The East Carolinian, August 30, 1979






"Let us dare
to read, think,
speak
and write
The East Carolinian
Telephone
Numbers
757-6366
757-6367
757-6309
Vol. 54 No. 2
16 pages today
Greenville, N.C.
Thursday, August 30, 1979
Circulation 10,000
Board of Trustees
elect new officers
By KAREN WENDT
News Editor
The Board of Trustees, in a meeting held
Wednesday voted their officers, passed several
resolutions concerning new policies and old faculty,
nd discussed several departments.
The Board elected (all by acclamation) Troy rate
to the Office of Chairman, Ashley Futrell to the
Office of Vice-Chairman, and Mrs. Mebane Burgwyn
to the office of secretary.
A later election was also held which named Ruth
Allen as assistant secretary to Mrs. Burgwyn.
Chairman Pate commented that he would
"pledge my wholehearted efforts for the betterment
C T �� Y T
The Board is attempting to establish a structure
of accomplishing higher goals in the next decade
Copies of the organizational chart were then
passed to the board members. The chart was a
refine version of one which had been approved
previously, and which had no trouble being
approved again without dissension.
It was the structure of the ECU long-range
planning commission was approved by the Boara,
also with out dissenstion. . ,
Bill Cain, Director of Atheltics, then informed
the Trustees on a program he is working on wh ch
would involve possibly playing schools such as the
Naval Academy, the University of hmond
William and mary, Old Dominion ancJames
Madison in what he termed as a multi-sports
conference , , t. f.
The conference would involve at least 6
different sports, excluding football
Cain needed tentative approval from the Board
to co ahead with the tentative arrangements, this
doe! not mean that he has gained the program;
only that he will be allowed to continue to work
t0WDrdS Andrew Best then spoke on the progress
which' has been made in the department of
buudgns and grounds. He felt that the Peking lo
construction is well underway, and said We all
are going to be very pleased and very proud at the
OUtCH0eme'informed the trustees that the decision
concerning the choice of a final architect ior
-WHofmnfAf. JS
in a proposed policy which concerned the fund
raising policies and a set of guidelines for the
Alumni donation program. The resolution was
passed without dissension. Affn;rs
Dr Robert Maier, of Academic Affairs,
announced that there was, as of 5 pm. Tuesday a
total of 11,751 students enrolled in the ran
�ets.er. Dr Maier also thanked .he Boarfor
approving Dr. Brewer's invitat.on for Dr. Ma.er to
ioin the faculty at ECU.
J Dr Laupus, of the School of Medicine, gave an
account of his department, and of how construction
is going on the new medical facilities.
The construciton of the Brody Medical Science
Two faculty
honored at
BreweT welcomed the 120 new faeulty members by
rk;n0gnoge,hero.d0and neJ, with outstanding
T,AtJKS or uV"
outstanding EA-U iaruici uv R
At"d tTsJTtS pntoe Bai�meni
Toton, T P-en L outstanding teaeher
aWaEeh fve�r97the79ECU alumni association allocates
tl XX to be awarded to two professors who have
ticTed 1 their classroom endeavor, JA .war
"are given to recogn.ae and emphas goo
machine throughout the university, Powell
I. nfd "and are named after three alumni
whte clmribulns to the umni association have
made these awards possible.
Building has run into problems with its foundation
due largly to the amount of ram we have had
lately, and construction is several eeks J�;
The builders have assured the School of Medicine
that the work will be completed on schedule, which
means that the center will open during the fall ot
t i.� Cnnkp highly of the family
Dr Laupus also spoKe nigmy � . f
Support it has received from its benefactors.
The Vice-Chancellor of Student Life, Dr. Elmer
Mever gave a report on the changes being made m
Th 'department, s'ome of them are quite extensive
including joining the housing offices or both men
and women into one department to be caliea
Residence Life, and doing more for j.�tuated 75
to 80 percent of the time students spend outside ot
theDfSSMe0yer- did say that there is still a housing
shortage since at this point there are 72 people in
temporary beds and 26 on the waiting bat.
Dr Meyer also mentioned that they have come
across a problem with Title 9, concerning equality
EL-S no? ,ra�pBS
violation ot tne nci. i� ?
, u ac vet no one nas come up
into at present, but ,as yei,
with a solution
Chancellor Thomas Brewer
photo by John Grogan
Brewer planning for ECU
By KAREN WENDT
News Editor
"I thought it went
real fine, " Dr. Thomas
Brewer, Chancellor of
East Carolina University
said during a recent
interview. Chancellor
Brewer spoke about his
SEE TRUSTEES p. 6
After 6�l hours
MacDonald found guilty
By NAOMI KAUFMAN
Associated Press Writer
It's been a long nine
years for Alfred and
Mildred Kassab as they
relentlessly pursued
bringing their former
son-in-law, Dr. Jeffrey
MacDonald, to trial for
the slaying of their
daughter and grand-
children.
Wednesday, after the
former Green Beret was
convicted on three
counts of murder, they
said they felt
vindicated. It was a
different story in Cali-
fornia, however, where
the Patchogue, N
native has lived since
1971.
The seven- men,
five-woman jury spent
about, 6 and a half
hours deliberating
before returning one
first-degree murder
verdict and two
degree verdicts. He was
sentenced to three
consecutive life terms.
MacDonald, 35, of
Huntington Beach, Calif,
was charged with killing
his preganant wife,
Colette, 26, and
daughters Kimberly, 5,
and Kristen 2, while
stationed at Fort Bragg
. in 1970.
mem
hers
meeting
The first award, in the name of Robert.
"Roddy" Jones, was presented for teaching
excellence to Elizabeth Sparrow, lecturer in the
Department of Business Education and office
administration in the school of technology.
The second award, named for Robert and Lina
Worthington mays, was presented for teaching
excellence to Dr. Paul W. Ayers, associate professor
of chemistry in the college of arts and
sciences. In addition to the presentation of these
awards, new members of the administration were
introduced, Among was Dr. Elmer Meyer, who was
appointed to the new post of vice-chancellor of
student life.
For the present faculty, the meeting was on e of
encouragement, urging them to maintain their
present standard and reputation of excellence, and a
reminder of rewarding things in store for them in
and the institution.
The jury gave the
first-degree verdict on
Kristen's death.
Prosecutors argued she
was the last to die and
was killed in attempt to
cover up the other
killings.
Outside the
courtroom after the
verdict was announced
Kassab put his arm
around his wife and
said, "we feel vindi-
cated. We can rest in
peace now
"I feel that now I
can let Colette and
Kimmie and Kristie rest
1 can rest said mrs.
Kassab.
Kassab pursued
prosecution, going to
the Justice Department
soon after MacDonald
was discharged from the
Army after it found
charges against him
"not true A federal
jurt indicted MacDonald
in 1975.
"I have said before
and I will repeat again
that I never for one
instant ever believed
that 12 jurors would say
he was innocent
Kassab said.
A spokesman at St.
Mary Medical Center in
Long Beach, Calif said
MacDonald had been
fired, effective immed-
iately, from his plost as
director of emergency
medical services.
The reaction there
was incredulous
they just couldn't
believe it said
another.
"I have no idea
what happened in that
jury room said Dr
Stephen R. Shea, the
man who had
temporarily replaced
MacDonald as director
of the emergency de-
partment.
"I know he's not
guilty . � I'm waiting
for a call from his
lawyer now to see what
we can do at this end.
If he needs money,
we'll get the money
A dinner, dance and
raffle for MacDonald in
June raised $30,000 for
his defense fund, Shea
said.
In 1975, Shea and
others raised MacDo-
nald's $100,000 bond in
eight hours. That bond
was revoked after the
conviction.
�6
MACDONALD
p. 6
faculty, his plans and
the problems of the
University.
About his staff,
Brewer has nothing but
compliments, when
discussing the past
year. "When you work
with such fine faculty
and staff you couldn'T
but have a good year
Brewer and the
Board of Trustees are
planning to go into
what Brewer refers to
as a "massive planning
processHe felt that
the University has a
need to know where it
is going.
To this end he and
the Board of Trustees
have created a planning
commission which has
received the approval of
the Executive Comm-
ittee of the Board of
Trustees.
The commisiion,
which will be composed
of approximately 35
members, will be
working towards their
planning goal starting in
the fall. Brwere termed
the commitee "Rather
substantial
Evervbodv wants
felt that this would be
a good outgrowth of
planning process, he id
did admit that "the
gaining of excellence is
a slow laborous
process
Brewer and his staff
are also striving for
"excellence in all
areas
chancellor Brewer
also felt that one of the
most important things
which can be shown
about the quality of a
University is the amount
of funds which it
receives from it s
alumni.
In the past year,
East Carolina has haad
a 76 percent increase in
alumni receipts.
However, we still have
a long way to go.
The $1.5 million
dollar donation by the
Brody family to the
medical school is one
which the University is
very proud of. Even
Brewer refered to it as
a "Magnificent
donation
The suspension of
the basketball team was
another subject which
has been on the minds
of students and faculty
the
was
alike.
"We thought
findings incorrect
the way Brwere termed
school' standing on
placing the basketball
team on probation. (The
team was placed on
probation in June for
alledged recruiting vio-
lations).
Brewer did have
faith in the future of
the basketball team,
stating that, he has
"confidence that Caoch
Odum will turn that
team into a winner
Of his predesesor,
Brewer again only had
good words. when
asked if he felt he was
foiling in Jenkin's
footsteps, Brewer
replied, "Dr. Jenkins
did a magnificent job
for East Carolina He
also said that he and
Dr. Jenkins have kept
in touch by phone, and
have a good relation-
ship.
Dr. Brewer is
making a lot of plans
for the future, and a lot
changes, and with help
form the students,
faculty, and staff, he
will succeed in his goal
of acheiving "excellence
in all areas
Congress travels
on tax dollars
WASHINGTON AP
If travel is broadening, Rep. James bcheuer
may be one of the broades-minde member of
Congress after the current recess
The New York Democrat's schedule of foreign
travel this month reads like a road map of Asia,
with stops in nine cities in seven countries during a
three-week sojourn. .
Scheuer is one of at least 89 memebers of
Congress - 73 representatives and 16 senators �
traveling abroad at taxpayer expense during the
month-long august recess.
That total is down from the 115 who went
overseas during the April Easter recess.
The 89 traveling this recess are those members
whose offices confirmed they were taking trips
authorized by various committees. Other members
had travel overseas authored by committees but
are not making the trips. A
The actual total of tax-paid trips could be higher
than 89.Some committees refused to give out
information on their members' travel plans.
There were also indications some congressemn
and some congressional staff members were
becoming sensitive to publicity about the fact-finding
nPBoth the Senate Armed Services and Senate
Intelligence committees declined to give any
information about travel by their members.
And Jack Brady, chief of the House Foreign
Affairs Committee staff, "These stories about
travel overseas because "we oversee spending ol
billions of dollars in foreign aid.
"The press is totally irresponsible in the way it
handled these stories he added.
A staff member of Rep William Clay s office
who identified himself as the Missouri Democrat s
top aide refused to confirm or deny that his boss
went to Japan, South Korea and Singapore for
three weeks as scheduled.
It is impossible to determine how much the
trips will cost taxpayers. But commercial air fares
form the United States to the most popular stopover
destinations - Peking, Moscow, Rome and Bangkok -
total more than $100,000, if the number of
lawmakers going to those vicinities is multiplied by
coach fares to those cities. Multipel-stop trips add
even more to the cost.
And using committee records of the amount ol
travel-time scheduled, daily expense allowances of
$75 per day for the 89 congressmen on the road
could add up to more than $55,000
i mii jiij1Smj i I8 ��





� t.
CAROLINIAN 30 August 1979
Chi
If

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TR. i

J3?
Convocation: (if going through rush, attendcnce required
September 6, 7 P.M. Wright Auditorium
Rush Week: September 9-14
AKA Rush: September 19 7:30 Mendenhall
Dc
10a





30 August 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 3
Chicago restaurant rates rave reviews
by Larry Popelka
When it comes to
great world cuisines,
our country stands alone
at the bottom.
The French have
their great souffles,
crepes and fondues.
The Germans have
sausages and sauer-
kraut.
And even the
Italians have their fine
lasagna and spaghetti
dishes.
But what do we
Americans have?
Two-all-beef-patties-
special - sauce - lettuce
cheese - pickles
. onions - on- a - sesamie
- seed - bun. Blah!
The Chinese brought
us egg rolls, chow mein
and fortune cookies. But
what are we giving
them?
Coca" Cola, McDon-
ald's, malnutrition and
indigestion.
out, the problem isn't
so much with our
country's cooking�we've
done better. Xhe
problem is what we're
promoting.
We have a dumb-
looking clown peddling
greasy hamburgers and
fries. We have an old
man with a beard called
'colonel" pushing
tasteless, batter-fried
birds. And we have a
bunch of smiley kids
singing praise
steamed weiners.
If some
Chinaman came
here, dressed up
jclown jmtfit and started
singing about stale rice,
what would you think?
The problem is none
of the clowns, bearded
men and smiley kids
have discovered
good food in
country.
That's because
people who make it like
to keep it to them-
for
old
over
in a
the
this
the
selves. They hide out in
the backwoods of
Alabama Georgia, Mis-
sisippi and Louisana.
They make barbe-
cued ribs, chicken, hog
hocks, chitterlings,
cornbread and potato
pie.
Mmmm. Just talking
about it makes me want
to toss my Whopper
and fries and head
south.
Call it soul food. Or
Southern cookin Or
just a good ol' down
home meal. Whatever.
It's American. And it
sure beats the Big Mac.
So whenever I have
the chance, I pass up
the food services and
head south for a little
soulto Chicago's
South Side.
My latest ventures
was to the H&H Rest-
aurant, a greasy spoon
in one of Chicago's
shadiest neighborhoods.
It's the kind of place
you only go to with a
bodyguard or a
revolver. Or both.
A friend who claims
to be an expert on
soul food recommended
the H&H to me. He
says he takes all his
dates there and they
love it.
I find that hard to
believe. I think most
would faint before they
got there.
As we drove through
the dimly lit streets one
evening last week, we
saw abandoned build-
ings, abandoned cars,
and abandoned people.
Finally we came to a
small, homey-looking
drive-in. I had my
doubts about leaving
the car, but once I
smelled the aroma, I
couldn't resist.
Fried catfish,
chicken, hog hocks, beef
stew, cornbread muffins,
red beans, turnip
greens, and out-of-this-
world peach cobbler
lined the huge serving
table inside.
For $4 we each got
a plate, helped
ourselves and ate to our
hearts' content. I even
forgot that the woman
at the cash register was
sitting behind a bullet-
proof window for a
reason.
After four or five
plat-fulls, we stumbled
safely back to my car.
But later that night I
could not resist calling
up the owner, Hubert
Maybell, to congratulate
horn on one of the
finest American meals I
have ever had.
Hubert told me all
about his chicken
croquettes, potato pie
and mother's cornbread
recipe (which is a
secret, of course).
He also told me
about his chitterlings, a
southern delicacy
otherwise known as hog
intestines.
"they're hardest
things to clean
Hubert said. "They
used to give 'em away
at the butcher's for
free, and we'd go and
tote 'em off and clean
chitterlings all night.
Now ther're chargin' for
'em, and they're
supposed to be clean
when you buy 'em.
But - they're just not
clean. There just ain't
no machine that can
get 'em clean
The H&H is named
after Hubert and his
e.x-wife, Helen. The
couple opened the
restaurant 31 years ago
after moving to Chicago
from Alabama.
"We didn't have
money enough for
signs, but I wanted to
get a neon one
For those of us who cannot afford, nor have the time to drive to Chicago, the new snack bar in Wright annex,
next to the Student Store has a lot to offer. Photo by Richard Greene
Hubert explained. "All
I had was $250, and to
do one with both our
names would have cost
$800. So I came up
with H&H
But Helen has since
left Hubert to start her
own restaurant, the Soul
Queen Cafe, a few
miles away. Recently
she added a second in
the same neighborhood.
"She always wanted to
expand Hubert
moaned. "I never
wanted two restaurants.
I like to be close to
everything 1 do. I'm not
a chain man. But she
wants to open a whole
bunch of restaurants
and have 'em
coast-to-coast
Chitterlings, ribs and
potato pie coast to
coast? I could think of
a lot of things wors.
Just as long as she
doesn't hire a clown to
do her adverti
M�G


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3-i'T! Wa
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T "� �j
'v
Eastern N.Cs newest
and largest enclosed mall.

t
zaM
V'
Cards, Gifts,
Books
The Gazebo
Leather 'n Wood
Lynn's Hallmark
Shop
Walden Books
Department Stores
Belk-Tyler
Sears
Food Services
Baskin-Robbins (ice cream)
Big-Top Deli
Chic-Fil-A
General Nutrition Center
(health foods)
Hot Sam (subs G sandwiches)
Morrow's Nuts
(nuts, candies)
Orange Julius
Second Cup (coffee, tea,
10a.m. to9p.m
MonSat.
spices)
Swiss
Colony
(package
cheese wine)
Tiffany Bakery (cookies)
Jewelry
Henebry's
The Jewel Box
Rings & Things
Time Square (time G repair)
Zales Jewelers
Men's Apparel
Chess King
Coffman's Men's Wear
Fine's
The Junction
Just Pants
The Pro Shop
Steinbeck's
T-Shirts
Topps G Trowsers
Music, Records, and Radio
Lowrey Organ Center
Radio Shack
The Record Bar
Restaurants
Castel Carini Restaurant &
Pizza, Inc.
S & S Cafeteria
Shoes
Athletic Attic
Butler's Shoes
Connie Shoes
Father G Son
Jack and
Jill
Kinney Shoe
Red Cross
Thorn Mc An
Specialty Apparel
Dottie Lou's (children's)
Motherhood Maternity
Specialty & Services
Aladdin's Castle
(amusementgames)
Women's Ready To Wear
Blount-Harvey
Charles Shop
College Shop
DAKS
Foxmoor
Lerner Shops
Sidney's
16
Stuart's
Virginia Crabtree
Planter's Natf Bank
Circus World (toys)
Docktor Pet (pets)
Rowers by
Roselind (florist)
Great Expectations
(men or women's
hair styling)
Merle Norman Cosmetics
Pearle Vision Center
(opticaloptometrist)
Tinder Box (tobacco)
GREENVILLE
264 By-Pass
on Highway 11
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The East (aroli
Editorials
& Opinions
Thursday, August 30,1979, page 4
Greenville,N.C
Parking is a problem
This country has become a true
slave to the automobile. Those of us
who are healthy and well able to walk
a few blocks to class go outside and
get in the car, only to search for a
parking place.
Search is the right word to use in
this instance, I'm convinced. Just
because you laid down you $25
doesn't give you any guarantee of
finding a parking place. There is a
reason for the hike in the price of the
parking stickers. Last spring, it was
decided by the Board of Trustees to
raise the money to pave 650 spaces
around Minges Coliseum. The cost-an
estimated $300,000. Also, an expen-
sive study to determine the parking
needs of East Carolina will be
undertaken, and almost $9,000 was to
have been spent on "other parking
needs In the original report, it was
revealed the Athletic Department would
pay a part of the costs. We still have
not seen, in dollars and cents, exactly
what "part of the cost" means.
Another point that must be
brought up is the use of day student
parking places by faculty and staff.
Will parking tickets be given out to
faculty members who park in spaces
reserved tor day students? We can
well imagine the effect of a student
parking in a "staff only" lot. Our
guss is that we would see the back
of the student's car as it is being
towed away.
It might have been a good idea
for another time of year-like
summer to have been chosen for
such disruptive construction of parking
facilities. The student, them, would
not have to move in, go through drop
add, etc while dodging the concrete
trucks and other earth moving
machinery.
Another problem which no one
seems to have thought of is the lack
of lighting in the temporary parking
places on side streets around the
campus. While we cannot advocate
the idea of the city erecting lights for
a temporary situation such as this, we
can recommend that students travel in
numbers if they know they are likey
to be out late at night, and they
know that the likelyhood of finding a
parking space is remote.
The expense of operating an
automobile continues to rise each
month with the grim news on
television about gas prices rising out
of sight. Still, we have a suggestion
for the solution of the parking
problem�a solution from other
campuses that we have read about in
other student newspapers across the
state.
Given the fact that many students
work, and need their cars to get back
and forth from their jobs, the logical
thing to do would be to, at an
increased cost, rent parking space to
them next to the dorms. For students
who want to save money, or who do
not use their automobiles that often,
assign them to less expensive fringe
lots around the perimeter of the
campus. This might be a good
solution for those students who use
their cars once a week to get home
the weekends.
Secondly, money could be saved
by the use of smaller, more fuel
efficient cars by the university, and
issuing sharp restrictions on their use.
These ideas might go a long way to
pay some of the expenses of parking.
A better miles per gallon rating as
well as restriciting the use of state
cars to essential trips only might at
least go a part of the way toward
paying for site preparation.
Finally, to help save gas and to
help ease the congestion parking lots,
the simplest solution might be to find
a parking place, and leave your car
parked there until you absolutely have
to use it. Both the city of Greenville
and the SGA have transit systems
that can get you almost anywhere in
town. Use them to run the errands
that drain your gas tank and your
budget.
Greenpeace
ii ii
Protection of the species
B JERRY ADDKRTON
Special to
The East Carolinian
Summer is usually a
time of activity and
growth for all life on
this planet. High energy
and good spirits
from the mountains to
the coast among people
and the newborn of
Spring begin their life
journey, filled with all
the lessons they must
learn for survival in the
ever-changing eco-sys-
lem.
On many fronts, this
is a time for focusing
action and energy on
making sure all forms
of life on this planet
may coexist and prosper
for the good of the
whole sphere. It has
oecome more than "a
good thing to do it is
now a necessity. Heigh-
tened planetary con-
sciousness must be ach-
ieved to ensure not only
the survival of specific
plants and animals, but
mankind itslef.
This and following
articles will deal with
the wide scope of ecol-
ogical problems and ac-
tion taken on them. The
Greenpeace Foundation
is an international cor-
poration of the envi-
ronment and all forms
of life within it. It will
be my goal to make
people aware of the
situations and to sti-
mulate positive, in-
formed action on them.
As environmentalists,
we of Greenpeace are
involved in the many
and varied issues con-
cerning the protection of
endangered species and
environments the world
wide. This summer
there will be anti-
whaling campaigns on
two oceans, and efforts
to bring about solutions
to such issues as end-
ing the practice of
sealing, (now in the
economic aspects after
the Spring massacres),
unwise fishing practices'
the Iki Island dolphin
slaughters, the Tellico
DamSnail Darter con-
troversy (which we have
won, it seems), the
"incidental" porpoise-
dolphin kilts as a result
of tuna industry fishing
practices, nuclear pow-
er, the use of toxic
chemicals in farming
and forestry, ocean and
air pollution, and the
list goes on. It's time
to get involved because
if things go on like they
are now, we will in our
lifetime see the ugly
consequences of our
lack of foresight and
compassion.
The following excerpt
is from the 1976 Green-
peace Report. Its state-
ment remains the same
lor now and speaks for
itself:
"Whether the prob-
lem is the abuse of
nuclear power, the pol-
lution of the environ-
ment or the extinction
of whales and seals, the
root cause is basically
the same; our lack of
what has been called
"planetary conscious-
ness In other words,
we lack the breadth of
vision to see that when
we damage any part of
nature we are damaging
ourselves, because all of
nature is inter-related
and inter-dependent.
"We have set up a
problem for ourselves .
We cannot understand
our part within the
framework of nature
until we actually see
ourselves in danger of
tearing it apart. This is
not a political matter,
althoug politics and
economics are undoub-
tedly involved. This is a,
matter of life and
death. And not just the
death of hundreds of;
thousands oflanimals, but
the slow death of hu-
man moral conscious-
ness and the inevitable
ultimate death of an
ecological system which
will in time reach out
to damage mankind it-
self
American Journal
The guzzler's demise
SAN FRANCISCO -
Bill Purcell padlocked
the doors of the auto-
mobile showrrom where
he had worked four 23
years, as the sun's
fading rays slanted a-
cross Van Ness Avenue.
Until today, Purcell was
the financing and in-
surance person at
Hughson Ford. Hugh-
son, the world's oldest
Ford dealership, was
shutting down, a victim
of the falling sales and
rising price of new cars.
Seventy-five years
ago, Henry Ford himself
pumped William Hugh-
son's hand on a visit to
San Francisco and told
him, "Billy, you're my
first dealer A sturdy
Ford motor car cost a
few hundred dollars, a
gallon of premium gas-
oline just a couple of
coins. Today, a plush
new Ford LTD goes for
$11,000 � and although
Hughson marked down
its LTDs to the factory
price of $8200, a clump
of the big cars crowded
the showroom floor, un-
claimed. Sales of in-
termediate-sized cars
were down, too. It had
been that way for
month
Hughson Ford
slashed its sales staff in
desperation from ten to
four i recent weeks, but
it was a classic case of
too little and too late.
Americans are just not
buying the big cars
anymore, can't afford
them, couldn't find gas
for them even if they
could make the pay-
ments. America's love
affair with the gas-
guzzling roadhog is on
the rocks, and the
entire auto industry is
feeling jilted.
� Sales of the Big
Three automakers are
off 19 percent from last
year's record pace.
� U.S. auto pro-
duction in the second
half of this year is ex-
pected to fall by 12
percent, then fall some
more next year.
� The Chrysler
Corp which didn't see
the age of the more
energy-efficient small
car coming fast enough,
may yet leave us with
the Big Two. Unless, of
course, Chrysler's gov-
ernment loan guarantees
come through, in which
case the wisecracks
about America having
welfare for the rich and
free enterprise for the
poor will again be pro-
ven true.
This seemingly sud-
den turn of events has
been in the making for
a long time. Even if we
have a contrived oil
crisis now, we'll have a
real one soon enough.
And the environmental
damage done by the
car, the esthetic dis-
asters of highway con-
struction and the still
unacceptably high death
toll on those highways
are reasons enough to
reduce our dependence
on the automobile.
We can go a long
way towards upgrading
our quality of life by
integrating cars into a
balanced, safe, energy-
efficient transportation
system, instead of let-
ting them run all over
us. Buses, bikes, ferries
and the streamlined
new versions of electric
troileys now operating
in some cities could all
serve us well as al-
ternatives to the car. So
could trains.
President Carter took
a good symbolic first
step a few weeks ago
when he rode Amtrak
and announced that
trains belong as much
to the future as the
past. The trouble is, it
was only a symbolic
step. As Carter rode
the train in the com-
pany of photographers
and reporters, his ad-
ministration moved to
chop 20 percent of the
Amtrak system. While
that's better than the
43 percent cut he was
advocating until recent-
ly, it's far from good
enough.
Amtrak needs to ex-
pand, not contract, to
finally become an ef-
fective transportation
system. And to achieve
that we need more from
Carter than toothy grins
and injunctions to have
a nice future. We need
imaginative new pro-
grams that care as
much about our future
as they do about Car-
ter's, programs that wil
restore this country's
transportation system to
the well-oiled efficiency
it had before World
War II.
There may even be
place for Chrysler in a
program oi transit re-
storation, as economist
Gar Alperovitz has sug-
gested. Alperovitz would
retool Chrysler to make
mass transit vehicles as
well as cars, while
guaranteeing govern-
ment purchasesof the
new vehicles. That
would have the effect,
in theory, of both sta-
bilizing and diversifying
Chrysler, enabling the
company to meet the
changes in economic?
and lifestyles that are
already hitting home.
Regardless of what
Carter does now,
changing world condi-
tion will inevitably
cause America's ro-
mance with the car to
cool to the point where
we'll be just good
friend. It may take five
years; it may take 20.
Eventually, we'll re-
member today's auto-
motive culture with no-
stalgia and perhaps am-
usement, the way Bill
Purcell does when he
looks back on the glorv
days of the great
American dream ma-
chine.
"When I started in
the car business 23
vears ago, I had a 1956
Ford Victoria Purcell
told a reporter. "Had
an eight, automatic,
power steering,
bought it for $2260. I
still have the invoice. I
thought I'd frame the
sucker
Letters
Letters to the ed-
itor are welcome,
however, they must
contain the name,
address, and I.D.
number. No letters
will be printed if
they are not signed,
in ink, by hte person
writing the letter.
Letters must be
received by noon,
Mondays and Wed-
nesdays, at the
newspaper office on
the second floor of
the Publications
Building, which is
directly across from
Joyner Library.
The East Carolinian
Managing Editor
Stove Bachnor
Editor Marc Barnes
Director of Advertising
Robert M. Swaim
Production Manager
Anita Lancaster
News Editor
Asst. News Editor
Features Editor
Asst. Features Editor
Karen Wendt
Lisa Drew
Bill Jones
Richard Green
Asst. Director of Advertising Terry Herndon
THE EAST CAROLINIAN is the student newspaper
of Eat Carolina University sponsored by the Media
Board of ECU and Is distributed each Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic year (weekly during
the summer).
Editorial opinions are those of the Editorial Board
and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the
university or the Media Board.
Sports Editor Charles Chandler
Asst. Sports Editor Jimmy DuPree
Copy Editor Barry Clayton
Asst. to the Editor Leigh Coakley
Ad Tech Super Paul Linke
Offices are located on the
Publications Center (Old
mailing address is: Old SOuth
Greenville, NC 2734.
floor of the
Our
ECU.
The phone numbers are: 7S7-63M, 8367, B�M).
Subscriptions f $10 annually.
up
The phone comp
phones as qu
Moni
stay
temp
The g
raise the Ci
ocean nr
extremely fraf
A series
week?
detenorat-
and ma) ha
charge-
Richard. I
and Atn
briefing tl
raising tht
"We
an effort.
He Bi
expert a I
oi thr vess
public iev.
Am on
for recovi
armored gui
The dm-
water ofl C
of NOAA.
Harbor B'
oceanograpf
Fla.
In 49 -
recovered �
Among the
containing I
base and a
cabin.
The Mon
under tow I
classic battit
Virginia. I
The anr
standoff M a
marked the endl
Gl
Start!
Have
ye
Sigi
Dean
Inv:
our
ALSO
cheese
barn
imok
tendei
�teak
chick
bvttei
cotobll





i�e,N.C.
"Vr,
nomics
that are
u home.
what
now,
i condi-
mevitablv
I ro-
the car to
"int where
�t good
take five
ike 20.
re-
auto-
;h no-
am-
Bill
en he
lor
great
ma-
: in
5S 23
a 1956
Purcell
ler. "Had
itiatic,
I
12260. I
invoice. I
trame the
ers
'i the ed-
Icome,
must
name,
and ID.
letters
printed if
ot signed,
hte person
letter.
must be
by noon,
and Wed-
at the
office on
Id floor of
iPublications
which is
icross from
rary.
ler
The phone company has been trying to hook
phones as quickly as possible.
Photo by Pete Podezwa
Monitor will
stay under
temporarily
By WARREN LEARY
AP Science Writer
The government has decided against trying to
se the Civil War ironclad USS Monitor from its
ocean grave off North Carolina because of its
extreme!) tragile condition, it was announced today.
-eries of dives to the wreck in the past four
weeks yielded evidence that the ship has
h'ttriorated seriously after 117 years under water,
may have suffered further damage from depth
charges dropped during World War II.
Richard. A. Frank, head of the National Oceanic
and Atmospheric Administration, told a news
ling the agency has ruled out any possibility of
:ig the vessel in its entirety.
"We will not risk shattering the remains in such
:lort Frank said.
He said the government will assemble a panel of
experts to determine if historically significant parts
-� vessel should be raised and preserved for
blic view.
Among important items that may be considered
recovery is the ship's famed "cheesebox"
armored gun turret.
The dives to the Monitor, lying in 210 feet of
water off Cape Hatteras, N.C were an undertaking
NOAA, the state of North Carolina and the
Harbor Branch Foundation, a private, non-profit
eanographic organization based in Fort Pierce,
Fia.
In 49 scientific dives this month, scientists
recovered a wealth of new artifacts from the ship.
Among the new items are a wine bottle, a jor still
mtaining relish, a mustard bottle, a brass lantern
base and a porcelain soap dish from the captain's
cabin.
The Monitor sank in a gale Dec. 31, 1862, while
under tow. The loss came only months after her
classic battle with the Confederate ironclad, the CSS
Virginia, commonly called the Merrimack.
The armored ships fought each other to a
standoff March 9. 1862, in a battle historians say
marked the end of the era of wooden warships.
Greek News
Starting Tues Sept 4
Have all Information in
by 9 a.m Mondays,
Sigma Sigma Sigma
box
Dean Falghum's office
Phone fees
explained
30 August 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Pace 5
By LISA DREW
Assistant News Editor
By next week,
phones in the dorms
will be ringing again at
a cost that many
students feel is
unreasonable. Margaret
Whitehurst, Business
Office Supervisor at
Carolina Telephone, feels
that students "misun-
derstood what the
charges are which
leads to hesitation
andor complaints.
The basic charge for
connection of a private
line, Ms. Whitehurst
explains, is $14. This is
a non-recurring fee, and
"is not refundable upon
termination of service
In addition to this
charge is a monthly
service fee of $8.05 and
$.50 for each additional
listing. If a student has
service disconnected
before the 15th of the
month, the service
charge for that month
will be refunded.
Whitehurst went on
to explain that ECU
students are not
required to pay a
deposit on their phones,
which can run anywhere
from $50 up. Instead,
they sign a contract
with the phone
company. "We do not
hold contracts with
regular customers
Whitehurst said. "The
contract states that the
student will be respon-
sible for the phone and
will make payments on
time.
If payments are not
made on time, a
student will receive a
five day notice. If
payment has not been
made by the end of this
period, service will be
interrupted and a re-
connection fee will be
charged.At the end of
the year, if a student
has his or her service
disconnected and does
not pay the final bill, it
will be turned over to a
collection agency.
All of this goes on
record and establishes
either good or bad
credit for the student,
so as Ms. Whitehurst
points out, "it I is
important that you keep
up your payments
People,
places,
and
There is no longer a
flash page. All an-
nouncements should be
sent to Karen Wendt,
news editor, for inclu-
sion within the news
section. They will be
included in the "Peo-
ple column, which
will serve the same
function as the old
Flash page.
baseball
ECU Baseball Try-
outs will begin Tuesday,
September 4th at 6
p.m. Players should re-
port directly to Harring-
ton Field.
careers
The Career Planning
and Placement Offices
urges all seniors to re-
gister now to be eligible
for campus interviews
beginning in October.
Don't delay � Stop by
our office to pick up
the necessary forms to-
day.
dancing
handicapped
The Office of Hand-
icapped Student Ser-
vices offers a compre-
hensive program to
those who have a phy-
sical disability. To learn
more about this office
come to Whichard 210 r
call 757-6799 or go by
the Handicap Center in
Cotten Hall.
The University Folk
and Country Dance Club
will hoild its annual bu-
siness meeting on
Thursday, 6 September
at 7 p.m. in Room
D-109, Brewster
Building, for the
election of editors. The
Club will meet every
week on Thursday
evening in Brewster
D-109, and all who are
interested in Clogging
or Square, Kola, Folk,
Country and Round
and Dancing are
welcome. For further
information contact Ann
Matthews (752-0826) or
Dr. Ken Wilson (757-
6883).
'Middleman' defended
in question of inflation
By CHET CURRIER
Ap Business Writer
NEW YORK AP-Presi-
dent Carter's recent cri-
ticism of the "middle-
man" in the food indus-
try has revived an old
and bitter debate.
Whenever food
prices rise at a painful
ratewhich seems to be
most of the time these
days-consumers natur-
ally start asking who's
responsible.
And when prices on
the supermarket shelf
keep rising while farm
prices decline, as has
Happened in recent
months, the search for
a culprit is bound to
turn to the p.ucessors,
distributors and retailers
of food.
This collective
"middleman" has never
been a very popular
guy, in any business or
profession. The term
itself has a distinctly
pejorative ring, like
'money changer" or
"10 percenter
But at least one
voice, that of the week-
ly Financial Digest pub-
lished by New York's
Manufacturers Hanover
Trust, has been raised
in defense of the mid-
dleman in the current
foodprice situation.
First of all, the bank
says, "In the past it
has taken two to three
months before farm
price drops were reflec-
ted at the checkout
counters. Consequently,
expectations of lower
food prices resulting
from recent farm price
declines have been
somewhat premature
Secondly, the bank
points out, the rise of
retail food prices has in
fact slowed lately.
That argument is
supported by the gov-
ernment's consumer
5rice data for June and
uly, which showed
rises of only 0.2 percent
and 0.1 percent, while
the index of all prices
was jumping a full
percentage point in each
month.
In addition, the bank
says, costs of process-
ing, distributing and
selling food account for
more than half of its
retail price, and in an
inflationary environment
they can easily offset
small declines in farm
prices.
During the second
quarter, it noted, food
industry labor costs rose
at a 7.4 percent annual
rate, while packaging
costs climbed 16 percent
and energy costs were
up by almost one-third.
There is even some
evidence that the mid-
dlemen have absorbed
some of those rising
costs rather than pass-
ing them on, Manufac-
turers Hanover's econo-
mists maintain. The
middleman's
average
share of the retail food
dollar actually declined
from 60.7 percent in the
first alf of 1978 to 59.5
percent in the first half
of this year.
And the profits of
food processors and
retailers increased by a
relatively modest 15
percent in the first half,
while those of all indus-
tries posted a 29 per-
cent rise.
Thus, the bank con-
tended, although the
spread between farm
and retail Dnces wid-
ened by 0.5 percent
from early spring to
mid-summer, the situa-
tion does not seem to
have "unduly bene-
fited" the middleman.
The debate over the
middleman's role will
continue, of course. Like
inflation, it seems to be
something that just
won't go away.
SPECIAL OF THE WEEK:
3 pieces golden fried chicken
potato salad or trench tries
1 large biscuit
6:30-8:00 ONLY fl.4
MON.SAT. 33 8. GREENE
corner ot 4th and greene
a blocks from The Attic
BISCUIT INN
Invites you to come in and try
our delicious homemade biscuits.
ALSO FEATURING BISCUITS WITH
cheese
ham
sausage
smoked sausage
egg
tenderloin
steak
chicken
bntterielly
combination
WE ARE For grott or taKe�7s95,
THE BISCUIT PEOPLE'
LANDOVER
FARM
Horse Stalls
Available At Reasonable
Rate CONTACT
Eddie Evans 752-6498
BOYD'S BARBER
and HAIRSTYUNG
1008 S. Evans St.
Phone 758-4056
By Appointment Only
Melvin H. BoydfMelvinH.Boyd,Jr.
Franklin C. Tripp
COMPLETE SELECTION
OF HARDBACK AND
PAPERBACK
BESTSELLERS
LOCAL ANDOUT-OFTOWN
NEWSPAPERS
FULL LINE OF
MAGAZINES
CENTRAL
NEWS AND
CARD SHOP
OPEN 9a.m9P.m.
7 Days a Week
EVANS 8T.MALL
DOWNTOWN
1
, by Nature's Way
I
specializing in
natural hair cuts for men & women
COMPLETE
REDREW SALON
appointments only
758-7841
Downtown Mall
Greenville, N.C.
WHERE THE LOFT
WAS LOCATED
r
' '�!� Irfl H.





Page 6 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 30 August 1979
MACDONALD
continued from page 1
Another acquain-
tance, police officer
Arnold Schmeling, said
he was "absolutely
dumbfounded" by the
verdict. MacDonald is
an honory life member
of the Long Beach
police association.
Schmeling said
MacDonald was a "very
warm, very gre-
garious" person who
rarely spoke of the
killings.
The only time I ever
heard him refer to it,
he would be almost on
the verge of breaking
down - his eyes wuld
well with tears
TRUSTEES
continued from page 1
A report was given by the Financial Aid Office,
which said that so far we are having little trouble
with HEW, and are in the top four on their list of
well run programs.
The Career Planning Department has had a 14
percent increase in the number of students applying
tor help, and now has a .total of at least 138
companies which have taken advantage of the
program.
Dr. Brewer entered a resolution to commend Dr.
Howell on the excellent work he has done for the
University.
The meeting ended with a closed session to
discuss facultv.
Student life
Th K -aroli
Celebration9 sponsored
Sandy Ranier collapses by the fountain after completing Drop-Add.
Photo by Pete Podezwa
By KAREN WENDT
News Editor
"Student Life
Celebrates" will be held
on the mall, on
September 5 between 3
and 7 o'clock.
The 'Celebration'
will be sponsored by
the Student Union, the
Student Government
Association, and the
Intramural office.
"Every area of
student life will be
involved according to
Charles Sune, president
of the Student Union.
The day was planned
with the specific goal of
promoting Student life
and activities.
A variety of acti-
vities have been
planned for the event,
including booths, games
and a variety of prizes
to be given away.
The Student Union
will be sponsoring
Bruce Frye, a local one
man act, who has been
fairly popular in this
area.
They will also be
sponsoring a watermelon
cut, which is probably
well known to those
who went to orientation,
or to summer school.
The cuts are tradi-
tionally held once a
week during ne
summer.
The 'Celebration' is
also expected to have a
dunking booth, though
who will get the seat ot
honor is not yet known.
Budweiser will be
sponsoring a six-pack
stacking contest during
the activities.
Pepsi will be giving
away free drinks during
the day also. In all the
'Celebration' will be
sponsored by at least 41
different Greenville area
sponsors.
The organizations
involved are spending
quite a bit of time and
monev to make this day
a suc"ce� for evorvnne,
so go out and enjoy!
Lucille Ball says,
"Giveagiftof
you.BeaRedCross
Volunteer
We need writers
IH
A PuChc Seonce o( TNs Newsoaoc
4 The Advertising Counc Pl
The news department of The East Carolinian needs English
majors, minors, and especially Journalism minors, to write for
the paper. Come to our office in the Old South Building
(across from the Libraryand we'll try and put you on our
payroll.
See Karen Wendt, News Editor, or Lisa Drew,
Assistant News Editor.
Peace
Peace Corps Volunteers are serving today in
over 60 countries in all parts of the world. They
are facing constant challenge and adventure
trying to help people meet their basic needs.
For more Information contact:
Peace Corps Coordinator
Science Education Department
East Carolina University
Greenville, NC 27834
(919) 757-6586
Special People People Who Care
�T&
M8k
Pitt Plaza
756-0309
Open:
MonSat.
10:00-9:30
AUGUST SUPER SALE
20 to 60 OFF
Brooks Shoes, Speedo
Swimsuits, T-shirts, Tennis
Rackets plus other
selected shoes.
SALE ENDS SEPT. 1st
BASO-MBBIHS
ICE CREAM STORE
We Missed
9
You Sale
All students with this ad
will receive a free seoop
off iee cream with each
purchase off two scoops.
Buy a double and
receive a triple.
FREE SCOOP
Carolina East Nail
and Greenville Square
FRIMTTS
1890
Seafood
Thurs. Night
Specials
SHRIMP $475
OYSTERS $4.75
FLOUNDER 3.5O
TROUT $2.95
PERCH $2.95
all you can eat
No take-outs please.
Meal Includes:
French Fries, Cole slaw,
Huahpnpplcs, and iced tea
We are proud to
announce that we
have added
one os ���
AREAS FINEST
SALAD BARS
for your
dining pleasure.
Just Arrived
Add-A-Bead
14 Kt. Gold Bracelets
14 Kt. Gold Necklaces
YOU
Design Yourself
Gold Bead Reg.Sale
2mm .75.58
3mm 1.50.78
4mm 2.00.98
5mm 3.001.88
6mm 4.502.98
7mm 5.003.49
Jade Bead
7mm 2.50. -98
Tiger Eye
7mm 2.50.98
Onyx
8mm 3.001.75
Pearl
5mm 7.004.88
7mm 11.007.88
Chains
18" Med. Weight Gold Chain
24 Light Weight Gold Chain
Bracelets
T Add-a- Bead Bracelet
Reg.
Reg.
OPEN FOR LUNCH
Daily
(except Sat.) 113� - 2:30
HOURS
MON - THURS.
�:oo -10:00
FRI. & SAT.
fcOO -10:30
f Add a personal touch to your jewelery by creating your own pattern
ust
dd a bead when you're celebratirj fa special occasion,
r whenever the mood strikes. Choose from our big selection
olf beads, chains, and bracelets at Brody's
Located On Evans Street
to World
face Wi
Pi
Leanderd
r
V
East Carolina
a nevs athlet.
East Crohna
begin prepare
for a new
from the ECl B-
during a H
confident tha:
will be organiz. I
The other -
conference includ
Richmond and w
Cain said tl
football as a spoj
number of other
"The athlet:
met on sevei
situation Cam
boards from the
scheduled to repc
sometime in St
together again.
Cain said tha
about the idea
did not forsee a
in the beginning
optimistic that thl
A LOOK AI
reveals a non
ex-Pirate split ci
coach this -
record for caree
NATIONAL rl
cut thier roster-
Both ex-Pirates
Pittsburgh and E
have survived th
ward off an
who were cut
assured ot a
though.
VALENTIN E
last Saturdav
Cowboys in a re
He played quit
impressive tackl�
squad. YaientintJ
linebacker.
EAST CARO!
with the quote
noon press conj
not this might tj
ever had at E(
dynamite he
it'll make a hel
DYE HAS Tj
freshman quart
asked about the
the press confej
"He's a special
"He's been I
had no idea hj
offense this fas
high school
passer. But he
well, and in a
of my pets
THE F1FT!
have a pet
Freddie Joncsl
freshmen at thi
that we cool
tomorrow
� -a? �





red
though
-eat of
known.
will be
six-pack
during
giving
- during
all the
will be
: least 41
i tile area
r cations
i pending
ime and
this day
I enjoy!
The East Carolinian
today in
orld. i .ayj
adventure!
3sic needs
'ho Care
-0-0rs

pattern.
on
� ian 1 m
sports
Thursday, Augusty,1979, page 7
Greenville,NC.
Face Western Carolina
Pirates open season Saturday at home
Leander Green shed his jersey
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
"This team is like a stick of dynamite said
East CArolina coach Pat Dyw of his Pirates at a
Wednesday afternoon press luncheon. "Eventually,
if it's ever lit, it'll make a hell of a noise. But I
don't know when or if it'll get lit
Such was the assessment by Dye of his club as
they prepare for Saturday's contest with Western
CArolina. "Western is always tough. We'll have to
be ready he said.
Dye seemed to feel that there was plenty of
talent on the squad but noted that workouts had not
been especially impressive this week. "We've looked
a little tired he said.
But looking at his team on paper he feels that
offensively there is more talent on the 1979 squad
thatn was around last season. "There's just more
natural ability here this season. Of course, there's
also more experience
Experience is definitely the word on the
offensive line where the five regulars are all
returning starters.
The backfield is set also with Leander Green
at quarterback for his senior year. The starting
running backs are Anthony Collins, Theodore
Sutton, and either Mike Hawkins or Sam Harrell.
Talented receivers are there for Green to throw
to. Billy RAy Washington is one of the best and is
joined by Vern Davenport in the starting lineup.
Freshman Reggie Harden will also see some action.
Defensively, the Pirates are less fortunate as far
as returnees go. Zack Valentine, now a Pittsburgh
Steeler, and safety Gerald Hall are only two who
have departed.
But back to continue the success experienced by
last season's Pirate defense (national honors galore)
is Mike Brewington, an All-America candidate at
linebacker. "You can talk about him in the same
breath as any linebacker anywhere said Dye.
A big strength for the Pirates defensively is the
secondary. "We've got the best situation this year
in the secondary that we've ever had Dye
claimed. Ruffin McNeill, Charlie Carter and Willie
Holley all return and will be joined by Thomas
McLaurin. Wayne Perry will vie for a starting bid
once he recovers from an injury that has plagued
him throughout and will definitely see increasing
amounts of playing time as the season rolls along.
Dye mentioned that his defensive club is blessed
with depth at nearly every position. "We lost a lot
of people but we have a lot of quality people
coming back that some may not have heard of.
They will be heard from, though
The fifth-year Piiate mentor and his staff have
been preparing the team for this game for quite
some time now, and with a different approach than
in past seasons.
"We haven't cut any corners with the football
this year he said. "We laid it right out htere for
them. I guess we'll see how it got across this
Saturday night
Kickoff time is set for 7 p.m. at Ficklen
Stadium. Ticket sales have been good and a sellout
is expected.
Defense is Cat keynote
East Carolina University to become a member of
� letic conference? Possible, very possible.
Ea?- Crolina Athletic Director Bill Cain is set to
reparations in the laying of the groundwork
new conference. Cain received permission
ECU Board of Trustees to pursue the idea
a Wednesday night meeting. Cain is
that if matters work out, the conference
rganized by the 1980-81 school year.
ther schools in the proposed six institution
e include Madison, Navy, Old Dominion,
nd and William and Mary.
Cain said that the conference would not include
as a sport but noted that basketball and a
of other sports would be included.
'The athletic directors from the schools have
n several occasions and discussed the
Cain said. "They are now talking to the
rds from their respective institutions and are
iuied to report the results of these meetings
etime in September when we will all get
r again
Cain said that all the schools seemed exited
it the idea of forming a conference and that he
forsee any problems. "Right now, it's jus?
m the beginning stages he said. "But I am very
optimistic that things will work out
A LOOK AT THE EAST CAROLINA sidelines
a non-uniformed Terry Gallaher. The
ex-Pirate split end is serving as a graduate assistant
h this season. Gallaher holds the all-time Pirate
ord for career yardage and career touchdowns.
NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE TEAMS have
thier rosters to the mandatory number of 45.
Both ex-Pirates in the NFL, Zack Valentine of
Pittsburgh and Eddie Hicks of the New York Giants,
have survived this cut. Now they must be able to
sard off any number of free agents and veterans
who were cut from other squads Both seem
assured of a job in the world of pro football,
VALENTINE APPEARED ON national television
last Saturday when the Steelers took on the Dallas
Cowboys ma rematch of last seasons Super Bowl
He played quite well and made any number of
impressive tackles as a member of the special team
squad. Valentine also saw a good deal of action at
linebacker. . . -�-
EAST CAROLINA COACH P.t Dye came, through
rift ft. qUo.e of the week Jgfi&fZ
noon press conference. He was asieu
not thfs might be the most talented -uad J� ha
ever had at ECU. "This team is hke a stick of
dynamite he said. "Eventually , � it ever gets lit,
it'll make a hell of a noise
DYE HAS TAKEN QUITE A LIKING,Ua yung
freshman quarterback named Carlton Nelson. When
asked abou the youngster from Port month, Vat
ine press conference, Dye smiiw 6
HeH�SPho' r,erv very ple�.n. .urprise We
He s been a very, r �� nf our
PwXr.�dBU4h.ehy'ere.dftioh he . one
�f THEH-YEAR PIRATE �.� ?�
v r " i?" ��� ���
Freddie Jones. He s tne - confident
freshmen at this stage, aaia "7 � win with him
that we could start htm n�
tomorrow
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
"They'll flat get after you. They have every year
that I have been here
The words came from East Carolina head football
coach Pat Dye as his team prepared for Saturday's
7 p.m. meeting Ficklen Stadium with Western
Carolina. A sellout is expected.
They played us really tough K t year he said
thinking back to the Pirates' narrow 14-6 victory.
"We were lucky to win that one and will have to
play really well if we are to win this time
The same can be said for the catamounts,
especially since they may have to play without star
flanker Gerald- Harp, harp, who is suffering with a
bad rib injury, may not even suit up for the game,
"it's just a wasit and see thing said Western
head coach Bob waters.
Harp will be sorely missed if he is unable to
play as he was the nation's second leading receiver
last season and tied for Southern Conference player
of the year honors.
With the exception of Harp and freshman wide
receiver Ricky Lewis, who is out with a knee injury,
the Cats appear healthy.
"We look pretty good, nothing but just the usual
bumps and bruises Waters said.
Before pre-season Waters was concerned with his
offensive squad, especially the offensive line, where
graduation hurt deeply. The CAramount coach says
that this is still an unsure area.
"We've come along pretty well. We 've just got
a great deal of inexperience up front. I'll have to
put them in there and see what happens. We're
young on the offensive line and will make mistakes
but I feel we can be good
Curtis Allen, a junior tackle, heads up the line
and is considered all-conference material by the
catamount staff. Allen, 5-11 225, is definitely the
leader of a group that includes Joel Potts(6-2, 220),
Mitch Vestal (6-3, 230), Vernon Green (6-1), and
David Willingham (6-3,220). Quality reserves here
are hrfrd to come by.
If the Cat offensive line fails to come through a
great deal of backfield talent will be wasted.
"Western has two exceptional quarterbacks in
(Mike) Pusey and (Kent Briggs) said Pirate
assistant Bobby Wallace. "They are lucky to have
Anthony Collins makes a turn
Johnston heads
strong EXXf front
�� "
Cat QB Mike Pusey
two of that quality
Pusey will start Saturday and will be expected to
pass quite a bit. "I look for them to throw 30 to 35
times. They just don't run very much said
Wallace.
Starting in Harp's place at the flanker position
will be Jeff Dean, a 5-9 sophomore. Dean is sure to
see quite a bit of the football come gametime with
Harp and Smith sidelined. Others in the receiving
corps include come gametime with Harp and Smith
sidelined. Others in the receiving corps include split
end Dwayne Norman and tight end Eddie McGill.
The backs, termed by Waters as "exciting are
Sidney Cnningham and Robert Brown. Both Brown
and Cunningham were originally defensive ends, but
were moved to the backfield when depth problems
arose.
The CAramount defense is a thing to behold.
Ten starters return from a year ago. Yet another
ten letterraen are back also. "We could have one of
our best defensive units ever this season said
Waters.
Heading the defense is all-Southern Conference
safety Thomas Gunn. Gunn also received honorable
mention for the Associated Press All-America team.
Joining Gunn in the secondary are Willie Wells,
Willie McGall and Willie Carpenter.
The defensive line is strong with Mike Brownlee,
Bobby Peche, Clay Bullard, Larry McClain and
Tommy Renfro listed as starters. Renfro beat out
sophomore George Alston, an all-conference perfor-
mer a year ago.
"George came to camp a little overweight and
got off to a slow start said Waters. "Tommy has
played extremely well and beat him out fair and
square. George is coming along, though
The linebackers are Ricky Smith and Randy
Howard.
linebacker said East
Ken Hutcherson. "He's
Gerald Harp, an injured star
"Smith is a first-class
Carolina assistant coach
really tough inside
Hutcherson noted that the Catamount defense
could possibly be confusing for the Pirates. "They
run a lot of different schemes he said.
Cat coach Waters feels that it will take all the
schemes his club can muster to take on the Pirates.
"They're an excellent club, always well-coached.
They're awfully quick offensively. We'll have to try
and react fast enough to stop them, I guess
East Carolina guard
Mitchell Johnston likes
aggressive football and
it is a technique that
has put him in the
winner's circle often.
Chosen to the pre-
season all-Southern In-
dependent football team
heading into his senior
year, Johnston knows
the value of a step in
the right direction and
hopes his Pirates can
make a similar jump in
the season opener Sept.
1 in Ficklen Memorial
Stadium against
Western Carolina.
"Being off six inches
or less with your first
step can make an
offensive lineman miss
his block or be
ineffective said
Johnston, a very
effective operator at 6-4
and 242 pounds.
"Aggressiveness and
strength go hand in
hand when you need to
finish off a block, but
it's technique that gets
me in the right place
and the right position
Johnston has been in
the right position aften
and is a prime reason
why the Pirates go into
the 1979 season as the
No.9 team in the NCAA
in rushing over the past
five years. East Carolina
has averaged 272.49
yards per game in the
iast half-decade, threee
of those years with the
High Point native
smoothing the way.
"Mitchell was our
outstanding lineman at
the end of last year and
I'm looking for him to
pick up right where he
left off said Pirate
coach Pat Dye. "He can
play either guard spot
or tackle well which
indicates his blend of
quickness and strength
and his grasp of the
offense. He has played
with injuries, too. He
could play every snap if
we needed it
Johnston is a wily
veteran in the trenches,
but one of only five
returning starters the
Pirates have up front.
In Johnston and right
guard Wayne Inman,
East Carolina has as
rugged a tandem of
guards as it has ever
fielded. Inman made the
second team All-
Southern Independent
squad a year ago.
Tackles Matt Mul-
holland and Joe Godette
Mitchell Johnston
and center Jeff Hagans
surround that duo with
plenty of punch as well,
striving to satisfy the
critical eye ot ofensive
line coach Dick Kupec.
"Coach Kupec pre-
pares us for the
opponents detense
every week so when a
play is called John-
ston said, "Vv e know
automatically what our
blocking assignments
are. Even when the
defense shifts, the new
block is automatic
This may be simple
to five offensive linemen
who have won 11
varsity letters between
them, but it hasn't
always been that eas.
For Johnston his
football life began in
the fourth grad and
he's been mastering his
technique for 13 years
now.
He has learned a lot
about the game and
himself in those years,
including a perception
of the game in
microcosm.
"Every play I either
win or lose 'Johnston
said. "To win a game 1
have to be consistent
from the first series to
the end. When I come
off the field I can just
about tell what grade
I'm going to have when
coach Kupec finishes
looking at the- film,
almost right on the
button
Johnston has confi-
dence in the 1979
Pirates, but like his
teammates and coaches,
he isn't making any
predictions, but with
Mitchell Johnston
applying his techniques
at left guard, Pirate
fans will be happy to
enjoy it one play and
one game at a time,
too.
. ��





Page 8 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 30 August 1979
DAIRY ft EGGS (YEAST)
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&
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ENTRANCE
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to mb HOSIER
20
LQBfcY
OFF MANUFACTURER S
SUGC-STED RETAIL
CIGARETTES
CIGARS
TOBACCO
JEWELRY
MAGAZINES
0 5?
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MDSE. STORES
1 Prices Effective
Wed Aug. 29
Thru Sat, Sept. 1,1979
NONE SOLD
DEALERS
OPEN 7 AM TO MIDNIGHT
MON
THRU
SAT
OPEN SUNDAY
9AMT09PM
600 Greenville BlvdGreenville
Phone 756-7031

MMMMpM





30 August 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 9
The Fearless Football Forecast
WESTERN CAROLINA AT EAST CAROLINA
COLORADO ST. AT ARIZONIA
LONG BEACH ST. AT UTAH
LSU AT NEW MEXICO
WICHITA STATE AT NEW MEXICO ST.
NORTH CAROLINA A&T AT WINSTON-SALEM
1TEP AT NORTH TEXAS STATE
NORTHEAST LA. AT SOUTHWEST LA.
CHARLES CHANDLER
ECU 24-7
Arizonia
Utah .
LSU
N. Mexico St.
N.C. A&T
N. Texas St.
northeast La.
JIMMY DUPREE
ECU35-12
Colorado St.
Long Beach St.
N. Mexico
N. Mexico St.
N.C.A&T
N. Texas St.
Southwest La.
RANDY HARRILL
ECU21-17
Colorado St.
UTAH
LSU
Wichita St.
N.C. A&T
UTEP
Northeast La.
TERRY HERNDON
ECU 31-14
Colorado St.
Long Beach St.
LSU
New Mexico St.
Winston-Salem
N. Texas St.
Southwest La.
WAYNE NEWNAM
ECU Director of Sports Promotions
ECU 28.7
Colorado St.
Utah
LSU
N. Mexico St.
Winston-Salem
N.Texas St.
Southwest La.
Niekro brothers pres
day version of Deans
By WILL GRIMSLEY
AP Special Correspondent
The kid still is threatening to show up his big
brother, but you don't get any yelps out of Phil
Niekro.
"We, Joe and I, have never had any personal
rivalry - not even when we go against each other,
said the 40-year-old knuckleballer of the Atlanta
Braves, who notched victory No. 17 by beating the
New YOrk Mets Tuesday night.
"We are really close. We get a kick out of what
the other one does. I hope he wins 30, and I am
sure he wishes the same for me
Joe Niekro, five years Phil's junior, already has
passed the No. 17 plateau, though he was foiled in
his bid for his 19th victory against
Wednesday night.
Montreal
ECU field hockey action
They're baseball's most illustrious pitching
brothers since the Dean boys, Dizzy and Paul, toiled
for the St. Louis Cardinals in the 1930's.
"I don't think the Deans had 20 the same
year the elder Niekro commented during the
Braves' get-away game Wednesday in shea Stadium.
"That's the reason I'd like for Joe and me both
to get 20 this year. It's within reach and we'd b e
the first brothers in the National League to do it.
Phil Niekro is up on his diamond history. For all
the glamour that surrounded the Dean brothers,
Paul never reached 20-game season although he
twice got to 19 in the 1930's when Dizzy scored 30
and 28 triumphs.
Despite the gap in their ages, the knuckleballing
Niekros have had virtually paralleling careers.
Except for Joe's brief tenure in the American
League, they have been Naitonal Leaguers.
"We have faced each other five times Phil
recalled with a touch of relish, "Joe's won three
and I've won two. The one that got to me most
was two years ago in Atlanta when Joe hit a home
run to beat me.
"He's never let me forget it.Now every time our
teams go against each other, there's Joe over in
the dugout swinging five bats, acting like Babe
Ruth itching to get to the plate
The Niekros grew up around Martins Ferry,
Ohio, the only boys in a family that included an
older sister. Because of the difference in age, Phil
was more like a father to Joe, who idolized his big
brother.
"We had a great relationship
never fought an
Phil recalls. 'We
GOLF
SALE
All men's Golf slacks 12 price. Over 80 pairs to choose from.
Remainder of IZOD short sleeve Men's shirts going on sale now
for fall clearance. Normally $20.00 NOW ONLY $12.00 Sizes
Small only.Childrens IZOD short sleeve shirts 4 to 16
NOW only $7.00
Our childrens IZOD long sleeves have arrived and we are having
an Early Bird Special. If you buy 2 or more you get a big discount
Sizes range from 4-20
Just received large selection of long sleeve IZOD shirt, childrens
sweaters, childrens slacks - Men's V-neck & Cardigan sweaters
and we are having an Early Bird Special on all these items.
Discontinuing all Chemold Tennis Rackets 12 price.
All men's and ladies ETONIC KM Streetfighter jogging shoes
reduced to $26.00 per pair. All tennis shoes 1 2 priceIncluded
are Foot Joy and Head
BAD NEWS- Golf ball prices well be increased Sept. 10th. This will
be our last offering of Titleist - Wilson - Top Flight - Hogan and
Dunlop Golf Balls Balls $12.50 per Dozen Now until Sept. 10th
Also Now Spalding Dot blemished Golf Balls Normally $18.50 dz
NOW only $5.00 dz
ALL Golf Bags 20-50 off All knit Head Covers 12off
Dunlop Championship & Extra Duty tennis balls $1.75 per can
(limit 2 cans per customer) Now until Sept. 4th only
All Golf Shoes , Men's and Women's Make an offer - we need to clear
all these out - very LARGE selection .
Men's Women's & Childrens' ECU lined jackets with Crest reg.
$22 00 NOW ONLY $15.00. We also Hets for other schools at
same price. Golf gloves Buy 3 get wie FREE. We also have
a large selection of shag balls at good prices. Closing out all of last
years Ski's & equipment at drastic Reductions to make room for New
Ski Equipment. QQRDON FULP'S
GOLF - SKI - TENNIS SHOP
Located Greenville Country Club
Off Memorial Drive Behind Greenway Apartments
TENNIS WESTERN
SIZZLIN
STEAKHOUSE
No. 1 8oa SIRXION
Includes Idaho Kin BakedPotato with
margarine ,Texas Toast, tossed salad &
dressing.
AU FOR for $$.49
Reg. �4.09
with ECU ID
Party Facilities Available
Call 758-871
OFFER GOOD
MOW. SEPT. 3 thru THURS. SEPT 6
758-2712 2903 E. 10th St.





Page 10 the ft Carolinian � �.T.M ��,
Football games often
scene of grand memories
By JIMMY DuPREE
5sr. Sports �etoor
Whenever football becomes the object of
�nversanon at East Carolina University many
U"7abl' �" of days by are certain tobl
ossed about. Bu haps the most �
Se gLes " m aCUV,t,eS m the SUnds and �"�?
Nm, grand moments in the history of the sport
have derived from ECU-UNC Tar Heel clashes
Une alumnus was reminded of the 38-17 whipping
he Pirates handed the rival Heels the Saturday
-ng; the death of former football coach and
athletic director Clarence Stasavich
A member of one of ECU's finer fraternities
recalls o her aspects ot the cross state rivalry
Apparently feeIing the effeclg rf
isumption, one of his fraternity brothers saw the
- dispose ot remnants of fried chicken and
ad.
With no properly labeled depository in sight the
alternative for someone at his level of
lv 1
oniv loi
The wild.
world of baseball
By WILL GRIMSLEY
AP Special Correspondent
Apple pie, Chevrolet, Kate Smith and baseball .
Francisco, pitcher Yida Blue threatens to
gun to the lockerroom and "blow away"
rters who pester him. That failing, he says he
"lg " n � a baball bat. Teammate 'John
walks out after being fined $500 for
ev. nips on the team plane against rigid
rules - me players are in open revolt against
- Manager Joe Altobelli.
ae: Somebody will write a book and call
stick Caspers Peanuts, popcorn, "getcha
r here and baseball . .
nmg unfit for man o'r beast, on sloppy
Irenching rain, Reggie Jackson loses his
misplays a fly ball to right field, the
os nastily and refuses to let up every
gg sticks his nose out of the dugout. ' '
the man who was courted by Yankee
rge Steinbrenner, who signed ' for $2.9
and struck three titanic home runs in the
me of the 1977 World Series - catalyst
rrer ol the two-time world champions.
T, r, blood-thirsty once maoned John
first seven-foot high jumper, after
� the Olympic Games. "They're like
in the roman Colosseum in the old days
to please them every day or they yell 'Off
head Towhead kids, free helmets,
graphs ami baseball. . .
intoxication was to scatter his parcel in a UNC
student transit vehicle.
Although any of the numerous security agencies
(Public and private) that protect Ficklen Stadium
a test that their duties include enforcing a ban of
alcoholic beverages at the games, several isolated
I incidents of fans wandering in with ice chests
loaded with their favorite malt beverages have
occured. 6
The consumption of these malt and grain liquids
have, Iron, time to time, produced some rather
bizarre behavior.
"I forgot where my car was once reported one
jun.or Ive even heard of guys who forgot who.
their date was. B
Homecoming activities seem to bring out a
special sort of madness in Pirate fans.
The 1977 affair was dedicated to Leo Jenkins
who was enterring his final year as ECU chancellor
In honor of the occasion, one of the women's
dormitories made a dummy with a crown to
symbolize their allegence to the departing leader
A passerby (having partaken in the aforemen-
t.oned spirits) admired the crown subsequently
coronated himself. H ?
tarm hn?leS ?, ECU HaVe a,S� bee" kno�n to
tarnish their halos.
One stated that after games, they had to find a
worth while activity to occupy time, so a game called
Naked Bumper Cars" was invented
Apparently the game is played with only the
equipment Mother Nature provided; with arms
crowed ,n front to serve as the bumper. (The object
0 h� game is unclear and left to the imagination
01 the reader.)
Saturday's home opener with the Caramounts of
Western Carolina marks the beginning of final days
ol Leander Green and Mike Brewington as Pirates,
but as long as there is football at East Carolina
University, there will be outragious tales to be
passed on.
ABORTIONS UP TO 12TH
WEEK OF PREGNANCY
$175-00,ncV-�l�
pregnancy test, birth control and
problem pregnancy counseling For
further information call 832-0535 (toll-
free number 800-221-2568) between
9 A.M5 P M weekdays.
Raleigh Women's Health
Organization
917 West Morgan St.
Raleigh, N.C. 27603
Pitt Plan
pin ��� w
Shopping Center
Walk-Ins
and Appointment
7S6-i76o
tto
Tl
Complete Dance
Wear
SALE RACK each store of
Disco and & Swim wear items.
COME IN TO DA Y
AND LET US HELP YOt
CAPEZIO - DANSKIN
NOW TWO
LOCATIONS!
Greenville
,805Dickinson Ave
752-5186
Rockyi
K-Mart
446-0,
T
Crfmwilh, JV. C.
TONITE LIVE
Tommy 6. and Co.
Sat. and Sun. Nite
Rock and Roll with
a Dollar Pistol
Don't Forget
Fri. afternoon
it
Big Four
tickets
set to go
WELCOME BACK
NEW AND
HODGES' BUi
millioi
ha:
on.
as
Ma
tan Weaver, the smartest manager in the game
a confrontation with umpire Ron Luciano, who
- quoted as saying, "I don't care who wins
as it isn t the Orioles or Weaver The
is slapped with a three-game
American League President Lee
witnessing the scene, said rather
imply cannot tolerate Earl making
about an umpire's integrity How
Pinstripes, crackerjacks,
m by
who.
i
pontil
pul in merit
iJr Weaver'
lys Cooding and baseball
pre
Aar
gar;
Willie Randolph, underrted second baseman of
he New York Uikees, picks up the cudgels from
�on Hnk Aaron and ex-Baltimore star
in insisting that racial injustices still
m the grand old American game three
r Jackie robinsun broke the color line.
iys, "AH black men get shafted in this
Frank Robinson charges, "They still refuse
irk man a position of responsibility
Rnadolph views the situation from a strictly
standpoint. "I think I am the best athlete
ball club. But when you hear about the
Yankees, it's usually Jackson, Nettles and Dent
rhe) deserve their due. But why isn't recognition
spr d around?
Chris Chambliss can't get anything for his
home run which won the 1976 playoff; if Roy
White, after lo years, can't get anything speaking
engagement, appearances, etc what can I expect to
get r
Ro Kroc, announcing a plan to spend $10
million to improve his San Diego ball club, was
asked by the AP's Norm Clarke if he would be
interested in the Yankees' Craig Nettles and the
Reds' Joe Morgan, who may be up for grabs. Kroc
licked his lips like a man who had just devoured a
big Mac and said, in effect, "Sure, that would be
nice. Boom! He hadn't had time to wipe his chin
before Commissioner Bowie Kuhn had slapped him
with a 1100,000 fine. The offense! tampering.
That's a fragile no-no in freemarket baseball
these days - and a rather silly one. Kroc was not
devious. He made no overt move to contact either
of the superstars. The hamburger baron, realizing
his error, quickly apologized. His sin was similar to
that of Atlanta's maverick Ted Turner who
admittedly emboldened by a half-dozen martinis'
three years ago expressed as similar, off-the-cuff
interest in Cary Matthews. The yachtsman-sports-
Eonn�? r Td knocked out of his 8aii8 h a
IU 000 fine and a year's suspension
Baseball should bring its archaic tampering rules
into accordance with reality. IF an owner actually
schemes to lure a player from his current employer!
throw the book at him. If he simply expressesTn
opinion, forget it.
Apple pie and baseball. Whatever became of
Kate Smith, anyhow?
Student tickets for
Last Carolina's football
games at N.C. State
and North Carolina will
go on sale on Labor
a, September 3 at 6
p.m.
I ickets (or both
games will be sold for
$1.50 to students with
LCL ID cards. As in
the past, the tickets will
be sold at the ticket
booth located in Minges
Coliseum.
The Sept. 8 meeting
with the Wollpack and
the Oct. 27 contest with
the Tar Heels are
both sellouts. A
vet) limited supply of
tickets will be available
to ECU students.
In the past, the
tickets to these games
were sold early in the
morning. But due to
excessive noise and
littering made by
students who stayed in
line overnight, the
tickets will be sold in
the late afternoon this
vear.
Tickets to Pirate
games at Wake Forest
and Duke are plentiful
and are available to
students at the present
time. Tickets lor the
Sept. 15 game against
Duke sell for $5.00 to
students with ECU ID.
Tickets to the Wake
game go lor $8.00 each.
Field hockey,
volleyball
'aT
Name H.L. Hodqcs J
Address HO E jth St
Phone 7sa-4is�
t
K
1 IV,
vro
��.
Good for
? i.
ol 10.
Or mo r e.
$200 cash and
merchandise giveaway
tryouts
Tryouts are now
being held for spots on
the East CArolina
volleyball and field
hockey teams.
The Pirate field
hockey team returns
only four regulars from
last season and head
coach Laurie Arrants
says that all interested
persons are more than
welcome to contact her
at 757-6161 or come by
Minges room 144 at
3:30 this afternoon
(Thurs).
Volleyball coach Alita
Dillon also welcomes all
interested persons to
call her at 757-6161.
Plenty of spots are
available on the squad.

i
U�e of this coupon automatically reei.te� �.
far giveaway, howavc,�. purcuu
MAKE THE CAMPOS
your phone before VrfVl II lCVri 1 IVJ I�
Friday, August 31 st, you can save yourself a trip
Now thru Friday, Carolina Telephone representatives will be
Lobo? S�25n 3t! i reKeKCamp ,OCati�ns: � S Star?
Lobby; Clement Dorm Lobby and Tyler Dorm Lobby.
In addition, by ordering your phone now, you'll beat the crowd
� and get early installation.
And finally, your early order ensures that your
number wil I be incl uded in the ECU
Telephone Directory
kJor 79-80.
i � �. Wt So make the
connection. Order
phone today.
� ���-�
your
fflQQ Carolina Telephone
UNITED TELEPHONE SYSTEM
EC
w
Ji
NateWi
s
Wfi
By RICK1 GUARMIi
Staff Writer
On Sept. 5, from
p.m. until 8 p.m
intramural Sports, alor
with all areas of tl
Division of Student Lif
is sponsoring an "Aft;
on the Mali Th
"celebration" i? beirj
held to introduce ti
intramural-recreational
opportunities availabl
to students and t
expose students to tl
many services provide!
by Student Life.
During the day. thl
Intramural Departmei
will be sponsorinl
games and contests. Aj
participants will gain
chance to win one
several prizes bein(
given away during th
affair.
Free watermelon anj
Pepsi will be provide
and "Affair a banJ
which has worked fre
quently with Mik
Cross, will perform.
Information booth:
will be set up b
various groups on caml
pus such as the Place
ment Service, Counsel
ing Service, Handicap
Sed Services and Men
enhall Student Centet
to name just a few
Members of thesf
organizations will be
present to answer ques-
tions and to acquaint
students with the ser-
vices they provide.
Intramural Sport:
announces job opening
for both male anc
female students. Sports
officials are needea for
basketball, flag football
roller hockey, soccer j
slow pitch softball, team
handball and volleyball.





30 August 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 11
c C
COME ON OUT
THE PUTTINGS FINE!
Bung this coupon and Play
3 Games foi only $1 50
(Por Person P '�
PUTT-PUTT
f,nir LOURSfS,
y
10th St. Extention
Besirir Rivf r Bluff Apts
Greenville. N C
758 1820
IfcartlieftinofiiLLc
264 PLAYHOUSE
From the Makers of Honeypie
& Sweet Cakes in color
CT-lfYT Adults Only X
COOKIES
Starring Five All New
Erotic Beauties from
the Pages of Playboy
& Penthouse
See the Sensational Rocky Take
Off as seen in Playboy

M-
6 miles west of Greenville
on Hwy 264
Valid ID Required
WELCOME ABOARD
Dl SCO
ECU PIRATES DISCO DEN
SUN. LADIES NIGHT
WED. BEACH NIGHT
THURS. J.R DISCO DANCE
CONTEST - $50.001st PRIZE
REGISTRATION STARTS
SAT. BEFORE
FRI. TGIF AFTERNOON
SOCIAL 4-7
Doors Open at 8:30
be
ire
our
:cu
�ry
he
der
loday.
Parking in Front
and Rear
Leather Belts
S6toJ19
Leather Handbags
$10 to (25
�Shoes Repaired To Look
Like New
Riggan Shoe Repair
& Leather Shop
111 WEST 4TM ST.
OOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
WANTS
PART-TIME
JOB
Looking for a part-time
job with flexible hours
and real business
experience? Northwest
Mutual Lite Ins. Co.
las openings for college
agents. Call before noon
for appointment.
752-4080
Part-time, flexible schedule; Sales
Marketing position for enterprising student
Includes opportunity to attend a 3 112 day
seminar in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
Send resume to CO. Tankard Co Inc P.O. Box
1025. Washington, N.C. 27889. Include name,
address, phone number, age, year in school,
previous employment, interests and future plans.
Affair on the Mall
By R1CKI GL1ARMIS
Staff Writer
On Sept. 5, from 3
p.m. until 8 p.m
intramural Sports, along
uith all areas of the
Division of Student Life,
is sponsoring an "Affair
on the Nlall1 This
"celebration" is being
held to introduee the
intramural-recreational
opportunities available
to students and to
expose students to the
mam services provided
by Student Life.
During the day, the
Intramural Department
will be sponsoring
games and contests. All
participants will gain a
chance to win one oi
severaj prizes being
given away during the
affair.
Free watermelon and
Pepsi will be provided
and "Affair a band
which has worked fre-
quently with Mike
Cross, will perform.
Information booths
will be set up by
arious groups on cam-
pus such as the Place-
ment Service, Counsel-
ing Service, Handicap-
ped Services and Men-
denhall Student Center
to name just a few.
Members of these
organizations will be
present to answer ques-
tions and to acquaint
students with the ser-
vices they provide.
Intramural Sports
announces job openings
for both male and
female students. Sports
officials are needed for
basketball, flag football,
roller hockey, soccer,
slow pitch softball, team
handball and volleyball.
1
Experience is not
necessary. Clinics for
the officials will be held
prior to each snort's
eason. Students should
be available to officiate
in the late afternoons
and evenings, Mondays
through Thursdays, with
games occassionally
being held on Fridays
and Sundays.
Pay rate for officials
will 'range from the
minimum wage per hour
to 50 cents above that
sum.
Anyone interested in
officiating during the
1979-80 school year
should contact Robert
Fox, Assistant Director
of Intramurals and
coordinator of officials,
in 204 Memorial Gym
or call 757-6387.
On Sunday, Sept. 9,
at 7:15 a.m nine
members of the ECU
Pepsi Physical Fitness
Club will compete in
the Triathlon-YMCA
Iron Man Contest at
Wilmington, N.C. The
Triathlon is a swim-
ming, biking and run-
ning event.
The ECU members
competing are Nancy
Mize, Associate Director
of IM-Rec; Pat Cox
and Robert Fox, assis-
tant directors of IM-
Rec; Maureen Fox,
Dept. of Surgery; Bob
Gotwals, chemistry stu-
dent; Tony Guiterrey,
f;raduate student in Bio-
ogy; Anne Holms, Bos-
ton Marathoner and
teaching assistant in
P.E Linda Mason, stu-
dent in Theraputic Rec-
reation; and Ken Mur-
ray, student in Indus-
trial Technology.
Participants will
swim approximately one-
third mile, mount bicy-
cles for a 50-mile ride,
and finish the competi-
tion bv running 10
miles. Anyone interested
in competing should
contact the Wilmington
YMCA for information.
The Phvsical Fitness
Club begins the 1979-80
school year with its first
meeting on Tues Sept.
18 at 7:30 in 104
Memorial Gym.
The club was formed
to promote exercise.
Activities include
biking, running, swim-
ming and walking. Par-
ticipants select their
preferred method of
exercise and work out
at times and places
according to their sche-
dules. Members log
their distances and
times and upon reach-
ing their goal ot 100,
500, or 1000 miles,
receive a T-shirt com-
memorating the achieve-
ment of their goal.
Anyone interested in
joining' the Pepsi Phvsi-
cal Fitness Club would
contact Robert Fox, 204
Memorial Gym or call
757-6387.
Don't forget the
entry deadline for Flag
Football is Sept. 7, at
12 noon. Captain's
meeting will be held
Sept. 10, 4 p.m. at
Biology 103.
An Intramural Coun-
cil meeting will be held
on Thurs Sept. 6, at 4
p.m. in Brewster B-102.
r:
SJ
Volleyball year
set to begin
XyX-Xv

�s&sj8is$i
East Carolina's
volleyball team opens
its 1979 season at home
against state champion
N.C. State, Sept. 18,
one of six home dates
for the Pirates this fall
in addition to the
annual East Carolina
Invitational tournament.
The 7 p.m battle
with the wolfpack
which opens the sche-
dule is only the first of
several meetings be-
tween the two schools.
The two play in Raleigh
on Oct. 9 and could
meet again in the state
A1AW tournament set
for Nov. 9-10 at N.C.
State, or in several
other tournaments as
well.
Tournament competi-
tion dots the fall slate
with the Pirates entered
in events at Eastern
Kentucky on Sept 28-28,
South Carolina on Oct.
5-6, and Maryland on
Oct. 26-27 in addition to
the tournament the
Pirates will host Oct.
19-20.
Entries in the East
Carolina Invitational
include Kentucky State,
Wake Forest, N.C.
Central, Winthrop,
Longwood and the
Pirates.
The Pirates, enter-
ing their third season
under Alita Dillon,
finished 23-12 a year
ago.
UMJTOTOrTii ITlTtT �� �- -�
They're the ones that you want
The Films Committee brings you
great movies year-round
Coming this fall
Grease � An Unmarried Woman
Midnight Express � Foul Play
Heaven Can Walt � Interiors
Richard Pryor in Concert STUDENT UNION
I and many, many more
CMOUNA
!





The East Caroli
inian 1
features
Thursday,August 30,1979, page 12
Greenville,N.c.
.
The Innocent9
a story of human destruction
By WILLIAM JONES
Features Editor
The eves tell the
ston.
The Innocent opens
in a sweat-steamed fen-
cing school. Tulio, an
intense middle-aged
man. leaves his partner,
already late to accom-
pany his wife, Teresa,
to a piano recital.
The couple arrive at
the recital and, as they
move toward the perfor-
mance . chamber, are
glared at by Julian, a
beautiful woman sur-
rounded by handsome
and distinguished men,
all hungry to gain her
or. The look is one
of purest, most intense
jealousy. The married
man greets her stare
with an equally intense
one of shock, anger,
and desire.
? Julian is Jennifer
O'Neil. Tulio is Gian-
carlo Giannini. And
Teresa is Laura Anto-
nelli. The movie, The
Innocent, directed by
Luchino Vixconti, is
playing through today at
the Park theater.
Tulio and Teresa
have a most unusual
relationship. Tulio is an
atheist. But, more than
this, he also is totally
amoral. He lives only
for the 'thrill the 'fire'
of being alive. Teresa,
is sentimental and im-
mensely loyal.
Tulio and Julian, the
enamoured woman, are
lovers. They are too
completely comfortable
in this role and carry
on with indiscretion,
Tulio being quite frank
with his wife about his
affair with Julian
Teresa seems to accept
this as her lot in life.
She in no way tries to
change things. In fact,
nearly all the way
through the film she
falls for Tulio's self-
pitying cries of how
much he is suffering
because of his consum-
ing love for this 'other
woman
This double-standard
comes to a screeching
climax when Tulio
� laces Ramundo,
eresa's child outside
on Christmas night. The
snow storm nearly free-
zes the baby and it dies
from the exposure.
At this point, Teresa
finally leaves Tulio. And
he returns to his former
lover, hoping to again
be accepted by her. The
result of their meeting
is perhaps, as unlooked
for by the two of them
as the viewer. But, no
less inevitable.
The Innocent fea-
tures detailed costuming
of the Victorian era,
and the sets are impec-
Raging rabbit raids Carter
By BROOKS JACKSON
Associated Press Writer
WASHINGTON (AP) - A "killer rabbit"
attacked President Carter on a recent trip to Plains,
Ga penetrating Secret Service security and forcing
the chiel executive to beat back the beast with a
noe paddle.
The rabbit, which the president later guessed
was fleeing in panic from some predator, actually
swam toward a canoe from which Carter was fishing
in a pond. It was hissing menacingly, its teeth
flashing and nostrils flared, and making straight for
president.
Carter was not injured, and reports are unclear
what became of the banzai bunny. But
rtunately for Carter's credibility, a White House
stafl photographer made a picture of the attack and
the president's successful self-defense.
It was fortunate because some of the president's
st staff members refused to believe the story
oi the aquatic attack rabbit when Carter related it
to them later. Their skepticism arose despite
Carter s strong and oft-repeated promises never to
lie.
"Everybody knows rabbits don't swim said one
former doubter.
Carter, stung by this skepticism from his inner
By JOE EDWARDS
As ed Press Writer
NASHVILLE, Tenn.
AP�Kenny Rogers,
shing in on his hit
ng "The Gambler
will have the strongest
hand when the annual
Country Music Associ-
ation awards are an-
nounced this fall.
But some of
other big names
country music are
! contention.
Dealt out of
competition were Dolly
Parton, Johnny Cash,
Ronnie Milsap, Mej
the
in
out
the
Tillis, Eddie Rabbitt,
Charley Pride and
Tammy Wynette, who
failed to make the
finalists in any category.
The gray-bearded
Rogers dominated the
finalists for the I3th
annual CMA awards.
He is one of five
finalists in five of the
10 categories.
Rogers is a finalist
for entertainer of the
year, male vocalist of
the year, single of the
year for "The
.Gambler album of the
year for "The Gambler"
L i
��LYtPuF0N WlLL N0T BE ,N THE RUNNING
FOR THE CMA's AWARDS THIS FALL.
circle, ordered up a print of the photograph to offer
as proof. But even this was not good enough at
first. 6
"You could see him in the canoe with his
paddle raised, and you could see something in the
water said the doubter. "But you couldn't tell
what it was. It could have been anything
So Carter ordered an enlargement made "It
was a rabbit, all right said the staff member after
seeing the blown-up photo.
Another staffer who saw the picture agreed.
"It was a killer rabbit. The president was
swining for his life this staffer said.
No news photographers were allowed within
camera range of Carter on the fishing trip
Immediately afterward. White House photographers
released an official picture of Carter fishing, but
withheld the picture of him flailing at the swimming
rabbit. 6
Rabbits aren't the only animal troubling the
president. Mice have reappeared inside the White
House after a protracted bureaucratic hassle that
eventually reduced the population significantly
earlier m Carter's term. There even have been
reported sightings of rats recently in the executive
mansion.
please turn to page 14
intry nominations
The winners will be
announced during the
CMA's nationally tele-
vised annual awards
show Oct. 8 at the
Grand Ole Opry House.
Other categories and
the finalists:
Song of the year. . .
"Amanda by Waylon
Jennings; "If Lovin'
You Is Wrong I Don't
Want to be Right" by
Miss Mandrell; "The
Devil Went Down to
Georgia by the
Charlie Daniels Band;
"The Gambler by
Rogers and "You
Needed Me by Miss
Murray.
Album of the year-
� "Armed and Crazy
by Johnny Paycheck;
"One for the Road by
Nelson and Leon Rus-
sell; "Rose Colored
Glasses by Conlee;
"The Gambler" by
Rogers and "The
Originals" by the
Slatlers.
Song of the year,
honoring a songwriter-
� "Amanda Bob Mc-
Dill: "Every Which
Way But Loose
Stephen Dorf, Milton
L. Brown, Thomas Gar-
relt; "She Believes in
Me Steve Gibb;
'Talking in Your
Sleep Roger F. Cook
and Bobby Ray Woods,
and "The Gambler
Don Schlitz.
Vocal group of the
year�Dave and Sugar;
Charlie Daniels Band;
the Kendals; Oak Ridge
Boys and the Statlers.
Vocal duo of the
year�Conway Twitty
and Loretta Lynn; Jim
Ed Brown and Helen
Cornelius; Johnny Dun-
can and Miss Fricke;
Rogers and Miss West;
Nelson and Jennings.
Instrumental group
of the year�Asleep at
please turn to page IS
cable in their authenti-
city.
It, of course, suffers
the same handicap to
lip-synching that all for-
eign films are burdened
with. Aside from this, it
is an excellent example
of fine directing on the
part of Visconti. Shot
angles, closeups and
camera pans disclose
almost as much as the
script.
Giannini's perfor-
mance could not have
been better. His ability
to make the viewer hate
his ruthlessness is
wretchedly accurate.
Antonelli's acting
ability is exceeded only
in degree by the total
voluptuosness of her
body. Visconti no doubt
realized this when he
capitalized on it's photo-
genticity in one of the
most tasteful erotic love
scenes ever done. This
love scene is the high-
light of the film.
O'Neill's portrayal
seems to pale next to
Gianinni and Anto-
nelli's.
The Innocent is a
story of human destruc-
tion brought about by
greed, lust and total
selfishness. It will not
leave the viewer un-
moved.
THE INNOCENT, playing at the Park Theater,
the Italian producer Viscontis last film.
is
Bus trip: A different but
aggravating experience
and duo of the year
with Dottie West.
Other finalists for
entertainer of the year,
the top award, are
Crystal Gayle, Barbara
Mandrell, Willie Nelson
and the Statlers.
'Finalists for top
male vocalist are John
Conlee, Larry Gatlin,
Nelson, Rogers and Don
Williams.
Finalists for No. 1
female vocalist are
Janie Fricke, Miss
Gayle, Emmylou Harris,
Miss Mandrell and
Anne Murray.
By RICHARD GREEN
Assistant Features Editor
It is sad that we depend on automobiles to the
extent that we do because as with all things, they
are as imperfect as the men who design them (and
service them).
With Murphy's Law functioning properly, my car
began burning oil in large quantities on the way to
school last week. So when I finished work on
Saturday I took my car home to Charleston, S.C to
be serviced under warranty.
I thought it would be simple matter to catch a
bus back to Greenville on Tuesday for drop-add and
the first days of classes. This is what I got for
thinking.
I called the bus station in Charleston for
information and was told that the last bus left for
Greenville at 5:30 p.m. Why shouldn't I believe
that?
Arriving at the bus station at 5:00 p.m. I asked
for a one-way ticket on the 5:30 bus to Greenville
and was immediately informed that there was no
5:30 bus to Greenville.
Evidently the person who gave me the faulty
information was new on the job and did not realize
that I had a newspaper deadline on Wednesday at
noon.
So I bought a ticket for Jacksonville, N.C, at
5:30 hoping to get a ride to Greenville with a
friend.
On the same bus was a small platoon of recent
recruits; Marines, I believe At our first stop in
Union, S.C they landed and assaulted the drink
machine, but what they didn't realize was that the
stop was only for a minute or so.
Well, a few good men might have missed the
bus had it not been for their combat training on
how to board a moving vehicle.
Next stop, Myrtle Beach, and the Marines were
the first ones there, as usual. They occupied the
snack bar with little resistance and held off the rest
of the passengers until it was almost time to leave.
One Marine, who sported a 'showing-scalp'
hairstyle and whose accent accused him of being
from the Bronx, overheard a girl ask for a barbeque
"What's a 'bob-a-cue'?"
Obviously, barbeque is as rare in New York
City as grits.
On the way to Wilmington the Marines were
wandering around the bus, whispering things to
each other and grinning suspiciously. I thought thev
were planning to commandeer the bus and take us
all as hostages.
From Wilmington called Advertising Director to
explain my situation and he offered to pick me up
in Jacksonville.
It was 10 p.m. and my connection to Jacksonville
wouldn t leave until 11:55. Whoever designed bus
stations never had to sleep in one.
Ten o'clock also meant that the bus station was
closed. So I was locked in a closed bus station for
two hours, and the man in charge of this closed
bus station was very serious about his job
He was going to keep that station closed, no
matter what. He had to be persuaded by two
passengers, who were accidently locked out that
they were passengers.
Finally, at 12:45 a.m after nearly three hours,
four cups of coffee and many more cigarettes the
bus arrived at the closed station C1�arettes' the
closTd'st l� b�ardthe bus � gced at the
closed-station-supervisor, who was unloading
packages from the luggage compartment.
"I hlvi�t 7 ,?ni SUted Father �"er-of-factly,
other s -t" thC S"1 bef�re l Can lod the
HtSh?Uld-haVeL repHed' "So who cares?" But, I
andNutLT8 itHat hC WaS a8 enthused with ses
ana stations as I was.
f
An ECU student passes the time after drooadd
reading through the student newspaper
30 ol
direct
Sale 1
Reg. $2
Floding
whiteon
backcovj
color. R
19.99
J.C.Penl
3-speed
thermos
Sale $1
Reg.$15
ribcord
terrific
Machine
cottonpi
15.99
Corduro
arms am
Cotton c
Cotton K
Blue, bei
and browl
?Shop
�Pho?





Knc

Think school. Think savings
&
3Ut
ce
Sale prices effective through Labor Day.
Cushy comfort
14.99
Classic sandal styling on a common
ground of sueded cushioned insole
loning. Rich leather
done in two
styles.
Misses' size
30 off
director'chairs.
Sale 18.2D
Reg.$26
Floding director's chairs in
white only. Canvas seat and
back covers in choice of
color. Reg. 6.99 Sale 5.99.
"The Shirt"
only at J.C. Penney
Sale 5.99
Reg. $8.00
19.99
J.C. Penney deluxe
3-speed fan with
thermostat, protective grill
Classic short
sleeve tennis shirt
is great for all
sportspeople.
Cottonpolyester
Knit with placket
front and extra
long tail.
Great colors in
S,M,L,&XL.
Sporting goods
department

Sale $12.00 twin
Reg.$15.00 Solid color
ribcord bedspread in
terrific decorator colors
Machine wash and dry
cottonpoly.
Sale 9.99
Reg. 12.99
Lo-cut Converse
"All star" canvas
basketball shoe.
Assorted colors in men's
zes. High-Top Reg.14.99
Sale 11.99
Sale 2.39
Reg. 2.99 cotton athletic
shorts. Choose white ,
with contrasting trim
or solids with white trim
XS.S.M,L,&XL.
15.99
Corduroy bedrestwith
arms and side pockets.
Cotton cordorov
CottonKapok filling.
Blue, beigfegreen'9�,d
and brown.
Special
9.99
Pre-washed
jeans.
Young men's fashion
of 100 pre-washed cotton
denim have scallop or
slash-stitch pocket detailing
Blue only in sizes 29 to 38.
ai
Special 9.
Tee with cream.
Tee-dresses piped with cream Always refreshing And
sweetened with the nicest details Like a button-trimmed vee or
scoopy neckline Plus cap sleeves and skinny string belt
Served up in colorful, silky-smooth poly In terrific solids, too.
For juniorsizes
Special
2.99
Rain poncho.
Slick rain poncho of
lightweight vinyl with
hood. Goes over and
anything andfits anyone
In choice of styles and co
20 off
Women's
slide.
Sale 9.99
Orig. 12.99.
Slide into center stage
with the flirty touch of
sueded slides.
Two styles to
choose from
sizes 5 to 10.
Auto Center
.Shop 8:30 A.MTil 9 P.M
� Phone 756-1190 Ext. 251
This
is
dCPenney
?Shop 10 A.M. Til 9 P.M
�Phone 756-1190
Catalog
�Shop 10 A.MTil 9 P.M
�Phone 756-2146
I
T





Page 14 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 30 August 1979
Tax sleuths slap twelve
yearold for evasion
BY TRUDY TYNAN
Associated Press Writer
ABLANY, N.Y. (AP)
�As far as non-voting
12-year-old Jody Gerard
is concerned it's "Tax-
ation without repre-
sentation
New York State's
tax sleuths caught the
pint-sized entrepreneur
selling fishing worms
dug out of his back
yard, and forced him to
remit 64 cents in un-
collected sales taxes.
"It cost him 50
cents for the bank
check the boy's
mother Lynette Gerard,
said.
Tax department
spokesman Howard
Brock said Thursday,
"We're not embar-
rassed, we're proud.
We followed routine
procedures
Jody's troubles be-
gan at the breakfast
table one morning in
mid-July, when he re-
ceived a certified letter
from the state Depart-
ment of Taxation and
Finance informing him
the worms he was
peddling for 35 cents a
dozen were "tangible
personal property" sub-
ject to seven percent
sales taxes.
If he didn't cough
up the back tax due in
20 days the letter said,
the stale would take
action.
"He was sick for a
week. Migraine. . He
thought they were going
to come and take away
his bicycle and his
They talked for a bit
and finally she asked
him how old he was.
"Twelve Jody
said.
There was a long
pause.
After a week of
consulting lawyers and
plotting its course, the
department dispatched
two men from Albany
to tiny Eddyville in the
Catskill Mountains to
audit Jody's pencil-
written books.
"It's taxation without
representation Jody
said he protested.
But, inevitably, he
paid.
Officials had no
estimate of how much
time and money it cost
the slate of New York
to collect.
"We don't have
people out looking for
lemonade stands Br-
ock asserted. "Someone
complained so we sent
out a form letter We
didn't know it was a
12-year-old boy. If we
had, we would have
handled it differently
said the competition
closed shop. Now, his
sale are up to an
average of $1.50 a day.
And Jody says he is
even considering fran-
chising his operation by
letting all the other
little worm-sellers in
Eddyville operate under
his license�for a
modest cut in the take.
Correction.
��
In the August 28
edition of The East
Carolinian, page 31 of
the Features section, it
was erroneously stated
that visits to the
Counselling Center
become - part of one's
record.
Visits to the Center
do NOT become part of
one's record. Records
are kept, as they are at
the REAL Crisis Center,
but both are completely
confidential.
We regret the error,
due to misinformation,
and the fact that it was
not double-checked
ovfL"
THE PARTY BEVERAGE CENTER
Corner of 10th A Evans St.
Open 24 Hours
ALL US FOR ALL YOUR PARTY NEEDS WE
HAVE DELIVERY & CATERING SERVICES
752-6303 or 752-5933
WE SUPPORT THE PIRATES
How?
know
"1 don't
Brock said.
"It was the first
case of its kind
The tax department
has assigned someone
to help Jody, who
suffers from dyslexia
and has trouble reading,
fill out his quarterly
reports, which grow
more complicate I as
business gets better.
When word got out
about his taxes, Jody
Hungate's
Welcomes Students
and
Invites you to see our
LARGER STORE
STILL AT PITT PLAZA
Offering You
ELECTRIC TRAIN SUPPLIES
LATCH HOOK RUG KITS
THEATRICAL MAKE UP
DRAFTING SUPPLIES
ARTIST MATERIALS
CRAFT SUPPLIES
NEEDLE WORK KITS
RACE CAR SETS &
fitchell's Hair Styling
el
Pitt PIm� Shopping Cmw
Crrrnvillr North Carolina 37IJ4
GLUES
PAINTS
MODELS
FINISHES
DMCFLOSS
BALSA WOOD
WOOD PLAQUES
MACRAME BOOKS & CORDS
CAKE DECORATING SUPPLIES
SUPPLIES
Hungate's
PITT PLAZA SHOPPING CENTER
Open MONSAT. 10 AMI9PM.
Greenville, N.C. 756-0121
STUDENT
SPECIAL
Cut, Style & JQ
Conditioner
Reg. $15.00 OFFER GOOD THRU SEPT.
Oil one of our hair stylists for a FREE consultatio
756-2950 or 756-4042
PITT PLAZA GREENVILLE
Banzai bunny
continued from page 12
Carter feels a keen revulsion for the rodents
steemmingstemming from a childhood memory of a
field mouse than ran up inside the leg of his
father's trousers.
Shortly after the president took office, he found
the White House, including the Oval Office, infested
with mice. Initial efforts to control the problem were
hampered by bureaucratic buck-passing when the
Gerneral Services Administration insisted it was
responsible only for mice inside the White House
and that the Interior Department, which includes the
National Park Service, hasd jurisdiction over the
White House grounds from which the mice
originated. It took some sharply worded messages
from the White House to launch a coordinated
attack.
THIS IS
StudentWZ
ApPrcC
iafion
Week
�IN-
Support
East Carolinian
advertisers
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
All ECU Students Are Invited! Come Celebrate With Us,
And Get Special Discounts and Speciallu Priced Merchandise
All This Week! We've Got em On Everything You Need.
Student ID Cards Required.
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE ASSOCIATION, INC.
We have a
complete selection
of toe, tap, ballet,
and modern dance
shoes, and
bodywear, in a
spectrum of colors!
:� I
fc
i
I
mumtm
gpgftMi MM �������
miiiitimumwmmmmmmmMuirtwum " ���
BWwti m Hi i�
"US.
Ill" KllIll IJIWl U�il,Milll�H "W���'
i
Polisl
T
KRAK0v
(AP)�Being
trumpeter
isn't all U
glory, says
Pudelko.
It gei
in the wint
can't go ij
bowl of zui
you make yj
the tower o
night, there
in the soup
Lately, hi
problem ha-
"The
the pig
says Pud
dering in
quarters hn
500-year-old
"And the
bad
An ami
old father
Pudelko is
official
working
bnck-and-si
stories at
medieval n
fc i
hour.
duty p u I
handlt
time on
Then
Re
REIAl
hibition of
Dickinson's
religious n
Kentucky
and Weal
opened yes
gallery on
floor of Me
First
Corcoran
Washington
exhibition
circulated
Smithsoniai
Traveling
Raised
Baptist,
Dickson
Knoxville,
has visit!
mountains
nearly ev
since 196'
documental
meetings
churches,
and urbanl
where th
customs at
strictlv ol
injunction;
The pi
these con)
not the fai
evangelists,
preachers
farmers
working
with their
the rest
To achi
documental
began to
graphs. All
has been
full suppo
preachers
gations.
view her
as a way
eating then
practices u
Through
Counti
continul
the wheel
and Les
Davis and
Brass; Gj
and Friendl
Daniels Baj
lnstrui
year�Atki
Daniels;
and Charj
The
the Counti
o' Fame
nounced
the living
are Casl
"Duke oj
Ford, Col
Hank Sno!
man, Luj
Scotty
ceased
Vernon
Fnzzell,
the Origj
the Pionj
Slonemanl

I
rM�'1H





Polish timekeepers
30 August 1979 THE EAST CAROLINIAN Page 15
ft?
ITER
IEEDS WE
RVICES
TES
J SEPT. 8
ionsultation.
INVILLE
r
vvv ,
7
fNTOWN
Trumpeters banish bugs
KRAKOW, Poland
(AP)�Being the tower
trumpeter of Krakow
isn't all fanfare and
glory, says Kazimir
Pudelko.
It gets cold up there
in the winter and you
can't go down for a
bowl of zurek. And if
vtiu make your own in
the tower on a stormy
night, there are waves
in the soup pot.
Lately, he says, the
problem has been bugs.
'They come from
the pigeon feathers
says Pudelko, shud-
dering in his cramped
quarters high in the
500-year-old fire tower.
'And they were really
bad
An amiable 26-year-
old father of two,
Pudelko is one of six
official trumpeters
working in the old
brick-and-stone tower 10
-tories above Krakow's
medieval market square.
Every hour on the
hour, the trumpeter on
duty pulls an iron
handle to ring out the
time on a large bell.
Then he puts on a
firefighter's hat, opens
a small window over
the square and plays
the two-line "Marian
Fanfare
He closes the win-
dow smartly and
marches to each of the
three other corners of
the tower, repeating the
trumpet call at each
one.
Then he yanks a
lever to ring it again on
a smaller bell.
All six trumpeters
are music-school grad-
udates, but they are
also firefighters, keeping
a centuries-old lookout
for fires and other
dangers.
It has been, at
times, a hazardous job.
The fanfare ends on a
broken note in memory
of a trumpeter hit by a
Tartar arrow in the 13th
century.
"We still look for
fires Pudelko says.
"But they're harder to
see now with all the
city lights
Pudelko, whose
name in Polish means
box, shares his 24-hour
shift with a partner
whose name means
skylark.
They spend 24 hours
in the tower on a shift,
each working six hours
at a time. The man
who starts with the 7
a.m. fanfare finishes
with the noon one that
is broadcast throughout
Poland, bells and all.
"Our microphone
was made in 1907 he
says, pointing to a large
black funnel-like device
"It was supposed to go
to a museum once, but
when they brought the
new one it didn't work
as well as the old
one.
If he stays on the
job for 40 years, his
trumpet will be put in a
city museum. But
Pudelko says 25 years
is the longest anyone
has stayed at it in
recent years.
Each day of work
means climbing up a
dark, 88-step spiral
stone staircase, then
clambering up four
more stories of wooden
stairs and ladders
through the dusty,
pigeon-littered tower in-
tenor.
Krakow's trumpeters
made local newspapers
this month when they
complained about an
outbreak of bugs. They
said they were being
bitten when they played
and even when they
tried to rest in their
tiny room.
The bugs, officials
say, are miles from an
estimated 5,000 pigeons'
nests in the tower.
City Hall has pro-
mised to debug the
lower later this month,
when the trumpeters
will move for 48 hours
to yet another lofty
medieval post on the
other side of the
square.
After the de-bug-
ging, even better things
are promised back home
at the fire tower.
Among these: pigeon-
proofing of the centur-
ies-old structure, a new
sound system so trum-
peters can play inside
without opening the
windows, and more
heaters.
"We're even sup-
posed to gel a shower
says Pudelko.
Revival photos at Mendenhall
REVIVAL an ex-
hibition of 60 Eleanor
Dickinson's photographs
religious revivals of
Kentucky, Tennessee
and West Virginia
opened yesterday at the
gallery on the second
fio r of Mendenhall.
First shown at the
Corcoran Gallery in
Washington, D.C the
exhibition is being
circulated by the
Smithsonian Institution
Traveling Exhibition
Raised as a Southern
Baptist. Eleanor
Dickson was born in
Knoxville, Tenn. She
has visited the
mountains of Applachia
nearly every summer
since 1967, compiling a
documentary of revival
meetings in tents and
churches, in both rural
and urban communities
where the religious
customs are all based
strictly on Biblical
injunctions.
The preachers to
these congregations are
not the famous traveling
evangelists, but resident
preachers who may be
farmers or miners
working side by side
with their people during
the rest of the year.
To achieve fuller
documentation, she
began to make photo-
graphs. All of her work
has been done with the
full support of both
preachers and congre-
gations, some of whom
view her serous study
as a way of communi-
cating their beliefs and
practices to others.
Through her photo-
graphs, the viewer can
witness the congrega-
tions' faith, in services
such as the "layingon
-of -hands" by healers,
the sepent handling at
Pentecostal meetings
and baptisms in
mountain creeks.
Supplementing the
photographs are
handbills publicizing the
meetings, healing cards
to be filled out by the
suffering, fans and
hymnals which have
been used in revivals,
and a monumental 3' x
6' canvas banner, with
the legend, REVIVAL,
hand-lettered in red.
The exhibition will
continue on view
through Sunday, Sept-
tember 2.
Alison Bartel,
chairperson of the Art
Exhibition Committee
said that she plans to
have a speaker on the
subject of revivals. No
one has been scheduled
so far, but the speaker
will be someone who
actually conduedts
revivals.
The next Smith-
sonian exhibit will be a
pictorial history of
bicycles. It is sched-
uled for Ocl. 14.
Jit-2��&�
Unique Gifts
and
Accessories
L7U ?az�.bo
201 �. 5th �t�.ct
vtcnvrfL, JSI.C. 752-9384
FOR INSURANCE CALL:
Bill McDonald
Phone:752-6680
Located on E. 10th St.
(next to King's Sandwich Shop)
STATE FARM INSURANCE COMPANIES
HOME OFFICES: BLOOMiNGTON, ILLINOIS
Country
continued from page 12
the Wheel; Chet Atkins
and Les Paul; Danny
Davis and the Nashville
Brass; Catlin Family
and Friends, the Charlie
Daniels Band.
Instrumentalist of the
year�Atkins; Roy Clark;
Daniels; Buddy Emmons
and Charlie McCoy.
The nominees for
the Country Music Hall
of Fame were an-
nounced previously. In
the living category, they
are Cash, Whitey
"Duke of Paducah"
Ford, Connie B. Gay,
Hank Snow, Floyd Till-
man, Lulu Belle and
Scotty Wiseman. De-
ceased nominees are
Vernon Hainan, Lefty
Frizzell, Hubert Long,
the Original Sons of
the Pioneers and Pop
Stoncman.
INTRODUCING
Natural
Spray Cologne
.75FI.OZ.
$75
4
2.7FI.OZ.
s9
00
AN EXCITING NEW FRAGRANCE FROM
d?PRINCE MATCMABELLI
Qualify � Competltlv Prlcts � Servfc
�11 Dteklnaon A�. �h St. 4 Memorial Or.
7K-71W 7�M1�4
ji i
Board your hone at
Forest Acres Stables
Excellent care and conditions
$85amonth 3milesfrom town call 752-1823
SOUTH 8EA8PET SHOP
GREENVILLE SQUARE
756-9222
Welcome back ECU
Selected tropical fish on
Sale. Your complete Pet
Supply Headquarters.
Buy any Bowl and get
a Goldfish FREE.
offer good while
supply lasts
SHIRTS
GET IT ALL TOGETHER
AT T-SHIRTS !
� More styles of Quslity T-shirts,
jerseys, golf, tennis shirts,
& fashion shirts than you've ever
seen before in ALL sizes for everyone
In the femily
�Greek letters available
�Large eelection of transfers
including ECU
� Ask sbout our Group Ssles
OPEN: 10:00-9:00
CAROLINA EAST MALL 756-9709
THEHOBBIT
THEHOBBIT
GIFT SHOPPE
Welcomes back
ECU
STUDENTS
WITH GREAT
BUYS
11
kA
'UNIQUE IDEAS IN
GIFTS AND
DECORATING
2800 E. Tenth St.
Next to LaKosmetique
Phone: 758-7477
WELCOME BACK STUDENTS
TueS. Nite: Ladies Night
Sounds of the South
With one of the best
Beach
Top 40 Shows Around
Wed. Nite: 5 Degrees South
Thurs. Nite: John Moore
"The American Dream"
Fri. Nite:
Our Famous Eiid of the Week Party 3-7
Sat. Nite: Tommy Gardner
Sun. Nite: "Penny Nite"


N
The East Carolina University
Panhellenic Association
Cordially invites you to
participate in
SORORITY RUSH!
Convocation:
(if going through rush,
attendence required)
September 6, 7 p.m.
Wright Auditorium
Rush Week: September 9-14
AKA Rush: September 19
7:30 Mendenhall
HOPING TO SEE YOU SOON!






16 16 THE EAST CAROLINIAN 30 Ann 1979
Former UNC coed says
ECU is a lot nicer
By. WILLIAM JONES
Features Editor
Sometimes, new
friends can be made
under unusual and am-
using circumstances.
Take last Tuesday,
for instance. Registra-
tion Day, and Green-
ville's population swells
with ECU's new and
returning students.
I was helping a
friend mover her stuff
into her new dorm
room. We were carrying
it there from my place
via my wreck of a
pick-up truck. Wouldn't
you know it, we get the
truck half loaded when
it starts pouring rain.
Then I hear Dina
holler, "Hey, why don't
you come inside out of
the rain to a young
lady huddling under the
half-protection.of a tree.
Enter one chagrined
female; smiling sheep-
ishly and vociferating
thanks through the pri-
mary stage of a good
rain soaking.
After offering our
unlooked-for but wel-
come (and at her ex-
pense, amusing) guest
some refreshment, we
proceeded to make a-
quaintances.
Amy Holland is her
name. She is an art
major, and will be a
sophomore this year.
But, what is really unu-
sual about Amy is that
she transferred here
this year after attending
UNC-Chapel Hill for the
last two years. I could
not help but wonder
why someone enrolled
in a "name" school
such as UNC would
come to a less pre-
stigious school such as
ECU.
The reasons she
gave were thus: "I
came to East Carolina
because they have a
very good art depart-
ment. I've heard great
things about it.
At UNC, the school
is so big, I didn't get
very much personal at-
tention from my pro-
fessors.
"The competition
wa so great between
studentslike, every-
body who goes there
was an "A" student in
high school, so when
you get there (rather
than being at the top of
the class) you become
an average student.
And it's really hard to
make that adjustment
and to try to find the
support you fteed from
professors or other stu-
dents.
"In the art courses I
took there, it seemed
like the professors were
more interested in their
own art work than in
actually teaching art.
"ECU is a smaller
school. It has a slower
pace. It's more easy
going and that's, a lot
nicer � like this per-
son, it was raining
outside and this person
just asked me to come
into their house and
wait until it stopped
raining! (laughs jubi-
lantly)
I guess all this goes
to prove, it's not always
what or how much you
do, rather how you do
it.
(Introducing Pirate Checking)
�� . 9
Spittin
champ
dethroned
INDIANAPOLIS (AP)
�Like any contest,
there were rules to be
followed�among them,
no spitting on the
spectators.
But it was not a
rule that was Vernon
Adair's undoing as he
returned Tuesday, Au-
gust 21, to the Indiana
State Fair with hopes of
defending the title of
spitting champion he
earned lasi year.
Despite years of
practice, a steady eye
and a longstanding love
of chewing tobacco,
Adair, from Jay County,
was dethroned by an
18-year-old challenger,
Tim Leveridge of
Jennings County.
Leveridge, whose
winning entry measured
20 feet to Adair's- 18.6,
was modest about his
victor).
"All I did was
spit the rookie told
his cheering fans.
Adair took his loss
well. "It has nothing to
do with experience
the burly wood-cutter
explained.
"I've seen little kids
do it�they just wind up
the juice and let 'er
fly
The Traffic Light!
A Contemporary Clothing Store
WELCOMES BACK
Come and see
Marianna, Pam, Deb, and Mary
I hi p
4 I t
V
lUi
K V
Pitt Plaza Highway 864- Greenrille
open 10:00 9:00 756 8320
We will be dosed Labor Day.
Have a wonderful Labor Day and
come to our big
after Labor-Day Sale.
Savings of 75 to 50.
The Traffic Light
PITT PLAZA m
Let's face it. For years, Planters has
offered a variety of tee shirts, frisbees
and other trinkets to entice East Caro-
lina students to bank with us.
Now, there's a better way to stu-
dent banking. We call it "Pirate
Checking
With "Pirate Checking" ECU students
still receive no-service-charge checking
with no required minimum balance
(because we know students don't have
a lot of money, just a lot of potential).
You also get an introductory order of
Pirate checks plus free travelers
cheques, cashiers checks, money orders
and notary service.
We've got four offices in Pitt County
to serve you, including the only bank in
Carolina East Mall. At Planters National
Bank we offer a practical approach to
student banking.
But, there's something more
important.
For every Pirate Checking account
opened, we'll give $1.00 to ECU for
unrestricted use as scholarship funds.
PLANTERS
NATIONAL
BANK
A Practical Approach
To Money
Limit: One Pirate Checkins Account per student.
ECU students only.
T
V
i
Bkmmmmmmmm
m
MI
HHjWWWWi
ami)' �"
�M�MHHP





ECU
STUDENTS
&
Welcome You To Gret
Come by any Greenville Fast Fare
Redeem the Coupon for a FREE 16 OZ. DR. PEPPER
REGISTER FOR A
FREE MOTORBECANE
and a
SCHWINN BICYCLE
From Sutton's Service Center,
Greenville's Factory Franchised Schwinn Sales & Service Dealer
Drawing to be held Sept. 17 at 9.00 P.M.
at Fast Fare 305 E. 10th Street
Fast Fare Locations:
1
2
3
4
5
2010 Tenth St - Book and Magazine Store and Gas
425 Hooker Rd. - Gas 24 HOURS
3101 S. Evans St Book and Magazine Store
Rt. 7, Washington Hwy. - Gas - 24 HOURS
220 Cotanche St. - Gas - 24 HOURS
Check cashing privileges for all ECU Students with proper I.D
6
7
8
9
10
Rt. 9 Eastern Pines - Gas
506 Memorial Dr. - Gas - 24 HOURS
q?S K, l?th St " Wine Shop & Discount Beverages
3J0 N. Memorial Dr. - Gas
1920 Evans St Gas
CIGARETTES
379
per carton
FAIR PRICE
PROGRAM
BEVERAGE
SPECIALS
COUPON GOOD THRU SEPT. 15. 1979
1 FREE 16 OZ. DR. PEPPER
DEPOSIT NOT INCLUDED
REDEEMABLE AT ANY GREENVILLE FAST FARE BEFORE SEPT. 15, 1979





Title
The East Carolinian, August 30, 1979
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 30, 1979
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.02
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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