)
play-ground of Palm
Beach alter the hurri-
cane eve skipped past
Miami and Fort Lauder-
dale, hovering just oft-
shore.
"When it get- bj
Palm Beach, the coast
drops hack Frank
-aid. "If it follow- a
more northerly course,
it'll get farther awa. It
could go north or
north-northwest. It s
going to be moving up
the coastline todayI
don't have the expertise
to �av how clo-eU.
During the night,
th� -t"rm appeared
hradvti for the den sly
populated Miami-Fort
Lauderdale area, then
shifted course to take a
more northerly track.
The small shift in
direction wouldn't have
been significant t.ir out
at sea, Frank said. But
when you put eight
million people in its
path, it become- very
significant he added.
At least five hurri-
cane-related deaths were
reported in Florida. Two
men suffered heart at-
Thousands celebrate despite threat
Hungry students beware
college
almost
Bv LEIGH COAKLEY
Issistaal to the Editor
Breakfast consists of
a honey-bun and colfee,
lunch a Quarter-Pounder
and tries, dinner a
garbage pia, plus in-
numerable soft drinks,
beer potato chips, and
other assorted snack
foods "consumed in
ma quantities
This menu is a bit
exaggerated but one
typical of the
student at ECU:
totally a carbohydrate
diet. Il has become
easJ t, stop at
vending machine,
posit some change, and
receive a fast meal.
Manv of us are keeping
the "fast food" places
in business at
petise of our
health.
It's no wonder a
large percentage of stu-
dents spend so much
time in the infirmary. A
diet of this sort contains
empty nutrients and
weakens the body's de-
lenses to fight off
infection. The vitamins
so
a
de-
the ex-
own
and nutrients are not
there. Doctors can't
help us if we don't try
to help ourselves. We
have become victimized.
Proof is adequate in
regard to deficiency di-
seases. A well-known
disease to women and
children, anemia, is
caused by an iron defi-
ciency. Lack of Vita-
minl) causes rickets,
and an absence of Vi-
tamin C in the diet
causes scurvy.
Heart disease, the
number one killer of
Americans has been
linked with the use of
large quantities of salt,
saturated fats and oils,
and sugar.
Studies now show
that 50 of the Ameri-
can diet consists of
refined sugars and
carbohydrates in the
forms of candy, ice
cream, cookies, soft
drinks, pies, and other
forms of rich deserts.
It is obvious that
many will continue this
sort of self destruction
but for those of us who
are aware of the food
we eat, there are alter-
natives to the "junk
food" regime.
Fresh and dried
fruits, nuts, plain pop-
corn, dried seeds, raw
vegetables, and yogurt
ar excellent suggestions
for snack items and
energy boosters at min-
imum cost. The snack
bars on campus carry
many of these items.
Try substituting seafood
and poultry for red,
fatty meats. When pos-
sible, try to avoid white
flours, white, refined
sugar, and salt. Salad
bars and Chinese re-
staurants are favorite
spots for the food-
conscious individual.
It takes alot of di-
scipline to alter eating
habits and will require
some behavorial
changes, but the reward
is great: Good health.
Now is the time for us
to start caring and
thinking about ourselves
more. Let's not become
part of the percentage
that - typifies Americans
as being overweight and
in ill health.
By PEGGY ANDERSEN
Associated Press Writer
Most Americans
were celebrating Labor
Day 1979 with picnics
and fireworks, but some
will remember this hol-
iday as a singularly
unfestive occasion.
Thousands of South
Florida residents were
forced to flee for safety
as Hurricane David hur-
tled toward the state,
bringing with it a his-
tory of death and de-
vastation.
And on the Texas
Gulf Coast, the tourist
industry suffered with
empty hotels as holiday
travelers shunned bea-
ches recently stained by
oil from a runaway
Mexican oil well.
Elsewhere, labor
leaders and politicians
spoke of umemployment
and inflation as workers
set those uncomfortable
realities aside for fire-
works, barbecues, par-
ades and fairs.
President Carter was
to be the host at an
old-fashiopned picnic on
the White House lawn,
with about 1,000 labor
leaders and rank-and-file
union members attend-
ing.
in Cincinnati, boat
owners on the Ohio
River vied for good
spots at the docks,
where theywatched a 34-
mmute fireworks extra-
vaganza tonight at the
conclusion of a river-
front
fair.
In
Day
West
arts and crafts
New York, Labor
coincided with
Indian Day, and
Mayor Edward Koch
was expected to turn
out in Brooklyn for the
annual parade featuring
steel-drum bands, infec-
tious calypso rhythms
and limbo dancers.
Manhattan was host to
a Labor Day Street Fair
near Theatre Row, with
mimes, clowns and dis-
co music for the city's
roller-skaters.
The need for fuel
economy seemed to
�bring back the old-
fashioned notion of a
holiday at home as
some states reported
highway traffic was
lighter than usual.
In California, life-
guard Terry Hearst
reported a normal crowd
at the Santa Monica
beach Sunday, but "no
more than thatI'm
really shocked
Local authorities said
some travelers may
have been scared off by
a threatened service
station strike that failed
to develop.
In nearby Las Vegas,
the 14th annual Jerry
Lewis Labor Day Tele-
thon got under wav.
offering everything from
Sarah Vaughn to the
Rolling Stones in an
effort to raise money
for the fight against
muscular distrophy.
A watermelon cut will he one of teh activities at Student
Wednesday at 3.
Life Celebrates' scheduled U
fc





Page 2 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 4 September 1979
Registers need response
.r
KS

1
By ED WILLIAMS
Staff Writer
The 1979-80 edition
of teh Freshman Reg-
ister has seemingly ta-
ken students by sur-
prise. Only half of the
registers have been
picked up by freshman
subscribers, with $9000
worth of registers re-
maining to be taken,
according to SGA Vice
President Charlie Sher-
rod.
There must be some
reasons why so many
registers are still lin-
gering around. Perhaps
its because this is the
first year the register
has been on time
according to Sherrod,
who also edited the re-
gister. He said the
register usually arrives
in late spring.
"The STudenl Gov-
ernment worked hard on
the book in the summer
to beat the deadline to
get the book here on
time he stated.
Another reason the
register hasn't been
picked up by students
who ordered it is be-
cause of it's new look,
both hinside and out.
The book cover was
designed lby a Com-
munications At class
student, Sherrod said.
The color and typw of
the cover was changed
to orange and canary
yellow and broadway
type, respectively.
Inside, the book
contains fall and spring
schedules, as well as a
football schedule. This
year's edition of teh re-
gister also contains a
theme which is entitled
"The East Carolina
Way of Life
Maybe the biggest
reason freshman have
failed to acquire their
register is because they
don't know where to
pick it up. According to
Sherrod, students can
get their registers at
Mendenhall Student
Center in room 228.
Now there is no
reason left for freshmen
not to pick up their
registers. As Sherrod
said, "Students can't
enjoy it until they get it i
in their hands
IF YOU'RE INTO EXERCISE
and Good Health
Check Out Our
Complete Selection
of
Vitamins and Protein
Supplements
Nature' Harvest Natural Food
Downtown 5th St.
752-9336
Relaxing on a row boat is a thing of teh past now that classes have started.
Hasste-FreeTHp
Problems of any kind on your trip abroad
can be a big hassle. And who needs it?
Traveling abroad is not as simple as it may
seem. There's a lot more to it than just buying
a ticket, grabbing your passport and taking off
to parts unknown. A successful trip requires
advance preparation � send to
Correspondence Management Division
Bureau of Public Affairs
U S Department of State
Washington. DC 20520
it's Miller time
ca .
UBM
"
Please send me a copy of "YOUR TRIP ABROAD"
Name
Please Print
Address
City-
State
Zip.
8P�
r
Lei'
I
.s
�l v
yyM
&nm
Hk.h l.tft Btf r
One of the conveniences that
we have offered college students
over the many years Is a charge
account.
Brody's will be happy to tailor
one to suit your needs. For over
a quarter of a century, we have
featured college-minded fashions
in sportswear, shoes, dresses,
and lingerie.
You can count on Brody's service
of cashing checks, free local
telephone use, gift wrapping, and
out- of-town mailing. We want to
be your friend away from home.
May we have the pleasure of
adding your name to our many
student charge customers?
�Downtown
Pitt Ptaz;
i
WOULD YOU LIKE TO
BEAT INFLATION ?
IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO HAVE SOME HELP WITH RISING INFLATION AND HAVE A
GREAT TIME DOING SO, READ ON;
FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY THE ELBO ROOM HAS ON SALE SPECIAL SEMESTER
MEMBERSHIPS GOOD FOR FREE ADMISSION DURING 1st SEMESTER.
HERE IS HOW YOU CAN SAVE ;
THE ELBO ROOM WILL BE OPEN 80 NIGHTS DURING 1st SEMESTER
IF YOU COME TO THE ELBO 13 OF THOSE NIGHTS THE MEMBERSHIP WILL HAVE
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THESE SPECIAL SEMESTER MEMBERSHIPS ARE ONLY $10.00!
AND WILL BE ON SALE WED.FROM 1:00 pm UNTIL 5:00 pm AND NIGHTLY
8:00-9:00 pm THRU WED. SEPT. 12th
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ACT NOW AND SAVE!
e&�.
Ij you a
'i
Alii
le
Bx LAKitt �
5
Ma
I
lention ol m
one
fields. M -
swered qu -
- �
hov do I
what arc
standards
Dr. Ronal I I I
Dean ol ihe S
Allied Health amv
these quetr
more indepth ones
recent inten i
Fir - mi
information about
health. It is a
new school in I
development
December ol I
Theile became Deal
January ol I972
then. Allied H-
steadil) grown
present size, o I
nine department- Fj
include Bi
Audiolotry. ami Mej
Technology I
the departnv
master? pr g
right offer
degrees.
Admiss
are not based - I
a fixed GPA.
Thiele elabora
ever) departemtn
required minimum
2.5 GPA tor I i
to that particular
gram.
"Admiss ns
program- in this
i a competitive pn
It is not an oped
missions. You I
appl) to the d( .
and meet their
ards. There are
limitations on the
ber of students thai
be taken
An
9ra
fin;
in
sui
th
Ev
mi
opi
th
eli
to
av
federal Bi





ISE
hat
Idents
large
ailor
over
lave
hions
les,
I
ervice
, and
nt to
1
Allied Health teaches
programs
leading to degrees
B LARRY GRAHAM
Staff Write?
Man) freshmen come
to ECL sith ihe in-
tention of majoring in
one ot tin- Allied Health
fields. Mosl have unan-
swered questions about
the school. For instance,
how do I get in and
what are the academic
tandard ot the school?
Dr. Ronald L. Thiele,
Dean of the School ot
Allied Health answered
these questions and
more indepth ones in a
recent interview.
First, some general
information about Allied
health. It i- a fairly
new school m K(.I ; its
development began in
December ot 1968. Dr.
Theile became Dean in
Januar) ot 172. Since
then. Allied Health ha
steadil) grown to it
present size, comprising
nine departments. These
include Biostatistics,
Audiology, and Medical
Technology. Three ot
the departments otter
masters programs and
eight offer bachelors
degrees.
Admissions to AH
are not based solely on
a fixed GPA. DR.
Thiele elaborate Most
ever) departemtn has a
required minimum ot a
2.5 GPA for admission
to that particular pro-
gram.
"Admissions to the
program in this school
is a competitive process.
It is not an open ad-
mission;?. iu have to
appl to the department
and meet their stand-
ards. There are also
limitations on the num-
ber of students that can
lie taken
The competitive ad-
missions tend to raise
the academic standards
of the school. No plans
have been made to
change the situation;
only the best students
are accepted. The
school itself has to live
up to two sets of
stringent standards:
those of ECL in ad-
dition to the standards
ot a national accredi-
ting agency. Dr Thiele
describved the ECU
standards a- "a bench
mark of quality
Allied Health is a
quality school, and the
training students receive
there i- one ot the best
in the state. "1 think
that our programs con-
stantly improve in qual-
it states Dr. Thiele.
"W e are striving for
improvement. I think
the best indication of
this are our students
who are employed in
their professions we
get excellent feedback
concerning the quality
of their performance.
i have every indi-
cation that thej are
doing a good job.
Another indication ol
the quality of teaching
is the employment re-
cord ot successful stu-
dents. Dr. Thiele esti-
mates that about 95
of AH studenyts stu-
dents are accepted tor
work. The exception
here is social work and
health education, since
there may not be many-
job openings in those
fields in this area.
Allied Healtti is
steadily growing to
meet the demands of
increased enrollment.
The school is gaining
two more staff mem-
bers, one in Biostatistics
and one in rehabilitation
couseling. Plans for a
new program are im-
pending.
"One of the major
endeavors we are going
through right now is
the effort to develop a
masters degree program
in social work Dr.
Thiele went on to say
that this is merely a
feasibility study at the
present time. It will
have to be approved by
the university and the
Board of Governors be-
fore any work in this
area may begin. It will
take several vears. Also
planned for the future
is the expansion ol Bio-
statistics and Epidemi-
ology.
The School of Med-
icine will probably not
affect Allied Health
much. The two schools
much. "We probably
need them more than
they need us Dr.
Thiele joked. "We com-
pliment each other we
round out the picture
No plans have been
made to merge the two
schools; Dr. Thiele be-
lieves that this could be
more detrimental than
helpful, since the two
schools have different
aims.
A pamphlet entitled
"The Allied Health and
Social Professions Bul-
letin" is available for
the student seriously
interested in an Allied
Health career, an in
finding our more about
the departmental re-
quirements. Te pamph-
let can be obtained at
the offices of Allied
Health in the Belk
Building.
cont. from page 1
HURRICANE
tacks as they strained
to put up storm pro-
tection on their homes
and another was elec-
trocuted when his car
hit a power pole. A
driver was killed when
his car overturned on a
wet road and a woman
was killed by a car as
she hurried toward an
evacuation center. But
property damage ap-
peared moderate.
"A flop said
Arthur St. Amand, Civil
Defense Director in
Broward County, which
includes Fort Lauder-
dale.
David, once a mon-
ster that killed at least
640 persons in its
march through vulner-
able island republics of
the Caribbean, slipped
to a relatively mild 90
mph as it neared the
Miami shoreline shortly
before dawn.
The storm's eye and
fiercest winds, however,
staved just off-shore. At
10 a.m. EDT The
Storm's eye was
just off Palm Beach
at latitude 26.5 north
and longitude 79.6 west.
David's fringe gusts
tore down hundreds of
transmission lines and
Florida Power & Light
Co. reported about
55,000 people in Dade
and Broward counties
were temporarily
blacked out. In Palm
Beach County, high
winds downed power
lines and motorists were
ordered off the high-
ways for safety.
The Palm Beach
County area, with
350,000 residents, isn't
nearly as populous as
Dade and Broward
Counties, which have
more than 2 million
residents.
Hurricane warnings
were lifted for the
Florida Keys, Miami
and south of Fort Lau-
derdale and residents
who evacuated Sunday
headed back home. But
warnings remained in
effect from Fort Lau-
derdale north to Day-
tona Beach. Gale
warnings extended to
the Florida-Georgia
border.
ARMY MEDICAL DEPARTMENT
SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM: The U.S.
Army Health Professions Scholarship Pro-
gram offers a unique opportunity for
financial support to a number of students
in the health professions. The program is
substantial, both in the size and scope of
the scholarship and the number offered.
Every student or potential student of
medicine, osteopathy, veterinary medicine,
optometry, psychology is invited to examine
the program and submit and application, if
eligible.
Financial support in the scholarship
includes approximately $5600 per year. In
addition, tuition and certain other expenses
required by all students in a particular
course of study will also be paid by the
governme it.
A fact sheet containing information as
to eligibility criteria, pay, service obli-
gation, and application procedures is
available from your nearest Army Medical
Department Personnel Counselor.
The personnel counselor will also
answer questions you may have about his
or other programs and will assist you in
the completion and submission of your
application. Personnel Counselor
Major Roy J. Leatherborry, III,
federal Building, Suite 310 Post Office Box 27524
(919)834-64136414,
As a Peace Corps Volunteer, you can help people
in developing nations try to meet their basic
needs in areas of Food, Energy, Community
Development, Health Care, and Education. It's
a full-time, 24-hour a day comr�� .ent with
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Education, Greenville, N.C. 27834
(919) 757 6586
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Tht1 Kast (aroli
Editorials
& Opinions
Tuesday, September A, 1979 Page 4 Greenville, N.C.
The right to vote
A PROPOSED SOLUTION TO THE
10th ST. CROSSING PROBLEM
Students who maintain an address
for the purposes of attending school
in this county are being denied one of
the basic American freedoms�the
right to vote.
To vote in Pitt County, you have
to prove that your permanent domicile
is here. Establishing a residence is
not enough. According to a press
release, which is dated April 14,
1972, and which Is considered current
by the Pitt County Board of Elections,
students cannot vote unless they can
prove to a registrar that they plan to
make the Greenville area their
permanent home.
According to the same release, a
registrar might ask the following
questions. The release quickly adds
that the questions would be asked in
substance, which seems to mean that
these direct questions would not be
asked, but that a safer, less offensive
set might be used.
A registrar might ask, for exam-
pie, if you left home for the
temporary purpose of attending
school, or did you leave home to cut
the home ties? If you fail at the
university, would you return to your
parents home? Would you still be
living in the university town if the
school were not there? For what
purposes other than attending school
are you in this college town? Where
do you maintain church and lodge
affiliations?
Such questions, short of not being
anyone's business, might be construed
by some as invasion of privacy. Why
does the state need to know where
you go to church? Is it the state's
business why you are living in
Greenville, if it is for purposes other
than attending ECU?
This doesn't tell us, however, how
we are supposed to react when we
pay taxes and abide by the same city
ordinances as "full time" residents of
Greenville, and yet we are denied the
opportunity to have a hand in how we
are governed.
Looking at the population of the
school and the population of the city
of Greenville gives you some idea of
the size of the problem. With a
population of 12,000 students, and a
city population of approximately
35,000, it is easy for the students
here to see why the good citizens of
Greenville would not want ECU
students to vote.
It's time for the city to take into
account the fact that ECU students
are here. We add to the quality of
life, we support local merchants and
we give freely to the community in
service and time,
settle down here
terms of volunteer
Some of us even
after we graduate.
We should be allowed a say in
how the local government governs us.
Polls each election year show us
declines in the percentage of voters.
A good way to teach people to vote
wisely would be to let them get
involved in local government for the
four years they are in college.
The first years after we receive
the right to vote are the most
important times to teach students the
responsibilities of being an American.
Good voting habits, if taught with the
student voter in mind, might make for
a more intense realization of what our
responsibilities are today and in the
future.
We can only wonder why the Pitt
County Board of Elections does not
want students registering to vote.
The suspicion we have is fairly
obvious. If all ECU students organized
themselves into a voting bloc, the
political power of this campus would
be overwhelming. It is conceivable
that an ECU Grad student or
professor could be elected to the
mayor's office, and to a majority of
the city council seats. Even with the
vote, student apathy would never
allow this to happen.
Still, the Pitt County authorities
would never let anything like that
happen. It is attitudes like this that
widen the chasm between town and
gown.
Uppity women
The privilege to wait
By G.C. CARTER
Uppity Women
If you were brought
up in the same general
geporgraphical location
(the southern half of
North America) that I
was, and msot of the
women that I know
were then part of your
cultural heritage is the
belief that because you
were borm a woman,
the world owes you a
living. You, a woman,
are "privileged You
ahve the "right" to a
comfortable abode, to
"protection" against
strenuous physical acti-
vity or over-taxation of
mental processes. You
"expect" to have doors
opened for you (literally
and metaphorically),
male conversations ' cen-
sored in your presence,
harsh realities smoothed
over.
Capitol Letter
Sunset commission gears up
By
WILLIAM M. WELCH
Associated Press Writer
RALEIGH, (AP) -
The state sunset com-
mission, after spending
its first year dereg-
ulating watch repairs
and similar mundane
matters, has turned its
attention now to con-
sumer issues and may
take on more powerful
interests.
The commission's
first batch of reports
since it battled with the
General Assembly over
minor concerns came
out late last month.
And the reports on
optometry and opticians
may be a signal of the
higher visibility the
board is to assume.
The commission staff
recomended the Legis-
lature change the
state's licensing of op-
tometrists and opticians.
It said the current
regulations are exces-
sive and, by driving up
the price of eyeglasses
and examinations, are
costing North Carolina
consumers as much as
$21 million annually in
extra charges.
So far, no reaction
has been heard , from
those professions. But
they have proved their
lobbying influence in
other battles in the
General Assembly, such
as over a law that now
permits optometrist �
who are not medical
doctors � to use drugs
in their practice.
The staff is now at
work on similar studies
of state regulation of
lawyers and doctors.
For the purchase of
a pair of eyeglasses,
the staff concluded the
average price in North
Carolina is $58.17, or
$12.63 higher than in
states without regula-
tions. With an esti-
mated 880,000 pair sold
this year, the staff
concluded North Caro-
linians with poor vision
are being charged $11.1
million loo much.
The reason for the
higher prices, the staff
concluded, was that
North Carolina's laws
have kept down the
" number of opticians and
encouraged glasses to
be dispensed by op-
tometrists instead. North
Carolina has the second
toughest requirements
to become an optician
of all the states, Jordan
said.
The sunset commi-
ssion, called the gov-
ernmental Evaluations
Commission, was set up
to review 100 state
regulatory and licensing
agencies. The regulatory
laws expire over a
six�year period unless
renewed or altered by
the General Assembly.
In its first legislative
session, the commission
and its director, Paul
Jordan, had to fight for
its most mundane rec-
ommendations � ex-
termination of the state
board of watchmaking
and repair. They suc-
ceeded in killing that
board, but not before
the fight became a test
case for t!�e Legislat-
ure's resolve to drop
regulations � particu-
larly when the trades
are protected by the
regulation and want to
keep it.
Now come the op-
tometry recomenda-
lions that may set off a
battle even before the
12�member sunset
commission itse'f.
The reports cited a
1976 study by Uni-
versity of North Caro-
lina professor James
Begun, which found
North Carolina had the
highest average cost of
an eye examination by
an optometrist of 33
states surveyed, $32.97.
With three years of
inflation figured in, the
commission staff con-
cluded the average cost
of an exam in North
Carolina is $11.54 high-
er than in states with-
out restrictive regula-
tions � amounting to
$10 million in extra
costs each year.
The recommendation
was to maintain the
present restrictions on
opticians dispensing
contact lenses, but to
relax them for those
selling only eyeglasses.
"Opticians themselves
are not responsible for
the high price of eye-
glass sales to be readily
available
And what is the
source from whence all
this "privilege" flows?
Who's gonna pay the
rent and fight the wars
and cover the mudholes
and open the doors?
Traditionally, women
have had the "privi-
lege" of being provided
for by men � first
their fathers, then their
husbands. There are
plenty of women (and
men) who believe that
this is the way it
should continue to be.
It sounds good,
doesn't it? All a women
really has to do is make
sure she's as good-look-
ing as she can be, and
make sure she stays in
her place. If she plays
it rights, she can charm
her way right into her
father husband's heart
wallet, and not have to
worry about a thing
except continuing to
play it right.
While woman's pri-
vilege is emphasized in
beliefs and behaviors
which are learned early
in life and reinforced
over the years, the
other side ol the coin is
rarely mentioned. All
privilege has its price,
and it is up to each
individual woman to de-
termine whether the two
balance out to some-
thing she can live with.
To speak in broad
categories, woman has
traditionally paid her
price for privilege in
two ways � by waiting,
and by "waiting on"
others. Traditional mo-
theres taught their
daughters to care for
and "wait on" their
baby dolls, and to wait
until someday they
could grow up and be
real mommies. Daugh-
ters were trained to
"wait on" th"ir families
like mommy does, and
wait until someday
when they could marry
and have their own
families to "wait on
When daughters
grew older, and became
interested in the other
sex, their traditional
mothers instructed them
to wait for the boys to
show the first signs of
interest. If a young
woman wished to mar-
ry, she had to wait to
be asked.
People say that
things have changed,
but I can't reallv tell.
because I can't visit
everyone in their
homes. For most ot the
people I know, thing-
are till pretty much as
they've always been.
Little boys are still
raised on dreams ot
baseball and pioneering
and rocket ships, and
little girls are still at
home taking care of
baby dolls and helping
mommy set the table. A
-voung woman who takes
the initiative in a re-
lationship with a young
man i assumed to be
an easj lay. The mar-
ried woman who pur-
sues a career will be
stuck with the "blame"
whether husband is at-
tracted to a more tradi-
tional woman, because
his wife is "emascu-
lating" him. A working
wife is still expected to
do the housework and
cook the meals and
wash the clothes and
take care of the kids.
Woman's traditional
privileges have usually
been bought with the
price of "self. Women
have been expected to
defer to their providers,
in all respects, in ex-
change for material
comforts. For those wo-
men who want it that
way, it will be no
problem, for there are
plenty of men looking
for women to wait on
them and bolster their
"masculinity
Young women today,
however, might be wse
to weigh price and pri-
vilege carefully. Unlike
many women before us,
we have grown up with
exposure to education
and ideas, and we have
been made aware of the
value of "doing" sbme-
thing in society, is
opposed to letting
other- do everything for
us. Main young women
have found, to their
dismay, that the) re-
quire more from life
than an expensive house
to keep clean, and days
filled with screaming
children and arpools
and suburban gossip.
Those women who haw
eomc to college to Wil
time while "waiting" to
earn their "Mrs.
gree, would do well to
actively pursue studies
that will lead to a
self-supporting career. It
could very well mean
the difference between
paying the price tor a
self-fulfilling lite, or
having the "privilege"
of waiting our ones
davs "waiting on" some
one else � for every-
thing.
Letters
Letters to the editor
are welcome, however,
they must contain the
name, address, and l.D.
number. No letter will
be printed if they are
not signed in ink by the
person writing the
letter.
Letters must be re-
ceived by noon. Mon-
days and Wednesdays,
at the newspaper office
on the second floor ot
the Publications Build-
ing, which is directly
across from Joyner Lib-
rary.
Letters will be edited
for brevity, libel or
obscenitv.
The East Carolinian
Managing Editor
Steve Bachner
Editor Marc Barnes
Director of Advertising
Robert M. Swaim
Production Manager
Anita Lancaster
I News Editor Karen Wendt
Asst. News Editor Lisa Drew
Features Editor Bill Jones
Asst. Features Editor Richard Green
Asst. Director of Advertising Terry Herndon
L
THE EAST CAROLINIAN is the student
of Eat Carolina University sponsored by the Media
Board ot ECU and is distributed each Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic year (weekly during
the summer).
Editorial opinions are those of the Editorial Board
and do not necessarily reflect the opinions ol the
university or the Media Board.
Sports Editor Charles Chandler
Asst. Sports Editor Jimmy DuPree
Copy Editor Barry Clayton
Asst. to the Editor Leigh Coakley
Ad Tech Super Paul Linke
Offices v located on the second floor of the
Publications Center (Old South Building). Our
mailing address is: Old SOuth Building, ECU,
Greenville, NC 2734.
The phone numbers are: 7S7-S3M, �387,
Subscriptions are $10 annually, alumni St annually.
J





eenville, N.C,
0N TO THE
PROBLEM . . .
1 �Tj-e'v
wait
- L-iety, as
letting
.thing tor
g women
I, to their
the) re-
from life
�ive house
in, and days
-i reaming
carpools
gi i-ip.
n ho have
ge to kill
� aiting1 to
r Mrs de-
uld do well to
pursue -tudies
will lead to a
�sup g areer. It
id very well mean
ference between
the price tur a
-fulfilling life, or
ing the "privilege"
.Nailing our ones
waiting on some
even -
Letters
Letters to the editor
in however,
contain the
SS, and I.D.
etters will
!�- printed if thej are
not m ink the
writing the
� r.
Letters mu-t be re-
noon. Mon-
days and Wednesdays,
at the newspaper ollice
on the second floor of
the Publications Build-
which i directly
a ro� troni Joyner Lib-
rar.
Letter- will be edited
brevity, libel or
emt .
Manager
mcaster
Charles Chandler
Jimmy DuPree
Barry Clayton
Leigh Coakley
Paul Linke
econd floor of th�
th Building). Our
ith Building. ECU,
p-6366. S367, 6309
alumni $6 annually.
Student's voting rights explained
There has been a lot
ol debate in the past
lew years concerning
the voting rights of
students in their college
towns. Recently in Or-
ange County, the laws
were challenged, but
the tat Board of El-
ections has not changed
their position on the
matter.
Arc. ding to Reg-
iter, at the Pitt County
Board of Elections, the
local voter registration
offices have been in-
structed to go by the
guidelines set in 1972.
The issue at hand is
the right of a student
to vote in either their
residence or their dom-
icile. According to the
guideline "residence
and domicile are not
convertable terms
Resdience is defined
as "a person's place of
abode, whether per-
manent or temporary in
the courts opinion.
Domicile is defined as
"one's permanent, esta-
blished home as distin-
guished from a tem-
porary, although actual,
place of rsidence La-
ter in the instructions it
gives two things which
must be determined in
order lor a place to be
Student running
for City Council
By KAREN WENDT
News Editor
Last Carolina may get the chance to have a
voting student serve on the Greenville City Council.
David Hunt, a senior, will be running for a seat
in the upcoming City Countil election, to be held on
October 8.
"1 think a large portion of the Greenville
population consists ol" students said Hunt, and he
feels that the students deserve to have a say in the
Cilv Council.
For the past several years, whoever is holdingthe
office of president of the SGA has the right to hold
a seat on the City. Council, and speak before the
Council, but does not have a vote on the Council.
The population of Greenville is estimated at
37,500, not including the nearly 12,000 students who
are here 8 months out of the year.
Hunt was born in Greenville, though he has only
returned to the city since attending school at ECU.
He plans to live in Greenville after his graduation.
Right now the Council is dealing with the 10th
Street overpass, which has been an issue for quite
some tune now. and the possible construction of
new bicycle paths in the downtown and campus
areas.
With the rising costs of parking, and gasoline, it
is thought that bicycles will be in more use, in the
very near future. Anyone who has walked or driven
down 5th Street has' seen the traffic problems that
the cyclist come- in contact with and can cause the
automobile traffic.
The proposed overpass at the junction of 10th
Street and College Hill Drive has been a topic
which has been length!) considered, but so far the
unlv thing which has been done to attempt to solve
the problem is the construction of crossing lights
and caution lights near the intersection .
Hunt is not sure that an overpass is the answer,
being uncertain that if it were constructed it would
be used b the hurried students attempting to get
to class.
II Hunt is elected lo the City Council it is hoped
thai he will be able to provide a more active voice
lor the students on the Cilv Council.
Mopeds unsafe?
termed a domicile.
"First, residence; se-
cond, the intent to
make the place of re-
sidence a home
Another statement
contained in the in-
structions reads, "The
questions whether a
student's voting resi-
dence is at the location
of teh college he is at-
tending or where he
lived before he entered
college, is a question of
fact which depends up-
on the circumstances of
each individual's case.
Domicile is a highly
personal matter. The
fact that one is a
student in a unviversity
does not entitle him to
vote where he is situ-
ated, not does it of
itself prevent his voting
there. He may vote at
the seat of teh uni-
versity if he has his re-
sidence there and is
otherwise qualified
Later it states
"Domicile is a fact
which may be proved
by direct end circum
stantial evidence
Some of the criteria
which is used to deter-
mine whether or not a
person is residing in
their residence or their
domicile, is the way the
student supports himself
(independently or by his
parents), and whether
or not he is planning to
stay in the city when
he has graduated from
the school.
For students who do
not have their domicile
in the city of Greenville
they must arrange to
vote in their home
towns by absentee bal-
lot.
Register termed the
voting of students to be
a "temporary situation,
even though they may
be there four years, or
six years, or whatever.
Students who desire
to vote must arrange to
have an absentee ballot
sent ot them to be tab-
ulated in their home-
town elections.
People, places,
and
tennis
Tryouts for the Wo-
men's Tennis Team will
be held 4 pm this
Thursday, Sept. 6 at
the Minges tennis
courts. Call Women's
Athletic Office for more
details.
major
attractions
Student Union Major
Attractions Committee
members need to turn
in their addresses and
phone numbers to the
STudent Union office
immediately.
ski
Ski Organizational
Meeting for Christmas
and Spring Trip will be
held Spet. 26, at 7
p.m Brewster B wing
102. For information,
contact Jo Saunders,
Memorial Gym at 757-
6000.
rugby
CHAPEL HILL, NC
(P) Increased in-
surance and stricter
saletv regulations are
needed to halt a rising
accident rale lor mo-
peds, according to the
author of an 580,000
University of North
Carolina study.
"As long as the
price of gas continues
to rise and the main-
tenance of vehicles con-
tinues to rise and mo-
peds remain a viable
mode of transportation,
I see sales going up
and accidents going
up said William W.
Hunter of the Highway
Safety Research Center
in Chapel Hill.
In North Carolina,
the number of accidents
involving mopeds in-
creased from 105 in
1976 to 212 in 1978,
Hunter said. He said 27
percent of moped ac-
cidents in the state in
1978 involved operators
who had suspended dri-
ver licenses.
Hunter said a con-
clusion of the study was
that head injuries ac-
counted for 35 to 55
percent of all moped
rider injuries and for 75
to 80 percent of severe
injuries and deaths.
The study, funded
by the U.S. Department
of Transportation's Na-
tional Highway Traffic
Safety Adminisration,
found that 1.2 percent
of moped accidents re-
sult in death, compared
to .2 percent of motor
vehicle accidents.
Hunter said the
number of moped fa-
talities could be reduced
by regulations requiring
helmets and an oper-
ator's license.
dance
Faculty Dance will
begin Sept. 11. Can
take 25 couples. Contact
Jo Saunders, 757-6000,
or come by Memorial
Gym Room 205.
poetry
Rugby practices will
begin on Tues Sept 4
at 4 p.m. Practices will
be held at the intra-
mural fields behind the
Allied Health Building
every week on Tues
Wed and Thurs. after-
noons at 4 p.m. Anyone
interested in playing
should attend any of
these practice sessions.
For a little exercise and
alot of good times,
come on out and play
some rugby.
gymnastics
Registration for
Children's Gymnastics
will be Wed Sept. 5
� Ages 6-10 and
Thurs Sept. 6 � Ages
11-16.
Registration will be
in the gymnastics room,
Memorial Gym at 7
p.m.
gamma beta phi
Gamma Beta Phi will
meet Thurs. night at 7
p.m. in Room 244,
Mendenhall.
The Poetry Forum
will begin its bi-monthly
meetings. Thr first me-
eting will be Thursday
evening at 8 p.m. in
248 Mendenhall. It is
an informal gathering of
people interested in
getting feedback. on
their poetry. The only
requirement is that you
bring copies of your
peotry to pass around
to j the group. The
Fdrum will regularly
meet on the first and
third Thursday in the
same place at the same
time.
law
The ECU Law So-
ceity will ahve an or-
ganizational meeting
Wednesday, SEpt. 12th
at 7:30 p.m. in room
221 of Mendenhall.
Anyone interested in
law school andor the
legal profession is wel-
come. Great new things
are being planned so
please come!
Wanted
Waitresses
Now taking
applications
pply in person
2-4 Monday
at the
REE HOUSE
PART-TIME
JOB
Looking for a part-time
j ,b with flexible hours
J real business
? Northwest
aii
experience
Mutual Life Ins. Co.
has opening for college
� Call b. fore noo'
ii�r appoinlH'
7BS-4080
Part-time, flexible schedule: Sales
Marketing position for enterprising student
Includes opportunity to attend a 3 1 2 day
seminar in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
Send return to CO. Tankard Co Inc. P.O. Box
1025. Washington, N.C. 27888. Includa nama.
address, phone number, sge, yesr in school,
previous employment, Interests and future plans.
Needed
We are still taking applications for several positions on the
East Carolinian Staff. If you are interested in joining us here at
the paper come by andfdl out an application.
Our office is open from 8 til 5 Monday through Friday, and
most Monday and Wednesday evenings.
Our office is in the Old South building, across from the library.
on the second floor.
Well see you soon.
Makethecampusconnection.
If you want to be listed in the ECU Telephone Directory
for 79-80, you need to order your phone now.
The deadline is September 7.
You can place your order at the Carolina Telephone Phone
ShopBusiness Office at 1530 Hooker Rd.
So get in on the connection, and order your phone today.
LTDE3 Carolina Telephone
UNITED TELEPHONE SYSTEM
WET T-SHIRT
CONTEST
WED. SEPT 18
$100.00 1st PRIZE
Now Accepting Entries
758-3943
STEEL DRIVIN
BAND
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IS SCHEDULED FOR THE
20th OF 8EPT.NOT THE 19th





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Th�- VM
V
De
M7
EC I :
reputal
deter mi
Bu
Kepley, Jil
who l) .
defennv t-
The 19
ranking
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order
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of the
tradition
With
question ml
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anxiou- stj
to acquire!
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seats po?
for their i
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place to
said one
aked thej
early. Ttv
bouse
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studer: I
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shift vn i
ground to
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NEITI
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A&MJCiati-j
f�t in ti





I he Easl Carolinian
tiaii
sports
Tuesday, September 4,1979, page 7
Greenville,NC.
Anthonv Collins looks for hole
"They (ECU) just overpowered
us all over the field. They
jumped on us early and we
could never get in the game
Bob Waters,
WCU coach
Defense answers some questions
while others must still wait
By JIMMY DUPREE
Asst. Sports Editor
ECU football has gained through the years a
reputation of being a defensive power with
determination and esprit de corps as catalysts.
But gone are the days of standout leaders Danny
Kepley, Jim Bolding, Harold Randolph and others
who typified the spirit which lived in the Pirate
defensive rank.
The 1978 unit gained national attention with a
ranking of second in total defense among NCAA
Division I schools. But even that unit was hard hit
by player- terminating their eligibility.
Replacing six talented starters would be a tall
order for the Pirate coaching staff. Gerald Hall,
D.T. Joyner, Oliver Felton, Tommy Summer, Fred
Chaw and Zack Valentine (now an official member
the Pittsburg Steelers) had developed that
tradition to its peek.
With those strongholds departed, a giant
question mark traveled with the Pirate defense.
Would ail-American candidate Mike Brewington
The lines were long and hot yesterday as
anxious students waited in line at Minges Coliseum
to acquire tickets to upcoming Pirate games with
N.C. State and North CArolina.
Some of the studen .s were in line as early as
Sunday night in anticipation of getting the best
seats possible for the two biggest games of the year
lor their dear, beloved Pirates.
"Some guys from Western Carolina needed a
place to stay Saturday night and we provided one
said one ECU student. "So come Sunday night, we
asked them to do us a favor; stand in the lines
early. They did and we have the best seats in the
house
This is just one example of the lengths that
students went to to get tickets to these games.
Most of the students came in groups and took
shifts waiting in line. Towels were laid on the
ground to secure their spots in line.
The mid-day hours were hot, miserably hot for
the waiters. Many simply stayed on their towels and
sunbathed while others got up and threw anything
from frisbees to footballs to beer cans.
"We had a great time out there said one
student after the long wait was over. "Heck, it was
like being beside a pool or something, except that
there was not cool water to jump into
Many red, lobster-like creatures departed from
the lines outside of Minges after purchasing their
keys to two big Saturday afternoons. "I'm burned
all to heck said one of those who chose to
sunbathe all day.
"I wouldn't take anything for this chance to be
in the sun said one ravishing young lady. "I
would have been in the sun anyway so I told my
boyfriend that I would wait in line for him. He
must have trusted me here alone because he
showed up an how
While some left the lines sun-b urned, others
left slightlv more relaxed than when they began to
stay at Minges. "A little too much to drink was
all one stumbling student could say as he lett the
lines. , , .i �
"I had a great time but I'm sure glad this
happens only once a year stated a tired female
student. �
One look at her and a young man standing
nearby said, "Boy, 1 wish we could do this more
f '
WeB, they say the guys are the aggressors
anyway. On to Raleigh and Chapel Hill.
�����
THE PIRATE BACKFIELD gained a handsome
iota of 368 yards rushing in East CArolina s 31-o
L h�n�Tf Western CArolina last Saturday night,
thrashing ot western v.� .110 �j halfhark
Fullback Theodore Sutton gained 112 and halfback
Anthony Collins totaled 95 in the victory. Reserve
MasUTTC0ONb bTtHWAY, scored two touchdowns
i. the game. This number is twice the fifrire that
he tallied in his previous two seasons.
NEITHER ECU OR NC bTA� "he,
. Coinrdav are currently ranaea in mc�
opponent sext Saturday, are c 7
Associated Press lop iwneiy. �u
! tmm a vicotry fo' either could mean a
received votes. A vicoiry ��
spot in the elite rankings the following week.
be able to answer the pre-season pressure?
Would Jeffrey Warren, Noah Clark, and John
Hallow fill vacancies adequately? If not, who would?
Saturday's contest with Western Carolina
revealed some very bright spots to the ECU
mentors, but it also revealed several short-comings.
While the Pirate's allowed the Catamounts to
amass 180 yards passing, WCU netted only eight on
the ground with 26 carries.
The Catamounts, though unable to penetrate
ECU territory but three times during the contest,
again plagued the Bucs with their aerial assault
directed by senior quarterbacks Mike Pusey and
Kent Briggs.
THe pair connected on 12 out 24 passes, while
throwing but one interception to Brewington in the
second quarter.
While statistics from the clash show Brewington
with only one solo tackle and four other first hits,
defensive head Coach Frank Orgel maintains the
optomistic point of view.
"Mike Brewington had a good game overall
Orgel stated. "Western Carolina did not run the
ball very much; we didn't expect them to.
"He had that big interception for us near the
end of the first half to end a drive and he knocked
down a key pass in the end zone he added.
Orgel added, however, that there is plenty of
room for improvement. "We had way too many
penalties on defense said the six year Pirate
assistant. "They hurt us with some of their curl
patterns. We missed some assignments that we
shouldn't have.
"They weren't a running footbali team Orgel
offered. "Our game plan was to make them run by
cutting off their passing attackwe just never made
them run
The only drive that produced any points for the
Cats came late in the fourth quarter as the reserve
defense took over.
An outstanding first game performance was
displayed by freshman defensive back Freddie Jones
who made two solo tackles on the defensive
specialty teams covering kickoffs and punts.
Covering a second quarter Rodney Allen punt,
Jones speared ECU wide receiver Jeff Dean just as
the ball arrived for a no-gain effort.
Sophomore tackle Matt Jones made one of the
glowing plays of the reserve unit when he sacked
Briggs at the Western three yard line for a loss of
16.
With 'the Western Carolina game as history,
Orgel must now prepare the troups for a visit to
Carter Stadium and the Wolfpack of N.C. State.
"It's always a very physical game when we play
State he noted. "We're just going to have to
force the big plays
Leander Green escapes grasp of Catamount defender
Photo v Pete Podeszua
Sutton gains 112
Pirates down WCU
ECUoffem
impressive
By JIMMY DUPREE
Asst. Sports Editor
"They just overpow-
ered us all over the
field said Western
Carolina Coach Bob
Waters following a 31-6
victory by the East
Carolina University Pir-
ates in the season
opener.
"They jumped on us
early and we could
never get in the
game
An appropriate anal-
ysis considering the Pi-
rates surprisingly sud-
den march into the end
zone only 2:23 into the
contest.
Leander Green op-
ened the Buca' blitz-
kreig with an 11-yard
pass to split end Vern
Davenport.
Green continued to
pass throughout the
night with the consis-
tency the team . has
lacked for years.
King of teh Gridiron
Scholarship honoree
Theodore Sutton rushed
for two touchdowns
while amassing a game
high 112 yards on the
ground.
The pair of TD's
doubled Sutton's career
total.
Sutton's first came
with 2:01 remaining in
the first half on a one
yard blast up the mid-
dle. The second Sutton
gallup was from 13
yards out.
Kicker Bill Lamm
completed the night in
perfect fashion, con-
necting on all four point
after attempts and ad-
ding a 24 yard field
goal, rounding out the
Pirate scoring.
Running back An-
thony Collins added 95
yards rushing to the
Pirates' impressive 368
yard total. Reserve
Marvin Cobb added 51
coming off the bench.
Green connected on
six of 14 passes, while
reserve Henry Trevathon
(See OFFENSIVE page 8)
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
East Carolina fullback Theodore Sutton gained
112 yards and scored two touchdowns, one more
than he had in the previous two seasons, last
Saturday before a Ficklen Stadium crown of 25,500
to lead the Pirates to a 31-6 vicotry in-state rival
Western CArolina.
Sutton spearheaded a Pirate offense that
amassed an astounding total of 514 yards. "We
seemed to take advantage of opportunities real
well said East CArolina head coach Pat Dye.
While the offense was running over the
Catamount defense, the Pirate defense held Western
CArolina to a mere 8 yards rushing and only 188 in
all.
"It's hard for me to evaluate our defense said
Dye. "While we did well against their running
attack, our pass coverage fell apart a couple of
times. On several occasions they gained big chunks
of yardage
The Pirates wasted very little time getting on
the scoreboard. After Western kicker Ted Dunn
slipped on the opening kickoff ECU linemen Wayne
Inman recovered on the Pirate 40 to give ECU great
field position.
Two passes from Leander Green to Vern
Davenport went for 32 yards before Green rolled
right and ran 25 yards to put the Pirates on the
board for the first time with only 2:33 gone in the
contest.
The Pirates did not score again until the 9:30
mark of the second quarter when halfback Sam
Han-ell's one-yard plunge capped an 83 yard drive.
The drive included runs of 14 yards by Anthony
Collins and 19 yards by Mike Hawkins. A Green to
Davenport pass set up the score. Bill Lamm's kick
increased the Pirate lead to 14-0.
The Pirates' next scoring drive featured a
spectacular 70-yard pass play from Green to Billy
Ray Washington. Washington made a super catch as
Green's toss was slightly underthrown. The pass left
the ball on the Western 5-yard line.
Two plays later Sutton crashed through the
middle of the Pirate offensive line for one yard and
the third ECU touchdown at the 12:01 mark of the
first half. Bill Lamm's third extra point kick of the
game gave the Pirates a 21-0 advantage at the half.
Of the Green to Washington pass play, Dye
simply asked, "Wasn't that something? The run
after the catch was something too
On thier first drive, of teh second half the
Pirates drove from their own 28-yard line to the
Catamount 34 before being stopped on fourth and
one by the Western defense.
Green and company picked up hwere they left
off on the next possesion, driving 72 yards in 10
plays for a touchdown. Theordore Sutton's 15-yard
burst up the middle gave the Pirates a 27-0 lead
that was increased by a point with the addition of a
Lamm kick. Sutton ran for 33 yards in 3 carries on
this drive alone.
The Pirates scored on their very next possesion.
A Henry Trevathan to Gerald Sykes pass that
covered 14 yards and runs of 12 and 13 yards by
Marvin Cobb set up a 24-yard Bill Lamm field goal
put the Pirates comfortably on top at 31-0. The field
goal came at the 12:08 mark4of the fourth period
and completed a good night's work for Lamm, who
was successful on each kick attempted during the
game.
Lamm's success, along ' with that of punter
Rodney Allen prompted Dye to comment on the
Pirate kickers. "Our kicking game was good
tonight he said. "Also, our kick coverage seemed
to get better and better as the night wore on.
Western got on the scoreboard on the drive
immediately following Lamm's field goal, quickly
driving 76 yards in 7 plays. The drive featured the
passing of Cat quarterback Kent Briggs, who was
subbing for starter Mike Pusey at the time.
Briggs, facing a defense of mostly ECU reserves,
began the drive with a 47-yard pass to split end
Dwayne Norman that put the ball on the Pirate
29-yard line. A 16-yard toss from Briggs to Jeff
Dean moved Western even closer to paydirt.
Two plays later, with third and two situation at
hand and the ball on the ECU six-yard line, Briggs
attempted a pass that was deflected by Pirate
linebacker Mike Brewington. BLt a pass interference
call on the East Carolina secondary nullified the
play and put the ball on the Pirate one and gave
the Cats a first down.
One play later Western tailb'ack Leonard
Williams swept around right end for the Catamounts
only score of the game. Western attempted a
two-point conversion that failed and seasled the final
score at 31-6.
Though the Pirate offense accumulated massive
chunks of yardage all evening, Dye appeared
concerned about one aspect of the game.
"I was very disappointed in the number of
penalties called against us he said, referring to
the 110 yards assessed against the Pirates.
"We went through the first 13 practices without
any offside or holding calls on our first offensive
unit. I just didn't expect to see us make this many-
mistakes. We found that we have a problem in this
area and must coreect it before next week
"Next week" is when the Pirates face the
Wolfpack of North Carolina State in what is always
a big, big game for the Pirates and their fans.
As for the game next week, Dye would only say,
"We've got a chance Western Coach Bob Waters
must feel the same way.
Pirate-Catamount stats
WCU 0 0 0 6-6
ECU 7 14 7 3-31
ECU�Green 25 run (Lamm kick)
ECU�Harrell 1 run (Lamm kick)
ECU�Sutton 1 run (Lamm kick)
ECU�Sutton 15 run (Lamm kick)
ECU�Lamm 24 field goal
WCU�Williams 1 run (run failed)
A-25,500
INDIVIDUAL STATS
Rushing
ECU�Sutton 12-112, Collins 16-95, Green 5-7,
Hawkins 5-23, Harrell 5-47, Cobb 10-51, Freeman
1-2, sykes 1-10, Nelson 7-26, Blue 3-(7). Team
totals: 66-368.
WCU�Pusey 3-1, Cunningham 2-10, Brown
11-18, Williams 6-18, Briggs 4-(-39). Team totals:
26-8. Passing
ECU�Green 6-14-0, 132 yards, Trevathan 1-1-0,
14; Nelson 0-1-0, 0. Team totals: 7-16-0, 146 yards.
WCU�Pusey 5-10-1, 64 yards, Briggs 7-14-0
116. Team totals: 12-24-1, 180.
Pass receiving
ECU�Davenport 3-49, Washington, 2-84, Harrell
1-0, Sykes 1-14.
'wcu8dean 5-67, McGill 3-23, Brown 1-9, Norman
3-81.
4
u





Page 8 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 4 September 1979
Stojzs,
Unique Gifts
and
Accessories
Dfie. gazebo
201 �. 5tfi Stxe.e.t
faxttnvdU.cN.C. 752-9384
Willie Holley nabs WCU back Leonard Williams
Offensive team
Continued from page 7
hit on his nl attmept
ami freshman Carlton
Nelson missed hi sole
�rt.
Nelson, a speedster
li .in Portsmouth, ir-
a, has impressed the
Pirate coaches with his
rapid adaptation to the
wishb ne attack, having
played under a different
offense while earning
Portsmouth ami all-
Region honors.
"W c didn't make
mistakes offensively
thai we did last year
. d ECl roach Pat
De. "When we got the
opportunity to score on
offense, we took advan-
tage of it
The Catamounts re-
mained scoreless until
the reserve defensive
unit was installed in the
fourth quarter.
With 9:06 remaining
in the contest, Leonard
Williams put WCU on
the board with a dive
from one yard out. A
run attempt by Williams
for the extra point fell
short.
"I'm proud of our
offense said Dye.
"We didn't have a
turnover.
"I'm very, very dis-
appointed in our num-
ber of penalties,
though. The penalties
took us out of some
situations that could
ahve become scoring
situations.
"I feel like Leander
Green can throw the
ball well and threw it
well. I think the backs
on the first unit blocked
well he added.
� ECU FOOTBALL HOSTESSES
Got in on the action, support the
1979 Pirate Football Team! If you
are interested In becoming a
football hostess, a meeting is
scheduled for Thursday, Sept. 6,
at the Scales Fleldhouse; 7:30pm.
In case of a conflict, call:
757-6330,
ask for Coach Wallace.
FOR INSURANCE CALL:
Bill McDonald
Phone: 752-6680
Located on �. 10th St.
(next to King's Sandwich Shop)
STATE FARM INSURANCE COMPANIES
HOME OFFICES: BLOOMING TON, ILLINOIS
r-c:
NCAA football set
to get underway
IMF. ASSOCIATED
PRESS
rhe preliminaries
over and the stage
is i tor
e
son to
action.
With I
the stars of
football sea-
swing into
Collegia t
sociation'
ittle fanfare,
he National
Athletic As-
Division I-A
teams � none of them in
Associated Press
Top Twenty�got the
season under way Sat-
urday. Next weekend,
the teams with numbers
before their names take
T.
No. 1-ranked South-
ern California, the pre-
season choice to capture
the national champion-
ship, opens at Texas
Tech while runnerup
Alabama, the defending
national champion, trav-
- to Georgia Tech to
kick off ABC's 1979
television package.
Oklahoma, Texas,
Penn State, Nebraska
and Notre Dame, the
pre-season 3-4-5-8-9
teams, arc idle while
sixth-ranked Purdue en-
tertains Wiscounsin, No.
7 Michigan hosts
Northwestern and No.
10 Michigan State is at
home against Illinois.
In the Second Ten,
No. U Georgia, No. 17
Pitt and No. 20 Arkan-
sas aren't scheduled but
No. 12 Missouri enter-
tains San Diego State,
No. 13 Stanford is at
Tulane, No. 14 Texas
A&M meets Brigham
Young in Houston,
Wyoming is at No. 15
ashington, No. 16
Houston at UCLA Cal-
ifornia at No. 18
Arizona State Southern
Mississippi at No. 19
Florida State.
On the small-scale
opening weekend the
spotlight belonged to
Hubert Oliver, who
rushed for 196 yards on
25 carries as Arizona
whipped Colorado State
33-17. Richard Hersey
added 120 yards on 15
rushes while Jim Krohn
ran for two touchdowns
and passed to Oliver for
one. �
To get things off on
the right foot there
were even a couple of
upsets. Tulsa bowed to
McNeese State 6-3 on
second-half field goals
of 47 and 40 yards by
Don Stump while West
Texas State blanked
Southern Illinois 14-0 in
a Missouri Valley Con-
ference game as half-
back-quarterback Clint
Plant scampered 85
yards for one touchdown
and engineered a 67-
ard drive for the other.
The MVC was the
onlv conference with
4
league games. New
Mexico State trimmed
Wichita State 23-13 as
Howard Greathouse
rushed for 134 yards
and Ray Locklin added
115 and Indiana State
downed Drake 19-12
despite Mark Menden-
h all's MVC-record four
field goals.
Del Rodgers galloped
60 yards for a first-
period score and Mark
Anderson returned an
interception for a 20yard
touchdown 44 seconds
later as Utah whipped
Long Beach State 34-10.
Brad Wright completed
16 of 22 passes for 171
yards to lead New-
Mexico past Louisiana
Tech 34-0.
Two of the nation's
winningest independent
teams were easy victors.
Bernard Jackson scored
on runs of 13 and 18
yards and rushed for
127 over-all as North
Texas State pounded
Texas-El Paso 35-0 and
Theodore Sutton gained
112 yards on just 12
carries, two of them for
touchdowns, to pace
East Carolina over
Western Carolina 31-6.
Hal King passed 19
yards to Kevin Sigue
with just over a minute
remaining to lift South-
western Louisiana past
North-east Louisiana 17-
13. Eastern Michigan
was the only other
Division I-A team in
action. The Hurons de-
feated Division II
Northern Michigan 21-7.
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4 September 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN F�je 9
wcu
Lady Pirate
practice starts
ATTIC
P
In. c
Marvin Cobbruns for some of his 51 yards in 31-6 Pirate win
Mike Hawkins "flips out"
WCU receiver goes down
Photos by Pete Podeszwa
By JIMMY DUPREE
Asst. Sports Editor
Although the Lady
Pirate basketball season
is still over two months
away, preparations for
season opener began
today.
Head coach Cathy
Andruzzi announced
Monday that open try-
outs will be conducted
during the next week
and that any interested
student should contact
her in Minges Coli-
seum, or call 757-6384.
While only two
players were lost from
last season's team (Gale
Kerbaugh and April
ROss), Andruzzi states,
"There are positions on
the squad for twelve
girls. Whoever wants to
play and hustle the
most will make the
squad
Starters Rosie Thom-
pson, Lynn Emerson,
Marcia Girven and
Lydia Rountree return
from the 1978-79 squad
which possessed speed
but lacked the depth
needed in a champion-
ship team.
In an effort to al-
eviate the problem,
Andruzzi and assistant
Marcia Richards re-
cruited a host of tal-
ented high school
players and tranfers to
add needed experience
and freshmen to build
for the future.
Junior Guard Laurie
Sikes joins the Lady
Pirates via Peace Col-
lege, Raleigh. Sikes
possesses the quick
hands and alert vision
that should earn the 5-6
newcomer a spot near
the top of the roster.
Other tranfer ath-
letes include Kathy
Reilley, a 5-9 forward
from Middle Tennessee
College where she was
the ninth leading scorer
in AIAW Region II.
Heidi Owen, a 5-8
forward, joins the Lady
Pirates through Wagner
College.
Freshmen talent
brought in this season
includes scholarship
players Donna Moody,
Mary Denkler and
Donna Brayboy, as well
as talented walk-on
Fran Hooks from nearby
Goldsboro.
Sikes, Moody, Den-
kler and Hooks partic-
ipated in the Pat Ken-
nedy Invitational Bas-
ketball Camps held this
summer in Ohio, Mas-
sachusetts and Atlanta,
Georgia.
"We're anxious to
get the girls in the
gym said Andruzzi.
"We at least have a
little more depth than
we had last year.
"What we really
want to do right now is
start getting the girls
into a routine
Afternoon workouts
in Minges Coliseum ac-
companied by three
sessions per week at
the local Nautilus clinic
should provide ample
preparation for the sea-
son opener against
Richmond November
17th.
BLIND
DRIVER
Wed.
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Page
,0 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 4 September 1979
The East Carolinian
features
Page 10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 4 September 1979
Woodstock revisited
By JAY STONE
Features Writer
1 am standing in line with what I would estimate
to br 300 people varying in cultural backgrounds,
from college students to counter culture reprobates
resplendent in suspenders and bandanas. The crowd
i- talking in a muted, bordering on reverant,
hesitant murmer. Two guys in front of me are
comparing notes on their experiences at orientation.
Finally, the theater doors open and the crowd
begins to filter in and assume seats. The
management, however is intent upon delaying the
film until everyone can be seated which inevitably
becomes a rather tedious, drawn out process.
Having reached the limits of its patience, the
audience begins to chant "Woodstock Woodstock
Woodstock It begins sporatically at first, but soon
the entire theater is contributing to the refrain.
"Woodstock Woodstock
A spirit of unification quickly envelopes the
audience. Inevitably, perhaps prompted by our
chant, the film documentary of the "Woodstock
Aquarian Music and Art Fair" (as it was originally
christened) opens to a full house and a raucous
round of applause.
The tact that Woodstock has been preserved on
film lor our generation is a tribute to the foresight
of Michael Lang, the man who is generally
acknowledged to have been responsible for
envisioning, planning, and promoting Woodstock.
Mike Lang, proprietor of a head shop in the
Coconut Grove section of Miami, went on to
promote several concerts in the Miami area and
eventually produced the Miami Pop Festival which
featured Jimi Hendrix, The Mothers of Invention,
The Blues Image, Blue Cheer, John Lee Hooker,
Chuck Berry, and Arther Brown.
Janis Joplin
Shortly after the Miami Pop Festival, Lang
moved to Woodstock, N.Y. where he met Artie
Kornfeld, vice president of A&R records.With the
assistance of Kornfeld, Lang conceived of a
Woodstock festival and began working to bring his
vision to cognition.
Alter consulting an attorney, Lang was steered
to John Roberts and Joel Rosenmann who ultimately
agreed to finance the festival for an initial
investment of $500,000. Subsequently, a corporation
was formed with Lang, Kornfeld, Roberts, and
Rosenmann acting as its principals, although Roberts
and Rosenmann were both opposed to admitting
kornfeld who had very little invested in the
venture.
Alter attempting to secure several sites for the
festival, the promoters eventually settled on Wallkill,
N.Y. A scant four weeks before Woodstock was
scheduled to premiere, however, a hostile town
board refused to grant the necessary permits to
hold the event. Miraculously, the same Friday that
Wallkill refused to grant vital permits, Lang spotted
Max Yasgur's 600 acre dairy farm. Between Friday
and Saturday morning Max Yasgur and Mike Lang
had reached an agreement on the farm for $50,000.
Work began on the land immediately since time
now bore a very high premium.
Yasgur was one of the wealthiest people in
White Lake, N.Y. and until the show was over he
was virtually alienated by the rest of the
community. He was a very noble and courageous
man. Although hippies and rock music were outside
of his experience and probably frightened him, he
transcended his inhibitions and prejudices.
Later in the festival when there was word out
that the residents of White Lake were selling water
to the kids, Max put up a big "Free Water" sign
on his barn. By the end of the event he had
become indoctrinated into the "Woodstock Nation
He called a press conference on his lawn and gave
a twenty-eight-page testimonial to the festival.
Woodstock itself has been romanticized to some
extent. Things were ripped off, two out of the three
days were marred by rain, and many of the arts
anil crafts exhibits had to be cancelled due to the
change in sites and lack of preparation. For all
practical purposes, though, it went down exactly the
wa it has been told and retold; one generation to
another.
It is difficult to conceive of a pre-Woodstock
America. Most of my own recollections are vague,
but there was a time when kids were expelled from
school simply for wearing their hair long or dressing
in clothing identifiable with counter-culture values.
The styles in clothing and hair in the 1960's
were the antithesis of the Paris and New York
fashion world. Clothing was created out of the
culture and people made a social-political statement
l . �� n American. Photo bv Michael Lee
The 'Woodstock Nation" was defiant and unconventional but not an American v
by the clothing they wore. Dressing with the same such as yoga, and �f-� �� �
�'1t was an insult to solid red blooded Americans through �ugs n
a defiant infringement on their territory. The ln drug culture b
conventions of patriotic dress were challenged: The more critically than any other ��
stars and stripes were transmogrified into shorts, counter-culture. Consequently drugs beciffl
at i"ts, bs, and headband This was a new unifying factor in the �� A noraRy
r ,rw�.i-m wbirh tn the rest of America puritanical establishment simply tailed to compre
rrraDa :�h er s;mb�,5 a�d if �-�-� r& ess
decals of flowers were signs of identification with enlightenment through drug Their onlj "Per'e"ce
2 peace movement or drug movement or both. had been with alcohol, nuot.ne.
vour
car stopped and searched
These could get
anytime.
In the ears preceding the festival the country
had undergone tremendous turmoil: John F.
Kennedy, Martin Luther King, and Robert Kennedy
were as'sasinated. We were engaged in a war that,
by and large, did not have the support of the
people who were being asked to fight it. There
were student riots at Berkle) and Columbia. The
Chicago Democratic Convention was a fiasco of
colossal scope. (In retrospect Richard Daley's
reactionary stance in regard to the youth movement
was predictable considering that he posted a
twenty-lour hour guard on all of Chicago's water
and or perscription drugs such as val.ums
qualudes, amphetamines, etc theretore drugs had
always been associatd with stupefication or
schizophrenia and the unpleasant side-effects oi
frayed nerves and hangovers. Ultimately, the) were
believed to promote violence.
Drugs played a large role at Woodstock.
Whether or not they actually helped to promote
harmonj and tranquility is anybody's guess, but the
fact remains that there were no injuries resulting
from violence treated by festival physicians.
Michael Lang took great pleasure in discouraging
the sale of alcohol, the drug of the establishment
which discouraged the sale of marijuana. Although
SSSr 'wSSr The hip7ZZL2r drugs were a par, of Woodstoc, j ��-��
dose the City's drinking water w.th LSD during the even, that requtred a degree ol mobthtv and a
convention.) . .
By the time of Woodstock, oriental philosophies see page twelve please
Costa Rica trip
gave new insight
BY RICHARD GREEN
Assistant Features Editor
s I slipped the tape box onto the shelf, my
tars were still aching from wearing those
cumbersome headpones for three hours.
1 was leaving the language lab when I saw a
notice, "Costa Rica Trip on the bulletin board.
That turned out to be the best notice I ever read.
The poster said to see Dr. Robert Cramer in the
Brewster Building, room A-222, so I decided to drop
bj on my way to Spanish class to check this thing
out.
Dr. Cramer is an interesting and friendly man
with alot of first-hand knowledge of Latin America.
He and his wife have traveled extensively and have
been the faculty advisors for the Costa Rica
program for seven years.
Being an avid photographer "Doc" showed me
some beautiful slides of Costa Rica, and I
immediately knew that I had to visit this tropical
wonderland.
But what about the cost of this exotic
excursion. And what classes are offered? And I
don't even speak Spanish!
He explained that the cost was the same as one
semester at ECU, a program fee of $425, plus a
plane ticket, necessary visas and spending money.
Each of the fifteen students in the program
would live with a Costa Rican family at a cost of
$100.00 per month, which includes room and board,
and laundry done usually once a day.
I wish I could live in Greenville that cheaply.
The courses offered this year include Tropical
Biology, Geography of Middle America, Spanish
Conversation, Spanish Culture, Field Studies and a
new course in folk dancing.
One of the following courses will be offered,
depending on student interest Economic Develop-
ment of Central America, International Relations of
Central America or Social Institutions of Costa Rica.
All courses are taught in English (except
Spanish, of coarse!)
So the pressure lo know Spanish was off, as
lur as classes were concerned, but what about the
rest of the time?
You cannot begin lo imagine what it is like to
be dropped off at a strange home, in a strange
country, where nobody speaks English. It was the
mosi difficult, yet exciting experience of my life.
Luckily, my Costa Rican brother, Juan, was there
to greel me in good English, and to help translate
. to tlie rest of my family.
Pops in Kinston
Jeanie Vasicek gets a shower, Puerto
Vargas style, from Lotto, a park service
But that only lasted for the first day. He is
married to an American girl from Elizabeth City,
N.C whom he met when she lived there during
the second Costa Rica Program. They live a few
blocks away.
I had taken Spanish 1001 so I didn't have too
many problems. Other students had members of the
household who spoke English, which turned out to
be a disadvantage. They didnt have to speak
Spanish and tney didn't learn.
4You cannot imagine what it is
like to be dropped a off at a
strange home, in a country,
where nobody speaks English
Universad Nacional in Heredia, Costa Rica, was
our home base for most of our classes, and was
within walking distance of most of our homes.
Three students lived in an outlying city, San
Pablo, and had to ride the bus to school.
But the Field Studies course took us all over the
country for anywhere from one-to four-day trips.
Before I left I had been to more parts of the
worker. Lotto has been on two voyages
with Jacques Cousteau. Photo by Richard Green
country than anyone in my family (my Costa Rican
family, that is )
In this small country located between Nicaragua
ana Panama, the climate varies from cool,
mountaineous regions to tropical rain forests to arrid
fiatlands to beautiful beaches. And we saw it all.
While we were in Costa Rica the conflict in
Nicaragua was boiling, and I imagined stepping off
the plane in San Jose, the capital of Costa Rica,
and being picked off by a sniper. But we probably
heard less about the situation than the people in
the States.
The only real crisis that any of us had to face
was "culture shock The Cramers were always
there to help us work out whatever problem might
arise.
We also had an indispensible friend, Jorge
Saenz, who works at the universidad and places us
in families, to help iron out differences with Mama
and Papa.
It was a great experience and it gave everyone a
chance for a new perspective on the good ol'
U.S. of You dont realize how good we have it!
And if you are interested in learning Spanish,
the third largest spoken language of the world, this
is your chance.
We met an American man in Cost Rica who
thought he had mastered the language. He ordered
a drink in a restaurant and the waiter cringed,
hurried away, and soon returned with the manager.
The man had ordered cattle laxative.
A Pops Concert by
the North Carolina
Symphony is scheduled
for Tuesday, September
18th in Kinston.
The concert will be
held at Northwest Ele-
mentary School Auditor-
ium in Kinston at 8:15
p.m.
Associate Conductor
James Ogle will lead
the orchestra for this
performance.
Associate Conductor
James Ogle is now in
iiis sixth season with
the North Carolina
Symphony. He joined
the Symphony after
winning the Symphony's
first Young Conductors
Competition in 1974, the
same year he won the
Malko International
Conducting Competition
in Denmark.
Formerly the Assist-
ant Conductor of the
University of Michigan
Orchestra and Arts
Chorale, Mr. Ogle has
studied at the National
Conservatory of Music
in Paris and with Igor
Markevitch in France.
The N&rth Carolina
Symphony is the only
major orchestra between
Atlanta and Washing-
ton, D.C having won
acclaim from critics in
New York, Washington
D.C Chicago and
North Carolina.
Performing concerts
to adult audiences and
educational matinees for
N.C. school children,
the orchestra and its
ensembles travel more
than 19,000 miles each
year and play to aud-
iences totalling more
than 280,000 people.
Single tickets will
be $6 for adults and $3
for students, senior cit-
izens and Symphony
society members.
West breaks vow
NEW YORK AP�
Mae West is making
her debut next week as
a huckster in a radio
commercial, or, as she
puts it, "breaking my
vow of commercial
chastitv
The wise-cracking
stage and screen actress
has signed for several
30-second commercials
for Poland Spring
Water, premiering in
California, it was an-
nounced Wednesday.
Miss West claims to
be 86 years old�one
the rare occasions when
she will discuss her
age. In her first com-
mercial scheduled for
showing Tuesday, she
kids herself on the
subject of age by say-
ing:
"I've been drinking
Poland Spring Water for
about�hmm�20 years.
Started when 1 was
four.
"I'm just crazy a-
bout i she says of
the product. I in-
vited the boys
from Poland Spring to
come up and see me
some time�and they
did. The rest, as they
say, is history
.MMa
iliillllllllliiH1t�
�' 4teT 4i





r
Pag� 11 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 4 September 1979
Albums spotlighted
The spirit of a game sometimes carries over into the crowd,
Widow arrested for stealing food
SAN VNT0N10,
X! AP�When she
irrested for shop-
eries lat
ar-old Mat-
. . was dest-
. and alone.
then, contri-
- from across the
- have bai-
rn � than
I Mrs. Sen-
se overnight
: � a national
- - she now
: it is
s a � alth
: loo
iev she said
"I think
l -hurt
' She ' ol
donated
in jail
lor trying to steal $15
worth t sausages, ham
and butter from a
supermarket on July 24.
Most of the donated
money has been put in
a special fund by a
five-man committee.
Bob Pugh, a member ol
the panel set up to
administer the contribu-
tions, said the commit-
tee decided not to give
Mr Sehultz the $25
000 in a lump sum but
to seek a court order
establishing a guardian-
-hip for her.
Hugh, 73. is pres-
ident of the local chap-
ter of the Texas Senior
Citizens Association,
which received some of
the contributions on
Mr Schultz's behalf.
He explained she
was conned out ol her
life savings of $5,000 in
1973 and that "if she
had all the money right
awaj she'd be easj
pre) for every Tom,
Dick and Harry
Pugh said money
"came from all over
America" alter a mag-
istrate decision to
dare the woman in jail
was criticized. the
charges were dropped,
and the mayor ordered
an investigation ol the
confinement.
"Fve never seen
anything like it aid
Pugh. "It proves Amer-
ica still has a heart
The elderly widow
was released two weeks
ago from � a hospital
where she was treated
tor heart and stomach
ailments. But she said
she doesn't feel any
better.
"I'm just tired. I'm
wore completely out,
said Mr Sehultz, who
worked a- a hotel maid
to help support herself
and her husband alter
he suffered a stroke.
Her husband was an
invalid for 21 years
before his death 18
years ago Sunday.
Mr Sehultz said
new- of the donations
cheered her up.
"1 thank all of them,
and God bless them
all she said.
Bui she added, "I'm
tired of life. I've got
uobody. 1 don't know
nobody. I've lived here
56 years and 1 don't
know a dozen people.
4 By SISSY HANKSHAW
Features Writer
A while back, a few talented individuals got
together to perform in the Greek Theatre at Cal.
Berkley. Ramblin Jack Elliot, Arlo, Pete Seeger,
Joan Baez, Jackson Brown, Terry Garthwaite, Richie
Havens, Dan Hicks, David Lyndley, Country Joe,
Maria Muldaur, Tom Paxton, Buffy Ste. Marie, and
Jesse Colin Young. They were there for a
performance at the Bread and Roses Festival of
Acoustic Music. Fantasy Records recorded the whole
show and released an album entitled Bread and
Roses. It is one of the most dynamic assemblages of
musicians to come along in ten years. It is a lot of
beautiful music, and not much noise.
If you're into noise, with direction and perhaps
a melodic attraction, there is a lot of good new rock
and roll. A sparkling new group, Mistress, has
released their first album entitled Mistress. This is
a fine debut album and features ia lot of good
tunes, especially "China Lake" and Neil Young's
"Cinnamon Girl
Jimmy Buffett and Peter Tosh have released new
albums. Bufett's new album, lolcano, is better than
his last, but that's a small claim to distinction. The
Bush Doctor's new album, Mystic Man, is
frightening. Tosh's music is certainly the tightest
Reggae ever produced, but the lyrics rumble of a
revolution that could bring the world to the feet of
the Third World, so buyer beware. Praise be to
Jah!
A couple of aging monoliths have new additions,
being RockU and Take It Home, by Chuck Berry
and B.B. King, respectively. Chuck Berry, recently
imprisoned for tax evasion, proves that he is an
ageless wonder. B.B.King's album is completely
commercial, but with the Crusaders backing him
and Lucille supporting him, how can he go wrong.
Another guitarist of note, David Bromberg, has
released a new recording of folk and ballads. My
Own House secures Bromberg's claim to cult
superstar -tatu
On the progressive jazz scene, where the
emphasis is on high caliber and not high capital,
there are, many good selections. New Chataqua, by
Pat Metheny is only surpassed by last year's Pat
Metheny group album, which has been on the
charts for sixty weeks.
Joni Mitchell left word that she was getting
ready to tour with thett Metheny Group and Jaco
Pastorius. She was very pleased with her last
album, a tribute to Charles Mingus, and she should
well be. Her next album should be the highlight of
her folk-jazz career. Remember, you heard it here
first. But if you like to hear Mingus, why not the
original with Mingus's last album, Passions of a
Man.
On the Funk front, the masters are holding their
own against a plethora of newcomers. Con Funk
Shun has just about their hottest album, Candy, and
their single "Chase Me Bootsy's Rubber Band
still holds their own with their album This Boot
Was Made for Funk, and putting that boot on the
heads of the recording industry. George Clinton is a
genius and perhaps the key figure in Black music.
If Clinton is the king, then Rich James is the crown
Prince. Certainly James is the "king of punk-funk"
and he is "Bustin' out of L Seven" to boogie your
sneakers away.
ABORTIONS UP TO 12TH
WEEK OF PREGNANCY
$175.00 inclusive"
pregnancy test birth control and
problem pregnancy counseling For
further information call 832-0535 (toll-
free number 800-221-2568i between
9 A M -5 P M weekdays
Raleigh Women's Health
Organization
917 West Morgan St.
Raleigh, N.C. 27603
Aniks Used
FURNITURE
and Repair Shop
We have a complete
line off used furniture
at bargain prices
Beds, Desks, Chairs,
Sofas
located on
600 Wilson St.
in Farmville
w.
CLIFF'S
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
� ALL YOU CAN EAT $2.75
TROUT
CRAB CAKES
OCEAN PERCH
FLOUNDER
Tea is included with meal
E. 10th. St. Extension
752-3172






t �� �
HH nHMpi
Page 12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 4 September 1979
MAXI CARE FOB MINI PATIENT
Woodstock
Jimi Hendrix' America the Beautiful
became the anthm of the new pioneers.
Photo by Barry Z. Levino
capacity for experience. Hard drug use was
discouraged by the environment itself. Marijuana,
Hashish, and LSD were popular drugs with many
people. Passing out free joints and even donating
free kilos of marijuana to promote the cause was
not uncommon. In fact, these were the factors that
contributed to the feeling of affinity and common
purpose at the festival.
The music was a veritable compendium of rock.
Ravi Shankar, at the height of his popularity,
symbolized, to some extent, the religious and Indian
influences; Richie Havens, Joan Baez, and Arlo
Guthrie represented the protest and folk aspects of
the culture; and Tim Hardin was part of the
folk-rock movement.
Country music had come into the major rock
scene simultaneously with the back-to-the-land
movement (Dylan had just made Nashville Skyline).
The Paul Butterfield Blues Band and Joe Cocker
were there to fill the blues abyss. Psychedelic and
hard-rock superstars like The Who (Tommy had just
sold over two million copies) and Jimi Hendrix were
featured.
In short, the music covered the spectrum of
tastes prevelant among the youth culture yet it
never really compromized its message.
Richie Havens opened the festival with his
compelling paean to an embattled people,
"Feedom and Hendrix closed it with a sizzling
"America The Beautiful" that would become the
anthem of the new pioneers.
Editor's Note: This is the first of a two part article
dealing with Woodstock�an event which symbolized
the post World War two generation. Part two will
be carried in the Thursday, September 6 edition of
The East Carolinian.
N. C. gas prices
lower than most
Fifth Ayden Collard Festival
The Fifth Annual Ayden
Collard Festival will be
staged September 3-9,
1979. in Ayden, North
Carolina. This small
town of 4000 people will
host about 18,000 col-
lard-lovers on the main
day of the festival,
Saturday, September 8.
During the week,
manv events will be
taking place, such as
softbali tournaments,
rides and games, a
beauty pageant in which
Miss Collard will be
crowned, a square-danc-
ing demonstration, and
a talent contest.
Saturday, September
8 will feature arts and
crafts displays, the
largest parade in Ay-
den's history, a collard-
cooking contest, pet
shows, karate demon-
strations, a skateboard
contest, horseshoe pit-
ching contest, and the
famous collard-eating
contest. (The record for
the collard-eating con-
test was set two years
ago when a gentleman
consumed six (6)
pounds of that leafy
vegetable in 30 min-
utes.)
To bring an end to
Saturday's activities, the
EMBERS will perform
at a street dance in
downtown Ayden from
8:00 p.m. until mid
night. There is no
admission charge foir
any of Saturday's activ-
ities.
Sunday, September 9
will complete the week
of fun with a horse
show presented by the
Pitt County 4-H Club
Horse Fanciers. AUo,
cross-country racing will
attract joggers from all
over the state, and a
gospel singing event
will be held at the
Ayden Grammar School
at 2:00 p.m.
JAMKS B HUNT. JR
(iOVHRNOR
WHEREAS, Ayden is the Collard Capital of North Carolina,
and
WHEREAS, the town of Ayden is holding its Fifth Annual
Collard Festival September 3-9, 1979, and
WHEREAS, the combination of collards and-cornbread is
a gastronomic delight enjoyed by any true Southerner, and
WHEREAS, collards helped produce many generations of
healthy North Carolinians,
THEREFORE, I, James B. Hunt, Jr Governor of the
State of North Carolina, and a collard-lover at heart, do
hereby proclaim September 3-9, 1979 as
COLLARD WEEK IN NORTH CAROLINA
and commend this observance to our citizens.
x�� -
lames B. Hunt, Jr
Bernstein is putting up his baton
SA1ZBURG, Austria
AP�Conductor Leonard
Bernstein says he's
putting up his baton�at
least for a year�to
concentrate on com-
posing.
"I've promised my-
self, no I've even
sworn, that I won't lift
my baton for the entire
year 1980 Bernstein,
the former music direc-
tor of the New York
Philharmonic, told re-
porters Tuesday evening
during a break in the
Salzburg Festival, where
Support
East Carolinian
he is conducting both
the Israel Philharmonic
and the Vienna Philhar-
monic orchestras.
He said he needs a
whole year free from
conducting to think
clearly about composing
his own music.
VWWG' OWNERS
L
Advertisers
NOW
OPEN!
By
The Associated Press
If you're crying over
gas prices in North
Carolina, don't expect
to find sympathy from
gas buyers elsewhere in
the nation, because
prices in the Carolinas
are lower than just
about anywhere else.
The American Auto-
mobile Association said,
in its weekly national
survey, that regular gas
is cheaper in North
Carolina than in any
other state except
Texas, which tradi-
tionally has the lowest
fuel prices in the
nation.
South Carolina fol-
lows right behind North
Carolina in all gasoline-
price categories.
South Carolina fol-
lows right behind North
Carolina in all gasoline-
price categories. But
state officials can't
understand why prices
are lower. Hank Dow-
ney of the AAA
couldn't explain the
survey. "We simply re-
port the figures. We
don't try to interpret
them he said.
Max Pegram of
Greensboro, president of
the N.C. Service Station
Association said, "I just
don't know why that
would be
Energy officials in
the Carolinas said there
is no obvious reason
why prices here are
lower. Both states
charge a state tax of 9
cents a gallon, about
the same as other
states.
Delivery costs
vary by less than 1 cent
a gallon.
North Carolina en-
ergy chief Brian Flattery
and Gene Maples, al-
location director in the
South Carolina Energy
Resources Office, said
they believe their hand-
ling of sparce gasoline
supplies prevented sum-
mer shortages and kept
enough gasoline on the
market to maintain
competitive prices.
Parking inFron
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 4, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 04, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.03
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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